The Windsong Testaments: The Three Fears of Pharasma

Thursday, October 31, 2019

“Reality is born. Reality must die. So somewhere in between must dwell both you and I.”

Such was said to be writ upon the Seal, carved in such a way that all would understand regardless of language or intellect. The Seal was the gravestone of the previous reality. The Seal was the foundation stone of the next reality. It was upon the Seal that Pharasma was born into this reality, adrift in the Maelstrom within an unformed metacosmos. She stood, and read the Seal’s Truth, and saw that she trod upon its core. Looking out over the Seal’s eight edges, Pharasma beheld the eternity of probability, a vastness yet formed from the raw entropy of the churning remains of what had come before. She was the Survivor, yet she knew not what she had survived—just that she had.

Pharasma stepped off the edge of the Seal, and as her foot descended to the nothing, the Seal expanded so that she was supported. She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous. Pharasma knew her first fear that very first step—fear of the unknown, fear that something else had survived, fear that she would not.

And so she stepped to the side.

As Pharasma walked, the edges of the Seal grew. The Outer Sphere bloomed beneath her feet as the Seal expanded its power. Where Pharasma walked, the planes themselves followed, and with each circuit around the Seal, she widened her path, walking a deosil spiral of creation that gave those who would follow a place to love and hate, to war and create. As she walked the spiral, the Seal itself grew outward, forming the Spire. It reached toward what lay opposite its beginning. And when Pharasma finished, the Spire had grown to support the Boneyard above, and it would be her home.

The Seal had responded to Pharasma’s spiral path, and as she strode, other divinities were birthed into the new reality. The Speakers in the Depths retreated at once to the heart of entropy and could not be bothered to take part in what followed. Desna marveled at creation, and with a wave of her hand brought the first night to the skies above. Sarenrae followed swiftly thereafter, and was smitten with Desna and her work, and so she chose the brightest of those stars to shine as the suns, birthing the first day. Ihys, who would in time become the First to die, and his brother Asmodeus, who would in time become the First to kill, each defined the other and brought goodness and evil with them. And Achaekek rose to stand between, an arbiter over morality and a judge whose impartial aegis would, in time, crumble to savagery. Yet not all of the first would have names, or even be remembered. One tread forth beyond the Eclipse, but without death yet in the world, this Prince became Bound to a throne in the Spire’s shadow to await his time. And the final would foolishly step forth beyond Pharasma’s first fearful step, and in so doing would be transformed and absorbed by that fear. Whether that fear became Rovagug or whether it was Rovagug who was the devouring fear, not even the gods can remember.

As those First Eight became, so did Pharasma feel something else wake on the far side of time. Just as she had walked a deosil spiral to create, a widdershins spiral wound in opposition at the other side of reality, where the Lurker at the Threshold formed the second anchor of creation. Pharasma thus learned that each cycle required not only a Survivor, but also a Watcher. So that between the two, between Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, all reality would thus become the Great Beyond. Thus began the Age of Creation.

The pale goddess Pharasma sits on a floating stone throne in judging a line of ghostly translucent souls from the Pathfinder Windsong Testaments fiction.

Illustration by Mark Molnar

And so in the ages that followed, Pharasma remained upon her throne. She watched and judged all who passed from life into death, and as time wore on the number of the dead grew apace to the number of the born. And in time, Pharasma beheld her second fear. An event beyond anticipation fractured fate, and on all worlds, the flow of prophecy was forever altered. Storms raged, empires fell, gods died, and in the least fortunate corners of reality, entire worlds came to an end. Pharasma herself lost track for that brief moment of what had yet to come, and when she opened her eyes again, she saw that the Seal had vanished, leaving behind a featureless void. She reached out to the Watcher to inquire if such a ripple in destiny had ever occurred before, to determine if the loss of the Seal had always been ordained, but the Watcher would not reply.

Yet reality went on. Mortals were born, and mortals were slain. Pharasma’s second fear abated, and she realized that the lost Seal was not an ill omen, but more akin to the passing of a parent or teacher. Now, this cycle of reality had matured to the point where it could continue on its own, and Pharasma knew that, going forward, reality was well and truly on its own. The apogee of creation had passed, and Pharasma knew that her days ahead would forever be in the shadow of her days behind. And while she knew how much time remained, she knew as well that there was more than enough for mortal life to enjoy more glories and triumphs than they could envision.

And even though reality must eventually end, Pharasma does not despair. She knows that the number of the dead has never before eclipsed the number of the born, for even as the Watcher witnesses from outside the cycle, there must always be a Survivor to carry on within the cycle to begin the next. In time, the flux of the born shall cease, and their number shall become a static record. And in those final hours, Pharasma knows she must prepare the next cycle’s Seal, and she must watch and wait as the final count of the dead approaches. And when that final visitant from life steps before her throne to be judged, Pharasma knows that it will be the Survivor who stands before her, and that she will not judge but will herself be judged. And so, with her death, shall this cycle end.

But it is here that Pharasma’s final fear awaits. The fracture of fate and the loss of the Seal has made her conviction falter, and she no longer knows for fact that she shall be the penultimate death. For if she steps before herself to be judged, and leaves behind none to Survive, the cycle shall end and nothing shall wend.

About the Author

James Jacobs is the Creative Director for Pathfinder. While he was there at the beginning of Golarion’s creation, many of the deities worshiped by that world’s heroes and villains had already existed for decades before. Goddesses and gods like Desna and Rovagug, Sarenrae and Abadar, Achaekek and Zon-Kuthon first established their faithful among PCs and NPCs alike in James’ home campaign in the late 80s and early 90s. Sharing them with the world as deities of the Pathfinder setting, seeing players and creators come to love and hate them (and in some cases cosplay as them), has been a career highlight.

About the Windsong Testaments

On the northern reaches of Varisia’s Lost Coast stands Windsong Abbey, a forum for interfaith discussion tended by priests of nearly twenty faiths and led by a legacy of Masked Abbesses. At the dawn of the Age of Lost Omens, Windsong Abbey suffered as its faithful fought and fled, but today it has begun to recover. A new Masked Abbess guides a new flock within, and the Windsong Testaments—parables about the gods themselves—are once again being recorded within the abbey’s walls. Some of these Testaments are presented here as Golarion’s myths and fables. Some parts may be true. Other parts are certainly false. Which ones are which is left to the faithful to decide.

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Tags: Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Web Fiction The Windsong Testaments
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I never considered "Oinodaemon" to be his name - to me it always sounded like more of a title. For one thing, he's always referred to as the Oinodaemon. And unless he was the namesake of the daemon race (a possibility of course), including -daemon in his name would be an odd choice. It's Asmodeus, not The Asmodevil; Rovagug and not The Rovaqlippoth. Whatever the case, seems like Oino was benched in the beginning because there were no mortal deaths for him to embody, and a second time when the Four Horsemen turned on him. Poor schmuck can't catch a break.


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Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I thought Sarenrae started as an angel and got upgraded to deity for leading her fellows in the fight against Rovagug.

That makes the assumption that the First Eight were all major deities just because they were first.

Achaekek is also one of the Eight and he has a killable statblock. Of course, this origin also contradicts the one in said statblock's description so who knows?

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Spamotron wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I thought Sarenrae started as an angel and got upgraded to deity for leading her fellows in the fight against Rovagug.

That makes the assumption that the First Eight were all major deities just because they were first.

Achaekek is also one of the Eight and he has a killable statblock. Of course, this origin also contradicts the one in said statblock's description so who knows?

That statblock is from 3.5, so lots of out date info there.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Yeah, the 3.5 version of Achaekek is VERY out of date. (In the 3.5 era, ALL deities had stat blocks, as per the rules in Deities & Demigods.)

Achaekek is a deity and, as such, doesn't have a stat block in Pathfinder, be it 1st edition or 2nd edition.

In any event I can confirm that the first eight, plus Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, are (or were) all deity level divinities. And they remain such today except in the case of Ihys (and maybe the one that Rovagug gobbled, if indeed that wasn't Rovagug in the first place just waking up!).


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James Jacobs wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I thought Sarenrae started as an angel and got upgraded to deity for leading her fellows in the fight against Rovagug.
That's one belief, sure. Not the one I prefer though; my preference is that Sarenrae was one of the first deities, and, perhaps, the one that served as the original draft for what a human should look like.

Huh...

Some interesting possible interpretations of the Ihys/Asmodeus myth from The Book of the Damned and Asmodeus' misogyny:

1) Sarenrae, and not Baalzebul, may be the first "angelic" being. Asmodeus may have spent eons trying to create "perfect" versions and they keep falling short.

2) Considering the origin story of Belial (especially the unnamed precursor being*), I wonder if one of the "issues" behind the fight between Asmodeus and Ihys wasn't just free will also because Asmodeus was jealous of a possible relationship between Ihys and Sarenrae.

3) The Book of the Damned tends to (subtly) denigrate Sarenrae as "insignificant", "lesser", "younger", "weak", etc. But she is credited with a large measure of influence in "seducing" (although through moral suasion and not sexually in the myth) Ihys away from Asmodeus.

4) Somehow, I doubt the meeting between Asmodeus and Sarenrae after he killed Ihys happened the way it is described in The Book of the Damned. Considering that Sarenrae is the goddess of redemption and "...even communicates with evil deities in the hopes of converting them from their dark ways..." (emphasis mine), I wonder if she was the one who let Asmodeus go.

*- "...an attempt to create a beauteous figure to outshine all others in existence..." (emphasis mine) "The result was terrible and insane, a thing of heaving flesh, golden hair, and luminous eruptions..." (emphasis mine)


James Jacobs wrote:

Yeah, the 3.5 version of Achaekek is VERY out of date. (In the 3.5 era, ALL deities had stat blocks, as per the rules in Deities & Demigods.)

Achaekek is a deity and, as such, doesn't have a stat block in Pathfinder, be it 1st edition or 2nd edition.

In any event I can confirm that the first eight, plus Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, are (or were) all deity level divinities. And they remain such today except in the case of Ihys (and maybe the one that Rovagug gobbled, if indeed that wasn't Rovagug in the first place just waking up!).

Should we assume the origin story for Achaekek presented here is the canon one?

Grand Lodge

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Erk Ander wrote:

So Ihys was LG God of Free will ?

I mean, is that so far-fetched? Starfinder gave us Hylax, a LG goddess of individuality and choice. I think it was JJ himself that mentioned that sometimes gods have a unique or unexpected (and even seemingly contradictory) portfolio. For eg, there’s always Tsukiyo, LG god of madness. Granted, he is the patron of the neurodivergent and those who have come back changed after incredibly stressful events, sure, but the idea of a Madness Divinity being LG is just as odd as a Free Will deity being LG.

It might be that Ilya would’ve possibly altered over time...if he were allowed to live

Tbh, I feel personally that this is a stretch and I agree it’s unusual, but it hardly lacks precedent

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Paradozen wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:

Yeah, the 3.5 version of Achaekek is VERY out of date. (In the 3.5 era, ALL deities had stat blocks, as per the rules in Deities & Demigods.)

Achaekek is a deity and, as such, doesn't have a stat block in Pathfinder, be it 1st edition or 2nd edition.

In any event I can confirm that the first eight, plus Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, are (or were) all deity level divinities. And they remain such today except in the case of Ihys (and maybe the one that Rovagug gobbled, if indeed that wasn't Rovagug in the first place just waking up!).

Should we assume the origin story for Achaekek presented here is the canon one?

Depends on what you want to believe. That's what myths are good at!

Dark Archive

I still like idea of current Asmodeus actually being separate from the original one xD But yeah, either way, with Asmodeus there are always some lies included in his versions of creation myths


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On a tangent, i totally sidetracked this read into Gurren Lagann memories with the Spiral and Anti-Spiral on the cosmic scale.

Was it only me?


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
The Gula Path wrote:
Oh man this was really good, I love the Lovecraft influence although it's got me wondering something. Is Azathoth still the same centre of creation like in the mythos or is he now "merely" just a really old powerful creature like Rovagug?

I see Azathoth as the center of the Material Plane, yes. If the material plane is a vinyl record, then Azathoth is the spike the record sits on.

In fact, I see ALL of the outer gods and great old ones as creatures that exist outside of the cycle of life and death and time, and that when a new iteration of reality begins, the outer gods and great old ones transition over. Which ones end up in which reality might vary, though. The next cycle of reality might have something else (or nothing at all) at the center of the Material Plane than Azathoth, for example.

Makes sense. That helps distinguish what the Outer Gods are and makes them different from other deities.


Generic Villain wrote:
I never considered "Oinodaemon" to be his name - to me it always sounded like more of a title. For one thing, he's always referred to as the Oinodaemon. And unless he was the namesake of the daemon race (a possibility of course), including -daemon in his name would be an odd choice. It's Asmodeus, not The Asmodevil; Rovagug and not The Rovaqlippoth. Whatever the case, seems like Oino was benched in the beginning because there were no mortal deaths for him to embody, and a second time when the Four Horsemen turned on him. Poor schmuck can't catch a break.

Maybe something like an ontodaemon?

CorvusMask wrote:
I still like idea of current Asmodeus actually being separate from the original one xD But yeah, either way, with Asmodeus there are always some lies included in his versions of creation myths

Asmodeus 2.0, some assembly required, lies and flattery included.


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James Jacobs wrote:


And the Bound Prince is not tied to the Eldest...but more to the Horsemen of the Apocalypse...

The Bound Prince... yeah... Who totally doesn't exist!!!

Everything is fine! Everything is under control! There's nothing wrong in Abaddon at all! Myself and the other Horsemen have everything under control! THAT'S JUST AN ECLIPSE IN THE SKY. NOTHING MORE!

*slowly boiling abject panic and a glance back at Balishek's crater with the worry that what happened then might happen again...*

Contributor

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CorvusMask wrote:
Oinodaemon getting redesign(in this case I guess only a name change because we literally know nothing else about him) to be more Paizo original than D&D version where the name came from,

The Bound Prince / The Father of the Forsaken / The First Daemon aka The Oinodaemon has had a uniquely Pathfinder origin story and nature since their first description in the 3.5 The Great Beyond. Everything since then has progressively built upon that uniqueness. The only thing that's legacy really is the Oinodaemon title.

The handling here in the Windsong Testaments was lovely. :D


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Rathendar wrote:

On a tangent, i totally sidetracked this read into Gurren Lagann memories with the Spiral and Anti-Spiral on the cosmic scale.

Was it only me?

Do the impossible, see the invisible.

ROW ROW

FIGHT THA POWER


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James Jacobs wrote:
And they remain such today except in the case of Ihys (and maybe the one that Rovagug gobbled, if indeed that wasn't Rovagug in the first place just waking up!).

My running theory is that the one that was "gobbled" was gobbled up by the Abyss itself and was spit out (woke up) as Rovagug. If this conversion by the Abyss occurred this gives some insight into the origin of the Qlippoth. Unlike other planes that developed symbiotic relationships with the deities that represent that plane, the Abyss consumed and converted its deific powers into Qlippoth. So when the Daemons inadvertently taught the Abyss to use mortal souls to create demons this was a game changer. Creating Demons is much easier, faster, and efficient to make in comparison to the Qlippoth. Mortal souls can quickly be combined with the essence of the Abyss to create Demons. Plus this has the added benefit of the souls giving the newly born Demons a level of ambition that the Qlippoth never had. Suddenly, the Abyss has a multitude of Demigods and Quasideities working for/with the Abyss and striving for their own personal goals. Sure the Abyss still uses the power contained within divinities to create Qlippoth, but at a much reduced rate, and has no real need to encourage the development of new Qlippoth Demigods. This can even be supported by the Abyss layer Rift of Repose where slain Demigods and Quasideities end up. Essentially, the Abyss pulls out the accumulated divine essence of the slain demigod to create new Qlippoth while fossilizing any remaining soul stuff and unique ambition that the demigod had.

That is my running theory for now.


^I thought the Daemons were actively trying to create Demons in the Abyss, and they just didn't expect the experiment to backfire on them so spectacularly.


She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

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scary harpy wrote:

She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

It's either the Abyss, or Rovagug, or something worse than the two of them combined. It's not Yog-Sothoth; he's everywhere, but mostly in the Material Plane and Dimension of Time. There's nothing any more compelling to him in the Abyss than anywhere else in the outer planes.

Silver Crusade

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It really liked this one, and while I have a lot of feelings one really wins out...

Sarenrae literally set the sky alight in order to flirt with Desna, and that is just awesome on so many levels ^^

Dark Archive

James Jacobs wrote:
scary harpy wrote:

She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

It's either the Abyss, or Rovagug, or something worse than the two of them combined. It's not Yog-Sothoth; he's everywhere, but mostly in the Material Plane and Dimension of Time. There's nothing any more compelling to him in the Abyss than anywhere else in the outer planes.

So... Qlippoths since they are stated to be oldest life forms in multiverse?

Liberty's Edge

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oconnor0 wrote:
Tusk the Half-Orc wrote:
I caught the death of Aroden but thought we might also have the Gap here as well?
Would you be willing to expound on that? I don't know Golarion very well.

I have argued elsewhere that the Age of Lost Omens is created by the Gap, and the nature of the Gap is to confound people trying to magically "remember" into it - which, from a fourth-dimensional perspective, is exactly what prophecy is.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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CorvusMask wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
scary harpy wrote:

She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

It's either the Abyss, or Rovagug, or something worse than the two of them combined. It's not Yog-Sothoth; he's everywhere, but mostly in the Material Plane and Dimension of Time. There's nothing any more compelling to him in the Abyss than anywhere else in the outer planes.
So... Qlippoths since they are stated to be oldest life forms in multiverse?

They're old, but not necessarily the oldest.


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Is anybody else picking up on the Marvel Comics influence here?

Silver Crusade

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Oh, turns out the setting is pre-apocalyptic. I love those :)


James Jacobs wrote:
The Gula Path wrote:
Oh man this was really good, I love the Lovecraft influence although it's got me wondering something. Is Azathoth still the same centre of creation like in the mythos or is he now "merely" just a really old powerful creature like Rovagug?

I see Azathoth as the center of the Material Plane, yes. If the material plane is a vinyl record, then Azathoth is the spike the record sits on.

In fact, I see ALL of the outer gods and great old ones as creatures that exist outside of the cycle of life and death and time, and that when a new iteration of reality begins, the outer gods and great old ones transition over. Which ones end up in which reality might vary, though. The next cycle of reality might have something else (or nothing at all) at the center of the Material Plane than Azathoth, for example.

Just as she had walked a deosil spiral to create, a widdershins spiral wound in opposition at the other side of reality, where the Lurker at the Threshold formed the second anchor of creation. Pharasma thus learned that each cycle required not only a Survivor, but also a Watcher. So that between the two, between Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, all reality would thus become the Great Beyond.

When Yog-Sothoth walked widdershins, did the 'selected' outer gods appear? like with Pharasma?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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scary harpy wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
The Gula Path wrote:
Oh man this was really good, I love the Lovecraft influence although it's got me wondering something. Is Azathoth still the same centre of creation like in the mythos or is he now "merely" just a really old powerful creature like Rovagug?

I see Azathoth as the center of the Material Plane, yes. If the material plane is a vinyl record, then Azathoth is the spike the record sits on.

In fact, I see ALL of the outer gods and great old ones as creatures that exist outside of the cycle of life and death and time, and that when a new iteration of reality begins, the outer gods and great old ones transition over. Which ones end up in which reality might vary, though. The next cycle of reality might have something else (or nothing at all) at the center of the Material Plane than Azathoth, for example.

Just as she had walked a deosil spiral to create, a widdershins spiral wound in opposition at the other side of reality, where the Lurker at the Threshold formed the second anchor of creation. Pharasma thus learned that each cycle required not only a Survivor, but also a Watcher. So that between the two, between Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, all reality would thus become the Great Beyond.

When Yog-Sothoth walked widdershins, did the 'selected' outer gods appear? like with Pharasma?

Nope. That's something the Survivor does, not the Watcher.


I'll say again, I'll buy any book that deals with this topic!


The Drunken Dragon wrote:

I mean, is that so far-fetched? Starfinder gave us Hylax, a LG goddess of individuality and choice. I think it was JJ himself that mentioned that sometimes gods have a unique or unexpected (and even seemingly contradictory) portfolio. For eg, there’s always Tsukiyo, LG god of madness. Granted, he is the patron of the neurodivergent and those who have come back changed after incredibly stressful events, sure, but the idea of a Madness Divinity being LG is just as odd as a Free Will deity being LG.

It might be that Ilya would’ve possibly altered over time...if he were allowed to live

Tbh, I feel personally that this is a stretch and I agree it’s unusual, but it hardly lacks precedent

Its more like it surprises me a little. And yes Hylax is a great example. However individuality and freedom etc are concepts that Paizo associates with CG. That's the surprising part. For instance I personally think Milani is more NG than CG (read her entire entry) but PAizo has decided that she should be CH, probably due to her revolution sphere. But I would love a NG Milani, first her overal creed much better.

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Erk Ander wrote:
The Drunken Dragon wrote:

I mean, is that so far-fetched? Starfinder gave us Hylax, a LG goddess of individuality and choice. I think it was JJ himself that mentioned that sometimes gods have a unique or unexpected (and even seemingly contradictory) portfolio. For eg, there’s always Tsukiyo, LG god of madness. Granted, he is the patron of the neurodivergent and those who have come back changed after incredibly stressful events, sure, but the idea of a Madness Divinity being LG is just as odd as a Free Will deity being LG.

It might be that Ilya would’ve possibly altered over time...if he were allowed to live

Tbh, I feel personally that this is a stretch and I agree it’s unusual, but it hardly lacks precedent

Its more like it surprises me a little. And yes Hylax is a great example. However individuality and freedom etc are concepts that Paizo associates with CG. That's the surprising part. For instance I personally think Milani is more NG than CG (read her entire entry) but PAizo has decided that she should be CH, probably due to her revolution sphere. But I would love a NG Milani, first her overal creed much better.

As far as I know, we've never said what exactly Ihys's areas of concern are.

I wouldn't say he was a deity associated with free will, personally. I would say he's someone who would be associated with equality. Those are similar concepts in some ways, but very different in others.


James Jacobs wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
scary harpy wrote:

She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

It's either the Abyss, or Rovagug, or something worse than the two of them combined. It's not Yog-Sothoth; he's everywhere, but mostly in the Material Plane and Dimension of Time. There's nothing any more compelling to him in the Abyss than anywhere else in the outer planes.
So... Qlippoths since they are stated to be oldest life forms in multiverse?
They're old, but not necessarily the oldest.

They emerged into existence around the same time Angels, Proteans and...well possibly the Aeons, but it is said in the Monitor book it was the Axiomites.

Question, where does the Monad work into all of this?


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VerBeeker wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
scary harpy wrote:

She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

It's either the Abyss, or Rovagug, or something worse than the two of them combined. It's not Yog-Sothoth; he's everywhere, but mostly in the Material Plane and Dimension of Time. There's nothing any more compelling to him in the Abyss than anywhere else in the outer planes.
So... Qlippoths since they are stated to be oldest life forms in multiverse?
They're old, but not necessarily the oldest.

They emerged into existence around the same time Angels, Proteans and...well possibly the Aeons, but it is said in the Monitor book it was the Axiomites.

Question, where does the Monad work into all of this?

Even the gods aren't sure about the Monad...I wonder if it is an aspect of the Seal?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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VerBeeker wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
scary harpy wrote:

She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous.

What she sensed...was it the Abyss? or Yog?

It's either the Abyss, or Rovagug, or something worse than the two of them combined. It's not Yog-Sothoth; he's everywhere, but mostly in the Material Plane and Dimension of Time. There's nothing any more compelling to him in the Abyss than anywhere else in the outer planes.
So... Qlippoths since they are stated to be oldest life forms in multiverse?
They're old, but not necessarily the oldest.

They emerged into existence around the same time Angels, Proteans and...well possibly the Aeons, but it is said in the Monitor book it was the Axiomites.

Question, where does the Monad work into all of this?

Somewhere between the first 8 + Pharasma and the rise of mortal life. The Monad's story is a different one than this one.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion Subscriber
Evan Tarlton wrote:
Is anybody else picking up on the Marvel Comics influence here?

Definitely got shades of Jim Starlin, among many other things, in there!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Evan Tarlton wrote:
Is anybody else picking up on the Marvel Comics influence here?

By this do you mean how Pharasma is the last suvivor of the previous universe, in the same way Galactus is?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Yqatuba wrote:
Evan Tarlton wrote:
Is anybody else picking up on the Marvel Comics influence here?
By this do you mean how Pharasma is the last suvivor of the previous universe, in the same way Galactus is?

And how she's going to die bringing about the next one while the last person alive becomes the next survivor.


Only two Sith Lords, the Master and the Student . . . only two over-deities, the Judge and the Survivor . . . seems awfully risky. In both cases, if something goes wrong for just **2** entities at the same time, the whole chain ends.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
UnArcaneElection wrote:
Only two Sith Lords, the Master and the Student . . . only two over-deities, the Judge and the Survivor . . . seems awfully risky. In both cases, if something goes wrong for just **2** entities at the same time, the whole chain ends.

Don't worry. There's a backup plan.

Wait, go ahead and worry, Groetus is the backup plan...

(If Pharasma kicks it, he's got orders to just eat everything and let it all start again from the ground up!)


Evan Tarlton wrote:
Yqatuba wrote:
Evan Tarlton wrote:
Is anybody else picking up on the Marvel Comics influence here?
By this do you mean how Pharasma is the last suvivor of the previous universe, in the same way Galactus is?
And how she's going to die bringing about the next one while the last person alive becomes the next survivor.

Highlander. 'Nuff said.

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