The Windsong Testaments: The Three Fears of Pharasma

Thursday, October 31, 2019

“Reality is born. Reality must die. So somewhere in between must dwell both you and I.”

Such was said to be writ upon the Seal, carved in such a way that all would understand regardless of language or intellect. The Seal was the gravestone of the previous reality. The Seal was the foundation stone of the next reality. It was upon the Seal that Pharasma was born into this reality, adrift in the Maelstrom within an unformed metacosmos. She stood, and read the Seal’s Truth, and saw that she trod upon its core. Looking out over the Seal’s eight edges, Pharasma beheld the eternity of probability, a vastness yet formed from the raw entropy of the churning remains of what had come before. She was the Survivor, yet she knew not what she had survived—just that she had.

Pharasma stepped off the edge of the Seal, and as her foot descended to the nothing, the Seal expanded so that she was supported. She stood there a moment on one of the Seal’s eight edges, one step into the new reality, and she could sense that she was already not alone. Something chewed and gnawed out there beyond perception. Something vast, and hungry, and dangerous. Pharasma knew her first fear that very first step—fear of the unknown, fear that something else had survived, fear that she would not.

And so she stepped to the side.

As Pharasma walked, the edges of the Seal grew. The Outer Sphere bloomed beneath her feet as the Seal expanded its power. Where Pharasma walked, the planes themselves followed, and with each circuit around the Seal, she widened her path, walking a deosil spiral of creation that gave those who would follow a place to love and hate, to war and create. As she walked the spiral, the Seal itself grew outward, forming the Spire. It reached toward what lay opposite its beginning. And when Pharasma finished, the Spire had grown to support the Boneyard above, and it would be her home.

The Seal had responded to Pharasma’s spiral path, and as she strode, other divinities were birthed into the new reality. The Speakers in the Depths retreated at once to the heart of entropy and could not be bothered to take part in what followed. Desna marveled at creation, and with a wave of her hand brought the first night to the skies above. Sarenrae followed swiftly thereafter, and was smitten with Desna and her work, and so she chose the brightest of those stars to shine as the suns, birthing the first day. Ihys, who would in time become the First to die, and his brother Asmodeus, who would in time become the First to kill, each defined the other and brought goodness and evil with them. And Achaekek rose to stand between, an arbiter over morality and a judge whose impartial aegis would, in time, crumble to savagery. Yet not all of the first would have names, or even be remembered. One tread forth beyond the Eclipse, but without death yet in the world, this Prince became Bound to a throne in the Spire’s shadow to await his time. And the final would foolishly step forth beyond Pharasma’s first fearful step, and in so doing would be transformed and absorbed by that fear. Whether that fear became Rovagug or whether it was Rovagug who was the devouring fear, not even the gods can remember.

As those First Eight became, so did Pharasma feel something else wake on the far side of time. Just as she had walked a deosil spiral to create, a widdershins spiral wound in opposition at the other side of reality, where the Lurker at the Threshold formed the second anchor of creation. Pharasma thus learned that each cycle required not only a Survivor, but also a Watcher. So that between the two, between Pharasma and Yog-Sothoth, all reality would thus become the Great Beyond. Thus began the Age of Creation.

The pale goddess Pharasma sits on a floating stone throne in judging a line of ghostly translucent souls from the Pathfinder Windsong Testaments fiction.

Illustration by Mark Molnar

And so in the ages that followed, Pharasma remained upon her throne. She watched and judged all who passed from life into death, and as time wore on the number of the dead grew apace to the number of the born. And in time, Pharasma beheld her second fear. An event beyond anticipation fractured fate, and on all worlds, the flow of prophecy was forever altered. Storms raged, empires fell, gods died, and in the least fortunate corners of reality, entire worlds came to an end. Pharasma herself lost track for that brief moment of what had yet to come, and when she opened her eyes again, she saw that the Seal had vanished, leaving behind a featureless void. She reached out to the Watcher to inquire if such a ripple in destiny had ever occurred before, to determine if the loss of the Seal had always been ordained, but the Watcher would not reply.

Yet reality went on. Mortals were born, and mortals were slain. Pharasma’s second fear abated, and she realized that the lost Seal was not an ill omen, but more akin to the passing of a parent or teacher. Now, this cycle of reality had matured to the point where it could continue on its own, and Pharasma knew that, going forward, reality was well and truly on its own. The apogee of creation had passed, and Pharasma knew that her days ahead would forever be in the shadow of her days behind. And while she knew how much time remained, she knew as well that there was more than enough for mortal life to enjoy more glories and triumphs than they could envision.

And even though reality must eventually end, Pharasma does not despair. She knows that the number of the dead has never before eclipsed the number of the born, for even as the Watcher witnesses from outside the cycle, there must always be a Survivor to carry on within the cycle to begin the next. In time, the flux of the born shall cease, and their number shall become a static record. And in those final hours, Pharasma knows she must prepare the next cycle’s Seal, and she must watch and wait as the final count of the dead approaches. And when that final visitant from life steps before her throne to be judged, Pharasma knows that it will be the Survivor who stands before her, and that she will not judge but will herself be judged. And so, with her death, shall this cycle end.

But it is here that Pharasma’s final fear awaits. The fracture of fate and the loss of the Seal has made her conviction falter, and she no longer knows for fact that she shall be the penultimate death. For if she steps before herself to be judged, and leaves behind none to Survive, the cycle shall end and nothing shall wend.

About the Author

James Jacobs is the Creative Director for Pathfinder. While he was there at the beginning of Golarion’s creation, many of the deities worshiped by that world’s heroes and villains had already existed for decades before. Goddesses and gods like Desna and Rovagug, Sarenrae and Abadar, Achaekek and Zon-Kuthon first established their faithful among PCs and NPCs alike in James’ home campaign in the late 80s and early 90s. Sharing them with the world as deities of the Pathfinder setting, seeing players and creators come to love and hate them (and in some cases cosplay as them), has been a career highlight.

About the Windsong Testaments

On the northern reaches of Varisia’s Lost Coast stands Windsong Abbey, a forum for interfaith discussion tended by priests of nearly twenty faiths and led by a legacy of Masked Abbesses. At the dawn of the Age of Lost Omens, Windsong Abbey suffered as its faithful fought and fled, but today it has begun to recover. A new Masked Abbess guides a new flock within, and the Windsong Testaments—parables about the gods themselves—are once again being recorded within the abbey’s walls. Some of these Testaments are presented here as Golarion’s myths and fables. Some parts may be true. Other parts are certainly false. Which ones are which is left to the faithful to decide.

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Web Fiction The Windsong Testaments
1 to 50 of 89 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Shadow Lodge

6 people marked this as a favorite.

Wow, cosmic. The Windsong Testaments have been nothing but hits.

In the meantime, just ignore Groetus.

(Also, I imagine Apsu claiming Pharasma has it wrong, but will refuse to clarify anything)


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Wow... just wow.
That was freaking epic!

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

3 for 3 so far - great stuff. This one is very thick with details. So much going on within each paragraph.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Happy Halloween to you, O Pharasma!!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

34 people marked this as a favorite.

This is the one that I was most excited for folks to get to, to tell the truth. There's a LOT in this one that reveals things that I've had in my head about the mythology that haven't seen print or even really been hinted at. (The original plot/draft of the "Strange Aeons" adventure path had the PCs learning some of this during the course of the adventure, but that went a different direction when I was moved off that project to instead re-do Curse of the Crimson Throne, alas.)

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

So who d we think all the deities are in this or are some of them new ones never mentioned before?


This is an amazing, epic tale, insight into the cosmos. So very well done.

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Also some possible implications of Arodens fate there as well or rather the cause ofhis untimly demise.

Liberty's Edge

4 people marked this as a favorite.

That's all really awesome.

The listed deities of the 'First 8' are Pharasma, Desna, Sarenrae, Achaekek, Rovagug, Ihys, Asmodeus, and a nameless God bound to Pharasma's throne.

The Speakers of the Depths are probably the Proteans.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Well damn, the First Eight.

I like that.

Also now I...now I want to wonder after who will be the next Survivor, who will be the next Watcher.

Rovagug’s origin.

And wait...the Lost Prince...no...they can’t be the same as the Prince named here can they? I mean...to think one of the first Gods left behind in the World the others forgot/turned away from...Hmmm.

Scarab Sages

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Deadmanwalking wrote:

That's all really awesome.

The listed deities of the 'First 8' are Pharasma, Desna, Sarenrae, Achaekek, Rovagug, Ihys, Asmodeus, and a nameless God bound to Pharasma's throne.

The Speakers of the Depths are probably the Proteans.

I'm not sure that Pharasma counts as one of the first eight. The way I see it is that each of the eight sides of the seal is one of the outside alignments (with Neutral being the center)

I would interpret it as

LG: Ihys
NG: Sarenrae
CG: Desna

LN: Achaekek (before he descended into savagery apparently)
N: Pharasma (Not counted among the eight)
CN: Speaker of the Depths

LE: Asmodeus
NE: Throne dude
CE: The guy that stepped off and got eaten by Rovagug (or just Rovy)

Paizo Employee Creative Director

15 people marked this as a favorite.
VerBeeker wrote:

Well damn, the First Eight.

I like that.

Also now I...now I want to wonder after who will be the next Survivor, who will be the next Watcher.

Rovagug’s origin.

And wait...the Lost Prince...no...they can’t be the same as the Prince named here can they? I mean...to think one of the first Gods left behind in the World the others forgot/turned away from...Hmmm.

The Watcher never changes. It's always Yog-Sothoth.

And the Bound Prince is not tied to the Eldest...but more to the Horsemen of the Apocalypse...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

13 people marked this as a favorite.
Bartram wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:

That's all really awesome.

The listed deities of the 'First 8' are Pharasma, Desna, Sarenrae, Achaekek, Rovagug, Ihys, Asmodeus, and a nameless God bound to Pharasma's throne.

The Speakers of the Depths are probably the Proteans.

I'm not sure that Pharasma counts as one of the first eight. The way I see it is that each of the eight sides of the seal is one of the outside alignments (with Neutral being the center)

I would interpret it as

LG: Ihys
NG: Sarenrae
CG: Desna

LN: Achaekek (before he descended into savagery apparently)
N: Pharasma (Not counted among the eight)
CN: Speaker of the Depths

LE: Asmodeus
NE: Throne dude
CE: The guy that stepped off and got eaten by Rovagug (or just Rovy)

Yup! (Throne dude is not associated with Pharasma's throne, though. It's a different throne.)


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I take it that the first group of deities each representing an alignment is not a coincidence?

ETA: Never mind. Anyway, I take it that the Throne Dude is the Oinodaemon?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Awesome, (aside from Yoggy) this was great ^w^

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

The throne guy, I'm assuming, is the "Dead God" referenced in Apollyon's PFwiki entry for his realm the Throne of Flies.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

How do the Manasaputras fit into this?

I'm assuming they're basically already hanging around?

Liberty's Edge

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I caught the death of Aroden but thought we might also have the Gap here as well?

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.

I thought the bound to throne one was Oinodaemon(or whatever their new name will be)


2 people marked this as a favorite.

So the Bubbly Boss of Lovecraft is highly integrated into the Lost Omens lore (at least in this POV), very interesting...

Grand Lodge

Asmodeus is so full of <BLEEP>. We all knew that already but to see it spelled out just HOW full of it he is boggles the mind. I'll bet he even buy his own lies wholesale.

I'm going to have to reread this in the morning to really process it all.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Evan Tarlton wrote:

I take it that the first group of deities each representing an alignment is not a coincidence?

ETA: Never mind. Anyway, I take it that the Throne Dude is the Oinodaemon?

Or whoever/whatever he killed to get the position of top daemon, I'd bet.

Lucas Yew wrote:
So the Bubbly Boss of Lovecraft is highly integrated into the Lost Omens lore (at least in this POV), very interesting...

I'm pretty sure Lovecraft's mithos has been part of the setting from the very beginning. I would be shocked if it was just JJ who was a fan at this point.

It's one of the things that attracted me to the Lost Omens setting from just getting the core books, actually. Love me some Lovecraft.

Edit: The thing I'd like to know is where The Monad was during all this stuff, since Concordance of Rivals positions it coming into existence either shortly after, or the same time as, Pharasma.
That is assuming it didn't exist already.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Perpdepog wrote:
Evan Tarlton wrote:

I take it that the first group of deities each representing an alignment is not a coincidence?

ETA: Never mind. Anyway, I take it that the Throne Dude is the Oinodaemon?

Or whoever/whatever he killed to get the position of top daemon, I'd bet.

Lucas Yew wrote:
So the Bubbly Boss of Lovecraft is highly integrated into the Lost Omens lore (at least in this POV), very interesting...

I'm pretty sure Lovecraft's mithos has been part of the setting from the very beginning. I would be shocked if it was just JJ who was a fan at this point.

It's one of the things that attracted me to the Lost Omens setting from just getting the core books, actually. Love me some Lovecraft.

Edit: The thing I'd like to know is where The Monad was during all this stuff, since Concordance of Rivals positions it coming into existence either shortly after, or the same time as, Pharasma.
That is assuming it didn't exist already.

Monad is weird in that its technically less of deity and more like the entire multiverse itself.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
James Jacobs wrote:
Bartram wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:

That's all really awesome.

The listed deities of the 'First 8' are Pharasma, Desna, Sarenrae, Achaekek, Rovagug, Ihys, Asmodeus, and a nameless God bound to Pharasma's throne.

The Speakers of the Depths are probably the Proteans.

I'm not sure that Pharasma counts as one of the first eight. The way I see it is that each of the eight sides of the seal is one of the outside alignments (with Neutral being the center)

I would interpret it as

LG: Ihys
NG: Sarenrae
CG: Desna

LN: Achaekek (before he descended into savagery apparently)
N: Pharasma (Not counted among the eight)
CN: Speaker of the Depths

LE: Asmodeus
NE: Throne dude
CE: The guy that stepped off and got eaten by Rovagug (or just Rovy)

Yup! (Throne dude is not associated with Pharasma's throne, though. It's a different throne.)

So Ihys was LG God of Free will ?


5 people marked this as a favorite.

I thought Sarenrae started as an angel and got upgraded to deity for leading her fellows in the fight against Rovagug.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Deosil. I learned a new word. :D

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

wow ... just wow ... one of the best cosmological tale I've ever read in ages.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hooray for the use of widdershins! It's a terribly underused word. My browser's spellchecker doesn't even recognize it.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I thought Sarenrae started as an angel and got upgraded to deity for leading her fellows in the fight against Rovagug.

The same could be said of Asmodeus and devils. I assume Angel/Devil might be considered a sort of a "divine race" and Sarenrae and Asm are the first (and greatest) of their kinds.

The so called Fall from "heaven" that Asmo led Dispaters, Moloch and the and others on could be a sort of rebellion from the other First. One being based on a lawful/Chaotic and Good/Evil perspective. OR just Free will.

Grand Lodge

10 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber

So is the "Throne-Bound Dude" Groetus?
"One tread forth beyond the Eclipse, but without death yet in the world, this Prince became Bound to a throne in the Spire’s shadow to await his time."
We know that Groetus "orbits" the Boneyard, drawing ever closer, only to be occasionally pushed back by...something. (I've not read the appropriate sourcebooks myself, but something to do with Pharasma grinding up the soul of an atheist or maltheist and "feeding" it to Groetus, which pushes his orbit back?)

Side note if true: imagine being an immortal deific entity with a grave responsibility, only to be born before the metaphysical conditions which underpin that grave responsibility have started existing?

"Alright Big G, you're in charge of closing out the lights and locking the door once everything in creation is [CONCEPT NOT FOUND]. And I mean, everything. But, says here - and this is a bit embarrassing! - but it seems [CONCEPT NOT FOUND] is not A Thing, yet? So, listen, we may have called you in a bit early.
Right, tell you what, while we wait for your literal raison d'être to start, you know, existing, you just go play in the corner, yeah?"

...no wonder dude is insane.

Scarab Sages

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Kishmo wrote:

So is the "Throne-Bound Dude" Groetus?

"One tread forth beyond the Eclipse, but without death yet in the world, this Prince became Bound to a throne in the Spire’s shadow to await his time."

I'm pretty sure it's the Oinodaemon (or his precursor? Things get fuzzy that far back in time)

As the neutral Evil progenator it lines up perfectly with daemons, further.

Furthermore the Temple of the Oinodaemon is located near the base of the boneyard (in the spires shadow) and lies under a great eclipsed Sun, said to be the prison (or the body?) of the Oinodaeom.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Bartram wrote:
Kishmo wrote:

So is the "Throne-Bound Dude" Groetus?

"One tread forth beyond the Eclipse, but without death yet in the world, this Prince became Bound to a throne in the Spire’s shadow to await his time."

I'm pretty sure it's the Oinodaemon (or his precursor? Things get fuzzy that far back in time)

As the neutral Evil progenator it lines up perfectly with daemons, further.

Furthermore the Temple of the Oinodaemon is located near the base of the boneyard (in the spires shadow) and lies under a great eclipsed Sun, said to be the prison (or the body?) of the Oinodaeom.

I love this specific theory and hope its true.

The Oinodaemon has been mysterious for so long and hinted at recently to a possible return.

In Return of the Runelords the Party finds a Mythic Astradaemon who is sacrificing souls to the Eclipse to revive The Oinodaemon.

And I read somewhere in a post by James Jacobs that he would like to plan a Adventure path that would focus on the release of the Bound Prince.

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.

JJ also has hinted something akin to Oinodaemon getting redesign(in this case I guess only a name change because we literally know nothing else about him) to be more Paizo original than D&D version where the name came from, I don't think Paizo would feel need to change Oinodaemon if they weren't planning to use him.(kind of like how I doubt 2e will ever refer to Tiamat since Paizo isn't interested in creating their own version of Tiamat. Also why Demogorgon hasn't gotten referred as demon lord after first bestiary I think)

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Lots of great insights in both the blog posts and this thread. Thanks to all.


Tusk the Half-Orc wrote:
I caught the death of Aroden but thought we might also have the Gap here as well?

Would you be willing to expound on that? I don't know Golarion very well.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Aroden death theory. He didn’t die at all. Instead, he used a powerful magical ritual to catapult himself forward in time to the end of the universe so that he could become this cycle’s “survivor.”

The ritual had some... unintended consequences, felt on many parts of Golarion.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
oconnor0 wrote:
Tusk the Half-Orc wrote:
I caught the death of Aroden but thought we might also have the Gap here as well?
Would you be willing to expound on that? I don't know Golarion very well.

Since we are in Pathfinder, the incident breaking fate and that entails gods killed resonates with the unforeseen death of Aroden. But the description also sounds a bit like the multiversal memory loss called the Gap in Starfinder. Though the Gap is supposed to have happened later that Aroden's death.

We also got hints that Aroden was murdered.

Chilling new hypothesis of mine : something happened that broke fate and someone took advantage of this to kill Aroden. What broke fate then had repercussions that for some reasons resulted in the Gap in the Starfinder era.

Maybe Dead God's Hand will shed some light on what broke fate, or maybe it will be food for a later AP.

In the end it fits my pet theory for the Gap : PCs did it, aka with great power in PCs' hands comes multiversal trauma.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

9 people marked this as a favorite.
Evan Tarlton wrote:

I take it that the first group of deities each representing an alignment is not a coincidence?

ETA: Never mind. Anyway, I take it that the Throne Dude is the Oinodaemon?

Them each representing each alignment is not a coincidence at all—it's kinda the reason, in my head canon, why those are the nine alignments in this reality.

Throne Dude is indeed the First Horseman, although we're moving away from calling him the "Oinodaemon" since that's D&D term and the route D&D takes with the oinodaemon being a disease themed daemon lord is different than what we do.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.
The Imperator wrote:

How do the Manasaputras fit into this?

I'm assuming they're basically already hanging around?

They're kind of doing their own thing in the positive energy plane. We haven't explored much about their role, and if/when we bring them back in 2nd edition, we'll look into that more.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

9 people marked this as a favorite.
Lucas Yew wrote:
So the Bubbly Boss of Lovecraft is highly integrated into the Lost Omens lore (at least in this POV), very interesting...

Yup; Yog-Sothoth has been a core part of the setting's canon in my head at least from day 1. From before that, in fact, because the role he plays in Golarion is the same as he did in my homebrew.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Evan Tarlton wrote:

I take it that the first group of deities each representing an alignment is not a coincidence?

ETA: Never mind. Anyway, I take it that the Throne Dude is the Oinodaemon?

Them each representing each alignment is not a coincidence at all—it's kinda the reason, in my head canon, why those are the nine alignments in this reality.

Throne Dude is indeed the First Horseman, although we're moving away from calling him the "Oinodaemon" since that's D&D term and the route D&D takes with the oinodaemon being a disease themed daemon lord is different than what we do.

So when will we get to know what he will be properly called in Pathfinder?

Aside from The Bound Prince.

Will it be in the Lost Omen: Gods and Magic?


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Oh man this was really good, I love the Lovecraft influence although it's got me wondering something. Is Azathoth still the same centre of creation like in the mythos or is he now "merely" just a really old powerful creature like Rovagug?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
I thought Sarenrae started as an angel and got upgraded to deity for leading her fellows in the fight against Rovagug.

That's one belief, sure. Not the one I prefer though; my preference is that Sarenrae was one of the first deities, and, perhaps, the one that served as the original draft for what a human should look like.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

9 people marked this as a favorite.
Prince Setehrael wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Evan Tarlton wrote:

I take it that the first group of deities each representing an alignment is not a coincidence?

ETA: Never mind. Anyway, I take it that the Throne Dude is the Oinodaemon?

Them each representing each alignment is not a coincidence at all—it's kinda the reason, in my head canon, why those are the nine alignments in this reality.

Throne Dude is indeed the First Horseman, although we're moving away from calling him the "Oinodaemon" since that's D&D term and the route D&D takes with the oinodaemon being a disease themed daemon lord is different than what we do.

So when will we get to know what he will be properly called in Pathfinder?

Aside from The Bound Prince.

Will it be in the Lost Omen: Gods and Magic?

It will not be in Gods and Magic.

My preference is for this sort of revelation to take place during a significant high-level adventure or as the culmination or a significant element of an Adventure Path. It's more satisfying, I think, for players to learn this in an adventure, and for GMs to read about it in the context of an adventure.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

9 people marked this as a favorite.
The Gula Path wrote:
Oh man this was really good, I love the Lovecraft influence although it's got me wondering something. Is Azathoth still the same centre of creation like in the mythos or is he now "merely" just a really old powerful creature like Rovagug?

I see Azathoth as the center of the Material Plane, yes. If the material plane is a vinyl record, then Azathoth is the spike the record sits on.

In fact, I see ALL of the outer gods and great old ones as creatures that exist outside of the cycle of life and death and time, and that when a new iteration of reality begins, the outer gods and great old ones transition over. Which ones end up in which reality might vary, though. The next cycle of reality might have something else (or nothing at all) at the center of the Material Plane than Azathoth, for example.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I love that good ol' Yoggy is so foundational here.

StarMartyr365 wrote:
Asmodeus is so full of <BLEEP>. We all knew that already but to see it spelled out just HOW full of it he is boggles the mind. I'll bet he even buy his own lies wholesale.

"The best liars convince themselves, most of the time, only occasionally reminding themselves of the truth."

Liberty's Edge

The Shifty Mongoose wrote:

Wow, cosmic. The Windsong Testaments have been nothing but hits.

In the meantime, just ignore Groetus.

(Also, I imagine Apsu claiming Pharasma has it wrong, but will refuse to clarify anything)

Apsu may go with a version of the Enuma Elish, the Babylonian Creation story and he may be correct from his perspective. There could have been multiple things going on at the same time. (Yes, this is what on Babylon 5 could be called a Vorlon answer.)

I liked this greatly. I suspect that there may exist things beyond the ken of the Survivor, the Watcher, and the Elder Gods and the Great Old Ones. Perhaps that is what ultimately causes the Gap, and such a being or beings may be as mysterious and powerful to Azathoth and Pharasma as the First Ones in Babylon 5 are to humans. (This would be a bit better than the the St. Elsewhere theory of a unified TV universe.)

Perhaps Asmodeus and his followers may have adopted their current forms as a mockery of those of Sarenrae and her followers. Or perhaps after Asmodeus and his followers fell, their forms changed or were forced to change. (Perhaps the Monad or something else caused this.)

This was a great read, as I am a fan of mythology and have read much by Joseph Campbell. I think he would have enjoyed this story but I suspect that is far from the only such story.


James Jacobs wrote:
The Imperator wrote:

How do the Manasaputras fit into this?

I'm assuming they're basically already hanging around?

They're kind of doing their own thing in the positive energy plane. We haven't explored much about their role, and if/when we bring them back in 2nd edition, we'll look into that more.

Thank you for the response!

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Okay so it also seems that Arodens death may have been less a cause of the disruption of profecy and all the other incidents that happend and more a symptom like the rest of the things that also involves the seal disapearing/being stolen?

1 to 50 of 89 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Lost Omens Campaign Setting / General Discussion / Paizo Blog: The Windsong Testaments: The Three Fears of Pharasma All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.