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QuidEst wrote:
Paladinosaur wrote:
Any word on when the playtest drops?

Near the end of the month.

I'm presuming a thematically appropriate Halloween release, allowing me to be pleasantly surprised if they do it earlier.

It's now looking like the playtest will drop a day or two after Halloween, per this post from Jason.


Mellored wrote:
oholoko wrote:
siegfriedliner wrote:
Say your buddy the alchemist gives you his bombs because his luck is being terrible and he feels you have a better chance to hit than him with his super awesome explosives would you be better off continuing to double shoot or would it be more effective to start throwing his grenades?

If you grab a level of rogue... Quick draw and sneak attack you can actually start getting pretty insane with your friend bombs.

Sneak attack doesn't work with bombs. They are not finesse or agile. Nor simple for Ruffian. Rogues don't even get proficiency in martial thrown weapon.

I checked earlier.

Actually, Sneak Attack works with all ranged weapons. So bomb sneak attacks are totally a thing.


Either their releasing the errata this week, or we’re getting a preview. I’d prefer the former, but be okay with the latter.

Also, interested in seeing what’s new with the Witchwarper.


Blave wrote:
Baarogue wrote:
Blave wrote:
Deadly Simplicity has nothing to do with rarity. It doesn't do anything for the spiked chain becase it's a martial weapon and Deadly Simplicity only affects simple weapons. And only weapons with a damage die smaller than d8.
Emphasis mine, to highlight the part I have a question about. It doesn't say so in the feat description, so could you tell me where to find that information? I'm going to be creating my character this weekend, and that seems pertinent because I've been compiling a list of likely deities based on their weapon damage potential.

You're right. It doesn't say anthing like that. Neither does the Champion's Deific Weapon feature, which does basically the same thing.

I swear, the ONE time I don't double check something before posting...

Apologies. I might have mixed this up with something else. Maybe something from the playtest, not sure.

Please disregard the sentence about the die size.

That being said, I think Abadar is the only currently available deity with a d8 simple weapon. At least I'm pretty certain Deadly Simplicity doesn't increase the two-handed d8 of Nethys' staff.

I imagine you got the language from the Ruffian Rogue Racket in there, which does have d8 maximum on the kind of weapons that they can use for sneak attack.


Been a long time since I've posted in this thread, but what the hey. I've been listening to some history podcasts, and the idea of a character based off of a steppe nomad sounds cool. And of course, the most iconic kind of warriors that came from the steppes were horse archers.

So, this character is going to be a Ranger, obviously. They're also going to be a human, because to really get the build going, you need two level 1 ranger feats: Animal Companion, for your horse, and Hunted Shot, to make you a good archer.

Really, we've already realized the basic character concept already, but let's keep going. Quick Draw will be our level 2 Ranger feat, although nabbing a dedication this level wouldn't hurt. Companion's Cry at level 4 will let our Ranger command their horse to stride 3 times, which still leaves 1 action left for two attacked with Hunted Shot. And at Level 6, we get a mature animal companion. Interestingly enough, the Horse's support benefit applies to Ranged Strikes as well as Melee Strikes, which works out well for our Horse archer.

I could go on, but I won't. At any rate, I think the base for this kind of character is pretty solid.


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Pharasma did it because she was tired of Aroden's control of prophecy horning in on her schtick as mistress of fate.


Gorbacz wrote:
Perform at kid's parties while wearing a pointy hat. Sorcerers just don't have the pizzaz needed for that.

Sorcerers? Lack pizzaz?

That's a new one.


HedwickTheWorldly wrote:

Fuzzy-Wuzzy, Kyrone, and Mellored: I've never really played a religious character in Pathfinder at all, but could see myself working with Redeemer or Liberator.

What deity would you recommend for something like that? It seems like the Champion might overlap/step on the fighter's toes. Is that not true as much in 2E?

I don't want either of us to feel irrelevant due to the the other, and I know that in 1E, a Paladin and melee Fighter might feel like they're covering the same basic core competencies, you know? It's that concern that has kept me from seriously considering the Barbarian, Champion, Monk, or Fighter of course.

For a deity that your Redeemer/Liberator worships, might I recommend Desna? She’s one of the only divinities worshipped in Thassilon that is still revered in modern-day Golarion, and that may provide a bit of stability and familiarity to your character who is living in a world that I’d no longer recognizable.

Also, you can never have too many front-liners.


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AnCap Dawg wrote:
What exactly was the reasoning behind Divine Font being based on Charisma anyways?

I'd imagine it has to do with Divine Font being the 2e incarnation of the 1e Cleric's Channel Energy power, which was based off of Charisma.

The main difference appears to be that Channel Energy wasn't powerful enough to warrant increasing your Cleric's Charisma to boost, while Divine Font is.


Rasheen Firebow wrote:

Hey folks,

while sifting through pages and pages, I did find something I found... strange.
Is it truly possible to wield as of 4th Level a heavy Crossbow with 2d20+2 points of Damage?
If you ask yourself how that should work.
Well, this is how:
At 1st Level, you start either as a Ranger or Cleric.
As a Ranger, you pick Crossbow Ace Ranger Feat, as a Cleric you choose Warpriest and a deity which has heavy crossbow as a favored weapon, which gives you the Deadly Simplicity Feat.
Both up the damage die of a heavy crossbow by one step.
At 2nd Level, you grab the corresponding Dedication Feat.
At 4th Level, you opt-in for a Class Feat of 1st or 2nd Level. So gaining the missing Feat.

Well, this will gladly work only with Home games, as for the only deities with a heavy crossbow are Zohl and Sabnach.
Still, that would be a little Nightmare...

I actually do hope that doesn't work. 4d20+2 might be very random but is certainly devastating.

It, in fact, does not work. Here are the rules on increasing the damage dice of weapons from page 279 of the core rulebook.

Increasing Die Size wrote:

When an effect calls on you to increase the size of your weapon damage dice, instead of using its normal weapon damage dice, use the next larger die, as listed below (so if you were using a d4, you’d use a d6, and so on). If you are already using a d12, the size is already at its maximum. You can’t increase your weapon damage die size more than once.

1d4➞1d6➞1d8➞1d10➞1d12

As you can see, you cannot increase your damage die higher than a d12, and you can only increase the damage die of your weapon once. Ever.


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Honestly, I wouldn't worry about wondering about a monk-primary build, since your character feels like a pretty solid story that could be told by a shark-instinct barbarian.


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CorvusMask wrote:

Actually now that I think about it, I think there might be another kasatha pic with eyebrows..

...Anyway, I know its because artists do artists things, but I'm kinda dismayed at kasatha art increasingly having more human like traits when one of reasons why I found kasatha cool in first place was things that made them more alien in first place

But yeah, otherwise no complaint here, her backstory IS awesome.

The eyes might not necessarily be the ones she was born with. Remember, this is Starfinder. Having your eyes ripped out and replaced with technologically-enhanced ocular organs is totally a thing that happens.


Perpdepog wrote:
Ventnor wrote:
Plus you can also do some unorthodox stuff too, like making a Barbarian who wields an oversized dueling sword or a ranger who dual-wields them.

I wouldn't recommend the latter. You would lose out on your parrying feats if you went that route, though you can build a great duelist without one, and since your off-hand weapon isn't agile you'd be eating higher MAP for trying to duel wield, though you can make some of that up with Flurry.

I do really like the idea of someone doing fancy swordplay with a sword longer than they are, though.

Another thought is an Aldori Duelist Ranger with the Precision Hunter’s Edge and an Animal Companion. Probably not as damaging as a dual wielder or an archer, but it could be fun.


Plus you can also do some unorthodox stuff too, like making a Barbarian who wields an oversized dueling sword or a ranger who dual-wields them.


So, here’s a question about how Druids can spend their time to regain their Focus Point(s). We’ll stat with the following from the description of the Druidic Order class feature.

Druidic Order wrote:
Order spells are a type of focus spell. It costs 1 Focus Point to cast a focus spell, and you start with a focus pool of 1 Focus Point. You refill your focus pool during your daily preparations, and you can regain 1 Focus Point by spending 10 minutes using the Refocus activity to commune with local nature spirits or otherwise tend to the wilderness in a way befitting your order.

So far so good. Let’s now look at the feat Natural Medicine, which human Druids or Druids with the herbalist background can get at Level 1.

Natural Medicine - Feat 1 wrote:

[General] [Skill]

Prerequisites trained in Nature
You can apply natural cures to heal your allies. You can use Nature instead of Medicine to Treat Wounds. If you’re in the wilderness, you might have easier access to fresh ingredients, allowing you to gain a +2 circumstance bonus to your check to Treat Wounds using Nature, subject to the GM’s determination.

“Natural cures,” hm? Interesting. So, would using the natural cures mentioned in this feat that you use while treating wounds also satisfy the “commune with nature spirits or tend to the wilderness” clause that Druids need to refocus?


Ediwir wrote:
Brew Bird wrote:
Ediwir wrote:

Late October, probably near the last week of it.

Source: Read Omens

Not to be too clueless, but do you mean one of the various recent rulebooks with "Omens" in the title, or did you divine this from the flight of birds?

I divine this from the flight of birds, a bit of math, and the overthinking on what might be between the lines of comments from some Paizo people and other individuals with access to further details but no intention to speak clearly.

Ibis redibis nunquam in bello morieris, but in a gaming setting. It's my best shot at understanding the intentionally cryptic.

You’d better perform a harrowing and check a magic 8-ball, just to be sure.


Chain shirts and other light armor are pretty much the worst kind of armor a champion can wear. They are one of only 2 classes that get access to armor specialization effects, and those only work for medium and heavy armor. So even Dex-champions are pushed towards using at least medium armor.


Sporelock wrote:
Spamotron wrote:

Archive of Nethys has the rules: https://2e.aonprd.com/Rules.aspx?ID=795

Essentially you take a vanilla animal companion from the core book and just say it's a megafauna version of that. Then when you receive access to an advanced animal companion you have another option to choose from to upgrade it. Just one for all megafauna though.

That's it? That's really lame. I was hoping for an actual mammoth or ground sloth or gigantopithecus.

The way I'd approximate a giant ground sloth is by starting with a badger animal companion and taking all of the size-advancing advancements I could.

We're probably going to need an elephant and ape base stats to approximate the other two, tho.

But for other megafauna options, you could use cat stats for a smilodon buddy, wolf stats for dire wolves or bone-crushing dogs, and bears for... well... cave bears.


Perpdepog wrote:
Edge93 wrote:
Phntm888 wrote:
Arachnofiend wrote:

I think you kinda have to think outside the box - Fighters already make good duelists without the dedication, so you'd want to take these feats with classes that struggle at fulfilling that concept like the Champion or Barbarian.

I did build out an Aldori Duelist using a Scoundrel Rogue as the base - it did work fairly nicely for that. I went Human for Unconventional Weaponry to get proficiency, and I chose the Rostland Partisan background for flavor. I was going to try a Ranger next, although a Champion might be a good choice, too.

I'm not sure I personally like the flavor of a raging duelist with the instincts we have right now, but maybe if we get an "Urban Barbarian" type instinct, I'll warm up to the idea.

Hmm, a Dragon Instinct Duelist actually sounds kinda interesting. You could really go in on the duelist ego stereotype with the Dragon Anathema if I remember it right.

Handsome warriors never lose battles. XD

And Brevoy is kinda known for their dragons. I think they've even got a dragon throne, and Draconic is one of their regional languages.

Also just tossing out that I'm a fan of the Saving Slash feat. It's pretty useful with how crits work in the game, and it's just good fun.

Ooh! You could even go with a white or silver dragon patron to play up the "cold up North" flavor too!


Deadmanwalking wrote:
Ventnor wrote:
Humans can make pretty much any class ready for Aldori Duellust by Level 2, except maybe wizards. It all depends on how a GM defines “Another Culture” in the Unconventional Weaponry feat.
They don't actually need Unconventional Weaponry. A Human can start with two General Feats, that'll get anyone but a Wizard to Aldori Dueling Sword Proficiency.

That is why I said “except maybe wizards.”


Humans can make pretty much any class ready for Aldori Duellust by Level 2, except maybe wizards. It all depends on how a GM defines “Another Culture” in the Unconventional Weaponry feat.


kaid wrote:

Honestly I think the intention is a ranger/druid can only do command animal 1 in a round so that would let them get some more pet actions. But I really don't see anything that stops you from using the normal command animal multiple times in a round. I see in the spell area that multiple concentration spells are possible if you are willing to spend the actions.

That said normal command animal is pretty specific about burning more actions to make your target animal do more stuff while the animal companion rules specifically change that functionality. It makes no mention of being able to spend more than the one action on it.

I can still sort of see it both ways. The fact that feat exists at all seems to indicate they expect animal companions default is 1 action per turn to gain 2 pet actions per turn.

My guess is that the only reason "Command an Animal" lacks the flourish trait is because it would be kind of unfairly limiting on Rangers who want to split their focus between the Animal Companion feats and the Dual-Wielding or Archery feats.


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Captain Morgan wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:
So what I'm hearing is we need Ki-cantrips. Could be an interesting way of testing the kineticist without committing to a full class right out the gate, and see what they can get away with within the current rules before pushing into new ground.
The thing is we already have ways to get cantrips on a monk... And I'm pretty sure you can use your ki spell proficiency if they are divine or occult. So this need doesn't feel very burning to me.

At least the way I see it, Ki Cantrips would be similar to the Composition Cantrips that Bards can learn. Unique magical abilities that only Monks know how to use, which have to be learned specifically through Monk class feats, but don't require spending a Focus Point to cast.


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So, one of the big problems I've seen people mention about the Fighter Multiclass feat is that it isn't a great pickup if you're already trained in Martial Weapons. So I propose the following changes to both Fighter Dedication and Diverse Weapon Expert.

FIGHTER DEDICATION - FEAT 2
[ARCHETYPE] [DEDICATION] [MULTICLASS]
Prerequisites Strength 14, Dexterity 14
You become trained in simple weapons and martial weapons. If you are already trained in simple weapons and martial weapons, you instead become trained in advanced weapons. You become trained in your choice of Acrobatics or Athletics; if you are already trained in both of these skills, you instead become trained in a skill of your choice. You become trained in fighter class DC.
Special You cannot select another dedication feat until you have gained two other feats from the fighter archetype.

DIVERSE WEAPON - EXPERT FEAT 12
[ARCHETYPE]
Prerequisites Fighter Dedication, expert in any kind of weapon or unarmed attack
Your proficiency ranks for simple weapons and martial weapons increase to expert, and your proficiency rank for advanced weapons increases to trained. If you are already trained in advanced weapons, your proficiency rank for advanced weapons increases to expert instead.

It makes sense to me that those who multiclass into fighter but who are already trained in simple and martial weapons would instead be able to access some of the fighters' ability to use advanced weapons, though of course they'll never be quite as skill as a real fighter.

Anyway, what are your thoughts?


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If you want to be really good at hunting dragons, be a gnome ranger. Use your first level ancestry feat to get Gnome Obsession, which you can use to get Dragon Lore (and according to some backgrounds in the Age of Ashes character guide, Dragon Lore is totally a thing!). It might not be the most powerful mechanically, but get the Outwit Hunter's Edge to improve your ability to recall information about enemies (like dragons). At level 4, pick up Favored Enemy and choose "Dragons."

It's simple, but you should be able to know just about everything about the dragons you're fighting.


So, here's an idea: what if Preserving is a metamagic feat that all Arcane Casters get for free at first level?


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Syries wrote:
Xenocrat wrote:
A Wizard who combines Eschew Materials, Conceal Spell, and Silent spell plus Shrink Item to hide his spellbook. Never gives away that he's casting spells if he can help it, and if caught pretends he's a sorcerer. His friends wonder why he always spends a full hour and ten minutes in the garderobe in the mornings, though.

To be fair the sorcerer also has to spend an hour prepping in the mornings.

Which is SUPER WEIRD to me, I might add.

How they spend that hour differs depending on the Sorcerer, of course. A dragon sorcerer has got to count out and polish all her coins, an aberrant sorcerer has to do some light stretches so that his tentacular limbs don't get cramps, an undead sorcerer has to listen to their entire Linkin' Park playlist so that they can be properly edgy... you know how it is.


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Maybe a redo of the Drake Companion rules found in the Legacy of Dragons supplement, redone as an archetype anyone can take.

Having a dragon drake buddy is a cool concept!


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Gorbacz wrote:
Igor Horvat wrote:

I think that for out games I will throw out short/longbow as a different weapon, also drop volley, deadly and propulsive and base just a BOW on minimum strength.

8 strength, 1d6 P, range 60ft
10 strength, 1d8 P, range 90ft
12 strength, 1d10 P, range 120ft
14 strength, 1d12 P, range 150ft

if you do not have required strength for a given bow, you get -2 attack penalty and deal minimum damage.

Why would anybody ever use your STR 8 and STR 10 bows if a crossbow exists?

Reload 0, I imagine.


I have no idea why people are so vehemently opposed to the idea that there should be lore about the Hellknights in a book that has a Hellknight archetype in it.


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Personally, if I were running a Dark Sun Campaign, I'd make the entire Divine casting tradition rare.

Athas is a world devoid of gods. Either they all died long ago, or they never existed to begin with. So any objects of a divine nature are going to be... well, rare. To say the least.


For your specific scenario? Only ever as a 7th-level spell.


There's also the Curious Companion feat for non-Treesingers who want a plant companion.


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Atalius wrote:
Does a Chaotic Neutral character work? How does one act?

I'd say rather than ask "how does a Chaotic Neutral character work?", the better question is "How does a worshiper of Gorum work?"

I think asking questions about the god your character chose to worship and why that character made that choice, rather than about the alignment itself, will help you get a better idea about how to RP your character.


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They're clearly intelligent enough to mix up an alchemical elixir in under 6 seconds.


Big Creepy Crawly Form


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Eleanor Ferron wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Also, MORTICS WERE ON THE TABLE!?!?!
Yes, but given we hadn't had a chance to see how they were received, it was eventually decided to hold off on them until we had a better idea of fan reaction. Which is to say, if you liked the mortics, let Erik Mona know.

I have no idea what a mortic is.


Maybe Abdengo is the local translation of Aroden's name? Since the storm appeared after he died, after all.


I've seen some of the discussion on the other parts of this forum about Rogues and cantrips, which gave me this idea.

Eldritch Trickster

You were born with a talent for magic, but whatever reason you've never been able to really hone your gifts beyond the basics. Your ability to use magic, however minor, does give you some unique tools that have helped you in your career. Perhaps you use your magic to assist in heists, to defend yourself against dangerous foes, or even con the gullible into believing that you are a mighty mage!

Choose one magical tradition (arcane, divine, occult, or primal). You gain two cantrips from that magical tradition's spell list. You can cast those two cantrips as innate spells at will. A cantrip is heightened to a spell level equal to half your level rounded up. You are also trained in the spell DCs associated with your tradition. Your proficiency with those spell DCs increases to expert at 7th level, and master at 15th level.

You are trained in one extra skill, depending on which magical tradition you chose. You are trained in Arcana if you picked arcane, Religion if you picked divine, Occultism if you picked occult, and Nature if you picked primal.


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So, here's another thought I had. Maybe the most important item for dual-wielding characters are doubling rings, right? The usual thought is you use them to replicate the fundamental runes from your main-hand weapon onto your off-hand weapon. But do you really?

What if the weapon you decide to focus on is your off-hand weapon? My thought is a dwarf who decides to go all-in on buffing her clan dagger. She has an agile parrying weapon in one hand, which means she has a relatively decent AC (even more so if she's a Fighter or Ranger who picks up the twin parry feat). She then changes her main-hand weapon depending on what she needs for her particular battle. She might pull out a whip if taking an enemy alive is what is called for, a warhammer if there are some ledges to shove people off of, or a trident if she needs a little extra distance.

All of these different weapons will be effective though, since our dwarven warrior is wearing the gold doubling ring on the hand that holds her clan dagger.


SuperBidi wrote:
True, but they are kind of all the same to me. I don't see any reason to choose one over another right now (unless one type of damage is more common than the others?).

The one I think is actually neatest is the Chain specialization. No matter how high your AC is, sooner or later you're probably going to be critically hit, and having the ability to negate some of that extra damage seems like a good thing to have going for you.


Don't forget that fighters are only one of two classes that can make use of armor specialization effects! Right now, the only armors that can get the chain or leather effects are medium armors!


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shroudb wrote:
Castilliano wrote:
Ventnor wrote:
So, maybe not the most outlandish build ever, but here’s kind of a fun idea: goblin barkeep alchemist, who takes the junk tinker ancestry feat at first level. Obviously, you create all of your alchemical items, whether bombs elixirs, or anything else, using old beer bottles.

And don't tell your fellow players! (Just the GM.)

"I throw a beer bottle at him." *hiccup* "Lousy orc."
(I'm assuming he's tipsy.)
Your Alchemist Fire could look like a Molotov cocktail.

He;s a goblin.

I'm assuming EVERYTHING is a molotov

edit:

it also just dawned on me:

"You're wounded? Here, take this healing elixir"
"Oh, thanks!... wait... what are those bits in it? why do they look like our yesterday's leftovers?"
"Yeah! I don't know why you guys threw those out, but they were perfect! Come on, bottoms up now."

I agree, the Irongut goblin heritage does seem the best fit for this concept.


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So, maybe not the most outlandish build ever, but here’s kind of a fun idea: goblin barkeep alchemist, who takes the junk tinker ancestry feat at first level. Obviously, you create all of your alchemical items, whether bombs, elixirs, or anything else, using old beer bottles.


graystone wrote:
You can but that means raising a shield gives you no AC and for shield block the shield has 1/2 hp and BT so at best that's hp 10, BT 5.

Not necessarily!

Normally you'd be right, but Junk Tinker specifically says that it allows you to ignore the shoddy quality for items that you make. That shield is going to fall apart for most people, but you know how to angle that hunk of junk in just the right way to make it kind of useful for you!


prototype00 wrote:
Ventnor wrote:

If you're going to go with the Barbarian multiclass, I'd say that the best Instinct to go with would be Animal rather than Dragon. Since your main offense comes from Dragon Style, it means that the Animal Instinct's anathema is no problem for you, and if you choose one of the Animals that gets a grapple unarmed strike, like ape, shark, or snake, you get better that grappling your opponents, and thus keeping them afraid of you.

Heck, the Snake instinct isn't even entirely off-brand for you. Just say that your particular style is based off of linnorms rather than true dragons!

Hmm, its a neat idea, but getting yet another 1d10 Unarmed Attack (You already have Dragon Tail) seems a bit superfluous?

Couple of Questions for fellow forumites:

1. I’m wavering between Human and Goblin, Goblin has the better stat spread but humans have Nice Ancestry Feats. (Pick up Ki Strike for even more damage!)

2. How much Cha/Dex/Con would you pick up? Str can go to 18, but would, say 14 in everything else be sufficient (only possible with Goblin) for demoralize shenanigans?

3. Besides Intimidating Prowess, any other Skill Feats I should focus on?

In the case of the Animal Barbarian attacks, the main thing you're looking for is not another attack but the Grapple trait on their natural weapons. This allows you to add the Striking Rune's item bonus to any athletics checks you make to grapple, which is not a bad thing to have when you want to keep your scared enemies right next to you so that they'll remain scared.


shroudb wrote:
Ventnor wrote:
shroudb wrote:

Flying Hammers:

Thrown weapons Paladin.
Pro's:
Actually has decent range!
You need (probably) less stride actions to get into position, meaning you attack more (hence why the agile Light Hammer as well)
Equally effective at range and at melee, although preffered range would be "close to melee" to protect his teammates as well
Good damage for a SnB ranged build

Con's:
Well, less damage than dual wielding, paladin/monks, and twohander paladins.
Loses the versatility of multiple Litanies

This build also works with the Trident as well, which can also be thrown 20 ft. and has a d8 damage die. Not to say that there aren't tradeoffs, of course. The light hammer is going to be more accurate if you throw it multiple times in a round, so the main question is if you want that or you want your reaction attacks to be stronger.

i did consider it.

it's the usual trade off of d6 agile vs d8 non-agile.

what tipped the scales for me is that Hammer crit spec is insane, and it combines with Zeal extremely well in high levels.

Knocking a dude prone is definitely strong. However, making an enemy clumsy with a trident crit also increases the chances of your allies landing a critical hit of their own.

Not saying hammer isn't better, but there definitely are some upsides if you prefer ranged poking instead.


shroudb wrote:

Flying Hammers:

Thrown weapons Paladin.
Pro's:
Actually has decent range!
You need (probably) less stride actions to get into position, meaning you attack more (hence why the agile Light Hammer as well)
Equally effective at range and at melee, although preffered range would be "close to melee" to protect his teammates as well
Good damage for a SnB ranged build

Con's:
Well, less damage than dual wielding, paladin/monks, and twohander paladins.
Loses the versatility of multiple Litanies

This build also works with the Trident as well, which can also be thrown 20 ft. and has a d8 damage die. Not to say that there aren't tradeoffs, of course. The light hammer is going to be more accurate if you throw it multiple times in a round, so the main question is if you want that or you want your reaction attacks to be stronger.


If you're going to go with the Barbarian multiclass, I'd say that the best Instinct to go with would be Animal rather than Dragon. Since your main offense comes from Dragon Style, it means that the Animal Instinct's anathema is no problem for you, and if you choose one of the Animals that gets a grapple unarmed strike, like ape, shark, or snake, you get better that grappling your opponents, and thus keeping them afraid of you.

Heck, the Snake instinct isn't even entirely off-brand for you. Just say that your particular style is based off of linnorms rather than true dragons!


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So, here's kind of an Unorthodox build.

Start with a Fighter, multiclass him to Demonic Sorcerer at level 2, and at level 4 pick up Basic Bloodline spell which will allow you to cast Glutton's Jaws, a fairly decent unarmed attack with a d8 damage die, the forceful quality, and the ability to nab you some good longevity in the form of temporary hit points.

But we're just getting started, because at level 9 you're going to want to get the human ancestry feat multitalented, which necessitates starting human or getting adopted ancestry. But no matter how you do it, you'll want to multiclass into Monk so that you can get Monk's Flurry at level 10. Flurry of Blows is a very nice feat for this build to have, since it synergizes really well with the forceful trait that your Glutton's Jaws attacks have. And of course, all of these attacks are coming off of the fantastic Fighter legendary proficiency.

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