Zaz

The Drunken Dragon's page

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. Organized Play Member. 737 posts. 1 review. No lists. No wishlists. 1 Organized Play character.


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Grand Lodge

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Gnolls, kitsune, and kobolds. Gnolls never get any love and I’d love to play one

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Yqatuba wrote:
lowfyr01 wrote:

Him getting more desperate About his age is one of the even more dangerous Things About him.

I could see him using his People in a ritual to get Young again like the one shown in the Villian Codex i think. Always looked like made for him^^

What if he actually does die of old age? Will his followers just go "I guess he wasn't a god after all"? Or will they make some lame excuse for how he was still a god?

Likely the same thing that happened when the founder of Scientology died, which is to say, his followers basically say "he didn't die, obviously. Dying is for mortals. He's just abandoned his mortal shell because he has no need for it any longer, and he has now finally ascended to the Beyond. Now it is the duty of us, his faithful, to continue serving him and protecting and expanding his domain." Etc etc. People are reeeeeaaaaally good at convincing themselves that they were right all along, even when provided with objective evidence to the contrary. Heck, there are a lot of death-cults of the world ending that, when the world fails to end as they predicted, they just go "oh, well, obviously we were just so freakin faithful that we got an extra couple of years ¯\_(ツ)_/¯"

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I should point out that we know some psychopomps take a very dim view of life extension magic or tech, and so people that take advantage of such things might end up becoming targets. That being said, I too choose to assume that most people extend their lifespan at least a little...until they get eaten by aforementioned space-bugs.

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Milo v3 wrote:
One thing at I feel is also useful to mention is that not everyone plays the Pact World's setting.

This is true, in which case it becomes a moot point because then the GM can adjudicate the significance of the archetype however they want. But, if they *were* using the Pact Worlds setting, then it becomes an interesting and relevant discussion. Otherwise, if it's outside the setting, it becomes a weird "no-true-Scotsman" debate.

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Oh that's a a solid point, actually

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To be honest, while my inner munchkin is perfectly okay with justifying taking advantage of abilities even if the flavor doesn't mesh super well...buuuut in the case of the Esotericist, it would be odd for every default character to be one, especially given how the archetype is based on a cultural phenomenon which is considered quite fringe in the default setting. Granted, some of the abilities within the archetype enforce this (such as the limitations based on spell schools and being unable to affect technological items or constructs), but I find myself veering towards the side of some of the people objecting against taking the archetype just for mechanics. To me, it feels a bit odd to play an archetype without maintaining its theme at all. It can be within reason, so it's not like I'd stop using tech at all (unless I was playing a Hanakan), but it definitely feels wrong to just slap them on like a borrowed shirt.

To me, archetypes feel, intention-wise, the same as prestige classes in Pathfinder 1E did: intrinsically tied to the lore of the game. To treat them as bundles of math for your own advantage feels wrong.

Then again: that also feels a bit too gatekeepy for my tastes. There's nothing wrong with taking advantage of options, and nothing wrong with mechanics-over-lore playstyle. It ain't my cup of tea, but it feels wrong to impose on others. I wouldn't, but I don't think the present version of me would be comfortable arguing against this. I dunno, I'm more ambivalent than anything.

Grand Lodge

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Erk Ander wrote:

So Ihys was LG God of Free will ?

I mean, is that so far-fetched? Starfinder gave us Hylax, a LG goddess of individuality and choice. I think it was JJ himself that mentioned that sometimes gods have a unique or unexpected (and even seemingly contradictory) portfolio. For eg, there’s always Tsukiyo, LG god of madness. Granted, he is the patron of the neurodivergent and those who have come back changed after incredibly stressful events, sure, but the idea of a Madness Divinity being LG is just as odd as a Free Will deity being LG.

It might be that Ilya would’ve possibly altered over time...if he were allowed to live

Tbh, I feel personally that this is a stretch and I agree it’s unusual, but it hardly lacks precedent

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There are also humans on Suskillion and Grascha. In the case of the former, it's implied that these humans were true natives rather than transplants from Golarion (as was the case with New Thespera and Akiton), and in the latter case its outright stated that they were independently native.

Given that parallel evolution allows for things like mountain eels and barathu, humans don't seem too far a stretch in this particular universe. Especially when you take divine intervention into account.

Also, don't forget literal actual Earth.

As for do the Azlanti Star Empire have Golarion-centric info? Yes and no.

New Thespera was cut off from Golarion prior to Earthfall, so they *might* have access to historical records of early to middle Azlant, but most of Pathfinder's modern history would be simultaneously unknown and irrelevant to the Star Empire. They didn't know how or why Azlant fell. They certainly never learned about Aroden (and would probably have found his claim as the Last Azlanti as extremely insulting, all things considered), and it's unclear how much they even know about comparatively "modern" things like the existence of dwarves or the Thassilonian Empire (the latter being uncertain, since the only thing we know for certain is that New Thespera was founded prior to Earthfall...but not when prior to Earthfall). And I say they wouldn't care since with the exception of Thassilon, none of that "human" culture is Azlanti, and therefore as far as they are concerned, not even legitimately human. That being said, their few surviving records of pre-Earthfall Azlant might be pretty decent, since it was far enough from the Gap to be possibly unaffected and if they wrote things down accurately enough, could be quite accurate. Given how revisionist totalitarian regimes are, though, even this might be false. We know the Ixomander dynasty has already played fast and loose with Imperial history (they claim their ancestors created the Aeon Throne...which happened during the Gap so that is...a guess), so who knows what else they edited.

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Considering that Aroden did a lot of...questionable...things on his rise to power, and tied his essence to a large number of powerful items and locations throughout Golarion...it might be a manifestation of that. Perhaps he was working on an undersea experiment of some sort and when he died, the controls for that magic broke. Or maybe a piece of the Starstone underwater reacted because his magic was connected to it. I have no idea.

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I mean given Arazni's aesthetic it seems a reasonable choice. Maybe Nocticula, but that seems far-fetched given that her color palette doesn't match and she has no real relation to the undead. It seems odd why a being like Ragathiel or Milani (another guess of mine) wouldn't just...claim responsibility.

Also Arazni feels more appropriate given the oath, so...

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Not gonna lie, if there was a biotech implant called "supercharged appendix" that let you carry an additional magic item would be hilarious

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This is, more than likely, an incredibly unlikely question to be answered, all things considered. However, at the end of Soldiers of Brass, the NPC Nib mentions a pair of figures to express her feelings on the PC's accomplishments. She mentions Grandmother Rat, which is definitely Lao Shu Po. But she also mentions Round Papa, and here's where I get confused?

What being is that a reference to?

I've tried searching this on pathfinder's wiki. No results. Starfinder's? Nada. A search on the forums. Zip. So either my search-fu is lacking (very possible) or this figure hasn't been referenced before or since. And I'm desperately curious: who is Round Papa? Is this a god or an obscure historial figure in ysoki culture. Is it Kofusachi (another Tien god that ratfolk may have preserved across the Gap, and the only one who, visually, might match that description)? Or is it just a throw-away line. It probably is, but given how ravenous I am for little bits of lore, I'm still desperately curious.

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So, I've been wondering about Morphic Skin. Specifically, I wanted to ask what is meant by the word "apparent" in the description of the Advanced Morphic Skin:
Found in Armory, pg. 93

"Advanced Morphic Skin offers the same options as the basic model, as well as the ability to change your apparent sex and age, alter your height by up to 1 foot, and gain features of another species of the same creature type (although you don't gain or lose abilities as a result."

Soooooo, here's the thing.

It says "apparent" sex. Does this mean that you alter your sex via an illusion? As in, you gain the primary and secondary sexual characteristics of another sex but close examination reveals otherwise? This seems to be unlikely given that the item's base description (pg. 92) refers to transmutation magic and mutagenic enzymes, implying the change is more substantive than just an illusion. However, what does "apparent" mean in this context? Do you have functional new genitalia, as if you'd consumed a serum of sex change? If the sex you elect to become is capable of bearing young, can you become pregnant? How potent is this mimicry?

I ask because a longstanding player for my campaign has an idea for a character that performs music onstage as a man, but adventures and goes through daily life as a woman. They have so far managed to maintain this by buying serums of sex change in bulk, but I was wondering if this magitech implant could allow them to effectively buy a "permanent" serum (i.e. one that can continue to be customized rather than single-use). And if yes, are the effects superficial or are they faithful recreations like the serum would produce.

Normally, "apparent" implies this is a falsified mimicry. However, given that the primary magic at work here is explicitly transmutation, which produces actual, substantive physiological changes, this seems like maybe the wrong read? What do you all think? Personally I've let the player interpret it however they wanted to be favorable (given that the hopping back and forth between sexes was more a flavor thing and mechanically there is nothing to worry about here), but now I'm more curious from a design standpoint? What do you think was the intent? And how would you interpret this yourselves?

Grand Lodge

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Is...is she basically just Bill Nye with an extra set of arms? Cause I dig it

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Besides...like, harsh, man. I know that House Thrune is pretty evil, and their regime encourages being like them to survive, but I'm pretty sure most Chelish are...just people? People who might even prefer not being ruled over by literal actual devil-summoners? But...they have Hell on their side. And even a full blown rebellion with angelic support failed. Not because the people are a lost cause. Because House Thrune kinda...cheats.

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I am so happy about that. As cool as the Inner Sea Region was, it still felt too...familiar? Like, too European? The potential for interesting countries based on the legends and myths of other cultures have me chomping at the bit for Casmaron and Southern Garund content.

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See, it actually kind of makes sense to me, though there are a few ways to visualize it. I can think of 3.

1. In this case, Pathfinder's "ethnicities" is more a statement of shared cultural origin than the real world's definition. In this case, classifying Chelish as Taldane is the equivalent of saying, for simplicties sake, classifying French as European. If I were making a simplified campaign setting that was...well, Earth, to a group of aliens, I'd introduce French people (or German people, or Greek people, or Spanish people) as "Europeans" (maybe "Western Europeans") and then detail specific cultural differences (and origins of root differences in ethnic group via historical context) in each country's description. Which...the Lost Omens guide does do.

2. It was always a tad strange, to be frank, that the Chelish were considered a separate ethnicity than the Taldane, when none of the other ethnic groups of the world presented in Pathfinder were ever subdivided in a similar fashion. Maybe Ulfen, but even still...

The Garundi have enormous variation across the board. Keleshites are outright stated to be an overarching category based on ignorance that encompasses a ton of different groups. The Tien are a mass of different peoples. And the Mwangi. And the Kellids. Except Varisians and Ulfen, no other ethnicity is so singular, and considering Varisians actually *do* have drastic differences based on where they live (possibly creating unique ethnic groups, like Ustalavic, Varisian, arguably even the Szcarni given that their culture is so unique). Honestly, having all the other ethnicities be so weirdly lumped together...but have the Taldanes have prominent sub-categories listed as full categories always seemed off-putting. Like, the Taldanes are the closest thing to "white" in Pathfinder's lore, and so seeing the different kinds of "white" get their own massive 8-page descriptions and having the other (admittedly, in my own opinion, more interesting and unique) ethnicites forced to share page-space with others (fundamentally different, mind you) based solely on a weird lumping was a bit...strange, to say the least. This felt kind of bringing it more into line with how other ethnicities were categorized, and I'm okay with that. I mean, personally, I'd have preferred the other direction (every sub-ethnicity becoming a full fledged, fully developed primary ethnicity) but I can understand why that wasn't the easier direction to go.

3. Consider this: do Chelish outside of Cheliax act at all differently when they live elsewhere? I bring this up because one way I look at ethnicity is...flexibility. I know this is strange, but stay with me. Taldanes seemed a good primary category to me because if I met a Taldane in Isger and a Taldane in Taldor, they would act completely different, sure, but they'd be very similar in appearance and from an outsider perspective I'd be hard-pressed to tell them apart. But Chelish are always described as acting...well, Chelish, wherever they go. They were a much more rigid group, more bound by national traditions that they insisted on clinging to when traveling abroad. This made them feel like "visitors" when they showed up in say, Vidrian or Varisia. They didn't feel like an overarching group, but literally just the same country-folk but displaced into other places. I know this one's kind of hard to follow, but the way I see it: broad-strokes, primary categories should be *broad*. When you say something is a "dog" it doesn't serve to narrow it's definition. It's meant to be cast as a wide net. To me, having Chelish as a primary category was like making "poodle" and "dog" the same level of specificity. A poodle is clearly a type of dog. We already have the dog word, and if you want to look for types of dogs, you can.

Lastly...err, I'm kind of confused by the statement that "scratch that statement without the word white and it'd be so much worse." I mean...yes, yes it would. So, uh...isn't the fact that Zenj aren't listed as a full category kinda crummy, then? That they're just Mwangi? They clearly aren't. They're definitely not Bonuwat, and they are sure as hell not Bekyar. Like yes, I agree this level of cramming together is not my favorite. Like I said, given my way, each and every minor ethnicity: from Varki to Tien-Min, from Irrisenni to Isgeri, would get their own full category and their own articles written on them. But the thing is, what I think the designers were going for here was to increase their consistency and change the definition of their in-world nomenclature. Now, when they say "ethnicity" they mean "broad-stroke shared grouping of humans." Now everyone is equally diluted. Since 2E is something of a reboot, that makes sense. Simplifying things makes them easier to understand and digest, and now at least that weird thought of "hey, why are Chelish different than Taldane but Osiriani aren't different from Garundi" won't pop up. It's more consistent. Plus, given how low Chelish global influence has fallen, having them diminish in significance from a full ethnicity to a sub-ethnicity is kind of a context clue within the setting that their star is on the decline while the rest of the world rises, so lore-wise it checks out.

So yeah, basically, um, I don't see a problem with it. That's my long and meandering reason why. And uh...on an unrelated note...I want to know more about the Isgeri tribes. Oh, and Thuvians. Oh, and the different Keleshite traditions. Oh, oh, and more about the Zenj please. And...and everybody else too (I want more Varki content, I've always been enamored with them and always wanted to play a Varki-Snowcaster half-elf). For that matter, more details on non-human ethnicities would also be super.

Grand Lodge

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This is amazing: dotting for later

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Whelp, I'm always down for more Starfinder content, so I may be a tad biased toward the positive...nevertheless...

I did notice that there were more "weird" species. And to be honest, I am actually all for that, especially with the addition of more Drift-native creatures. I like that Starfinder focuses on feeling distinct from its predecessor, and while I would dearly love some official conversions of some classic monsters (Gnolls as playable race are top of my list, for example), the fact that the space was being used for entirely new content is definitely exciting.

The addition of a lot of Azlanti Space species is also very welcome, since I've been running a campaign in the Star Empire and having more species to play around with is very handy. And the other species are very cool (here's looking at you, Raxilites and Spathinae).

Here are a few things I don't like as much:

As much as they promised the reprints would have more detail...it didn't really feel that much like an expansion. The Shimreen especially felt a little bit like a rehash, and I would've preferred a new species entirely. I wish there was art for the brand new dragons: since they are brand new, having a visual would be supremely helpful. I also wish there was more detail than the two page spread could provide, but that's not really fair.

Oh, one last thing: I think the fact that these archives are a community effort is really cool. Like, the fact that these entries were written by people of varying experiences and positions is really interesting and truly makes them all feel distinct. Also, shout out to Crystal Frasier's continued additions: Stridermanders and Hanakan are two of my favorite entries in this book, so kudos there!

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Southern Garund has always interested me. Especially now that catfolk are being mentioned more frequently. Also, the one Southern Garundi city from Distant Shores were really cool, and I'd love to see more information about it. Plus, I bet the southern cape is very interesting, and I'd love to see what the south pole on Golarion is like.

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Hold on, I’m confused. Doesn’t the CRB literally point out that item levels are a guideline rather than a hard restriction? As in, a low-level character could own level 20 items, it’ d just be a bad idea to allow that as a GM

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I mean, I can certainly understand how it can be comedic. Gods know my players have laughed at many of the player races, and the desire to make atrocious puns is quite strong...

(One day I will make my Morlawmaw gang boss who runs a street gang called the Eggmen and I will die on that hill)

Nevertheless, there's nothing I feel inherent to the system or the APs I've read so far that's comedically focused. Heck, many of the campaigns I've homebrewed and ran were very serious and they used existing lore. I mean, the fact that an internet equivalent exists means that characters can meme in-character, but the party was always going to do that...now they can just do it without it completely breaking the story down.

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They’re tiny plants, but they have a species-specific augmentation that heavily reminds me of Irken PAKs from Invader Zim. This aug are a set of dexterous biotechnical tentacles that can hold and use medium sized items

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I mean, Sorcerers do receive their 1st level focus spells for their bloodline, which feels comparable to, say, a bard getting one feat from their muse.

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Fare thee well, Mr. Stephens. Your contributions will always be appreciated. Starfinder has been one of my favorite Paizo product lines and your participation in that will be sorely missed. Thank you for all of your hard work and for helping provide people with great games.

Grand Lodge

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I dunno why this got skipped out, but a Vigilante archetype that uses the kineticist burn mechanics. Having an elemental superhero is kind of a staple, and it would be nice to have.

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I personally agree with Firebug's assessment of the OP's description. The shaman *can* do anything, but not all at once. Yes, it is versatile in how you build it, but that versatility isn't as at-the-same-time accessible like some wizard and druid builds are.

Don't get me wrong, I think shaman is a good class. I think it might be a low-key improvement on its parent classes (well, kinda, I like the witch's flavor too much to say that, and I have a personal dislike of the oracle that biases my opinion somewhat), and I think that it can have a few really neat tricks and abilities if carefully selected...buuuuut I still think a wizard or druid might be more versatile in the day-to-day.

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Lurkers in Light. The idea that the thing that's supposed to make you feel safe makes them more dangerous.

Oh, and Shining Children, because they make no sense and look really creepy af

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Androids seem pretty popular in mine, thoigh so far we’ve had no particular patterns at my table. Thoughe everyone certainly likes the idea on an Uplifted Bear or Morlamaw.

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To be honest, the entire cast of Guardians of the Galaxy could be played, or at least approximated, using existing stats, such as...

Rocket: A Ysoki bounty hunter soldier focusing on the bombard style and using heavy weapons
Gamorra: Android cyberborn operative (or soldier)
Peter Quill: Human (maybe Planar Scion) Outlaw Envoy
Drax: Half-Orc (close enough in terms of stats at least) Gladiator Soldier
Mantis: Damaya Lashunta Spacefarer Mystic

Then, you could move on to other various space-operas like Saga, Star Wars, Cowboy Bebop, Voltron, etc. Let's take Volton just for fun:

Keith: Simulate his lineage by making him a Half-Elf Mercenary Operative
Lance: Human Icon(?) Soldier (focus on sniper weapons)
Hunk: Human Roboticist Soldier (focus on heavy weapons)
Pidge: Human Scholar Mechanic (with maybe a hover drone to simulate that little robot she had in season one)
Allura: Endiffian Xenoseeker Technomancer (or maybe Witchwarper?)
Shiro: This one was tough. He's definitely human, but then he's either a Gladiator or a Cyberborn, and while his original robot arm had a lot of Solarian-like capabilities, I think I have to go with soldier instead.

We could do the villains too:
Zarkon: Hobgoblin (in stats) Death-Touched Soldier (Armor Storm specialization)
Haggar: Endiffian Death-Touched Witchwarper
Lotor: Half-Drow (in stats) Scholar Envoy (Star Knight)

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Indeed. It’s likely that the engineers if Alenstar developed firearms out of necessity. But thise beyond their borders are likely to giew them as foreign curiosities at best, given that they produce relatively few advanatges over, say, an enchanted crossbow. And since manufacturing guns requires the production of relatively difficult to make resources, it’s not like their ease of use or production can outcompete, say, alchemy or magic...yet. Clearly by Starfinder’s time this is drastically different, but those were very different guns.

Rudimentary firearms existed since the 15th century. If I recall correctly, full plate was designed to protect against them. Back then they were wimpy enough that this was actually a solid counter in the tech arms race for a while.

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Yeah I have an idea for a gladiator brakim that seeks to Continue the war his people abandoned long ago (or, really, any war: he’s an Alucard from the Hellsing anime levels of bloodthirsty) that I’d originally stated as a soldier that’d be perfect for a Vanguard. As to Biohackers, I know it doesn’t quite work stat-wise, but a drow biohacker sounds pretty menacing.

Also grays. Never forget grays

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Okay, I actually super like the proposal for Quantumancer, because that actually sounds really neat. I do want to push back against Biohacker though. Personally, I quite like the name, and the proposed alternatives sound more appropriate for themes.

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Oh this is so nice! Just a quick peak at these and I'm very excited to give these a whirl. They all look fun, interesting, and fill a niche that makes them distinct from what's already available. I'm really excited to see how they play.

...And am unashamedly salivating over the other options teased in that book. I hope it's a long one!

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WhileI am breathless with excitement about the new Starfinder classes, I would also be highly interested in an episode that details the ysoki, particularly those native to Akiton, as relatively little is known of their culture. In particular I want to know more about the Nurkop clan that was teased in Pact Worlds. The idea of an ultra rich clan of Ysoki sounds really interesting, and bega the question of what pies have they stuck their fingers in with that many resources to invest.

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I had my ysoki technomancer become a talk show host. Because he deicded that being an academic wasn’t fulfilling anymore

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Xenocrat wrote:
Getting armor is part of the graft. Adjusting stats is not. Only damage from weapons selection is adjusted. The Aeon Guard was designed by someone like you who didn’t understand the rules.

Alright, no need for anything personal. CeeJay does have a point in that the RAW of class grafts say you do adjust things with armor and weapons as well. However, I would still argue that this adjustment is large wnough to warrant a CR change. Flavor is all well and good but CR is a number game, and at some point your super fancy ubermench is going to have to be accounted for. CR is designed so GMs can eyeball a creature and make an assessment, and any possible tables or random encounter generators will have their results thrown off by a threat this dispreportionate listed under a CR 3 category. Just because it is physically possoble (even though I think at this point I’m concerned about the contradiction oresent in those two passages), doesn’t mean it should be done. I still think as a design choice the ripple effect is pretty harsh. Keep in mind that during the ol PF days, NPCs with better-than-usual gear did get Cr adjustments to compensate.

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I'd argue this would be more appropriate in the general discussion section as opposed to rules...but...

it *appears* to be the case. They look like one of those species, based on their description, which is hormonally driven to sexual reproduction only once in their lives. It's not an uncommon characterization of non-human sapients (The Listeners from Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archives also had a conditional sex drive, for e.g.), so I don't think it's out of the ordinary, per se.

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Personally I'm also fine with their skin tone variations. Even in Pathfinder skin-tone variation among orcs was mentioned, so it makes perfect sense for drow to have genetically selected ones that look "better" (i.e., if they are anything like humans, "more like us"). Also, this makes them more visually distinct from hobgolbins which was always a concern for me at any rate. Sooooooooo, yeah, I'm fine with their appearance. And the hobgoblin one too for that matter.

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Dracomicron wrote:

It's almost as if people with autism are individuals and not a monolithic block who all want the same things.

I think that the Vlaka are an interesting way to explore the issue of differences without the kind of stakes that are involved in the real world with real people of differing abilities.

Very true. It is indeed an issue of each individual decision. I have more to say but that's off-topic for this thread and would gladly engage in discourse via PM.

However, this is actually one of the reasons I would like more books like Pact Worlds in the future (i.e. more culture books). As fun as game mechanics are, SF as a setting is actually well poised to let GMs pick at really interesting cultural issues. I'd love to see the viewpoints of literal alien creatures more, as it can be quite insightful (Vlaka's perception thing, Maraquoi's views on relationships as a result of biology, etc. All very cool).

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CeeJay wrote:

From p. 127 of the Alien Archive.

Alien Archive wrote:

EVERYTHING IS OPTIONAL

When creating an NPC, you are free to enact whatever changes you need to in order to make your creation work the way you intend. For example, an array might tell you to select two special abilities, but you know you need four—or only one. Go ahead and make the change! If you want your combatant NPC to have a really high AC but not many Hit Points, you can increase its AC by 1 and use the expert array’s HP. This doesn’t make the statistics wrong; rather, it helps the statistics match your concept. Creating NPCs is fundamentally a creative process, so while these steps are useful to keep the NPC’s capabilities from going too far astray for its CR, don’t treat them as hard restrictions.
I think it's pretty unlikely that anything in the book "cannot be created using the rules in Appendix 1" given what that Appendix tells us about those rules.

I would like to point out that said section also cautions GMs against making substantial changes that throw off the CR balance. I.e. they tell you that you can make whatever changes you like, they also tell you to consider the gameplay implications (for e.g. adding double the special abilities to a creature of that Cr without compensating in other areas is *allowed*, but it will effectively make that monster a higher CR in terms of combat difficulty.

Given that the monsters published in the front of the book are created by the designers, who are aware of the potential threats to balance of raising the AC of a creature to 6 points above the recommended range for that CR, this still seems like an oversight. All rules can be broken, certainly, and all choices are optional. But their voluntary nature does not exclude them from consequences. The long and the short of it is that a party of 4 3rd level adventurers would have considerable difficulty fighting a creature that, according to gameplay, is only considered a modest threat. Therefore, while they were allowed to make this creature CR 3, it doesn’t seem altogether appropriate as a CR 3 encounter, given its stat distribution. At my calculation, a character would need to be fully optimized just to have a good chance to hit. A 3rd level soldier with a 20 in Dex and using a laser weapon, having laser accuracy and Weapon Focus, still only has a slightly above 50% chance of hitting. And that’s assuming they place considerable respurces towards optimizaion. A non-soldier character would have quite a lot of trouble.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Nah, it metioned that their blindness and deafness isncongenital, much like that in IrL dogs. And much like IRL dogs (and humans, for that matter, as the medical principle is the same), they still maintain the genetic ability to see, and even the functional hardware, so to speak. But a defect in the occipital or parietal lobes makes it impossible to perceive sound or hearing. However, corrective surgery for a society as technologically adept as SF’s, such as neurological fix is probably relatively simple. As to the justification as to why you should or shouldn’t fix a congenital defect...I mean technically it is a choice, sure. It *is* a weak cultural justification IMO. This gets used for the argument of whether we should “fix” autism if found. Speaking as someone who has autism, yeah I’d have preferred functional social skills thank you very much, and a lower predisposition towards GI problems. That would’ve been nice. And the whole “it’s just a different experience” is an argument. I don’t buy it though. Different, sure. It also causes me grief. That’s just me though. Still, it’s a bit of stale reasoning.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I mean, real physics indicate that without an opposing force to push back against an object...if an object continues to exert force to move forward in space (i.e. an empty void), it'll keep accelerating until it runs out of energy...at which point it'll maintain that speed until it hits something.

The implication of the star shaman ability, however, is that they accelerate *up to* X number of feet, and that's it. You don't get faster or slower until pushed, or until you presumably use the same magic to exert a force in the opposite direction to "stop."

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

People of the Stars is also a reference with some brief material, though some of it might be redundant and/or out of date at this point.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

My only concern is that NPCs aren’t supposed to be built using specific information such as their specific armor type as a PC would be. And while yes, the book does specify that NPC creation is optional, it does also specify that this optionality shouldn’t violate balance. At the moment, the AC of the Aeon Guard is equivalent to a CR 7 creature, and that wide of a difference feels more like an error than a voluntary deviation or flavor perk.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I mean, I’m not sure how offensive a teddy bear would be given that, as you said, stuffed animal humans exist in the form of things like rag dolls or cabbage patch kids and stuff like that. In my games at least, stuffed versions of types of aliens aren’t inherently offensive unless they appear to be deliberate caricatures rather than cartoonish versions of a living model (so, you know, a toy).

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

In my game, in Douglas Adams esque fashion, and researcher attempting this method repeatedly receives a constellation spelling out: “nice try, smarta**” signed by Desna

More seriously: results will likely vary or make no sense, or would “fuzz” on recording equipment or in memory

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Yeah I disagree with making liquid nitrogen equivalent in damage to lava. Maybe half as bad at worst. Supernaturally chilled nitrogen might be equivalent, buuuuuuuut, the bog stabdard liquid nitrogen shouldn’t be that degree of harmful. Keep in mind coming within 3 feet of lava is enough to cause things to bust into flame. You need to immerse a surface to cause harm, so making these two substance equivalent seems inappropriate given their vast differences in scale, as Metaphysician said

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