Adventurers of All Sizes!

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

We here at Paizo like to keep you up to date on our upcoming releases. Our most recent big release is Lost Omens Ancestry Guide, a book focused on expanding existing ancestries as well as providing you with brand new ancestries and versatile heritages to inspire all manner of adventurer. Let’s take a look at what’s inside.

Page 1 of the Ancestry Guide table of contents. Page 2 of the Ancestry Guide table of contents.

Expanded Ancestries and Heritages

The first half of the book provides an in-depth look at ancestries and versatile heritages that premiered in previous book. Each entry presents information on how each ancestry or heritage fits in the Lost Omens setting as well as provide new ancestry feats, heritages, and lineages. The section includes the following entries.

Aasimar (Calder CaDavid): Aasimars result from celestial influence, but only rarely are they literally descended from celestials, more often coming from special blessings or the residual energies in holy places. This book presents three new lineages, emberkin, idyllkin, and plumekith, for aasimars descended from peris, agathions, and garudas respectively.

Azarketi (Jessica Catalan): Often known as “gillmen” or “Low Azlanti,” azarketis are the descendants of the Azlanti Empire. They survived Earthfall by being mutated by their foes, the alghollthus, to become an aquatic people tied forever to seas and waterways—but their history draws them back to the land. This book presents new azarketi options, exploring their magical connection to water and adds the inured, murkeyed, spined, and tactile azarketi heritages.

Check out the Azarketi ancestry today with this pdf download!

Catfolk (David N. Ross): Native to the nation of Murraseth in southern Garund, catfolk are feline humanoids who believe they were created to hunt down threats to Golarion as a whole. This book presents new options to double down on catfolk’s agility and luck and adds the flexible, liminal, and sharp-eared catfolk heritages.

Changeling (Isabelle Thorne): The offspring of wicked hags, changelings are often left in the cradles of their mortal parent’s people and raised without understanding what makes them different. They often feel disconnected from their communities early in life, the subtle call of their hag mother coaxing them to abandon those they love. This book presents the moon may, snow may, veil may, and virga may lineages for changelings descended from moon hags, winter hags, blood hags, and storm hags respectively.

Dhampir (Lyz Liddell): Dhampirs are mortals descended from a living and a vampiric parent. Marked forever by their hungers, some may learn to draw strength from the blood of others, while others drink subtler substances, such as pain. This book presents three new lineages, adhyabhau, cel rau, and ru-shi, for dhampirs descended from psychic, strigoi, and jiang-shi vampires.

Duskwalker (Mikhail Rekun): Reincarnated souls, duskwalkers gained leave to have one more chance at life. All duskwalkers have strong connections to their previous identities, but each must decide for themselves whether to learn more about their past or forge a new path. This book contains options for duskwalkers based on how their previous life ended.

Hobgoblin (Owen K.C. Stephens): Many hobgoblins have been drawn toward the nation of Oprak, which seeks to forge pacts and earn respect through methods other than war and conquest. While clearly related to their goblin cousins, hobgoblins are less frenetic and more careful planners. This book contains options for hobgoblins to assist their fellow warriors or to tap into the legendary Cantorian Spring—the source of the hobgoblin ancestry—to gain healing effects. It also introduces the shortshanks and steelskin hobgoblin heritages.

A cactus leshy. This living cactus is squat and spherical with a small flower on the top of its head.

Art by Alex Stone

Kobold (Owen K.C. Stephens): These expert trap makers often live in secluded places that most other ancestries eschew. Kobolds operate in a world of larger, stronger creatures who often dismiss them—until these cunning survivors reveal what they can unleash on their foes. This book contains options for kobolds to improve their use of traps and kobold weapons, and even to grow draconic wings. It also includes the caveclimber and tunnelflood kobold heritages.

Leshy (Linda Zayas-Palmer): Leshys are immortal spirits temporarily given mortal forms in bodies made of plants and fungi. Created by powerful primal rituals, leshys come into the world fully formed and self-sufficient, independent of any settlement or even the ritualist that gave them form. This book grows the leshy options by adding the cactus, fruit, lotus, root, and seaweed leshy heritages.

Lizardfolk (Patchen Mortimer): The powerful reptilian lizardfolk call themselves iruxi and have a history that stretches back thousands of years. Patient and confident, lizardfolk explorers travel from their ancient nations to explore the world of younger ancestries and kingdoms. This book contains options for lizardfolk to gain insights from astrology or power from the bones of their ancestors and adds the cloudleaper and woodstalker lizardfolk heritages.

Orc (Calder CaDavid): Orcs were driven from their homelands by the dwarven Quest for Sky and thrust into a foreign world where they had to carve a place for themselves. A troubled history of warfare and grudges has left most orcs at odds with other surface ancestries. This book contains options for orcs to gain power from special painted warmasks. It also introduces the battle-ready, grave, and winter orc heritages.

Ratfolk (Patchen Mortimer): Small rodentlike humanoids, ratfolk are clever, adaptive, and communalist. Known amongst themselves as ysoki, ratfolk are natural explorers, travelers, and, most of all, merchants. This book contains options for ratfolk to squish, sneak, roll, and otherwise move about. It also adds the snow and tunnel rat heritages.

Tengu (Eleanor Ferron): The beaked and feathered tengu originate from Tian Xia. Nearly always in the minority, tengu have learned to use their knack for languages and blades to find space for themselves. This book contains options for tengu to store magic in specially made fans and adds the dogtooth and wavediver tengu heritages.

Tiefling (Mikhail Rekun): Tieflings are planar scions born with a fiendish stain in their blood. Though tieflings are not inherently evil, they are often mistrusted and many do find that fiendish powers and associated temptations come easily. This book presents the beastbrood, riftmarked, and shackleborn lineages for tieflings descended from rakshasas, qlippoths, and velstracs respectively.

An Enshrak orc. This orc has dark gray skin and is wielding a large battle axe. He is clad in leathers and has skull face paint..

Art by Gabriel Scavariello

New Ancestries and Heritages

The latter half of the book introduces new ancestries and heritages to Pathfinder Second Edition. Some of these entries include old favorites making their second edition premiere and even includes some brand new entries, each with their own rules options. The section includes the following entries.

Android (Jessica Catalan): Brought to Golarion by a starship crash in the land of Numeria, androids are half organic, half-machine lifeforms produced by alien technology. Though often looked upon with fear by superstitious communities surrounding the crash site, changing politics and the rise of the android goddess Casandalee have led to androids expanding their influence in nearby regions. The section includes feats that allow androids to tap into the power of their nanites and the artisan, impersonator, laborer, polyglot, and warrior android heritages.

Aphorite (Andrew Mullen): Aphorites are beings with a mortal base infused with the pure essence of law by the enigmatic axiomites of Axis. Originally designed to form a diplomatic bridge between the perfect logic of the axiomites and the constant contradictions of free-willed creatures, aphorites’ ability to choose has seen them grow beyond their original intent and into their own people. This versatile heritage allows a character use the crystalline motes that cover their body to conceal themselves or their allies.

Beastkin (Luis Loza): While most werecreatures are cursed with bloodlust at the sight of the full moon, some of their kin are born without this dire affliction. These beastkin are a source of respect and envy among their fellows, as they also lack werecreatures’ burning vulnerability to silver. This versatile heritage allows for characters with a connection of animals of any type that can tap into their animalistic instincts and senses.

Fetchling (Andrew Mullen): Fetchlings are scions of Ancient Azlant who escaped the cataclysm of Earthfall by fleeing to the Shadow Plane. As generations passed, more and more supernatural gloom seeped into these refugees until they evolved into something beyond their human origins. Fetchlings can gain control over their shadows and are shaped by the bright, deep, liminal, resolute, and wisp fetchling heritages.

Fleshwarp (Ron Lundeen): Fleshwarps are beings transformed either by magic or by technology beyond Golarion’s ken. Most commonly, they result from drow or other sinister forces transforming their victims out of sadism, yet fleshwarps can also be created from scratch through magical or alchemical manipulation of raw tissue. Fleshwarps are capable of transforming their bodies further to gain darkvision or grow new weapons. Depending on the nature of their transformation, a fleshwarp will have the created, mutated, shapewrought, or technological fleshwarp heritage.

An eaglekin. This humanoid has the head and wings of an eagle. They are clad in mage’s robes and are producing a magical flame in their hands.

Art by Rashad Pozdnyakov

Ganzi (Isabelle Thorne): Born wherever and whenever they’re least expected, these scions of chaos rarely conform to any overarching culture among themselves. Ganzi reside in the greatest numbers in the nation of Holomog, with their influence spilling out into Nex, Geb, and the Mwangi Expanse. The ganzi versatile heritage allows characters to tap into the power of chaos and produce random magic or new body parts.

Geniekin (Jessica Redekop): Kin to the elements and infused with the power of the planes within the Inner Sphere, geniekin live scattered all over the world, especially wherever extreme environments provide a conduit to primal energy. Most commonly found in Katapesh and Qadira, many geniekin gather in small communities both within and outside of major cities. Geniekin include five new versatile heritages: ifrits, keepers of elemental fire; oreads, wardens of elemental earth; sylphs, followers of the freedom of elemental air; undines, individuals adaptable like elemental water; and sulis, embodiments of the complex relationships between multiple elements.

Kitsune (James Case): Kitsune change shapes as easily as clothing, often living undetected among other peoples. Though these mischievous tricksters almost never gather in numbers large enough for political clout, their natural charisma and cunning mean they can have a significant impact on worldly events. Kitune are wielders of powerful magic and have the celestial envoy, dark fields, earthly wilds, empty sky, and frozen wind kitsune heritages.

Sprite (Mark Seifter): As denizens of the First World, sprites sometimes tire of their realm where choices hold no permanence and consequences don’t matter. These Tiny fey venture into the Material Plane in hopes of making their own mark. Sprites can empower their wings to grant them flight and sprite heritages vary to include draxies, grigs, luminous sprites, melixies, nykterasm, and pixies.

Strix (Samantha Phelan): These avian humanoids maintain small populations within Cheliax and the surrounding environs. Long persecuted by the humanocentric rule of House Thrune, strix have been enemies of the Chelaxian state for almost a century. This section provides feats that allow strix to take to the skies and attack with their wings, as well as the nightglider, predator, scavenger, shoreline, and songbird strix heritages.

Ancestral Gear (Luis Loza): The book’s final section provides new weapons and magic items with ties to the ancestries of Golarion.

A kayal fetchling. This woman has pale, gray skin and bright, white hair. She is wearing a leather thief’s outfit and is cleaning a bloodied dagger in her hands

Art by Tuan Duaong Chu

If any of the ancestries or heritages interest you, make sure to check out Lost Omens Ancestry Guide available now! We’re to see heroes of all types, big or Tiny, set out on new adventures!

Luis Loza
Developer

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Lost Omens Pathfinder Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Pathfinder Second Edition
Liberty's Edge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

This is an absolutely phenomenal book.

Also, Drag Down and Riptide are kinda scary.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Ahhhhh always great to see all the authors who worked so hard on these books!
The Androids and Azarketi were both standouts for me, will have to keep my eyes peeled for more of Jessica Catalan's work!

RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16

I'm loving this book.


8 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

This book is amazing.

Also - the pangolin pear leshy may be the best thing ever created. It's now my desktop wallpaper.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Love the art! The orc warrior has a great design. Interested in the dark fields kitsune heritage, among others!

Liberty's Edge

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Okay, seriously y'all? I *love* this book. Every single ancestry and heritage in this book has at least two or three things that jump out at me and make me want to play a character right away.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber

This makes so much more things seem so much more awesome! I am so happy I picked this book up!

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Digging it. Lots of cool stuff. A little sad to see the Skinwalker name change, but I like the rest of it.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

"How was I supposed to know they could turn into a wolf? Their resume said they were a lichenthrope!"


16 people marked this as a favorite.
Perpdepog wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

"How was I supposed to know they could turn into a wolf? Their resume said they were a lichenthrope!"

Nah, a beastkin leshy is a lichenthrope.

Dark Archive

Great job everyone! :3


1 person marked this as a favorite.
KingTreyIII wrote:
Perpdepog wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

"How was I supposed to know they could turn into a wolf? Their resume said they were a lichenthrope!"
Nah, a beastkin leshy is a lichenthrope.

You have no idea the depths of my sorrow earlier when I found out beastkin had to be humanoids.

Also, unrelated but ... am I crazy, or do Stryx not have a feat for perma-flight at 17th level?


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Perpdepog wrote:
KingTreyIII wrote:
Perpdepog wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

"How was I supposed to know they could turn into a wolf? Their resume said they were a lichenthrope!"
Nah, a beastkin leshy is a lichenthrope.

You have no idea the depths of my sorrow earlier when I found out beastkin had to be humanoids.

Also, unrelated but ... am I crazy, or do Stryx not have a feat for perma-flight at 17th level?

They don't... because their permanent flight feat is at level 13 instead! It's "Fully Flighted".


I've been interested in sprite characters for years. I'll need to check this out.


Ezekieru wrote:
Perpdepog wrote:
KingTreyIII wrote:
Perpdepog wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

"How was I supposed to know they could turn into a wolf? Their resume said they were a lichenthrope!"
Nah, a beastkin leshy is a lichenthrope.

You have no idea the depths of my sorrow earlier when I found out beastkin had to be humanoids.

Also, unrelated but ... am I crazy, or do Stryx not have a feat for perma-flight at 17th level?

They don't... because their permanent flight feat is at level 13 instead! It's "Fully Flighted".

Op, so it is. I did a derp and somehow got Juvenile Flight and Fledgling Flight mixed up in my head, and thought that Fully Flighted let you use Fledgling Flight all the time ... or something. Glad I was just being dumb and it wasn't some misprint.


6 people marked this as a favorite.

This book is uncomonly good, except for the spelling.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Can someone please tell Jessica Catalan they absolutely crushed it!


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Malk_Content wrote:
This book is uncomonly good, except for the spelling.

You beat me to it. Haha


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

I am in love with this book so far but I do have two sticking points.

The kobolds all look like they are half gorilla, being very top heavy with huge heads and arms and teeny little legs.

And the ganzi in an effort to have viable feats for almost any chaotic being came out very.... generic and bland.

Funnily enough though the ganzi art and kobold mechanics are some of my favorate so, take some loose some I guess!


"Looks like I'll need to add Golarion to my list of locations for locksmithing...."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

OMG cactus leshy? I just died that image literally impaled me with cuteness.


8 people marked this as a favorite.
silversarcasm wrote:

Ahhhhh always great to see all the authors who worked so hard on these books!

The Androids and Azarketi were both standouts for me, will have to keep my eyes peeled for more of Jessica Catalan's work!
keftiu wrote:
Can someone please tell Jessica Catalan they absolutely crushed it!

Aww, thanks! You just made my day.

A lot of wonderful people put their all into this book, and I'm proud to have been a part of it. Enjoy, everyone!


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

This book is amazing! I wish I wasn't a GM so that I could create ALL THE HEROES! Kudos to all the writing and all the art!

Second Seekers (Jadnura)

Such awesomeness!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

A lot of the art in this book is just amazing. My absolute favourite is the ganzi woman on page 94. Something about the mix of the hair and those feathers just really speaks to me. The riftmarked and beastbrood tieflings are also close in the running.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

As much as I like so much in this, two negatives stick out for me.
Kobold art is really strange, the reds make sense as it says they are a beefy clan, but all these heads are bulbous and far too virtical, it's very off putting. Maybe try putting more of an emphasis on adding bits of true dragons facial/head features based on their exemplar to help with the art direction.
More importantly, lizardfolk options. First off many reptiles have prominent jakobs organs meaning they have superior scent and heat tracking capabilities but still no representation of that in game. Second, lizardfolk have a long history of natural defense to go with their natural weapons, you even mention this in the sand brethren section and still no options for representing this.
These are things I think are part of the core of what lizardfolk are, so it's very strange they are still missing. I like the cultural feats, it's nice to have some non-physiological choices. I just hope we eventually get these two things as options before too long.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
kaid wrote:
OMG cactus leshy? I just died that image literally impaled me with cuteness.

Cactus leshy animal instinct barbarian.

"Hello, my name is Theodore. My friends call me Teddy, though, Teddy the Bear Cactus."


1 person marked this as a favorite.

This good has some AMAZING lore and mechanics choices. Theres not a single acestry I don't want to play!


Hello there. I have a slight problem with the PDF with the Azarketi ancestry. Being blind the action symbols for The feats PERFECT DIVE and DRAG DOWN are not showing up for me. Can anyone tell me what they are?


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Valantrix1 wrote:
Hello there. I have a slight problem with the PDF with the Azarketi ancestry. Being blind the action symbols for The feats PERFECT DIVE and DRAG DOWN are not showing up for me. Can anyone tell me what they are?

Perfect Dive is one action and Drag Down is a two action activity.

If I recall correctly, the Azarketi were from the Absalom book that got delayed. It was supposed to come out before the Ancestry Guide, which is why the Ancestry Guide has additional Heritages, Feats, etc. for them but not the actual Ancestry information; so the PDF is just a patch until the Absalom book comes out. Hopefully it will be correctly formatted in the Absalom book whenever it arrives.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The PDF has also been put up on Archives of Nethys, so you should be able to read it there, too. AoN has always played nicely with my screen reader so hopefully that helps, too.

Grand Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I still hope someone from Paizo sees this post, like Aaron, and pushes the issue to the right people so it can be fixed! :O


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Thanks all for the info. I never even thought of looking on Archives of Nethys. Paizo is good about fixing these sort of things, so I'm not worried for the actual book.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

Beastkin just reinforces my desire to see the Werecreature moniker changed to Werebeast.

Overall, I am really enjoying this book. PF2 has done an amazing job piquing my interest in playing other Ancestries. Usually a very strict Half-Elf kind of guy. But I want to make characters using all the options we've received thus far.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ly'ualdre wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:

I prefer the beastkin name myself, even before considering the other reasons to change the name.

Makes sense, and is similar enough in word structure to "werewolf" that the etymology seems natural. And not one of the Greek alternative words for shapechanging creature that would be a headache to spell.

Beastkin just reinforces my desire to see the Werecreature moniker changed to Werebeast.

I know, right? Finally an option to play an therianthrope without all the 'must eat babies baggage. Hyperbole, I know, I know. But still, chance to be a Beastkin Druid who gets to ask uncomfortable questions about the morality of animal husbandry...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

On the subject of Druids: possible forthcoming Druid Order of Stone possibly confirmed by Oread entry? :o
Much excite.

I've started looking for hints of future content in this book.


Good to have some free Azarketi ancestry stuff out there for PF2e. ;)

Liberty's Edge

Each time I see a pic of an Azarketi, it reminds me of Namor from Atlantis.

And I too dislike the very big heads of the kobolds.

But really this book is full of awesome content and it really shows that introducing the versatile heritages with their lineages was a stroke of genius.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Anyone else think it's odd that Azarketi are called Azarketi rather than Gillmen?

I don't mean it's odd that they have a name for themselves, PF2E has really been stressing that feature of non-human ancestries and it's really cool, but that they're referred to by their own name in their write-ups. Iruxi aren't called iruxi, but lizardfolk, for example, and the same is true for amurrun/catfolk and ysoki/ratfolk.

I'm curious about the rationale there, mostly.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Perpdepog wrote:

Anyone else think it's odd that Azarketi are called Azarketi rather than Gillmen?

I don't mean it's odd that they have a name for themselves, PF2E has really been stressing that feature of non-human ancestries and it's really cool, but that they're referred to by their own name in their write-ups. Iruxi aren't called iruxi, but lizardfolk, for example, and the same is true for amurrun/catfolk and ysoki/ratfolk.

I'm curious about the rationale there, mostly.

I just wish they'd initially gone all-in and not called them lizardfolk or ratfolk in their entries.


I really like this book.

PF2 now has an awesome range of different creatures. Most of them have genuinely unique and interesting abilites.

Scarab Sages

Perpdepog wrote:

Anyone else think it's odd that Azarketi are called Azarketi rather than Gillmen?

I don't mean it's odd that they have a name for themselves, PF2E has really been stressing that feature of non-human ancestries and it's really cool, but that they're referred to by their own name in their write-ups. Iruxi aren't called iruxi, but lizardfolk, for example, and the same is true for amurrun/catfolk and ysoki/ratfolk.

I'm curious about the rationale there, mostly.

I'm guessing 'gillmen' was dropped because it isn't gender-inclusive, and that nobody at Paizo wanted to call them 'gillfolk.'


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I would guess diagetically the Azarketi are more likely to be referred to as the Azarketi than other people are by their preferred terms, because of human chauvinism and the fact that an Azarketi is more identifiable as a human than an Iruxi, an Amurrun, or a Ysoki is.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder Second Edition / General Discussion / Paizo Blog: Adventurers of All Sizes! All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.