Rogue Class Preview

Monday, March 26, 2018

Are you plagued by a friend and coworker who peppers his blogs with puns and ridiculous word plays, often dessert-based? Does it bother you so much that you fantasize about stabbing him in the back, but federal and local statutes (along with those pesky pangs of morality) stop you? Well, I have good news! You can play a rogue and take out your frustrations on your friend's monsters!

Last week, Jason presented a preview of the Pathfinder Second Edition fighter class, giving you a peek into our process when designing classes for the new game. This week, I am happy to present the fighter's favorite combat companion—the rogue!

Illustration by Wayne Reynolds

The design goals for the rogue were simple: she had to be nimble, skillful, and able to take full advantage when enemies are unaware. The new class design achieves this through a mix of classic and new mechanics.

Rogue Features

I'm sure it will surprise no one that the first class feature the rogue gets is sneak attack. It works much like you would expect, granting extra d6s of precision damage when she strikes a flat-footed foe. Flanking a foe is the easiest way for the rogue to make her foe flat-footed, but at 1st level, she also gets the surprise attack feature. Thanks to surprise attack, during the first round of combat, the rogue treats any creature that has not taken its turn yet as if it were flat-footed.

But wait, there's more! In addition to dealing extra damage when attacking flat-footed foes, at 9th level the rogue also applies debilitating strikes to such attacks, allowing her to entangle or enfeeble her foes on top of the normal punishment. As her level rises, she has the opportunity to expand the conditions applied with debilitating strikes and increase the number of conditions applied, leading up to a potential instant kill with her Master Strike at 19th level.

So, the rogue is a ruthless combatant bringing pain and misery to her foes, but that's only half of the story. She is also a master of skills. Not only does she gain training and proficiency increases in more skills than other classes, but she gains skill feats at an accelerated rate (one per level instead of one every other level). And while Deception, Stealth, and Thievery and all of the skill feats attached to those iconic rogue skills may seem like obvious choices, the rogue's mastery of a wide variety of skills makes her one of the most versatile classes in the game—her breadth of knowledge and abilities means she's extremely useful in every mode of play.

If you want to play a dungeon-delving rogue, stock up on skill feats expanding on Acrobatics, Athletics, Stealth, and Deception to gain skill feats that let you do things like kip up from prone for free, jump from wall to wall, and move stealthily at full speed. If you want to be a savvy con artist bilking the rich and vain, focus on Deception, Diplomacy, Performance, and Society. If you want to play a fence or burglar with a semblance of respectability, focus on Crafting, Intimidation, and the like. Your options are so rich that you can easily create a mix of these types of rogues and many further variations.

Rogue Feats

Bridging the gap between the murderous and the skillful are the various class feats available to the rogue. The few of you lucky enough to playtest the rogue at Gary Con X or the GAMA Trade Show became acquainted with Nimble Dodge, a reaction that increases the rogue's Armor Class by 2 at a whim. And that's pretty cool, but the rogue's tricks don't stop there. At 2nd level, a rogue could take Mobility, allowing her to move at half her speed and ignore all sorts of reactions triggered by movement, such as attacks of opportunity. And at 4th level, there's a rogue feat called Reactive Pursuit, which allows the rogue—as a reaction—to chase after foes trying to disengage from her constant stabbings.

Avoiding attacks and getting into position are all fine and dandy, but occasionally rogues have a hard time lining up flanking. The 4th-level feat Dread Striker allows you to treat frightened creatures as flat-footed, which is pretty good, but if you want even greater flexibility for positioning, check out Gang Up at 6th level. That feat allows you to treat an enemy as flat-footed when it's within the melee reach of you and one of your allies, no matter your positioning. If that's not good enough, wait until 14th level, when you can take Instant Opening—with a few choice words or a rude gesture, you can make a single creature within 30 feet flat-footed to your attacks until the end of your next turn.

Rogues are slippery characters, both physically and mentally. Cognitive Loophole lets the rogue ignore a mental effect for a round before it fully takes hold. At 16th level, a rogue can parlay her proficiency in Deception to become a Blank Slate, which makes her immune to detection, revelation, and scrying effects.

Of course, many of the rogue's class feats also increase her fighting potential. One of my favorites is the 6th-level feat Twist the Knife. With this feat, as long as you have just hit a foe and applied your sneak attack damage, you can apply persistent bleed damage equal to half your current sneak attack dice. That's sure going to leave a mark.

All this has only scratched the surface of the rogue. In the end, this class is a toolbox of tricks, cunning, and mayhem, adaptable to a variety of situations in and out of combat. Its design allows you to focus on the kind of rogue you want to play, from a ruthless slayer who infiltrates dungeons to a swindler charming away coin from gullible townsfolk, or even a hard-boiled hunter of fugitives. It's up to you!

Stephen Radney-MacFarland
Senior Designer

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Merisiel Pathfinder Playtest Rogues Wayne Reynolds
1 to 50 of 596 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

Sounds pretty solid, and some of the effects sound really interesting. That being said, I've gotten no preview on how Dexterity helps the rogue in combat. I think playtests have shown the party rogue applying Dexterity to their attack rolls, but how is that done? Just via Agile Weapons by default (as in 5e), with a Feat? I'd like to hear more about this, given that this is pretty much *the* iconic ability that almost every rogue swears by!


Okay, it doesn't seem problematic, at a first glance...

Edit: Huh, Master Strike is now a 19th level ability? I wonder what will the capstone be this time...


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Okay. Gang Up is the Feat that Rogues needed in 1st Edition, so they can be more effective in combat without having to be behind a foe (or have a Summon behind a foe). It's good to see they are being given that ability.

I wonder if there will be any sort of Feats that will let Rogues get sneak attacks at range....


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I found the rogue!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Seems like they fixed rogues. Hurrah!


9 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Debilitating strike moves from 4th level to 9th? That seems strange.

I was hoping for a little more details, such as examples of a few skill feats.

Shadow Lodge

18 people marked this as a favorite.

A little worried about having to wait for high levels for functionality. Those levels often don't see play.


7 people marked this as a favorite.

So my favorite rogue in PF1 was far and away the Phantom Thief, which was also the only rogue archetype to trade away Sneak Attack entirely. So I don't love the implication that "Sneak attack is the defining characteristic of rogues" and I hope that there's an archetype I can take to trade it away for something that makes the trade worth it.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I hope a large percentage of monsters aren't immune to percision damage like they were in 1e.


BretI wrote:

Debilitating strike moves from 4th level to 9th? That seems strange.

I was hoping for a little more details, such as examples of a few skill feats.

I thought that move was a little surprising too. Who knows, maybe it's not as vital an acquisition to a 2e rogue? /guessing


I'm uncertain as to how Dread Striker would hold up. PF1 Shatter defences allowed for flat-footed on any fear status with not unreasonable investment, but most importantly, the rogue (via the rake and scout archetypes) had a reasonably reliable way of inflicting said status on the first round. Dread Striker currently seems like half of a good option, without the part that actually gets it to work.


14 people marked this as a favorite.

Huh. It's... cool, I guess? It doesn't really feel all that earth-shattering, and, like with the fighter, I guess it just leaves me with a 'meh' feeling. Not that it's not cool or anything, it's just that nothing in here leaves me particularly excited or terribly interested in trying a rogue in this new system. At the same time, though, I can't say I spot any big red flags, so... good job at making something that doesn't sound bad?

I'll just have to keep waiting for the wizard preview, I guess. But the blogs keep being pretty bare-bones, so I'm not sure if that will excite me either. All the blogs just keep either not revealing anything particularly interesting or framing something in such a way that it makes the final product seem as though it won't work out.

Silver Crusade

7 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm also a little concerned that some of these abilities sound like they kick in at too-high levels (in part because where will spellcasters be at those levels? probably getting class options that leave the poor Rogue in the dust if it's anything like PF1)

But I guess we'll have to wait and see whether this all feels well balanced in playtesting


The Sideromancer wrote:
I'm uncertain as to how Dread Striker would hold up. PF1 Shatter defences allowed for flat-footed on any fear status with not unreasonable investment, but most importantly, the rogue (via the rake and scout archetypes) had a reasonably reliable way of inflicting said status on the first round. Dread Striker currently seems like half of a good option, without the part that actually gets it to work.

Brawler has a free intimidate linked one their strikes maybe rogues will have something similiar.


Redblade8 wrote:
BretI wrote:

Debilitating strike moves from 4th level to 9th? That seems strange.

I was hoping for a little more details, such as examples of a few skill feats.

I thought that move was a little surprising too. Who knows, maybe it's not as vital an acquisition to a 2e rogue? /guessing

I expect that to be a feature of the inevitable nlog post of skills, since skill feats aren't unique to any class in particular.

-----

Everything in here sounds pretty good. I like that they get lots of skill feats to play with, and it's also nice to get some additional confirmation that there are class features in addition to all the feats that everyone is getting.

I notice that surprise attack is a class feature rather than just an element of the way the rules work. In PF1 any character that hadn't acted yet was flat-footed until their turn. I guess that element is going away? I'm not sure I'm happy to see it go overall, but it does kind of simplify things somewhat.

I like that there are options for expanding the conditions where sneak attack is applied. I also like that they have abilities to make them slippery on the battlefield. Overall, I'm pretty excited by what I see here!


7 people marked this as a favorite.
BretI wrote:
Debilitating strike moves from 4th level to 9th? That seems strange.

This is a serious concern for me; I was hoping that the Rogue would maintain her Unchained role as a hybrid damage dealer/debuffer, but that is obviously not going to be the case if you have to wait so long to do any debuffing.

The revelation that Rogues get more proficiencies and skill feats than anyone else is a good one, though. Hopefully a Rogue>Other Martials>3/4 casters>Full Casters paradigm is used to determine who gets how many skills.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

So, everyone doesn't start out flat-footed until they've acted the first time. That's new too.
Also, remember that flat-footed is a condition that gives the affected person/creature a -2 to AC (first revealed in the GlassCannon podcast I believe) - instead of a separate AC value.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Awesome!

Especially like the doubled skill feats. Now the rogue really *will* be the master of skills!


14 people marked this as a favorite.

Sadly, between this and the Fighter, I'm getting a distinct impression 2e won't be a game for me...


8 people marked this as a favorite.

Everyone not starting out flatfooted is a good thing. That was a nonsensical rule to begin with.


15 people marked this as a favorite.

The 14th level abilities from this and the fighter blog seem very... restrained. Hope they didn't tone down things too much.


10 people marked this as a favorite.

I am still a bit worried about the rogue. The dependency on sneak attack to deal competitive damage is one of the main weaknesses of the class in PF1. I was really hoping to see a change here (something like trick attack in starfinder).
So rogues are still forced to jump through loops to get the same damage output as other melees.
I am also not happy that abilities like Gang Up are class feats and not class abilities. So every rogue is forced to take them at the earliest level to stay viable. That is bad design to give players a false choice of "here you can decide between x abilities, but you have to take this one or you will regret it".
And let's not even start with all the immune to flank, immune to sneak attack monsters that totally neuter their abilities.
I am also not happy that nothing is done to cover the rogues other weakness: Being forced forced into melee with far weaker defenses (AC, hit points) than other melees.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Seems like the needs for either a swashbuckler class or a vigilante class will likely be invalidated thanks to the new rogue build.

Nothing in here seems to me ill design, but then again the skills that we've been exposed to also seem to be the best aspect of the new system.

In RAE it became much easier to build functioning rogue characters because Improved Feint reduced the time to a single act, meaning a rogue could feint and still get in their two main attacks, or move, feint, and get in a single act for attacks (granted in RAE, two-weapon fighting became the de facto rogue strategy) and we can see a similar form of that with Dread Striker, but is there also a method for using Deception in its place? Instant Opening seems to fill this requirement of mine, but gating it at 14th level would mean that having a functional rogue as early as 1st level with Improved Feint is not an option. Seems even more odd considering that Dread Strike is available at 4th level and by virtue of what's written is parallel in function as far as combat goes. It takes 10 levels to substitute which skill I'm using?

Testing may prove that the level gating these things in such a way is problematic for the game, methinks.

I'm also curious about Unchained Rogue's built in Weapon Finesse and Dex/Damage mechanics. This blog would most likely have been the most appropriate place to discuss whether or not Weapon Finesse is still a feat or if DEX is being taken out of attack and damage completely, partially, or if it is integrated into the system. I would like to know that.

Paizo Employee Designer

20 people marked this as a favorite.
FedoraFerret wrote:
Everyone not starting out flatfooted is a good thing. That was a nonsensical rule to begin with.

Relevant Order of the Stick, since an OotS reference is always fun!

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Sounds like the rogue is going to be the adaptable class in the game. Nifty!


5 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm curious: what can a rogue do to contribute to combat on turns where it is unable to arrange for an enemy to be flat-footed? And how frequently would that be an issue?

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Not a fan of the class as described or the new art for the rogue (Really dont like the footware which is unfortunate cause the old rogue was my second favorite looking Iconic). Seems like changing the look for the sake of changing the look


11 people marked this as a favorite.
GreyYeti wrote:

I am still a bit worried about the rogue. The dependency on sneak attack to deal competitive damage is one of the main weaknesses of the class in PF1. I was really hoping to see a change here (something like trick attack in starfinder).

So rogues are still forced to jump through loops to get the same damage output as other melees.
I am also not happy that abilities like Gang Up are class feats and not class abilities. So every rogue is forced to take them at the earliest level to stay viable. That is bad design to give players a false choice of "here you can decide between x abilities, but you have to take this one or you will regret it".
And let's not even start with all the immune to flank, immune to sneak attack monsters that totally neuter their abilities.
I am also not happy that nothing is done to cover the rogues other weakness: Being forced forced into melee with far weaker defenses (AC, hit points) than other melees.

So you want them to be equal to the martial classes (fighter, barbarian etc.) AND have all the skill stuff on top of that?

Why play a martial character then?

The Exchange

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Modules Subscriber

This does feel like the rogue lost some debuffing power to more effortlessly be super mobile and dodgy.

Sounds ok to me, but it does suck losong debilitating strike which was the main thing that makes rogues worth playing.

And for like the third time I really need to object to the name Thievery for rogue skills. Just call it something else.

Paizo Employee Designer

7 people marked this as a favorite.
Milo v3 wrote:
The 14th level abilities from this and the fighter blog seem very... restrained. Hope they didn't tone down things too much.

Instant Opening might not seem as cool as it actually is because it might be easy to assume that it requires some kind of check (or a failed save, or a roll of some kind) in order to work. But it actually works automatically. So one action from you equals two rounds of AC debuffs and all your sneak attack-related favorites. And it's not flanking, so all-around vision-type abilities won't help them.

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Please tell me sneak attack doesn't work umpteen times a round anymore... although maybe with the new action economy, two-weapon-fighting-tail-slapping-biting-horned rogues won't be so common.


Kevin Mack wrote:
Not a fan of the class as described or the new art for the rogue (Really dont like the footware which is unfortunate cause the old rogue was my second favorite looking Iconic). Seems like changing the look for the sake of changing the look

Reminds me of Etrian Odyssey's "drawing feet is too hard" art style.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I don’t know if this will take effect or not, but one of the ways to make higher levels work is to expand the feel of lower levels across more levels. In this case, it seems the devs added new options at lower and mid levels, then moved some of the mid level options higher to maintain the lower level feel.

Personally, I think this is good for the game and it would likely allow groups to routinely reach higher levels before ending the campaign.


Seems interesting.

Im really wondering what each skill can or cant exactly do in this system, cause it seems to be heavily built upon skills being very strong.


The Sideromancer wrote:
I'm uncertain as to how Dread Striker would hold up. PF1 Shatter defences allowed for flat-footed on any fear status with not unreasonable investment, but most importantly, the rogue (via the rake and scout archetypes) had a reasonably reliable way of inflicting said status on the first round. Dread Striker currently seems like half of a good option, without the part that actually gets it to work.

Ah, but thats when allies come in handy. Work together, have the barbarian or fighter intimidate the foe so you get the sneak attack. One-Two punch. I was going to point out Intimidating Strike, but that actually also makes you flat-footed.


13 people marked this as a favorite.
eddv wrote:
And for like the third time I really need to object to the name Thievery for rogue skills. Just call it something else.

Yes. Please. Thievery has too much of a negative connotation. Those skills have perfectly legitimate uses, too. I don't want a black cloud hanging over the whole skill set unnecesarily.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Arachnofiend wrote:
BretI wrote:
Debilitating strike moves from 4th level to 9th? That seems strange.

This is a serious concern for me; I was hoping that the Rogue would maintain her Unchained role as a hybrid damage dealer/debuffer, but that is obviously not going to be the case if you have to wait so long to do any debuffing.

The revelation that Rogues get more proficiencies and skill feats than anyone else is a good one, though. Hopefully a Rogue>Other Martials>3/4 casters>Full Casters paradigm is used to determine who gets how many skills.

I was a little sad that Debilitations got moved to 9th too. Hopefully if enough folks say something during the playtest, we can get that moved up a few levels, if it needs it, of course.


27 people marked this as a favorite.
Leedwashere wrote:
eddv wrote:
And for like the third time I really need to object to the name Thievery for rogue skills. Just call it something else.
Yes. Please. Thievery has too much of a negative connotation. Those skills have perfectly legitimate uses, too. I don't want a black cloud hanging over the whole skill set unnecesarily.

Yes, we can't have your PCs, who have just killed 50+ people and robbed their dead bodies, accused of something as demeaning as... thievery!

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
GentleGiant wrote:
Leedwashere wrote:
eddv wrote:
And for like the third time I really need to object to the name Thievery for rogue skills. Just call it something else.
Yes. Please. Thievery has too much of a negative connotation. Those skills have perfectly legitimate uses, too. I don't want a black cloud hanging over the whole skill set unnecesarily.
Yes, we can't have your PCs, who have just killed 50+ people and robbed their dead bodies, accused of something as demeaning as... thievery!

Silly Giant, goblins aren't people.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

I wrote my response before reading the comments and it's hilarious to see I'm quite happy and positive about the rogue while most people seem quite upset by it.

Things I got from the blog:
* People are no longer flat footed for the first round of combat before they act.
* Debilitating effects from Pathfinder Unchained (or a variation) are now core (makes sense. I'm all for it).
* Skill monkey: I approve!
* Bluff has been renamed to deception.
* Skill feats (at least some of them) will resemble what we're accustomed to with rogue talents. Hooray!
* Class feats: Despite some very 4th-edish names, it looks like for the rogue at least we're getting class feats that are very much grounded in Pathfinder 1st edition.
* Action economy: I'm starting to see the benefit of iteratives at all levels with the -5/-10 penalty. It makes the "sacrifice an attack" abilities very competitive instead of in PF 1st edition which cost a lot to use.
* I like that they're finding ways to offer similar (yet grounded in reality) effects when it comes to spells (blank slate being an example).

Overall I'm much more happy with how things are looking for the rogue. However I am concerned we perhaps didn't get any examples of "legendary" skill feats for rogues. If they're over the top and break the "aesthetic" of the rogue, I continue to hope they'll remain highly optional and viable characters can be made by topping off at mastery for many skills (vs legendary for a few skills).

I am also happy to see no dex to damage. I hope Paizo can be creative in keeping the rogue credible without going "all classes get 1[W]+Primary ability score mod" for all attacks (no bards using charisma to attack people with weapons please. Let's have ability scores mean something).

Silver Crusade

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

I'm mostly liking what I'm seeing, but debilitating strike moving to 9th level is a big disappointment to me. Debilitating strike is to me what made the Unchained Rogue not just playable but legitimately enjoyable.

Having to wait until 9th level (which could take a year or two of real-time to reach depending on your gaming schedule), is just very disappointing.

That said, I'm looking forward even more to how skills and skill feats work in the game to see where Rogues can really shine.

I have a player who is a multiclass Rogue 4/Alchemist 2 in my weekly campaign and when she converts over to 2e in our weekly game, I'll have to see if she feels a qualitative difference in her character.


I'm really excited to hear that the Rogue (from what we know so far) is the de facto skill monkey of the system, and that a lot of cues from the Unchained Rogue are being taken into P2e core! Although, speaking of the Unchained Rogue, will P2e Rogues get dexterity to damage as a class feature?


I have no qualms about any parts of this. A Skill Feat at each level is spectacular. Though I am hoping Reactive Pursuit is also available to Barbarians and perhaps Monks.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The blog said nothing about Dex to damage, so suggesting that that means it definitely won't happen seems rather premature.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Hmm...

Spoiler:
SNEAK ATTACK!!!!

Yes. Everything still seems to be in order here.

Shadow Lodge

Traditionally, rogues have been the poison masters of the game. Is this still true? Or will it be opened up to all classes?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Campaign Setting, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Quote:
Of course, many of the rogue's class feats also increase her fighting potential. One of my favorites is the 6th-level feat Twist the Knife. With this feat, as long as you have just hit a foe and applied your sneak attack damage, you can apply persistent bleed damage equal to half your current sneak attack dice. That's sure going to leave a mark.

Is the math being changed to make bleed attacks do anything? If you're hitting someone for 4d6 twice a round, doing an extra 2d6 each round is nice, I guess, but hardly worth a feat. If bleed stacked with itself and wasn't trivial to fix, then that might be worthwhile.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
GentleGiant wrote:
GreyYeti wrote:

I am still a bit worried about the rogue. The dependency on sneak attack to deal competitive damage is one of the main weaknesses of the class in PF1. I was really hoping to see a change here (something like trick attack in starfinder).

So rogues are still forced to jump through loops to get the same damage output as other melees.
I am also not happy that abilities like Gang Up are class feats and not class abilities. So every rogue is forced to take them at the earliest level to stay viable. That is bad design to give players a false choice of "here you can decide between x abilities, but you have to take this one or you will regret it".
And let's not even start with all the immune to flank, immune to sneak attack monsters that totally neuter their abilities.
I am also not happy that nothing is done to cover the rogues other weakness: Being forced forced into melee with far weaker defenses (AC, hit points) than other melees.

So you want them to be equal to the martial classes (fighter, barbarian etc.) AND have all the skill stuff on top of that?

Why play a martial character then?

Based on my PF1 experience rogues are not the skill monkeys they are supposed to be. Investigators and other int-based classes far outskilled them, while their niche of the nimble fighter was taken by the swashbuckler and the slayer.

I want them to have a viable niche.
And i don't really see the idea of a class that is only good in skills, especially if PF2 is like PF1 where in most cases only the best roll matters and being second best in everything only means you get beaten everytime by the class that is specialized in a smaller field or made obsolete by a mid-level spell.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The whelmingness of this, like a lot else, feels like depends on the "animal call":"immunity to scrying" quotient of skill feats. Certainly curious to see what those look like in practice.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
GreyYeti wrote:

And i don't really see the idea of a class that is only good in skills, especially if PF2 is like PF1 where in most cases only the best roll matters and being second best in everything only means you get beaten everytime by the class that is specialized in a smaller field or made obsolete by a mid-level.

From what they've said, skills are going to be a much more impactful part of the game in P2e than P1e. Not only can skills be used for initiative rolls, they've also indicated that they can, in certain cases, be substituted for attack rolls or saves. I'm not sure how that's going to work out in-game, but it sounds intriguing.

1 to 50 of 596 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Archive / Pathfinder / Playtests & Prerelease Discussions / Pathfinder Playtest / Paizo Blog: Rogue Class Preview All Messageboards