Hail the Gauntlet!

Friday, May 25, 2018

Thank you to everyone who donated to Paizo's 2018 team for the Gauntlet charity tournament. Team Paizo fought hard in Tak, but a catastrophic Valeria round tumbled us towards the bottom, and we clawed our way back up to 11th, and almost as high as 8th, with an awesome performance on the final Puzzle Hunt round. Thanks to all of you, including an incredible last-minute donation over $1,000, we also unlocked an astonishing number of blog segments revealing further secrets about previously blogged classes. This will be a monster-length blog, so strap in for a long ride!

Fighter Combos: Randyll and Solveig
Luis Loza

I've always been a big fan of martial characters, which was fully solidified by one of my favorite characters, who happened to be a fighter. One of the big things I love about the fighter in Pathfinder is his ability to do just about anything in combat. With the right set of feats, a fighter can be anything from a typical sword and shield-wielding knight, to a spear master who leaps across the battlefield to defend his allies, to a light-footed master of the rapier. When I got a chance to join one of the playtest games here in the office, my first thought was to put this new fighter to the test. A lot of it felt the same, as the fighter was gaining lots of feats, but it turns out there was much more to the fighter this time around.

The Fighter Class Preview previewed several fighter feats and class features, but one thing it didn't mention was fighters' ability to string together attacks to make powerful combinations. They do this through abilities that let them Fan attack or press the offensive—abilities with the open trait must come before any other attacks, and those with the press trait must come after you've already made an attack. Fighters can also enter stances, which are one of the most common types of open abilities, and grant various powerful benefits for the duration of the encounter or until you enter another stance. A bastard sword switch-hitter can appreciate the debuff potential of following up an Intimidating Strike (which is neither an open nor a press ability) with Shatter Defenses, a press ability that stacks various penalties on an intimidated foe, or Combat Grab, a press ability that uses your open hand to grab a foe and simultaneously attack with the weapon in the other hand. Between those options and your ability to make your opponents flat-footed with critical hits, you can significantly reduce the AC of monsters so your lower-accuracy allies can take them down. With all of these new abilities in mind, I created my first fighter, Randyll. He was a master of the bastard sword with a penchant for yelling and rushing into combat. He would use the versatility of his bastard sword to his advantage, switching between a one-handed grip and a two-handed grip to use whichever feat was best for the situation, granting him a surprising amount of versatility.

Unfortunately, due to his recklessness, Randyll was not long for Golarion. In his place, I created Solveig, an Ulfen shield maiden entirely dedicated to defending her allies. She's fared even better. A shield fighter with a flail is all about careful tactical placement on the battlefield. If you're standing in the right spot, you can block for your allies with Shield Warden, and the flail critical specialization effect of knocking enemies prone can keep enemies right where you want them, even on an open battlefield. With Shielded Stride, you can even Stride at half speed with your shield up, ignoring reactions that trigger off your movement. The Shield Paragon stance is an open ability that gives you the benefit of a raised shield for the rest of the battle, an extremely powerful advantage. Solveig is a complete shift from Randyll's combat style. Her movement is calculated and her defense is unmatched (at least by the rest of the party!). By the time she had avoided close to 10 attacks in a row, I was in love with the fighter. I had found that same feeling that I had in Pathfinder First Edition and I could tell that there were so many possibilities with different weapons, armor types, and of course, all the new fighter feats. But there are so many amazing feats—how can your fighter take all the ones he wants? And how do you make sure you have the one you need for the day's adventure? The fighter's 9th-level Flexibility feat grants a different feat each day, and that increases to two flexible feats with Improved Flexibility at 15th level. This also means that, counting those two flexible feats, fighters have the most class feats in the game! Let me just say that playing the fighter in the playtest has only further solidified my love for the class. The fighter is awesome and continues to be awesome in Pathfinder Second Edition. In fact, if I were told I could play only fighters for the duration of the playtest, I would be happy. There's so much the fighter can do that I don't see myself running out of ideas any time soon!

Cleric Domains of the Mox Gauntlet
Andrew White

Thanks so much to everyone who helped us get this far! Your generosity is hugely appreciated, and we did our best to represent you accordingly at this weekend's showdown. And as a special reward to those of you who made your donations in the name of Team Cleric, here's a sneak peek at more of what's coming for everyone's favorite energy channelling, undead-neutralizing, wound-healing bludgeon enthusiasts!

If the Mox Gauntlet was a deity, what domains would it have? A gauntlet is a symbol of Might, the donations are a form of Wealth, the charity this year helps Families, and each year there's usually a final round shrouded in Secrecy. So let's talk about the domain powers that a cleric of the Gauntlet might be able to cast. The Cleric Class Preview already included unity, but the Family domain also has the basic power soothing words, which dispels emotion effects on a target; this is actually extremely strong because as a power, it's always heightened to your highest possible level. This means it's quite tricky to keep up emotion effects on a Family cleric's allies, and you'll probably never need to prepare remove fear. Might has two options that are really good for heavily armored and high-Strength clerics. The basic power athletic exploit lets you ignore your armor's check penalty and movement speed reduction when you really need to, and enduring might is a reaction that reduces damage based on your Strength modifier and your cleric level. The Secrecy domain has forced quiet, which limits the target's voice to a hoarse whisper, making it much harder to raise an alarm. Even a successful save against forced quiet still affects the target for 1 round (though the effect might last as long as 10 minutes on a critical failure!). Secrecy's advanced domain power, safeguard secret, has a 1-minute casting time but thereafter grants you and all willing allies in range an enormous conditional bonus to skill checks (almost always Deception) to conceal a specific secret you pick, and to saving throws against spells that seek to ferret out that specific secret. These benefits last indefinitely until you use the spell again. Finally, Wealth's basic power, acquisitive's fortune, is sure to make you popular with every business owner in the city and with allies who like to make money during downtime. Once cast, it allows the target to reroll any critical failure on their check to Perform a Trade in the next 24 hours. As the name implies, it's a fortune effect. The domain's advanced power, money talks, allows you to substitute coin currency for any sort of cost with a value measured in monetary value. So for instance, if you needed a vase worth 100 gp, you could just use 100 gp. This is particularly handy when you're away from a settlement and suddenly need a bizarre item for a cost that you wouldn't have thought to bring along; the Wealth cleric has you covered.

The Rogue's Hidden Tricks
Katina Davis

Although I'm not particularly stealthy in real life, I've always enjoyed rogues and their stealthy ways because I figured they were most like how I would actually behave in an adventure setting. Instead of barreling headfirst into a fight and counting on being able to chug a bunch of potions afterward, the rogue is more calm, calculated, and precise. What's the point in drawing attention (and attacks) to yourself when you can tiptoe in, get the job done, and sneak away unscathed? Never let your opponents know how strong you are, and they will always underestimate you.

Even after the Rogue Class Preview, the rogue was hiding some of her sneakiest tricks. What did you expect? One thing about the rogue that's different than in Pathfinder First Edition is the rogue's focus on slippery mental defenses. In addition to the Cognitive Loophole feat mentioned in her preview blog, the rogue gains the slippery mind ability, which makes her a master at Will saves. Add in double debilitation, the ability to apply two debilitations to a foe at once, and you have a good sense of the rogue's odd-level features. But there are so many feats still hiding in the shadows. While the first blog focused on ways to get sneak attack, the rogue also has some fun ways to play with the action economy, including drawing and attacking with a weapon as a single action, or Stepping and Striking at a -1 penalty with the same action (in either order, perfect for flanking, entering reach, or forcing your foe to take an action to reach you). The rogue also has a pair of feats that allow her to poison weapons more easily, keep her poisons from being wasted, and create a bunch of doses of a very simple poison for free each day (this also works great with an alchemist on the team to make some really powerful poison for free every day). For those interested in traps, you can gain Trap Finder, which makes finding even the most devious traps easier and protects you against them, and Delay Trap, which can give you the time you need to escape the area when you accidentally set off a trap. However, unlike in Pathfinder First Edition, engaging with traps as a rogue is your choice.

All right, those feats were cool, but what about some high-level options? Sense the Unseen is a reaction you can use when you Seek that lets you automatically learn the location of unseen creatures in the area, no matter how well they were hidden. You still can't see them, but it's a good start! Cloud Step allows you to step so lightly that you are essentially weightless when you are Striding, allowing you to walk over water or air and avoiding pressure plates until you finish moving. Perfect Distraction allows you to use smoke and mirrors, decoys, and other tactics to make it seem like you are somewhere you aren't, perfect for leaving a decoy right after you hide. If you have Legendary Deception, you can even gain Reactive Distraction and use the decoy as a reaction to avoid an enemy's attack or other ability. Afterward, it takes a bit of time to set up your next decoy, but it's worth it! Trickster's Ace lets you jury-rig magic item resonance and stolen magical energy to set up your own magical contingency each day, similar to the spell. And finally, Hidden Paragon lets you go completely invisible, even beyond the sight of true seeing, see invisibility and the like and impossible to outline with even glitterdust, faerie fire, or similar magic!

Take That, Evil!
Mark Seifter

The Paladin Class Preview was centered around alignment and the paladin code, with some extra helpings of spells, healing, and defenses, but there's more to paladin options than that. Sometimes you just want to put on your Gauntlet and beat evil down. So, this section is all about offense. Retributive Strike, first mentioned in the paladin blog, is a good way to add onto your damage while enfeebling enemies that dare to attack your allies, and all paladins have access to it at 1st level. Another ability all paladins receive is the righteous ally, a holy spirit that assists you from 3rd level on. There are three righteous allies to choose from (and you can take the Second Ally feat to gain another): blade, shield, and mount. Naturally, the blade righteous ally is the most offense-focused of the three, inhabiting your weapon (which you are free to change each day), and giving it the benefits of a property rune for the whole day. This starts with some simple properties like disrupting and ghost touch, but you can use feats to gain the benefits of more powerful runes; for instance, you can make your weapon dancing, allowing the spirit in your blade to attack on its own. The first major blade righteous ally feat is Blade of Justice, which is parallel to the Pathfinder First Edition paladin's smite evil—you declare a target to face judgment and deal extra damage to evil foes. Although Blade of Justice deals less damage than smite evil, it can be used as many times as you like as long as you have the actions for it. And the real kicker is that this extra damage is good damage, which means that creatures like fiends that are weak against good abilities are going to take a lot more damage.

Speaking of how offense-focused paladins can wreck fiends, there's also Aura of Faith, a feat that makes nearby good allies' first attacks each turn deal 1 extra good damage against evil creatures (and of course, this can become quite a bit higher when applying a fiend's weakness!). But there's also a smiting ability every paladin gets that can ruin a fiend's day. Holy Smite deals persistent good damage equal to your Charisma modifier to evil creatures you hit with any Retributive Strike, which can apply extra damage round after round if the creature has a weakness to good. Instrument of Zeal is the last in the series of badass offensive abilities for the blade righteous ally: when you score a critical hit with your weapon, either with a Retributive Strike or against your Blade of Justice target, you gain an additional die of damage and the target is slowed 1 on its next turn, which can put it in a really tight spot! There's another fun way every paladin can increase a party's offense, particularly if the group stands in a tactical formation. Aura of justice is a class feature all paladins get that allows you to take a penalty to any Retributive Strike in order to allow all allies within 10 feet and in reach of the monster to make Retributive Strikes of their own! If you find your group often uses this to create a mega-chain reaction, you can later take the Aura of Vengeance feat to remove that extra penalty when you use aura of justice.

Behold the Gauntlet!

The Gauntlet is a powerful magic item fought over by champions since ages long past. We will now reveal the powers of the Gauntlet in a Pathfinder Playtest-compatible form. Behold, the Gauntlet!

The Gauntlet Item 18

Invested

Magical

Potent

Transmutation

Price 24,000 gp

Method of Use worn, gloves; Bulk L

Activation [[A]][[A]] Operate Activation


This mighty adamantine gauntlet was forged by the legendary artisans of Mox from the Card Kingdom and is inscribed with hidden runes of great power. The Gauntlet boosts your might and enhances your strategy to a razor's edge. You gain a +5 item bonus to Athletics checks and Warfare Lore checks. When you invest the Gauntlet, you either increase your Strength score by 2 or increase it to 18, whichever would give you a higher score.

While wearing the Gauntlet, you gain a +2 conditional bonus to damage rolls on unarmed attacks against minotaurs.

When you activate the Gauntlet, you slam the ground, creating the same effects as an 8th-level earthquake.

While you have invested the Gauntlet, if anyone offers you a challenge for the Gauntlet and the challenge is fair, you must accept that challenge, though you can finish any life-threatening or time-critical task before doing so. Once someone has won the Gauntlet from you in a challenge, you must wait 1 year before you can challenge them again to regain the Gauntlet. If the Gauntlet is stolen, sold, traded, looted from a corpse, or obtained in any way other than being won in a fair challenge, it vanishes instead, perhaps returning to the vaults of Mox.

A Familiar Disguise

Familiars, the traditional fuzzy friends of wizards and witches, are extremely popular in Pathfinder, especially among those who are fans of animals or cute things. While many classes gained access to familiars in later books, including the archetypes I wrote for Familiar Folio (my first-ever author credit for Paizo), plenty of characters have access to familiars from the outset of Pathfinder Second Edition's playtest. Not only can wizards take a feat to gain a familiar even if they also have an arcane bond, but alchemists can also gain an alchemically created familiar, and druids can gain a leshy familiar. But the most surprising and awesome feature might send our fans who love both gnomes and familiars (hmm, who could that be?) into a spiral of gnomes: there is a gnome ancestry feat to gain a familiar regardless of your class.

So enough about who can get familiars—how do they work? As someone who loves building familiars and getting exactly the type of animal that fits my concept, I was sometimes stymied when my ability to choose a familiar was locked behind how many low-power creatures that would be useful mostly only as familiars could be fit into the Pathfinder RPG Bestiary schedule. In the playtest, you won't have to wait for Bestiary 5 to have a flying fox. Familiars have always been magical creatures forever altered by your magic, so why not capitalize on that to allow for more variety and flexibility than ever before?

In the playtest's familiar system, you get to pick from a variety of powers that either allow the familiar to gain special abilities, like flight or speech (yes, you can have a talking cat, or a talking winged cat) or that grant special benefits to you, including extra spells and delivering your touch spells at a distance. You can normally swap those powers each day as part of your daily preparations, which allows you some awesome flexibility for your familiar, though a familiar that would naturally have any of these special abilities (like an owl's flight) always has that ability locked in. So if you need your rabbit to be able to swim for the next day's adventure, you can do that, or you can grant your leshy wings of flower blossoms. For the playtest, we started with around 10 different powers, but I imagine the list will expand over time and we might create feats for familiar-friendly characters to gain more powers than usual or to unlock particularly strong powers.

So we know about powers, but what about a familiar's base statistics? Your familiar uses your full saving throw modifiers and AC, with a set 4 HP per level, so it has better defenses than familiars had before. Familiars are adept at Perception, Acrobatics, and Stealth, counting as trained characters of your level and adding your spellcasting key ability modifier (this is Charisma if you have only innate spells, like the aforementioned gnome non-spellcaster). For other skills, they have the modifier of an untrained character of your level, meaning that after a few levels, their skills are far beyond what a simple animal could achieve.

Whew, that was an epic-length blog. Thanks again to everyone who donated to the Gauntlet to support Wellspring in their efforts to assist the homeless, and if you liked how much content was in this blog, be sure to post and thank all the donors as well!

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Charity Community The Gauntlet Pathfinder Playtest
151 to 200 of 238 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | next > last >>

Malk_Content wrote:
I can see Hidden Paragon won't have rules making you impossible to see. But rather all the things that normally help detect them don't work. Someone with Legendary perception can still locate them (or lower ranks if lucky) but they can't just pop a True Seeing to automatically detect the Rogue. At least thats my hope.

I'm trying to figure out if Paizo is moving to a rock-paper-scissor system. It seems like rogues are getting really, really powerful.

The blog update is really great stuff for most, and wizards can get a talking cat?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Desferous wrote:
1of1 wrote:

How does one counter a Hidden Paragon stabby man of save or die? I guess fumigating might work. Drop some blightburn covered in inhaled poison and glue the doors shut. But wait, he's a rogue, of course he got out before you. Maybe teleport away and hope the Schrödinger's rogue is actually dead?

Hmmm... as with all things pre test, and before release, we're probably missing something.

Maybe a wish will reveal him? It's always good when Rogues have more powerful magics than casters.

Right. Gotta keep those casters as gods above the non-casters. Otherwise we won't be able to b!!%~ about how much more powerful the casters are.


\/\/arlok wrote:
Desferous wrote:
1of1 wrote:

How does one counter a Hidden Paragon stabby man of save or die? I guess fumigating might work. Drop some blightburn covered in inhaled poison and glue the doors shut. But wait, he's a rogue, of course he got out before you. Maybe teleport away and hope the Schrödinger's rogue is actually dead?

Hmmm... as with all things pre test, and before release, we're probably missing something.

Maybe a wish will reveal him? It's always good when Rogues have more powerful magics than casters.
Right. Gotta keep those casters as gods above the non-casters. Otherwise we won't be able to b$%*+ about how much more powerful the casters are.

When you have a limited number of spells a day, they should have some benefit.

Logically, just like a rogue's poison will take out a wizard, a wizard's magic should reveal a rogue. (And we won't talk about a rogue being able to poison all day long, maybe it should be limited like caster spells?)

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

*blink* *blink*


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Desferous wrote:
\/\/arlok wrote:
Desferous wrote:
1of1 wrote:

How does one counter a Hidden Paragon stabby man of save or die? I guess fumigating might work. Drop some blightburn covered in inhaled poison and glue the doors shut. But wait, he's a rogue, of course he got out before you. Maybe teleport away and hope the Schrödinger's rogue is actually dead?

Hmmm... as with all things pre test, and before release, we're probably missing something.

Maybe a wish will reveal him? It's always good when Rogues have more powerful magics than casters.
Right. Gotta keep those casters as gods above the non-casters. Otherwise we won't be able to b$%*+ about how much more powerful the casters are.
When you have a limited number of spells a day, they should have some benefit.

Sure. But the benefit should not be "trump everything instantly". For example, having a "entangle" like spell that grapple several monsters in a turn, is a decent trade off for the spell slot. A fighter can only grapple 1 guy, but can do all day long, a caster can grapple several in one round, but can only do once per day (or more, depending the number of times they prepare the spell).

What it's not fair is that, in exchange for only being able to use 1-3 times per day, the effect of the spell is "I auto-win". Because that renders everyone obsolete 1-3 times per day, and unless the GM keeps throwing them to the same challenge once and again until the spellcasters run out AND he get sure they can't simply sleep and recover the spells, then spells trump everything, and that's a problem.

Quote:
Logically, just like a rogue's poison will take out a wizard, a wizard's magic should reveal a rogue. (And we won't talk about a rogue being able to poison all day long, maybe it should be limited like caster spells?)

I'm pretty sure the power of the poison the rogue can get every day (which is not the same than to get an unlimited amount of poison everyday, for that matter, as I'm sure they'll get a set number of dosis) will be roughly in the ballpark of autoscaling cantrips for the wizard.

I'm pretty sure also that the rogue cannot simply declare he is in Hidden Paragon Stance whenever he wants and run invisible 24/7. They'll have to spend some sort of resource, or have a limited number of uses per day.

So, to be "fair", the thing should go like this: The rogue can use poison, often (not sure it's "all day long" and not "X times per day", but let's assume it is), with the wizard doing the same with cantrips. If the Rogue goes unseen, and the wizard cast invisibility, both should have roughly the same kind of ability to remain unseen from the other. Does rogue have any ability to see an Improved Invisibility/Mind blank wizard? If not... why should the wizard have to do it vs rogues, specially when not being seen is pretty much the rogue's selling point?

If any class could have an ability to remain stealthy at any cost at higher level, it should be the rogue.


Desferous wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
I can see Hidden Paragon won't have rules making you impossible to see. But rather all the things that normally help detect them don't work. Someone with Legendary perception can still locate them (or lower ranks if lucky) but they can't just pop a True Seeing to automatically detect the Rogue. At least thats my hope.

I'm trying to figure out if Paizo is moving to a rock-paper-scissor system. It seems like rogues are getting really, really powerful.

The blog update is really great stuff for most, and wizards can get a talking cat?

it is not a blog about wizards, tho. It's a blog about familiars, which many people can get now (even a gnome fighter).


1 person marked this as a favorite.
gustavo iglesias wrote:
Desferous wrote:
\/\/arlok wrote:
Desferous wrote:
1of1 wrote:

How does one counter a Hidden Paragon stabby man of save or die? I guess fumigating might work. Drop some blightburn covered in inhaled poison and glue the doors shut. But wait, he's a rogue, of course he got out before you. Maybe teleport away and hope the Schrödinger's rogue is actually dead?

Hmmm... as with all things pre test, and before release, we're probably missing something.

Maybe a wish will reveal him? It's always good when Rogues have more powerful magics than casters.
Right. Gotta keep those casters as gods above the non-casters. Otherwise we won't be able to b$%*+ about how much more powerful the casters are.
When you have a limited number of spells a day, they should have some benefit.

Sure. But the benefit should not be "trump everything instantly". For example, having a "entangle" like spell that grapple several monsters in a turn, is a decent trade off for the spell slot. A fighter can only grapple 1 guy, but can do all day long, a caster can grapple several in one round, but can only do once per day (or more, depending the number of times they prepare the spell).

What it's not fair is that, in exchange for only being able to use 1-3 times per day, the effect of the spell is "I auto-win". Because that renders everyone obsolete 1-3 times per day, and unless the GM keeps throwing them to the same challenge once and again until the spellcasters run out AND he get sure they can't simply sleep and recover the spells, then spells trump everything, and that's a problem.

Quote:
Logically, just like a rogue's poison will take out a wizard, a wizard's magic should reveal a rogue. (And we won't talk about a rogue being able to poison all day long, maybe it should be limited like caster spells?)
I'm pretty sure the power of the poison the rogue can get every day (which is not the same than to get an unlimited amount of poison everyday, for that matter, as I'm sure...

Thank you for the response! You make good points, and I kind of get it, but something still isn't right in my mind.

I get the entangle bit and with the stealth to a point.

The wizard has lower hit points and cloth armor and poor weapons to be able to do those super powerful things 1-3 times per day when compared to the warrior or rogue with their higher hit points, superior armor and saves, and better weapons.

I guess that gets to the auto succeed aspect you bring up. I'm starting to think that yeah with everything the wizard has given up for the limited number of times she gets to be "godly" it should work. If it is a questionable pursuit, then a warrior or rogue will always be a better class because they have repeatable attacks, defenses, etc.

In addition to the 1-3 times a day, there is the built-in restraint of "did you prepare that spell?" I can't see myself memorizing see invisible unless I think I may be in the situation to need it. So, the "can't be seen by spells x, y, z is an double protection for that ability because if a wizard did have the thought to memorize that spell, then yeah, I do think it should work.

On the other hand, if the rogue has chosen to use Hidden Paragon, why should it be revealed by the wizard's spell? My response would be because the wizard used a spell slot to prepare it. The wizard has given up defense or offense for utility. The rogue still has all of his or her defense and offense with the added bonus of utility.

I think that is the bump for me. Wizards give up a lot to do what they do. They are glass cannons (in effectiveness, I'm not talking about blasting).


gustavo iglesias wrote:
Desferous wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
I can see Hidden Paragon won't have rules making you impossible to see. But rather all the things that normally help detect them don't work. Someone with Legendary perception can still locate them (or lower ranks if lucky) but they can't just pop a True Seeing to automatically detect the Rogue. At least thats my hope.

I'm trying to figure out if Paizo is moving to a rock-paper-scissor system. It seems like rogues are getting really, really powerful.

The blog update is really great stuff for most, and wizards can get a talking cat?

it is not a blog about wizards, tho. It's a blog about familiars, which many people can get now (even a gnome fighter).

Lol, yeah, a further erosion of the wizard.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Well the Rogue presumably has given something up. That feat could have been used for other things. In fact arguably they've given up more, as the feat choice is permanent while the spell choice isn't.


Okay, first off, WOW! I like all of it but what stood out the most for myself is the fighter combos and the familiar abilities. Kind of geeked hard on those. I will definitely pick a fighter for play test as well as picking a familiar for the classes that the’re allowed for.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Malk_Content wrote:
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I can aim a bow all day of the week. I don't need an enemy to target.
No you can't. You can probably aim a bow for about 30s before your arms and hand start to get fatigued. Same reason you can't just hold Horse stance all day an expect to be fine. In fact that sort of stuff is used as physical punishment.

Nope, lasted three minutes before only noticeable tiredness set in.

Could have gone longer but figured that was long enough.


8 people marked this as a favorite.
Desferous wrote:
The wizard has lower hit points and cloth armor and poor weapons to be able to do those super powerful things 1-3 times per day when compared to the warrior or rogue with their higher hit points, superior armor and saves, and better weapons.

Except they are not godly 1-3 times per day. They are godly 1-3 times per task. A mid level wizard (lvl 9-12?) can have about 20+ spells per day. They have 1-3 spells that trump a specific challenge, and then if a different challenge appear, they have a different set of 1-3 spells that trump the challenge again, and so on, until they run out of spells. Which is too common at low level, I agree with that, but never happens at higher levels. They have way too much spells for that.

A wizard can cast invisibility to past a "sneak" challenge, then cast fly to pass a chasm, then summon monster I to trigger a trap, then desintegrate a wall tha blocks the way, then cast clariaudience to scout a room, then charm monster the guy you need to interrogate. That's a pretty standard wizard spell selection, which happens to be a small portion of it's total spell slots, and which blows several challenges the party face in an adventuring day.

the only way to "beat" a wizard is if the GM keeps throwing them the same challenge until the wizard runs out of that particular spell (like needing several invisibilities in different parts of the dungeon). At that point, the wizard will probably feel annoyed because the GM is targeting him. It's better to balance things out to avoid this kind of situation. Also, this works vs wizards, but not vs sorcerer.

Quote:
I guess that gets to the auto succeed aspect you bring up. I'm starting to think that yeah with everything the wizard has given up for the limited number of times she gets to be "godly" it should work. If it is a questionable pursuit, then a warrior or rogue will always be a better class because they have repeatable attacks, defenses, etc.

Except the wizard, besides stepping on everyone toes because he can do stealth (invisibility), discern lies (detect thought), and pick locks (knock), they can also do Wizard-only stuff, like teleport the whole group across the map, dispel magic, or buff the party with haste, which are things the rogue and the fighter can't do.

Protecting the niche of things other people can do is a good thing, because the wizard already have its own niche. The old truism "everything you can do, a wizard can do better" is a bad design focus.

Quote:
In addition to the 1-3 times a day, there is the built-in restraint of "did you prepare that spell?" I can't see myself memorizing see invisible unless I think I may be in the situation to need it. So, the "can't be seen by spells x, y, z is an double protection for that ability because if a wizard did have the thought to memorize that spell, then yeah, I do think it should work.

In pathfinder you can leave 1 spell slot non memorized, and put a spell there with a 10m reading. For non-combat stuff, like Knock, it's incredibly versatile.

When talking about spells like see invisibility, the wizard still get the ability to see everybody, EXCEPT the guy who's selling point is being stealthy. I don't see a problem there, unless we start with the assumption that nobody, ever, can be better at something than the wizard is, because the wizard has spell slots and that should grant him god-like power 1-3 times per day per task, and about 6+ times per day per spell level. I don't think that's a healthy design goal, and I applaud the effort Paizo is doing to bring back God to the level the rest of the mortals play.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Starbuck_II wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I can aim a bow all day of the week. I don't need an enemy to target.
No you can't. You can probably aim a bow for about 30s before your arms and hand start to get fatigued. Same reason you can't just hold Horse stance all day an expect to be fine. In fact that sort of stuff is used as physical punishment.

Nope, lasted three minutes before only noticeable tiredness set in.

Could have gone longer but figured that was long enough.

With the arrow knocked and the bow tense? Wow.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
gustavo iglesias wrote:
Starbuck_II wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I can aim a bow all day of the week. I don't need an enemy to target.
No you can't. You can probably aim a bow for about 30s before your arms and hand start to get fatigued. Same reason you can't just hold Horse stance all day an expect to be fine. In fact that sort of stuff is used as physical punishment.

Nope, lasted three minutes before only noticeable tiredness set in.

Could have gone longer but figured that was long enough.

With the arrow knocked and the bow tense? Wow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtoBFXSvD6Y


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Starbuck_II wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I can aim a bow all day of the week. I don't need an enemy to target.
No you can't. You can probably aim a bow for about 30s before your arms and hand start to get fatigued. Same reason you can't just hold Horse stance all day an expect to be fine. In fact that sort of stuff is used as physical punishment.

Nope, lasted three minutes before only noticeable tiredness set in.

Could have gone longer but figured that was long enough.

Damn I was off by a lot! Still slightly shorter than all day.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Malk_Content wrote:
I can see Hidden Paragon won't have rules making you impossible to see. But rather all the things that normally help detect them don't work. Someone with Legendary perception can still locate them (or lower ranks if lucky) but they can't just pop a True Seeing to automatically detect the Rogue. At least thats my hope.

Ooh, I like that! That feels appropriately rogue-ish and powerful, without feeling too blatantly magical for a non-caster ability. More anti-magic if you will.


Desferous wrote:
Lol, yeah, a further erosion of the wizard.

I think most every class, through an archetype, class feature choices, or feats could get a familiar in PF1.

Notable exception were classes with selfish pets like phantoms and eidolons, but nothing keeps you from rolling a CN spiritualist who worships Calistria for the Wasp Familiar.


Rebel Rebel wrote:
...but I am feeling less likely to make the switch with every blog post I read about goblin and gnomes pc's and all the BESM artwork...

Hey!

What's wrong with *BESM?
It's a fun game!
Or, at least, the tri-stat version is. :p

--C.

Spoiler:
*Big Eyes Small Mouth

<edit> Really like the info on familiars!
The rest seems fine, too. (Although the cleric feels a little lackluster...)

Shadow Lodge

Fighter's Feat-ception: One feat for any two a day? Guess we won't see the Brawler hybrid class for a while, and this sounds either terrible or overpowered depending on the feats taken. I imagine people will pick up generic things with Flexibility to avoid it being wasted. Less fun, more reliable.

Money Cleric: Only reroll's a critical failure? How hard are Craft and Profession checks going to be fr this to be useful a lot? The other domains seem okay, with Family possibly being too strong if Rage remains emotion.

Rogue: Sounds fun. My only worry is, of course, poisons. They were nearly useless for players even if you specialized in them, and too expensive for the effort even then. With Multiclassing being a Rogue/Alchemist could probablydo wonders(and make sense if you focus on poison and subterfuge-based bombing).

Paladin: Their offensive abilities sound pretty cool, and they can buff their allies a little now, which is great. Just hope we actually get different alignments in core that stand up to their LG counterpart(come on, Paizo, I know you can do it!)

The Gauntlet: Looks good to me, though I still dislike Bulk. What was wrong with carrying capacity in pounds? :(

Familiars: You mention not having to wait for certain familiars, but not why or if there even will be new ones added in later on anyway. Can we just pick creatures in a certain low CR range? Will Improved Familiars be a feat anyone getting a Familiar can get?

Their HP seems incredibly low, but maybe that isn't a big deal if they get your full AC, including things like armor? A familiar protected by Full Plate and Tower Shield bonuses without wearing those things sounds tough indeed.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Dragonborn3 wrote:
Paladin: Their offensive abilities sound pretty cool, and they can buff their allies a little now, which is great. Just hope we actually get different alignments in core that stand up to their LG counterpart(come on, Paizo, I know you can do it!)

*sigh* Can we keep the Paladin alignment debate (PAD as an acronym, maybe) out of this thread, please?

Dragonborn3 wrote:
The Gauntlet: Looks good to me, though I still dislike Bulk. What was wrong with carrying capacity in pounds? :(

For one, most of the world uses the kilogram instead...


gustavo iglesias wrote:
Starbuck_II wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I can aim a bow all day of the week. I don't need an enemy to target.
No you can't. You can probably aim a bow for about 30s before your arms and hand start to get fatigued. Same reason you can't just hold Horse stance all day an expect to be fine. In fact that sort of stuff is used as physical punishment.

Nope, lasted three minutes before only noticeable tiredness set in.

Could have gone longer but figured that was long enough.

With the arrow knocked and the bow tense? Wow.

Poundage matters for the bow.

I tested a very light bow because you didn't say a warbow or anything amazing.

This guy using a stronger bow last 2 minutes and 19 seconds, but the wasn't in great environment.
https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/big-buck-zone/bowhunting-prep-how-long-ca n-you-hold-full-draw
A tip he gives is to let your string rest in the valley while you’re waiting at full draw. This keeps you from over-pulling against the backwall and exerting more energy than necessary.


Malk_Content wrote:
Well the Rogue presumably has given something up. That feat could have been used for other things. In fact arguably they've given up more, as the feat choice is permanent while the spell choice isn't.

No. Retraining is supposed to be much easier in PF2.

Liberty's Edge

Dragonborn3 wrote:
Fighter's Feat-ception: One feat for any two a day?

Actually, since you get Class Feats at even levels and Class Features at odd levels, the Fighter's Flexibility is probably not technically a Feat, and certainly adds on top of the normal Feat allotment (which is why they have the most Class Feats in the game now...they get the 11 for one at 1st and then every even level, plus two more floating ones).


Starbuck_II wrote:
gustavo iglesias wrote:
Starbuck_II wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
John Lynch 106 wrote:
I can aim a bow all day of the week. I don't need an enemy to target.
No you can't. You can probably aim a bow for about 30s before your arms and hand start to get fatigued. Same reason you can't just hold Horse stance all day an expect to be fine. In fact that sort of stuff is used as physical punishment.

Nope, lasted three minutes before only noticeable tiredness set in.

Could have gone longer but figured that was long enough.

With the arrow knocked and the bow tense? Wow.

Poundage matters for the bow.

I tested a very light bow because you didn't say a warbow or anything amazing.

This guy using a stronger bow last 2 minutes and 19 seconds, but the wasn't in great environment.
https://www.outdoorlife.com/blogs/big-buck-zone/bowhunting-prep-how-long-ca n-you-hold-full-draw
A tip he gives is to let your string rest in the valley while you’re waiting at full draw. This keeps you from over-pulling against the backwall and exerting more energy than necessary.

Ok. It's a good explanation.

As a side note, and totally off topic, I'm a EU citizen, we got a new GDPR (general data protection regulation) and as a result, web pages give us a lot if info about the cookies they try to implant when you access their web page. That particular web page informed me they had 23 necessary cookies, 9 information cookies, 29 statistic cookies, 298 marketing cookies, and 353 unclasiffied cookies. I'm really impressed to discover the ammount of crap random web pages give us.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Crayon wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
Well the Rogue presumably has given something up. That feat could have been used for other things. In fact arguably they've given up more, as the feat choice is permanent while the spell choice isn't.
No. Retraining is supposed to be much easier in PF2.

True, retraining does grant the martial classes a greater degree of flexibility than before, but there's still a world of difference between swapping out class feats during downtime and swapping your entire spell list daily. Not to mention the aforementioned casters can also retrain their class feats too.


Since familiars are now a feat instead of class ability I think it is likely there will be a way to grab the feat through multi-classing. If grabbing class feats form other classes is not the method of multi-classing now.

The fighter combos look fun. I do not see a problem with needing an action to enter a stance. I think a lot of class are going to have action cost they are going to want/need to pay the first round to activate class abilities. There is likely going to be a feat make drawing a weapon a free action or letting be combined with a move.

The Rogue getting super invisibility, most likely at or after level 15, is not that big a problem. By the level that this happens most of the other classes will have a lot of other abilities as well. Move to a narrow hallway back to back. Ready an action to gram the space the attack comes from. It will not matter as much that the rogue is invisible once they are grabbed. Getting that grab will be the hard part. There are still ways to counter the rogue, it is just that all of the easy ones are being taken off the table so you will need to think out side of the box.

It is also very likely that the rogue has a limit built into the ability. The rogue may have to pay Res(magic power form Cha) for each round the ability is up. The rogue will still be able to do a lot of damage with sneak attack in this time.

The magic item show that cost are not being to be going into the millions on gear this time. The item is nice and since a lot of time minor artifacts just have a lot of high level abilities, I think that any one of the abilities by its self is likely what we will be seeing on normal level 18 magic items.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

As a Rogue, I am almost afraid of the influx of power I'll be getting. Almost. With a Proficiency/Attack Bonus rivaling a Martial, a crap ton of mobility, and a lot of ways to just make things horrible for opponents, Rogues can finally start being the terrors we always knew they were supposed to be.


Deranged Stabby-Man wrote:
As a Rogue, I am almost afraid of the influx of power I'll be getting. Almost. With a Proficiency/Attack Bonus rivaling a Martial, a crap ton of mobility, and a lot of ways to just make things horrible for opponents, Rogues can finally start being the terrors we always knew they were supposed to be.

Really? Cuz I awlways thought rougues were supposed to be scouts and skill monkeys rather than killing machines, but I guess my grognard is showing.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
gustavo iglesias wrote:
Except the wizard, besides stepping on everyone toes because he can do stealth (invisibility), discern lies (detect thought), and pick locks (knock), they can also do Wizard-only stuff, like teleport the whole group across the map, dispel magic, or buff the party with haste, which are things the rogue and the fighter can't do.

In our home group we have a simple agreement: don't step on another guy's gig. This sort of thing hasn't been an issue since 2E D&D. Also kown as the golden rule (you know, do unto others and so on). I see it as a player issue, not a rules issue.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Charlaquin wrote:
Malk_Content wrote:
I can see Hidden Paragon won't have rules making you impossible to see. But rather all the things that normally help detect them don't work. Someone with Legendary perception can still locate them (or lower ranks if lucky) but they can't just pop a True Seeing to automatically detect the Rogue. At least thats my hope.
Ooh, I like that! That feels appropriately rogue-ish and powerful, without feeling too blatantly magical for a non-caster ability. More anti-magic if you will.

Hidden Paragon MUST require the Rogue to take off all their clothes.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Magog wrote:
Deranged Stabby-Man wrote:
As a Rogue, I am almost afraid of the influx of power I'll be getting. Almost. With a Proficiency/Attack Bonus rivaling a Martial, a crap ton of mobility, and a lot of ways to just make things horrible for opponents, Rogues can finally start being the terrors we always knew they were supposed to be.
Really? Cuz I awlways thought rougues were supposed to be scouts and skill monkeys rather than killing machines, but I guess my grognard is showing.

That started with Sneak Attack, now, while AD&D thieves can be underwhelming at times, especially if the DM is stingy with Backstab, the class seems to feel deeper than 3rd Ed/PF1 ones can feel, to me.

I do not think the Rogue needs to be married to Sneak Attack, as an option for a more combat focused one, definitely, but not sure why it needs to be the default.


One thing that has me curious about the Gauntlet... There is an entry for "Bulk".

Is this related to a new approach towards encumbrance?


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Pathos wrote:

One thing that has me curious about the Gauntlet... There is an entry for "Bulk".

Is this related to a new approach towards encumbrance?

Yes, see the equipment blog for that.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

I really don't like bulk, maybe I would like to know the actual weight of an item or creature, maybe I would like actual weight calculations for encumbrance, lifting, telekinesis, etc.


Desferous wrote:
I think that is the bump for me. Wizards give up a lot to do what they do. They are glass cannons (in effectiveness, I'm not talking about blasting).

To me PF2 is starting to look like PF martial edition, I guess is because the caster's blogs has not been that much exiting in comparison, but hopefully the actual playtest will prove me wrong.


Dragon78 wrote:
I really don't like bulk, maybe I would like to know the actual weight of an item or creature, maybe I would like actual weight calculations for encumbrance, lifting, telekinesis, etc.

I think you're in the minority there though. I mean, I don't know how much I will like Bulk, but I wouldn't ever bother with encumbrance if it wasn't for hero lab.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Captain Morgan wrote:
I think you're in the minority there though.

Oh, I've seen plenty of people that loathe bulk, myself included. I don't foresee using the system in any capacity so I'd like an option to use actual weights if a DM wants encumbrance checked.


6 people marked this as a favorite.
graystone wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I think you're in the minority there though.
Oh, I've seen plenty of people that loathe bulk, myself included. I don't foresee using the system in any capacity so I'd like an option to use actual weights if a DM wants encumbrance checked.

Without trying to sound dismissive, I think this is a case of a "vocal minority." I honestly think most people don't care enough about item weights to bother tracking them, and are therefore less likely to comment on the subject.

I think the goal of Bulk is to make the system less fiddly so that encumbrance is easier to track, and therefore more people WILL track it. Which I think is good to avoid STR dumping.

Grand Lodge

Was this all the information provided over the weekend?


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Captain Morgan wrote:
graystone wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I think you're in the minority there though.
Oh, I've seen plenty of people that loathe bulk, myself included. I don't foresee using the system in any capacity so I'd like an option to use actual weights if a DM wants encumbrance checked.

Without trying to sound dismissive, I think this is a case of a "vocal minority." I honestly think most people don't care enough about item weights to bother tracking them, and are therefore less likely to comment on the subject.

I think the goal of Bulk is to make the system less fiddly so that encumbrance is easier to track, and therefore more people WILL track it. Which I think is good to avoid STR dumping.

I'll probably ignore Bulk just as easily weights.

Shadow Lodge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Captain Morgan wrote:
graystone wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I think you're in the minority there though.
Oh, I've seen plenty of people that loathe bulk, myself included. I don't foresee using the system in any capacity so I'd like an option to use actual weights if a DM wants encumbrance checked.

Without trying to sound dismissive, I think this is a case of a "vocal minority." I honestly think most people don't care enough about item weights to bother tracking them, and are therefore less likely to comment on the subject.

I think the goal of Bulk is to make the system less fiddly so that encumbrance is easier to track, and therefore more people WILL track it. Which I think is good to avoid STR dumping.

Wasn't there a Starfinder post about someone's character not being able to pick up a downed party member because of Bulk? I believe it was a Trox that couldn't pick up a human.

There was never a need for Bulk either(that I know of). It just seems(to me) like it was made to make Carrying Capacity sound more Sci-Fi...


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Dragonborn3 wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
graystone wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I think you're in the minority there though.
Oh, I've seen plenty of people that loathe bulk, myself included. I don't foresee using the system in any capacity so I'd like an option to use actual weights if a DM wants encumbrance checked.

Without trying to sound dismissive, I think this is a case of a "vocal minority." I honestly think most people don't care enough about item weights to bother tracking them, and are therefore less likely to comment on the subject.

I think the goal of Bulk is to make the system less fiddly so that encumbrance is easier to track, and therefore more people WILL track it. Which I think is good to avoid STR dumping.

Wasn't there a Starfinder post about someone's character not being able to pick up a downed party member because of Bulk? I believe it was a Trox that couldn't pick up a human.

There was never a need for Bulk either(that I know of). It just seems(to me) like it was made to make Carrying Capacity sound more Sci-Fi...

Bulk is easier to track. My group is actually tracking encumbrance now that we're playing Starfinder and using bulk, whereas we just handwaved it before except in special cases like picking up a person.

Bulk also helps track item volume in addition to item weight, so it's more realistic. 100 pounds of pillows is infinitely larger than 100 pounds of bricks, and a character who could pick up the bricks really should not be able to pick up the pillows.


I like bulk in general I find it easier to use. That said the fact that bulk is linear (or at least in starfinder it is liner) means that high strength characters are a lot weaker than they are in PF1 carrying capacity rules (which are super linear).


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Stellar blog post!

I quite like the fighter description; it reminds me not only of the best parts from tome of the nine swords (varied stances/special attacks/reactions) but of some of the fantasy fulfillments I've looked for, and often failed to find in a pure fighter in pf1. Looking forward to playtesting this one ^.^

I like that domains seem a lot more important and useful to the pf2 cleric than in pf1, where my best and often only relevant combat option (at least at low levels) was some form of channel energy. It's been a long time since I played one because that playstyle just doesn't give me any sort of fantasy fulfillment. Maybe with stronger domains, and good deity tie-ins from feats/boons the class will start to feel interesting again. This is definitely a good start.

The rogue is definitely going in the right direction; I like how concealment is taken a step further, and buried into their combat options---giving them a built-in surprise strike, and some better maneuverability options. The intelligent dabbler is probably my preferred fantasy fulfillment here, so I also feel like the magical jury-rigging element has a lot of potential for the class and I think it'll be fun flavoring other features, like slippery mind to fit into this sort of character concept. It'll be interesting to see where development of the different themes presented stands by the time of the playtest.

The thing I like most about the 2.0 paladin remains the rejigged paladin's code which I think will go the farthest in creating love for the class, and hearing that non LG paladin alignments are under consideration for post-playtest material; that said I this reveal definitely cements LG paladins as the deity empowered warriors of justice we all know and love. I think they will definitely hit their fantasy fulfillment marks, and I like the focus on beneficial auras here; a paladin should definitely be a leader of sorts who can confer these sorts of blessings on others of their alignment/beliefs. Which is where I see a failing, actually; if you have a LG, and a LE paladin in the same party and they're both using these auras, I wonder if they'd really want to deal the other's good/evil damage? Especially considering things like casting evil spells are now explicitly evil. Similarly, what if you have say an evil cleric in the party who wants to reject the aura because it's not from their deity? Or a summoner whose devils shouldn't get a holy buff? (ok, these are fringe arguments and the easiest solution is not to play a paladin with those sorts of characters, but this will come up again and probably more than once) I wonder if litanies would work better as a single-action allies can take in order to opt-into paladin auras

I'd heard the gauntlet was a stat-giving item, and was fully prepared to hate it going in based on that and nothing else. The actual version presented here is very fun; I like it, it has a wonderful integration of flavor and theme into its mechanics. I'm very sick of belts/headbands of +whatever, but if they're presented similarly to this I'd enjoy having them in the new system.

More familiars? Better baseline familiar options? Ancestral familiars? Please and thank you. They've really grown on me through pf1, especially after the release of the familiar folio, and focused archetypes like the magical child vigilante. I'm really excited to play around with this and see what sorts of characters it enables/empowers. Really cool, and possibly my favorite reveal so far.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Magog wrote:
Really? Cuz I awlways thought rougues were supposed to be scouts and skill monkeys rather than killing machines, but I guess my grognard is showing.

I agree the rogue's primary role is not (should not be) killing machine, but I don't think "skill monkey" is a role at all. "Skills" is just a 3E-and-onwards term for other skills, those not central enough to have their own cool subsystem like the combat system, spellcasting, powers, special abilities. No class should be defined by being the master of the "none of the above" category.


I have never thought of rogue as a killing machine and I don't think that should be their role. But I do think they should be skilled, skilled at what should depend on the character. I also don't think that all rogues should be good at dealing with traps...though hopefully someone in your party will be;)


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Captain Morgan wrote:
Without trying to sound dismissive, I think this is a case of a "vocal minority."

Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. I can only tell you I don't, others I've met/know haven't liked it and I haven't seen an overwhelming number one way or the other on these threads.

Captain Morgan wrote:
I think the goal of Bulk is to make the system less fiddly so that encumbrance is easier to track, and therefore more people WILL track it.

From my experience, people that don't want "fiddly" things aren't going to embrace them if you stealthily change their name. There is a reason they didn't make you track each and every material component: it's SUPER easy to subtract -1 each time you cast a spell but "fiddly" all the same.

As to easy... Not so much IMO.For anyone that already knows the old pathfinder system AND is familiar with pounds, it seems counterintuitive and looking at starfinder it also seems to have some glaring issues like characters and object weights as there is no way to estimate volume/unwieldiness so there is an undefined modifier added to figure out bulk of unlisted items. I can google how much a table weighs but it's bulk?

Captain Morgan wrote:
Which I think is good to avoid STR dumping.

Is there any indication that STR dumping is even a possibility? As far as I can see, 8 or 10 are the starting points.

PS: As this is the Hail the Gauntlet! blog, we most likely should drop the bulk debate. I'm sure there is a thread on that topic we can take it to. ;)


Dragonborn3 wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
graystone wrote:
Captain Morgan wrote:
I think you're in the minority there though.
Oh, I've seen plenty of people that loathe bulk, myself included. I don't foresee using the system in any capacity so I'd like an option to use actual weights if a DM wants encumbrance checked.

Without trying to sound dismissive, I think this is a case of a "vocal minority." I honestly think most people don't care enough about item weights to bother tracking them, and are therefore less likely to comment on the subject.

I think the goal of Bulk is to make the system less fiddly so that encumbrance is easier to track, and therefore more people WILL track it. Which I think is good to avoid STR dumping.

Wasn't there a Starfinder post about someone's character not being able to pick up a downed party member because of Bulk? I believe it was a Trox that couldn't pick up a human.

There was never a need for Bulk either(that I know of). It just seems(to me) like it was made to make Carrying Capacity sound more Sci-Fi...

I don't know why his GM did not just choose to resolve it with a reposition/grab combat maneuver tho. It's what I've always done, including in PF. Someone really added the weight of the stuff the character standing has, plus the weight of the down character, plus the weight of the gear the down character has, before ruling if he can or cannnot carry a down team mate? That sounds like a huge waste of time for me, but mileages vary and such.


So when't that next blog?

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Deranged Stabby-Man wrote:
So when't that next blog?

This coming Friday. This last Friday and Today's standard Blogs were canceled on account of PaizoCon. We only got this one because people were really generous giving to charity.

151 to 200 of 238 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Archive / Pathfinder / Playtests & Prerelease Discussions / Pathfinder Playtest / Pathfinder Playtest Prerelease Discussion / Paizo Blog: Hail the Gauntlet! All Messageboards