Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide

4.70/5 (based on 10 ratings)
Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add Print Edition $49.99

Add PDF $19.99

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

Ready to go beyond the basics? Expand the limits of what's possible with the Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide! This 272-page Pathfinder Second Edition rulebook contains exciting new rules options for player characters, adding even more depth of choice to your Pathfinder game! Inside you will find brand new ancestries, heritages, and four new classes: the shrewd investigator, the mysterious oracle, the daring swashbuckler, and the hex-slinging witch! The must-have Advanced Player's Guide also includes exciting new options for all your favorite Core Rulebook classes and tons of new backgrounds, general feats, spells, items, and 40 flexible archetypes to customize your play experience even further!

The Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide includes:

  • Four new classes: the investigator, oracle, swashbuckler, and witch!
  • Five new ancestries and five heritages for any ancestry: celestial aasimars, curious catfolk, hagspawned changelings, vampiric dhampirs, fate-touched duskwalkers, scaled kobolds, fierce orcs, fiendish tieflings, industrious ratfolk, and feathered tengu!
  • 40 new archetypes including multiclass archetypes for the four new classes, Pathfinder favorites like the cavalier, dragon disciple, shadowdancer, and vigilante, and brand-new archetypes like the familiar master and the shield-bearing iron wall!
  • New class options for all twelve classes from the Pathfinder Core Rulebook including champions of evil, genie and shadow sorcerers, zen archer monks, rogue masterminds, spellcasting rangers, and more!
  • Even more exciting new rules, from rare and unique backgrounds to investigative skill feats, from spells and rituals like reincarnate and create demiplane to new items including special wands with unusual effects and exciting potions worthy of a witch's cauldron.

ISBN-13: 978-1-64078-257-0



Available Formats

The Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide is also available as:

Other Resources: This product is also available on the following platforms:

Hero Lab Online
Fantasy Grounds Virtual Tabletop
Pathfinder Nexus on Demiplane
Roll20 Virtual Tabletop
SoundSet on Syrinscape
Archives of Nethys

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Rulebook Subscription.

Product Availability

Print Edition:

Available now

Ships from our warehouse in 11 to 20 business days.

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO2105


See Also:

1 to 5 of 10 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

4.70/5 (based on 10 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

4/5


APG meets Expectations as it Concludes the Original Vision of PF2

5/5

The Advanced Player's Guide is the capstone piece to the original vision for Pathfinder Second Edition. The PF2 CRB was a whopping 640 pages and Paizo still had more content ready to go in it that they just could not release due to space issues. Everything that was left out was designated to be released over the next year in either the Lost Omens line of books or in the Advanced Players Guide. Things that were not quite fully fleshed out for the original release were then worked out. Four additional classes were put through a playtest and are featured in the APG; the Investigator, Oracle, Swashbuckler, and Witch. Five new ancestries are in the APG while three more were released in the Lost Omens Character Guide in 2019.

One of the new concepts in PF2 is that of Versatile Heritages. Instead of having separate ancestry categories for Aasimar, Tiefling, Changling, Dhampir, and Duskwalker, they are now what is called a versatile heritage. These modify the ancestry choice the player made for the character via the heritage selection. This is a very interesting concept as it provides many additional options for players. These five are just the first of multiple waves of versatile heritages which will be released over time by Paizo.

For those who have been desiring more options for characters, the APG delivers. The four new classes have their dedications for multiclassing along with 38 new archetypes. In addition, each of the 12 original classes gained some new options to choose from as did each of the original ancestries. Not all of the options are as viable as other options, but much of that will depend on the theme of a campaign and how GMs choose to allow players to select archetypes. I can envision some GMs designating some archetypes as free additional choices for players in that they can take one with no additional feat penalties because they give added depth to the campaign's theme such as the dandy or celebrity. Other GMs could emphasize select archetypes like the gladiator as a free archetype for their campaign's theme. The potential for some very interesting campaign themes definitely exists with these archetypes.

One of the things I was watching for in this book was the dreaded power creep. I do not see it present. None of the archetypes seems to overwhelm any of the original classes in terms of raw power while instead they augment them. This was a goal of Paizo from the beginning and it seems to have been met. The APG does what it was intended to do. It expands the options available to players at the initial creation of their characters and as those characters level up over time. Perhaps the best part of that is the APG continues to expand upon building characters as concepts and not as a collection of soulless numbers. While the numbers are important to determining how well a character can do something, the concept behind the character matters more. PF2 put the role back into roleplaying and the APG continues that vision.

Quote Reply
Report Edit


Can't-miss book for anyone at the table

5/5

Especially, and this is obvious, the Advanced Player's Guide is a terrific resource for players--but that doesn't mean GMs don't have a lot to gain from it!

Just on the strength of classes and ancestries, this book is about 150% the size of the core rulebook. Every existing class gets a major boost of options and feats and the same goes for existing ancestries. Adding in four new classes and five new ancestries on top of that is an amazing boon. True, some get more (or better) options than others, but I would say just on character creation alone, this book well beyond justifies its price point.

And that's just the base.

Add in universal heritages, which seem mechanically reasonable but almost unreasonably bursting with flavor, lore, or character development hooks. Add in the massive chunk of archetypes, which enables so many different nuances of character concepts without always landing on the somewhat clunky multiclassing rules. Add in a shot in the arm to spell lists, item lists, skill and general feat lists, and so on?

I just don't know that more needs to be said. This book is bursting with great content--and it's guaranteed to turn the heads of pretty much any player with at least a couple of its options!


Solid guide of varying quality

4/5

This is a solid addition to 2E and well worth adding to your library, although uneven or even disappointing in places. It feels something like a mix of 1E Advanced Player Guide and Advanced Class guide with less ancestries and classes but I like that: nice to have a bit of both rather than to get a bunch of one while waiting 6-12 months for the other.

Pros:
Witch, Oracle, and Swashbuckler are well designed with clever rethinking of mechanics that adds new dimensions to the classes and definitely improves playability with respect to other classes. I especially liked the witch patrons that could make your witch more like a prophet or a fate-weaver while still providing the usual curse, night and wild options for your classic scary witch. The oracle curses are much more interesting- and much more of plusses with minuses than the old version. And swashbuckler seems both quite playable and fun.

Versatile heritages are a great re-think, one of the best parts of the guide. While less potent at low level, the ability to add tiefling to any race, plus the new versatile heritages and the promise of more, greatly expands the range of character concepts.

Archetypes are nicely fleshed out. While the system was in the core rules, they don't really shine until here. Many will appeal only to a specific concept but can have their uses while others are significantly useful for those focusing on combat in particular. You will recognize many names from prestige classes of yore. While not, in general, as potent as an old prestige class, the move to archetypes is both more graceful and more manageable for all- players, refs and game designers. Many can be taken at lower levels and others at higher levels.

While familiars only get used so often in my games (more so by me as a player :) the extra abilities, feats and specific familiars are great. I especially like that it is both practical and clearly explained how to get an imp or faerie dragon.

Feats and spells are nice, mostly as they relate to new classes and archetypes. For existing classes, probably less useful but there are exceptions.

More middling:
Investigator seems suited to a limited range of campaign types. I wish it was a little less detective-like and more lore focused, but I think for the right players and campaigns, a good option.

The new races, while definitely a nice addition beyond too human-like variants, are also unlikely to get used much in my campaigns, except maybe catfolk, although they all seem well executed.

The new backgrounds are so-so. They are nice enough and its not like backgrounds are a particularly eye-catching part of the game, although it is a nice mechanic. The rare ones were a bit disappointing to me, but again the real flavor of them is left to the player in character creation so they are solid enough.

The core classes additions were a very mixed bag. Some are quite interesting and others are so narrowly drawn as to appeal to very few players. I'm thinking of you druid, where the additions are not likely to apply to most of the druid orders. In general, core classes deserve another round of additions like the 1E combat, magic and other guides. The current crop of goodies may disappoint many.

Overalll:
A strong guide. Hopefully upcoming Golarion and other guides will continue to flesh out 2E.

For those looking for more ancestries, classes and archetypes, I would certainly start with this guide but note that the Golarion books, both already published and planned, add a fair amount, almost all of which can be used in non-Golarion settings. For example, apparently many of the 1E Advanced Race Guide ancestries will be coming to a Golarion guide early next year.


Core Rulebook 2

5/5

This should have been in the Core Rulebook, but that would have made for an obscene word count. The content in this book is essential to the PF2 experience, and I can't imagine the game without it.


1 to 5 of 10 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
451 to 500 of 1,277 << first < prev | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | next > last >>
Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Squiggit wrote:
First World Bard wrote:
Bonus damage should probably be tied to agile or finesse weapons
Kinda hoping that's not the case. It fits with the Investigator to some degree, but the game could really use more options that aren't centered around agile and finesse weapons, especially with Swashbucklers in the same book having that bias too (or at least they did last time I checked).

I'd prefer Investigators not be tied to such weapons, but I'd also prefer them to be viable with such weapons, which might not work well unless they get some additional bonus wielding them.

Personally, I'm hoping for something like a bonus to damage, but an increased bonus if the weapon is Agile or Finesse. We'll have to see if they go that route.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

I can't wait to see what we get via the aasimars, changelings, dhampirs, and tieflings!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I'd love it if we got a preview/teaser of the coming ancestries on the Paizo blog like there was for the Lost Omens Character Guide. I cannot wait to get some lore on a bunch of them.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

I just want to see an archetype or two. I’ve been very curious about the changes to some of the classics (Dragon Disciple, Eldritch Archer) and the new ones like Beast Master


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber
LizardMage wrote:
I just want to see an archetype or two. I’ve been very curious about the changes to some of the classics (Dragon Disciple, Eldritch Archer) and the new ones like Beast Master

Have to say I'm MOSTLY interested in what the changes to the dragon disciple is, as I can see it being one of the most difficult ones to convert to 2e (as it gave quite a load of ability bonuses in 1e which 2e tries to avoid like a hot iron).


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
KageNoRyu wrote:
LizardMage wrote:
I just want to see an archetype or two. I’ve been very curious about the changes to some of the classics (Dragon Disciple, Eldritch Archer) and the new ones like Beast Master
Have to say I'm MOSTLY interested in what the changes to the dragon disciple is, as I can see it being one of the most difficult ones to convert to 2e (as it gave quite a load of ability bonuses in 1e which 2e tries to avoid like a hot iron).

I suspect they will do similarly with the dragon disciple as they did with the fighter multiclass archetype:

You get extra hitpoints for each archetype feat you select if your class hp is under 12.

Or maybe just a single archetype feat, maybe called "Draconic resilience" or something: "if your class gives you 10 or fewer hitpoints, gain 2 bonus hitpoints per level" Now I am not sure I phrased that correctly, but I believe you understand what I mean.


Dragon Disciple is one of my favorite PRCs from 3.0. I look forward to hiw it will be changed for 2e.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Definitely agree with others about hoping to see a blog post to preview an archetype. We have no specifics yet on any of them, just general gists on what they offer.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Still super looking forward to this, especially now that we know about that heart's bond ritual those iconics used in that really gorgeous story.


Iv been wondering if the new ancestries are going to be uncommon or not. Does anyone have any insight into that? It would make sense that they are.


Yigg wrote:
Iv been wondering if the new ancestries are going to be uncommon or not. Does anyone have any insight into that? It would make sense that they are.

No info on the ancestries. Dhampir was at one point in development an uncommon heritage, though.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm really hoping for a Winter Witch archetype for the Witch class as well as a Healing/Support-based archetype (maybe called the Hex Channeler again)?

Silver Crusade

Berselius wrote:
I'm really hoping for a Winter Witch archetype for the Witch class as well as a Healing/Support-based archetype (maybe called the Hex Channeler again)?

Not sure there is much design space for that. Between medicine skill and the heal spell it's pretty easy to cover healing needs. Not a lot of room between that minimal investment and a dedicated healing cleric.

Design Manager

21 people marked this as a favorite.

Witches can support really well on their own, but if extra support from an archetype is your thing, we announced at Paizocon the Blessed One archetype for every character, which is great for quick emergency healing / support / condition removal and a fun flavor about being granted this power by a deity...whether you wanted to get it and actually like the deity or not.


One thing i realized in that preview, and maybe this can be cleared up is what form of negative healing does dhampir get. Because negative healing is listed in two places. Negative healing gets its own writeup in bestiary 2 but assuming the player doesnt have that they would look at the undead tag and simply take it from there.

Taking it from the undead trait as it is worded would mean they take damage from positive healing, are healed by negative damage, and technically can still be healed by normal healing such as sooth or healing potions. Which is likely the intended result given ancestries dont tend to really get negative traits anymore. But it also means they can heal themselves by targeting themselves with vampiric touch which is quite odd.

If you make it that they simply get the new negative healing trait from bestiary 2 it clarifies that they take no damage from negative damage which eliminates the whole target themselves with vampiric touch aspect but still allows them to be healed by sooth and healing potions and such.

I actually hope it is intended that they can be healed by sooth and potions and such since healing potions in 2e are no longer spells in bottles and healers are not all positive healing. It just depends on hownyou read the trait. I think some players may rule that like the undead trait they dont heal by normal healing effects which would be a huge nerf.

Basically, im just curious if you are supposed to use the proper Negative Healing creature trait from bestiary 2 or if you are supposed to derive the effects from the undead trait. Likely is cleaner to use the bestiary 2 trait, but someone without that book may be confused as to where to find the "Negative Healing Ability". Unless of course its also detailed in the APG. Or maybe its entirely self contained in the description... you simply take damage from positive healing and heal from negative effects that specifically mention undead... which would reduce the list a bit but also not allow the odd vamperic touch self healing. It seems the dhampir negative healing would benefit from a more clarified description that is entirely self contained.


At what time do the Pdf versions release usually?


3 people marked this as a favorite.

They've established that the Negative Healing trait from bestiary 2 is the wording intended for all instances of Negative Healing.

Sovereign Court

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Yigg wrote:

One thing i realized in that preview, and maybe this can be cleared up is what form of negative healing does dhampir get. Because negative healing is listed in two places. Negative healing gets its own writeup in bestiary 2 but assuming the player doesnt have that they would look at the undead tag and simply take it from there.

Taking it from the undead trait as it is worded would mean they take damage from positive healing, are healed by negative damage, and technically can still be healed by normal healing such as sooth or healing potions. Which is likely the intended result given ancestries dont tend to really get negative traits anymore. But it also means they can heal themselves by targeting themselves with vampiric touch which is quite odd.

If you make it that they simply get the new negative healing trait from bestiary 2 it clarifies that they take no damage from negative damage which eliminates the whole target themselves with vampiric touch aspect but still allows them to be healed by sooth and healing potions and such.

I actually hope it is intended that they can be healed by sooth and potions and such since healing potions in 2e are no longer spells in bottles and healers are not all positive healing. It just depends on hownyou read the trait. I think some players may rule that like the undead trait they dont heal by normal healing effects which would be a huge nerf.

Basically, im just curious if you are supposed to use the proper Negative Healing creature trait from bestiary 2 or if you are supposed to derive the effects from the undead trait. Likely is cleaner to use the bestiary 2 trait, but someone without that book may be confused as to where to find the "Negative Healing Ability". Unless of course its also detailed in the APG. Or maybe its entirely self contained in the description... you simply take damage from positive healing and heal from negative effects that specifically mention undead... which would reduce the list a bit but also not allow the odd vamperic touch self...

If I understood correctly, the idea that negative damage heals undead and that positive healing damages undead - that's first edition thinking. In this edition damage is damage and healing is healing.

Bestiary 2 specifies this most neatly:

Bestiary 2 p. 305 wrote:
Negative Healing A creature with negative healing draws health from negative energy rather than positive energy. It is damaged by positive damage and is not healed by positive healing effects. It does not take negative damage, and it is healed by negative effects that heal undead.

Notice how it never actually has to say anything about "being damaged by positive healing" because healing isn't damage.

Soothe doesn't specify positive or negative, just "targets: 1 willing living creature". So that should work on dhampirs regardless.


Any idea when the options might be PFS legal?

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.

Some time after they’re released.


Rysky wrote:
Some time after they’re released.

I would hope not before...

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.

That would be fun :3


Alessandro Delle Cese wrote:
At what time do the Pdf versions release usually?

Always on the street date, July 30th (in this case).


A month.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

If you have a subscription, pdfs are made available when your order ships. If not, they are available to purchase on the day of release. I've noticed them available shortly after midnight on release day (I am in Paizo's timezone).


What day can I go into my LGS and buy this?

I must support it during these trying times.

Design Manager

27 people marked this as a favorite.
Evan Tarlton wrote:
If you have a subscription, pdfs are made available when your order ships. If not, they are available to purchase on the day of release. I've noticed them available shortly after midnight on release day (I am in Paizo's timezone).

For some reason, my brain decided to read this as "I am in Paizo's timeline," and on behalf of the rest of us in this timeline, I want to say, we are sorry you wound up here. Please check your Paizo subscriptions and see if you can get yourself switched to a different timeline, like the one where unicorns are real and their horns can magically cure all ailments.

(Note: please don't contact customer service about getting your timeline shifted. Not only do they have a huge backlog of e-mails, but also, the paradox after the last time they went the extra mile and shifted someone into another timeline is what brought the warehouse raptors upon us. Who knows what would happen this time.)


Grankless wrote:
They've established that the Negative Healing trait from bestiary 2 is the wording intended for all instances of Negative Healing.

Where did they establish that? Them simply making it part of bestiary 2 or them saying it?

Wonder if they will errata how the Undead trait handles being healed by negative damage or if its intended that they can be healed by things such as Vamperic touch.


No pdf availability yet? :(

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Alessandro Delle Cese wrote:
No pdf availability yet? :(

Unless you're a subscriber there won't be a pdf until the street date, which is the 30th July, not June.

If you are a subscriber, the shipping window starts on the 13th, I think.

Silver Crusade

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

It does rather clearly state that the PDF will be available on July 30th.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I must be a bit odd, because the thing I'm most curious about regarding this book is how much they've done with general feats and skill feats. The section in the core book is a bit thin.


Staffan Johansson wrote:
I must be a bit odd, because the thing I'm most curious about regarding this book is how much they've done with general feats and skill feats. The section in the core book is a bit thin.

You think so? I like the selection so far.


Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
Staffan Johansson wrote:
I must be a bit odd, because the thing I'm most curious about regarding this book is how much they've done with general feats and skill feats. The section in the core book is a bit thin.
You think so? I like the selection so far.

I mean, it's a good selection for the core book, but it's a field where there's lots more room to grow. Non-skill general feats in particular could use some love. Pretty much everyone I've seen has taken Fleet, Toughness, Canny Acumen, or Untrained Improvisation, because the others are kind of meh. And the selection of higher-level non-skill general feats are pretty much non-existent.

Skill feats are awesome in some cases, but some skills suffer from not having too much in the way of cool stuff. Society, for example, doesn't have any Master-level skill feats of its own, only "any Recall Knowledge skill" feats. Medicine is great when it comes to feats for the most part, with multiple feats giving concrete and useful benefits, but doesn't have any Master feats either.


Staffan Johansson wrote:
Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
Staffan Johansson wrote:
I must be a bit odd, because the thing I'm most curious about regarding this book is how much they've done with general feats and skill feats. The section in the core book is a bit thin.
You think so? I like the selection so far.

I mean, it's a good selection for the core book, but it's a field where there's lots more room to grow. Non-skill general feats in particular could use some love. Pretty much everyone I've seen has taken Fleet, Toughness, Canny Acumen, or Untrained Improvisation, because the others are kind of meh. And the selection of higher-level non-skill general feats are pretty much non-existent.

Skill feats are awesome in some cases, but some skills suffer from not having too much in the way of cool stuff. Society, for example, doesn't have any Master-level skill feats of its own, only "any Recall Knowledge skill" feats. Medicine is great when it comes to feats for the most part, with multiple feats giving concrete and useful benefits, but doesn't have any Master feats either.

Yeah, I love the feats we got, but it is a bit thin in some areas. I am also looking forward to new toys to play with.

Design Manager

6 people marked this as a favorite.
Yigg wrote:
Grankless wrote:
They've established that the Negative Healing trait from bestiary 2 is the wording intended for all instances of Negative Healing.

Where did they establish that? Them simply making it part of bestiary 2 or them saying it?

Wonder if they will errata how the Undead trait handles being healed by negative damage or if its intended that they can be healed by things such as Vamperic touch.

This is really a topic for its own thread, but the undead trait's quick glossary definition doesn't say it's healed by negative damage, it says it's healed by negative energy. "Undead creatures are damaged by positive energy, are healed by negative energy, and don’t benefit from healing effects." Negative healing describes it in more detail, and should have been in the first Bestiary, where we use it but the definition is missing.


Staffan Johansson wrote:
Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
Staffan Johansson wrote:
I must be a bit odd, because the thing I'm most curious about regarding this book is how much they've done with general feats and skill feats. The section in the core book is a bit thin.
You think so? I like the selection so far.

I mean, it's a good selection for the core book, but it's a field where there's lots more room to grow. Non-skill general feats in particular could use some love. Pretty much everyone I've seen has taken Fleet, Toughness, Canny Acumen, or Untrained Improvisation, because the others are kind of meh. And the selection of higher-level non-skill general feats are pretty much non-existent.

Skill feats are awesome in some cases, but some skills suffer from not having too much in the way of cool stuff. Society, for example, doesn't have any Master-level skill feats of its own, only "any Recall Knowledge skill" feats. Medicine is great when it comes to feats for the most part, with multiple feats giving concrete and useful benefits, but doesn't have any Master feats either.

I too hope there are a good spattering of skill and general feats. It's all told pretty low on my list of interests for the APG, but it's definitely there.


Ah, how one word can alter so much. Thanks for clarifying that. My brain read energy as damage. I do see now that the Negative trait says it covers 3 different effects so if it doesnt detail it in the effect of the spell itself then it does not have undead healing properties. That works. I appreciate the response.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This is probably going to feel like the longest month of my life. I hope my copy gets shipped a little earlier but I'm not going to count on it or I'll be disappointed the every day for the last two weeks of the month T.T


Since I'm blanking on it can someone tell me what the main stat for each of these classes is?


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
VerBeeker wrote:
Since I'm blanking on it can someone tell me what the main stat for each of these classes is?

Int for Witch

Cha for Oracle
Dex/Cha for Swash
Not sure about investigator


VerBeeker wrote:
Since I'm blanking on it can someone tell me what the main stat for each of these classes is?

I don't know if they've changed any since the playtest, but I doubt it. So:

Investigator - Intelligence
Oracle - Charisma
Swashbuckler - Dexterity
Witch - Intelligence


Sporkedup wrote:
Staffan Johansson wrote:
Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
Staffan Johansson wrote:
I must be a bit odd, because the thing I'm most curious about regarding this book is how much they've done with general feats and skill feats. The section in the core book is a bit thin.
You think so? I like the selection so far.

I mean, it's a good selection for the core book, but it's a field where there's lots more room to grow. Non-skill general feats in particular could use some love. Pretty much everyone I've seen has taken Fleet, Toughness, Canny Acumen, or Untrained Improvisation, because the others are kind of meh. And the selection of higher-level non-skill general feats are pretty much non-existent.

Skill feats are awesome in some cases, but some skills suffer from not having too much in the way of cool stuff. Society, for example, doesn't have any Master-level skill feats of its own, only "any Recall Knowledge skill" feats. Medicine is great when it comes to feats for the most part, with multiple feats giving concrete and useful benefits, but doesn't have any Master feats either.

I too hope there are a good spattering of skill and general feats. It's all told pretty low on my list of interests for the APG, but it's definitely there.

My highst lvl character is almost 3rd level so I havent looked at many excoet the crafting feats.

Grand Archive

Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Staffan Johansson wrote:
VerBeeker wrote:
Since I'm blanking on it can someone tell me what the main stat for each of these classes is?

I don't know if they've changed any since the playtest, but I doubt it. So:

Investigator - Intelligence
Oracle - Charisma
Swashbuckler - Dexterity
Witch - Intelligence

During PaizoCon they have shown the first page of each class, and those are right.


the art looks great as well


Pathfinder Card Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Staffan Johansson wrote:
I mean, it's a good selection for the core book, but it's a field where there's lots more room to grow. Non-skill general feats in particular could use some love. Pretty much everyone I've seen has taken Fleet, Toughness, Canny Acumen, or Untrained Improvisation, because the others are kind of meh. And the selection of higher-level non-skill general feats are pretty much non-existent.

I’ve taken Ancestral Paragon a bunch. And if your ancestry’s feats are meh, Adopted Ancestry is pretty good. But in general, yeah those fears are very well represented in builds. I’m excited to see what the Level 19 general feat ends up being.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
First World Bard wrote:
I’m excited to see what the Level 19 general feat ends up being.

The obvious answer is something that allows you to bump a Master ability to Legendary. Most classes have a few Master abilities that they might want to raise, so there's some choice. It might seem like a "must have" feat, which they're trying to avoid, but if they are going to have a must have feat then putting it at 19th level makes sense.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm also very excited for skill feats. I hope there's a legendary acrobatics feat, feels like there should be.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gaulin wrote:
I'm also very excited for skill feats. I hope there's a legendary acrobatics feat, feels like there should be.

I agree

451 to 500 of 1,277 << first < prev | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.