Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide

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Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide
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Ready to go beyond the basics? Expand the limits of what's possible with the Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide! This 272-page Pathfinder Second Edition rulebook contains exciting new rules options for player characters, adding even more depth of choice to your Pathfinder game! Inside you will find brand new ancestries, heritages, and four new classes: the shrewd investigator, the mysterious oracle, the daring swashbuckler, and the hex-slinging witch! The must-have Advanced Player's Guide also includes exciting new options for all your favorite Core Rulebook classes and tons of new backgrounds, general feats, spells, items, and 40 flexible archetypes to customize your play experience even further!

The Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide includes:

  • Four new classes: the investigator, oracle, swashbuckler, and witch!
  • Five new ancestries and five heritages for any ancestry: celestial aasimars, curious catfolk, hagspawned changelings, vampiric dhampirs, fate-touched duskwalkers, scaled kobolds, fierce orcs, fiendish tieflings, industrious ratfolk, and feathered tengu!
  • 40 new archetypes including multiclass archetypes for the four new classes, Pathfinder favorites like the cavalier, dragon disciple, shadowdancer, and vigilante, and brand-new archetypes like the familiar master and the shield-bearing iron wall!
  • New class options for all twelve classes from the Pathfinder Core Rulebook including champions of evil, genie and shadow sorcerers, zen archer monks, rogue masterminds, spellcasting rangers, and more!
  • Even more exciting new rules, from rare and unique backgrounds to investigative skill feats, from spells and rituals like reincarnate and create demiplane to new items including special wands with unusual effects and exciting potions worthy of a witch's cauldron.

ISBN-13: 978-1-64078-257-0



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4/5


APG meets Expectations as it Concludes the Original Vision of PF2

5/5

The Advanced Player's Guide is the capstone piece to the original vision for Pathfinder Second Edition. The PF2 CRB was a whopping 640 pages and Paizo still had more content ready to go in it that they just could not release due to space issues. Everything that was left out was designated to be released over the next year in either the Lost Omens line of books or in the Advanced Players Guide. Things that were not quite fully fleshed out for the original release were then worked out. Four additional classes were put through a playtest and are featured in the APG; the Investigator, Oracle, Swashbuckler, and Witch. Five new ancestries are in the APG while three more were released in the Lost Omens Character Guide in 2019.

One of the new concepts in PF2 is that of Versatile Heritages. Instead of having separate ancestry categories for Aasimar, Tiefling, Changling, Dhampir, and Duskwalker, they are now what is called a versatile heritage. These modify the ancestry choice the player made for the character via the heritage selection. This is a very interesting concept as it provides many additional options for players. These five are just the first of multiple waves of versatile heritages which will be released over time by Paizo.

For those who have been desiring more options for characters, the APG delivers. The four new classes have their dedications for multiclassing along with 38 new archetypes. In addition, each of the 12 original classes gained some new options to choose from as did each of the original ancestries. Not all of the options are as viable as other options, but much of that will depend on the theme of a campaign and how GMs choose to allow players to select archetypes. I can envision some GMs designating some archetypes as free additional choices for players in that they can take one with no additional feat penalties because they give added depth to the campaign's theme such as the dandy or celebrity. Other GMs could emphasize select archetypes like the gladiator as a free archetype for their campaign's theme. The potential for some very interesting campaign themes definitely exists with these archetypes.

One of the things I was watching for in this book was the dreaded power creep. I do not see it present. None of the archetypes seems to overwhelm any of the original classes in terms of raw power while instead they augment them. This was a goal of Paizo from the beginning and it seems to have been met. The APG does what it was intended to do. It expands the options available to players at the initial creation of their characters and as those characters level up over time. Perhaps the best part of that is the APG continues to expand upon building characters as concepts and not as a collection of soulless numbers. While the numbers are important to determining how well a character can do something, the concept behind the character matters more. PF2 put the role back into roleplaying and the APG continues that vision.

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Can't-miss book for anyone at the table

5/5

Especially, and this is obvious, the Advanced Player's Guide is a terrific resource for players--but that doesn't mean GMs don't have a lot to gain from it!

Just on the strength of classes and ancestries, this book is about 150% the size of the core rulebook. Every existing class gets a major boost of options and feats and the same goes for existing ancestries. Adding in four new classes and five new ancestries on top of that is an amazing boon. True, some get more (or better) options than others, but I would say just on character creation alone, this book well beyond justifies its price point.

And that's just the base.

Add in universal heritages, which seem mechanically reasonable but almost unreasonably bursting with flavor, lore, or character development hooks. Add in the massive chunk of archetypes, which enables so many different nuances of character concepts without always landing on the somewhat clunky multiclassing rules. Add in a shot in the arm to spell lists, item lists, skill and general feat lists, and so on?

I just don't know that more needs to be said. This book is bursting with great content--and it's guaranteed to turn the heads of pretty much any player with at least a couple of its options!


Solid guide of varying quality

4/5

This is a solid addition to 2E and well worth adding to your library, although uneven or even disappointing in places. It feels something like a mix of 1E Advanced Player Guide and Advanced Class guide with less ancestries and classes but I like that: nice to have a bit of both rather than to get a bunch of one while waiting 6-12 months for the other.

Pros:
Witch, Oracle, and Swashbuckler are well designed with clever rethinking of mechanics that adds new dimensions to the classes and definitely improves playability with respect to other classes. I especially liked the witch patrons that could make your witch more like a prophet or a fate-weaver while still providing the usual curse, night and wild options for your classic scary witch. The oracle curses are much more interesting- and much more of plusses with minuses than the old version. And swashbuckler seems both quite playable and fun.

Versatile heritages are a great re-think, one of the best parts of the guide. While less potent at low level, the ability to add tiefling to any race, plus the new versatile heritages and the promise of more, greatly expands the range of character concepts.

Archetypes are nicely fleshed out. While the system was in the core rules, they don't really shine until here. Many will appeal only to a specific concept but can have their uses while others are significantly useful for those focusing on combat in particular. You will recognize many names from prestige classes of yore. While not, in general, as potent as an old prestige class, the move to archetypes is both more graceful and more manageable for all- players, refs and game designers. Many can be taken at lower levels and others at higher levels.

While familiars only get used so often in my games (more so by me as a player :) the extra abilities, feats and specific familiars are great. I especially like that it is both practical and clearly explained how to get an imp or faerie dragon.

Feats and spells are nice, mostly as they relate to new classes and archetypes. For existing classes, probably less useful but there are exceptions.

More middling:
Investigator seems suited to a limited range of campaign types. I wish it was a little less detective-like and more lore focused, but I think for the right players and campaigns, a good option.

The new races, while definitely a nice addition beyond too human-like variants, are also unlikely to get used much in my campaigns, except maybe catfolk, although they all seem well executed.

The new backgrounds are so-so. They are nice enough and its not like backgrounds are a particularly eye-catching part of the game, although it is a nice mechanic. The rare ones were a bit disappointing to me, but again the real flavor of them is left to the player in character creation so they are solid enough.

The core classes additions were a very mixed bag. Some are quite interesting and others are so narrowly drawn as to appeal to very few players. I'm thinking of you druid, where the additions are not likely to apply to most of the druid orders. In general, core classes deserve another round of additions like the 1E combat, magic and other guides. The current crop of goodies may disappoint many.

Overalll:
A strong guide. Hopefully upcoming Golarion and other guides will continue to flesh out 2E.

For those looking for more ancestries, classes and archetypes, I would certainly start with this guide but note that the Golarion books, both already published and planned, add a fair amount, almost all of which can be used in non-Golarion settings. For example, apparently many of the 1E Advanced Race Guide ancestries will be coming to a Golarion guide early next year.


Core Rulebook 2

5/5

This should have been in the Core Rulebook, but that would have made for an obscene word count. The content in this book is essential to the PF2 experience, and I can't imagine the game without it.


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3 people marked this as a favorite.
The-Magic-Sword wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:
Sporkedup wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:

Were are you getting this new info from? Oh wait*checks paizo twitch*

Yeah, that wasn't it :( I want info on APG too!

From this thread... scroll up?
I don't see Mark Seifter posting in thread unless I've missed something
I work in mysterious ways. ;)
Btw, can you confirm the "June" date in the article was a misprint?

I'd prefer confirmation that it was correct. ;)


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I would also very much like to know! But I'm pretty sure the date on this very page only recently changed from July to mid july


I can hardly wait.


Pathfinder Card Game, Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Psyched!


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

"...and a superpowered ki form for monks whose spell level is over 9."

I understood that reference.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

The dhampir versatile heritage has a 17th level ancestry feat. I don't think we've seen one of those before--I wonder if there will be others (particularly for the core ancestries, where the high-level options can be a bit underwhelming at the moment).


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Evan Tarlton wrote:

"...and a superpowered ki form for monks whose spell level is over 9."

I understood that reference.

I wonder if the book will include a scanner, so you can see what it says about the monks spell level.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm very intrigued to see one of my more burning questions partially answered in the preview. I've been very curious how Paizo planned to handle the subraces from 1e. Looks like the answer lies in those 1st level ancestry feats with the new "lineage" trait, though no other information on the trait itself. Very interesting, though now I'm more curious than ever to see the full answer.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Xethik wrote:
Evan Tarlton wrote:

"...and a superpowered ki form for monks whose spell level is over 9."

I understood that reference.

I wonder if the book will include a scanner, so you can see what it says about the monks spell level.

You gotta be careful with those things though. They're very breakable.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
VestOfHolding wrote:
I'm very intrigued to see one of my more burning questions partially answered in the preview. I've been very curious how Paizo planned to handle the subraces from 1e. Looks like the answer lies in those 1st level ancestry feats with the new "lineage" trait, though no other information on the trait itself. Very interesting, though now I'm more curious than ever to see the full answer.

That was indeed the first thing I looked for, and it seems like a good way to handle them. A Level 1 feat that can't be retrained, defining their lineage. That leaves space for new feats in the future featuring new lineages and entire feat chains linked to them.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
CorvusMask wrote:
I really hope the heritages introduced won't be super expensive in society :D

I too hope they aren't too expensive. I'm looking forward to a Human Dhampir Swashbuckler.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

I hope it includes ancestry feats for the new leshies in the beastairy or people are going to be tapping their feet waiting for them.

Paizo Employee Webstore Coordinator

4 people marked this as a favorite.
The-Magic-Sword wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:
Sporkedup wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:

Were are you getting this new info from? Oh wait*checks paizo twitch*

Yeah, that wasn't it :( I want info on APG too!

From this thread... scroll up?
I don't see Mark Seifter posting in thread unless I've missed something
I work in mysterious ways. ;)
Btw, can you confirm the "June" date in the article was a misprint?

It is indeed. This is still scheduled as a July release. :)


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Thank you very much for the clarification!


It is scheduled to be released at GEN CON correct? Is that event still taking place?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

"Reply hazy. Try again later."


4 people marked this as a favorite.
AnimatedPaper wrote:
"Reply hazy. Try again later."

That's my line.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Hey the official artwork as posted, and I love it.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I am totally loving Daji's new look.
Feiya is badass as always.


The more infomation I get about this book, the more my anticipation builds for it. July can't come soon enough.


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, LO Special Edition, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

Oh, I dunno. May 18th would be soon enough. :-)


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Love the cover


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Less than two weeks until we get more details at PaizoCon! I'm quite happy to be to the point where we're getting tidbits.

Silver Crusade

That new cover though! Fantastic.


I wonder if there are plans to get 4h3m to subscribers by the day they would be released at GEN CON?

Is it possible to get more than 1 copy per the subscription?

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.

It just occurred to me the subtle brilliance of making Vigilante an archetype. They can't be picked until, generally, 2nd level. Meaning your first level will act as your character's scrappy Year One/Origin story. Love it.

Verdant Wheel

Is there a possibility that a metamagic feat that deal with the incapacitation trait will appear in this book ? I love the system but i have a lot of player complaining about this trait.


kayman wrote:
Is there a possibility that a metamagic feat that deal with the incapacitation trait will appear in this book ? I love the system but i have a lot of player complaining about this trait.

I put the odds at approximately 0.0%.

Verdant Wheel

Sporkedup wrote:
kayman wrote:
Is there a possibility that a metamagic feat that deal with the incapacitation trait will appear in this book ? I love the system but i have a lot of player complaining about this trait.
I put the odds at approximately 0.0%.

The problem is that the only complain i am constant listening in my games it is in relation with the caster being to much nerfed. It is not a problem for me but i understand my players. The rest of the system is almost perfect.

But why do you think this change is impossible?

Would a change like that break the game?

Sorry for my bad english .

Silver Crusade

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
kayman wrote:
Sporkedup wrote:
kayman wrote:
Is there a possibility that a metamagic feat that deal with the incapacitation trait will appear in this book ? I love the system but i have a lot of player complaining about this trait.
I put the odds at approximately 0.0%.

The problem is that the only complain i constant listem in my games is with the caster being to much nerfed. It is not a problem for me but i understand my the players. The rest of the system is almost perfect.

But why do you think this change is impossible?

Would a change like that break the game?

Sorry for my bad english .

Casters taking out boss encounters with one spell thanks to targeting the weakest saves using twinked out DCs was a routine problem in PF1. Paizo decided to remove that.

Unsurprisingly, some cry foul at that being a nerf, but honestly, it was long overdue. A caster in a tough PF2 fight buffs their allies, debuffs the enemy, takes care of minions. They don't blink a boss out of existence with a DC 30 save-or-die spell.

Grand Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Now it’s the fighter swiping left with a single attack that eliminates the enemy.

Verdant Wheel

Gorbacz wrote:
kayman wrote:
Sporkedup wrote:
kayman wrote:
Is there a possibility that a metamagic feat that deal with the incapacitation trait will appear in this book ? I love the system but i have a lot of player complaining about this trait.
I put the odds at approximately 0.0%.

The problem is that the only complain i constant listem in my games is with the caster being to much nerfed. It is not a problem for me but i understand my the players. The rest of the system is almost perfect.

But why do you think this change is impossible?

Would a change like that break the game?

Sorry for my bad english .

Casters taking out boss encounters with one spell thanks to targeting the weakest saves using twinked out DCs was a routine problem in PF1. Paizo decided to remove that.

Unsurprisingly, some cry foul at that being a nerf, but honestly, it was long overdue.

I agree with you. As a GM i have no problem with this rule. But i will say again , a lot of player are angry and disappointed. Why not create a metamagic feat like Quickened Casting?


Yeah, sorry for my glibness, but I strongly, strongly suspect the Incapacitation trait is here to stay. And I even more strongly suspect that trying to patch it through a metamagic feat is not how they would fix it. That would have so many spiraling ramifications for all casters, especially multiclass types as well. Definite feat tax for anyone who ever wants to cast one these now definite boss-wiping spells.

Paizo Employee

4 people marked this as a favorite.
kayman wrote:

I agree with you. As a GM i have no problem with this rule. But i will say again , a lot of player are angry and disappointed. Why not create a metamagic feat like Quickened Casting?

Because a feat that lets you insta-gib bosses is so good it becomes basically mandatory. Then everyone takes it, and there becomes no point to having included the limitation in the first place.

Quickened Casting gives you one extra action, once per day. A feat to remove the incapacitation trait would be vastly more powerful. For example, say we have a group of 4 players fighting a boss monster. If my wizard uses Quickened Casting to cast fireball as a single action, he might get to cast one more spell, or maybe move and attack. We've gone from having 12 actions to the enemy's 3 to 13. However, if I instead cast phantasmal killer and e.g. spend an extra action to remove the incapacitate trait and the enemy fails their saves, the best case scenario for the enemy is that they effectively lose all their actions as they're forced to flee (changing the action economy to 12 for the party, 0 for the boss) and take a debilitating penalty to all of their attacks and defenses for several rounds.

The effects between the two aren't remotely similar, and the potential power of removing the incapacitate trait is far more significant than quickening a single spell, even if both effects share the 1/day limitation. Quickened Casting lets you do a balanced thing you can already do a bit more efficiently once per day. A feat that removes the incapacitate trait would let you do a thing the game specifically prevents you from doing as an important balancing tool.

Verdant Wheel

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ssalarn wrote:
kayman wrote:

I agree with you. As a GM i have no problem with this rule. But i will say again , a lot of player are angry and disappointed. Why not create a metamagic feat like Quickened Casting?

Because a feat that lets you insta-gib bosses is so good it becomes basically mandatory. Then everyone takes it, and there becomes no point to having included the limitation in the first place.

Quickened Casting gives you one extra action, once per day. A feat to remove the incapacitation trait would be vastly more powerful. For example, say we have a group of 4 players fighting a boss monster. If my wizard uses Quickened Casting to cast fireball as a single action, he might get to cast one more spell, or maybe move and attack. We've gone from having 12 actions to the enemy's 3 to 13. However, if I instead cast phantasmal killer and e.g. spend an extra action to remove the incapacitate trait and the enemy fails their saves, the best case scenario for the enemy is that they effectively lose all their actions as they're forced to flee (changing the action economy to 12 for the party, 0 for the boss) and take a debilitating penalty to all of their attacks and defenses for several rounds.

The effects between the two aren't remotely similar, and the potential power of removing the incapacitate trait is far more significant than quickening a single spell, even if both effects share the 1/day limitation. Quickened Casting lets you do a balanced thing you can already do a bit more efficiently once per day. A feat that removes the incapacitate trait would let you do a thing the game specifically prevents you from doing as an important balancing tool.

Thanks for the reply . I will bring your argument for my players.

Design Manager

22 people marked this as a favorite.

Everything Ssalarn and others have said is accurate. But maybe this will help kayman: Incapacitate does prevent disappointing fight-enders against bosses, yes, but it was even more so created to protect the players and their characters from weird situations with multiple low level incapacitation enemies. If you get attacked by 8 harpies in PF1, or 8 mummies, even if every character in your party of 4 only needs a 5 on the d20 to save, the chances each character will fail and get incapacitated is about 5 in 6, meaning the chances everyone is incapacitated (and eats a coup de grace, TPKing) is about 50/50. And we saw that happening in those types of encounters a lot unless the GM pulled punches or used other methods to help save the PCs (you can likely see the pattern yourself if you check online reviews for any adventures you remember that have such an encounter).

Over the course of a long game, PCs are the ones most likely to benefit from effects like this that make things a little more likely for survival (since monsters don't need to survive an encounter but PCs need to keep surviving each encounter in the campaign). So you could also try to remind your players that this benefits them.

(Aside: your English is great. Much love for all our fans in Brazil!)

Dark Archive

Can confirm that happening, one of players in RotR in fifth book got coup de grace'd by mummies :p(they got better with breath of life, but still)

Verdant Wheel

Mark Seifter wrote:

Everything Ssalarn and others have said is accurate. But maybe this will help kayman: Incapacitate does prevent disappointing fight-enders against bosses, yes, but it was even more so created to protect the players and their characters from weird situations with multiple low level incapacitation enemies. If you get attacked by 8 harpies in PF1, or 8 mummies, even if every character in your party of 4 only needs a 5 on the d20 to save, the chances each character will fail and get incapacitated is about 5 in 6, meaning the chances everyone is incapacitated (and eats a coup de grace, TPKing) is about 50/50. And we saw that happening in those types of encounters a lot unless the GM pulled punches or used other methods to help save the PCs (you can likely see the pattern yourself if you check online reviews for any adventures you remember that have such an encounter).

Over the course of a long game, PCs are the ones most likely to benefit from effects like this that make things a little more likely for survival (since monsters don't need to survive an encounter but PCs need to keep surviving each encounter in the campaign). So you could also try to remind your players that this benefits them.

(Aside: your English is great. Much love for all our fans in Brazil!)

thank you very much.


Rysky wrote:
Isabelle Thorne wrote:
Ly'ualdre wrote:
But again, I'm certain Paizo figured out a reasonable ingame lore reason as to why things like Tiefling Leshy and similar creatures exist. So I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Having put a little thought into this already... my concept for changeling leshies was "leshies that develop in a place where a hag coven has long brooded or has been dumping their cauldron-brews".

ooo

*takes notes*

Thought it didn't apply because changeling were always biological females and leshies were weird genderless plant matter constructs animated by magic.

Yawar,

Silver Crusade

YawarFiesta wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Isabelle Thorne wrote:
Ly'ualdre wrote:
But again, I'm certain Paizo figured out a reasonable ingame lore reason as to why things like Tiefling Leshy and similar creatures exist. So I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Having put a little thought into this already... my concept for changeling leshies was "leshies that develop in a place where a hag coven has long brooded or has been dumping their cauldron-brews".

ooo

*takes notes*

Thought it didn't apply because changeling were always biological females and leshies were weird genderless plant matter constructs animated by magic.

Yawar,

Changelings are not all biologically female, and I'm guessing Leshies can have genders if they want. They're plants yeah, but they're made by magic.


Rysky wrote:
YawarFiesta wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Isabelle Thorne wrote:
Ly'ualdre wrote:
But again, I'm certain Paizo figured out a reasonable ingame lore reason as to why things like Tiefling Leshy and similar creatures exist. So I wouldn't worry about it too much.
Having put a little thought into this already... my concept for changeling leshies was "leshies that develop in a place where a hag coven has long brooded or has been dumping their cauldron-brews".

ooo

*takes notes*

Thought it didn't apply because changeling were always biological females and leshies were weird genderless plant matter constructs animated by magic.

Yawar,

Changelings are not all biologically female, and I'm guessing Leshies can have genders if they want. They're plants yeah, but they're made by magic.

Changelings are larval hags that result from hags mating with other species and always female. Leshies don't reproduce sexually so they couldn't produce a changeling.

That being said the GM could always houserule a witch-blighted leshy and treat it as changeling leshy, same as a necrotic dhamphir leshy, etc.

Yawar,

Grand Lodge

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That is no longer true.

Quote:
At roughly the same time in their lives, many changelings— women in particular—begin to hear the Call, a psychic urging from their hag mother luring them away from the communities that raised them. If followed, the Call eventually leads the changeling to the hag’s coven, where they are subjected to terrible rituals that twist them into hags themselves. Some changelings, especially those who have strong social bonds or embrace druidic traditions, are able to resist this Call and continue on with their mortal lives. The fact that the Call disproportionately targets female changelings has led to a widespread misunderstanding that all changelings are female, while in fact male changelings are simply assumed to be members of their paternal ancestry.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

As an example, “Torment and Legacy” has a male changeling.

Dark Archive

TriOmegaZero wrote:

That is no longer true.

Quote:
At roughly the same time in their lives, many changelings— women in particular—begin to hear the Call, a psychic urging from their hag mother luring them away from the communities that raised them. If followed, the Call eventually leads the changeling to the hag’s coven, where they are subjected to terrible rituals that twist them into hags themselves. Some changelings, especially those who have strong social bonds or embrace druidic traditions, are able to resist this Call and continue on with their mortal lives. The fact that the Call disproportionately targets female changelings has led to a widespread misunderstanding that all changelings are female, while in fact male changelings are simply assumed to be members of their paternal ancestry.

Kinda makes me confused about what calibans are now then


Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Maybe calibans are changelings who are actually raised by hags? And they are more likely to be male than female, as opposed to standard changelings for whom the reverse may be true?


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

Mechanically, they can be just particular lineage of Changelings.


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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Tears at Bitter Manor pg. 57 wrote:
The hags in such covens occasionally use their combined witchcraft to supernaturally create abominable male children—brutish monsters born of foul sanies and unholy ablutions that are stewed for days and then allowed to ferment into living creatures. These monsters go by many names among the hags who “birth” them, but among civilized races they are known by just one word: caliban.

Calibans are the creations of Hag Covens they are not the children of individual Hags.

There is a chance that Calibans get further developed into a number of different monsters similar to how there are different types of Hags.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
CorvusMask wrote:
TriOmegaZero wrote:

That is no longer true.

Quote:
At roughly the same time in their lives, many changelings— women in particular—begin to hear the Call, a psychic urging from their hag mother luring them away from the communities that raised them. If followed, the Call eventually leads the changeling to the hag’s coven, where they are subjected to terrible rituals that twist them into hags themselves. Some changelings, especially those who have strong social bonds or embrace druidic traditions, are able to resist this Call and continue on with their mortal lives. The fact that the Call disproportionately targets female changelings has led to a widespread misunderstanding that all changelings are female, while in fact male changelings are simply assumed to be members of their paternal ancestry.
Kinda makes me confused about what calibans are now then

I'm going to guess retconned out of the setting.


It seems like there is a very concerted effort to avoid gendered creatures, particularly ones that are more humanoid or that have problematic histories attached to the gendering (usually female, see: harpies).


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Kelseus wrote:
It seems like there is a very concerted effort to avoid gendered creatures, particularly ones that are more humanoid or that have problematic histories attached to the gendering (usually female, see: harpies).

Yeah, I didn't like retcons in general. Specially since the previous lore was internally consistent.

Now you have to do extra paperwork when referencing old lore.

Yawar,

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