Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide

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Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide
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Ready to go beyond the basics? Expand the limits of what's possible with the Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide! This 272-page Pathfinder Second Edition rulebook contains exciting new rules options for player characters, adding even more depth of choice to your Pathfinder game! Inside you will find brand new ancestries, heritages, and four new classes: the shrewd investigator, the mysterious oracle, the daring swashbuckler, and the hex-slinging witch! The must-have Advanced Player's Guide also includes exciting new options for all your favorite Core Rulebook classes and tons of new backgrounds, general feats, spells, items, and 40 flexible archetypes to customize your play experience even further!

The Pathfinder Advanced Player's Guide includes:

  • Four new classes: the investigator, oracle, swashbuckler, and witch!
  • Five new ancestries and five heritages for any ancestry: celestial aasimars, curious catfolk, hagspawned changelings, vampiric dhampirs, fate-touched duskwalkers, scaled kobolds, fierce orcs, fiendish tieflings, industrious ratfolk, and feathered tengu!
  • 40 new archetypes including multiclass archetypes for the four new classes, Pathfinder favorites like the cavalier, dragon disciple, shadowdancer, and vigilante, and brand-new archetypes like the familiar master and the shield-bearing iron wall!
  • New class options for all twelve classes from the Pathfinder Core Rulebook including champions of evil, genie and shadow sorcerers, zen archer monks, rogue masterminds, spellcasting rangers, and more!
  • Even more exciting new rules, from rare and unique backgrounds to investigative skill feats, from spells and rituals like reincarnate and create demiplane to new items including special wands with unusual effects and exciting potions worthy of a witch's cauldron.

ISBN-13: 978-1-64078-257-0



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APG meets Expectations as it Concludes the Original Vision of PF2

5/5

The Advanced Player's Guide is the capstone piece to the original vision for Pathfinder Second Edition. The PF2 CRB was a whopping 640 pages and Paizo still had more content ready to go in it that they just could not release due to space issues. Everything that was left out was designated to be released over the next year in either the Lost Omens line of books or in the Advanced Players Guide. Things that were not quite fully fleshed out for the original release were then worked out. Four additional classes were put through a playtest and are featured in the APG; the Investigator, Oracle, Swashbuckler, and Witch. Five new ancestries are in the APG while three more were released in the Lost Omens Character Guide in 2019.

One of the new concepts in PF2 is that of Versatile Heritages. Instead of having separate ancestry categories for Aasimar, Tiefling, Changling, Dhampir, and Duskwalker, they are now what is called a versatile heritage. These modify the ancestry choice the player made for the character via the heritage selection. This is a very interesting concept as it provides many additional options for players. These five are just the first of multiple waves of versatile heritages which will be released over time by Paizo.

For those who have been desiring more options for characters, the APG delivers. The four new classes have their dedications for multiclassing along with 38 new archetypes. In addition, each of the 12 original classes gained some new options to choose from as did each of the original ancestries. Not all of the options are as viable as other options, but much of that will depend on the theme of a campaign and how GMs choose to allow players to select archetypes. I can envision some GMs designating some archetypes as free additional choices for players in that they can take one with no additional feat penalties because they give added depth to the campaign's theme such as the dandy or celebrity. Other GMs could emphasize select archetypes like the gladiator as a free archetype for their campaign's theme. The potential for some very interesting campaign themes definitely exists with these archetypes.

One of the things I was watching for in this book was the dreaded power creep. I do not see it present. None of the archetypes seems to overwhelm any of the original classes in terms of raw power while instead they augment them. This was a goal of Paizo from the beginning and it seems to have been met. The APG does what it was intended to do. It expands the options available to players at the initial creation of their characters and as those characters level up over time. Perhaps the best part of that is the APG continues to expand upon building characters as concepts and not as a collection of soulless numbers. While the numbers are important to determining how well a character can do something, the concept behind the character matters more. PF2 put the role back into roleplaying and the APG continues that vision.

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Can't-miss book for anyone at the table

5/5

Especially, and this is obvious, the Advanced Player's Guide is a terrific resource for players--but that doesn't mean GMs don't have a lot to gain from it!

Just on the strength of classes and ancestries, this book is about 150% the size of the core rulebook. Every existing class gets a major boost of options and feats and the same goes for existing ancestries. Adding in four new classes and five new ancestries on top of that is an amazing boon. True, some get more (or better) options than others, but I would say just on character creation alone, this book well beyond justifies its price point.

And that's just the base.

Add in universal heritages, which seem mechanically reasonable but almost unreasonably bursting with flavor, lore, or character development hooks. Add in the massive chunk of archetypes, which enables so many different nuances of character concepts without always landing on the somewhat clunky multiclassing rules. Add in a shot in the arm to spell lists, item lists, skill and general feat lists, and so on?

I just don't know that more needs to be said. This book is bursting with great content--and it's guaranteed to turn the heads of pretty much any player with at least a couple of its options!


Solid guide of varying quality

4/5

This is a solid addition to 2E and well worth adding to your library, although uneven or even disappointing in places. It feels something like a mix of 1E Advanced Player Guide and Advanced Class guide with less ancestries and classes but I like that: nice to have a bit of both rather than to get a bunch of one while waiting 6-12 months for the other.

Pros:
Witch, Oracle, and Swashbuckler are well designed with clever rethinking of mechanics that adds new dimensions to the classes and definitely improves playability with respect to other classes. I especially liked the witch patrons that could make your witch more like a prophet or a fate-weaver while still providing the usual curse, night and wild options for your classic scary witch. The oracle curses are much more interesting- and much more of plusses with minuses than the old version. And swashbuckler seems both quite playable and fun.

Versatile heritages are a great re-think, one of the best parts of the guide. While less potent at low level, the ability to add tiefling to any race, plus the new versatile heritages and the promise of more, greatly expands the range of character concepts.

Archetypes are nicely fleshed out. While the system was in the core rules, they don't really shine until here. Many will appeal only to a specific concept but can have their uses while others are significantly useful for those focusing on combat in particular. You will recognize many names from prestige classes of yore. While not, in general, as potent as an old prestige class, the move to archetypes is both more graceful and more manageable for all- players, refs and game designers. Many can be taken at lower levels and others at higher levels.

While familiars only get used so often in my games (more so by me as a player :) the extra abilities, feats and specific familiars are great. I especially like that it is both practical and clearly explained how to get an imp or faerie dragon.

Feats and spells are nice, mostly as they relate to new classes and archetypes. For existing classes, probably less useful but there are exceptions.

More middling:
Investigator seems suited to a limited range of campaign types. I wish it was a little less detective-like and more lore focused, but I think for the right players and campaigns, a good option.

The new races, while definitely a nice addition beyond too human-like variants, are also unlikely to get used much in my campaigns, except maybe catfolk, although they all seem well executed.

The new backgrounds are so-so. They are nice enough and its not like backgrounds are a particularly eye-catching part of the game, although it is a nice mechanic. The rare ones were a bit disappointing to me, but again the real flavor of them is left to the player in character creation so they are solid enough.

The core classes additions were a very mixed bag. Some are quite interesting and others are so narrowly drawn as to appeal to very few players. I'm thinking of you druid, where the additions are not likely to apply to most of the druid orders. In general, core classes deserve another round of additions like the 1E combat, magic and other guides. The current crop of goodies may disappoint many.

Overalll:
A strong guide. Hopefully upcoming Golarion and other guides will continue to flesh out 2E.

For those looking for more ancestries, classes and archetypes, I would certainly start with this guide but note that the Golarion books, both already published and planned, add a fair amount, almost all of which can be used in non-Golarion settings. For example, apparently many of the 1E Advanced Race Guide ancestries will be coming to a Golarion guide early next year.


Core Rulebook 2

5/5

This should have been in the Core Rulebook, but that would have made for an obscene word count. The content in this book is essential to the PF2 experience, and I can't imagine the game without it.


Wonderful rate of additions!

5/5

Moving from 1e to 2e, one concern is always a drastic drop in content but Paizo has worked to tackle that concern tirelessly.

The new classes are quite different than their predecessors but still hold onto that class fantasy quite well. They may be the biggest draw but somewhere else truly shined, in my opinion.

Versatile Heritages are an absolute blast to use and incorporate into play. There was always the blurb in 1e where you could have Planetouched Non-Humans but this takes it to 11! The variety it has added by being compatible with all races and having mechanical effects is wonderful, and allows for easy expansion in the future! It makes me have countless character ideas and gives me no worry about being unique.

Looking forward to every book. I still play 1e as it is the first system I dove completely into (started with 3.5) and probably always will but 2e is a pure upgrade in my eyes.


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
The Raven Black wrote:
People keep asking for changes to feats, classes ..., but errata are not that.

Errata to the alchemist either says otherwise or gave people entirely the wrong perception.

I get the disappointment though. A lot of folks feel that the class is basically a lot of wasted potential and without errata a lost cause. I've yet to have a class at my table elicit such strong and immediate frustration from people playing one (not the alchemist nor oracle). But the concept of the witch, or even the mythological value of a witch, just seems to make the class's perceived or actual weakness to irritate people more.

So I guess the question is, if the witch will not receive any improvements via errata, is it just stuck where it is forever?


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I don't think anything I'd said was hoping for a buff, since it was unclear either way. I've read a lot of people that assumed dragon breath from dragon disciple used class DC, for example. Hell, even making it innate would be nice, so it scaled for classes like monk (even though it would be scaling off of charisma which is a little less ideal but better than having to spend four class feats on a caster dedication)

Paizo Employee Marketing & Media Manager

4 people marked this as a favorite.
David knott 242 wrote:


Any idea when the FAQ page will be updated to include the Advanced Player Guide errata? It currently has errata for the Core Rulebook (2 sets), Bestiary 2, and several Lost Omens books, but not yet the Advanced Player's Guide. I would find that more useful than the updated PDFs for the purpose of locating everything that changed.

Soon, I am told. While I can't comment on the content of the errata, (that is beyond my wheelhouse,) I can say that we have systems in place to make future updates smoother, with print product distribution, the PDF update, and the FAQ posting happening together.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Sporkedup wrote:
The Raven Black wrote:
People keep asking for changes to feats, classes ..., but errata are not that.

Errata to the alchemist either says otherwise or gave people entirely the wrong perception.

I get the disappointment though. A lot of folks feel that the class is basically a lot of wasted potential and without errata a lost cause. I've yet to have a class at my table elicit such strong and immediate frustration from people playing one (not the alchemist nor oracle). But the concept of the witch, or even the mythological value of a witch, just seems to make the class's perceived or actual weakness to irritate people more.

So I guess the question is, if the witch will not receive any improvements via errata, is it just stuck where it is forever?

I don't think we'll ever see errata to the extent that we saw with the latest CRB errata. Like it or not. The other books are suplements, even if the APG is counted as one of the core four.

That said, I sympathize with those claiming for a Witch buff. I think the Witch is in a tight spot in that its overall kit can be seen and felt as lacklustre. If you pick the other contentious classes, like the Alchemist or the Warpriest, you still have a nice chassis that can be optimized with some system mastery. Heck, a class archetype changing some alchemical item types or uses of divine font for other goodies could even provide players with so called 'fixes'. The Witch, not so much, IMHO.

But then, I only had one Witch player in my table and I let them keep playing with the playtest version since they felt they liked that iteration of the class better.


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richienvh wrote:


That said, I sympathize with those claiming for a Witch buff. I think the Witch is in a tight spot in that its overall kit can be seen and felt as lacklustre. If you pick the other contentious classes, like the Alchemist or the Warpriest, you still have a nice chassis that can be optimized with some system mastery. Heck, a class archetype changing some alchemical item types or uses of divine font for other goodies could even provide players with so called 'fixes'. The Witch, not so much, IMHO.

Witch can absolutely be awesome with system mastery as is, that's never been the issue.

A witch built "correctly" is solid. The problem is the number of traps and "choose wrong" options the Witch has (Rune/wild patron cantrip, eldritch nails, basic lesson is mandatory, etc.)

I've defended WP as an option that works best when you stack spells that don't require saves (mainly heal spells) as a means to make it work at its chassis, and it's window of viability to me is way narrower than a Witch.

A Witch with Stoke The Heart/Evil Eye/Buzzing Bites + Basic Lesson + a good Specific familiar (like faerie dragon) that grabs Cackle is a great character.

A Rune Witch with Eldritch Hair and Nails and a toad is the issue.

So while I am also sad about no Witch buffs, the idea that Witch cannot be built to be effective to me is not at all true.

The issue is the power floor for a witch is way lower than it should be, but I'd argue the ceiling is just fine.

DMerceless wrote:


Being totally honest here, this mentality of "things being slightly too good is a huge problem, but things being bad is not an issue at all" that the designers and a big chunk of the community seem to have is slowly chipping away at all the excitement I once had about the game.

While I can't say it's chipping away at my excitment necessarily, I also don't see why "nerfing Dragon scales/independent/etc. is fine, but buffs are not" sentiment is being paraded around and it's super weird to me.

Buffs generally sell things (people buy champions in League of Legends because of buffs), so it's not only beneficial to the health of the game it's also financially motivating to some extent.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

I mean, the level 16 witch in my Night of the Gray Death game is the bane of my existence, so I feel like it works pretty okay.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

I mean, witches are full casters. Smart spell selection and usage, especially later in the campaign, is really all you need to be functional and acceptably successful. It's the chassis bolted on top of that, in addition to the feat selection available, that marks the witch as a lesser light among the classes.

But that's all not really here nor there. The upshot is this errata did not include any sort of balance pass on any of the classes included, and it's not out of line to assume both that Paizo sees the classes as acceptable as they are and that no significant balancing tweaks are ever forthcoming. And I suppose that's very understandable, even if it's not what I'd prefer to hear.

Paizo Employee Marketing & Media Manager

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The Advanced Player's Guide Errata is live.

Liberty's Edge

Midnightoker wrote:

While I can't say it's chipping away at my excitment necessarily, I also don't see why "nerfing Dragon scales/independent/etc. is fine, but buffs are not" sentiment is being paraded around and it's super weird to me.

Buffs generally sell things (people buy champions in League of Legends because of buffs), so it's not only beneficial to the health of the game it's also financially motivating to some extent.

Power bloat is very definitely one of PF1's failures that PF2 wants to avoid whatever it costs.

And buffing without power bloat needs considerable time and effort (and likely playtest). So, very much out of an errata's purview.


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The Raven Black wrote:
Midnightoker wrote:

While I can't say it's chipping away at my excitment necessarily, I also don't see why "nerfing Dragon scales/independent/etc. is fine, but buffs are not" sentiment is being paraded around and it's super weird to me.

Buffs generally sell things (people buy champions in League of Legends because of buffs), so it's not only beneficial to the health of the game it's also financially motivating to some extent.

Power bloat is very definitely one of PF1's failures that PF2 wants to avoid whatever it costs.

And buffing without power bloat needs considerable time and effort (and likely playtest). So, very much out of an errata's purview.

So you think the mutagenist buffs were playtested then? I'd wager they were not.

And PF1 had more issues with feat traps than it ever did with power bloat. The overall balance between the best and worst feats was stretched in both directions.

Allowing feat traps like Eldritch Nails to continue to be options for players (as well as stuff like Eschew Materials) can be just as damaging to a system.


Aaron Shanks wrote:
The Advanced Player's Guide Errata is live.

Yay!

(The list is missing the changes to Eldritch Archer. The Dedication no longer grants an extra cantrip if you have pre-existing spell slots.)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder PF Special Edition Subscriber
Sporkedup wrote:
The Raven Black wrote:
People keep asking for changes to feats, classes ..., but errata are not that.

Errata to the alchemist either says otherwise or gave people entirely the wrong perception.

I get the disappointment though. A lot of folks feel that the class is basically a lot of wasted potential and without errata a lost cause. I've yet to have a class at my table elicit such strong and immediate frustration from people playing one (not the alchemist nor oracle). But the concept of the witch, or even the mythological value of a witch, just seems to make the class's perceived or actual weakness to irritate people more.

So I guess the question is, if the witch will not receive any improvements via errata, is it just stuck where it is forever?

I was hoping it was going to get *something*, not necessarily buffed just,,,, made more in line with lore and the like?


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder PF Special Edition Subscriber
dmerceless wrote:
Being totally honest here, this mentality of "things being slightly too good is a huge problem, but things being bad is not an issue at all" that the designers and a big chunk of the community seem to have is slowly chipping away at all the excitement I once had about the game.

I have to agree, I love GMing for my players but after going from 2 to 12 as a blaster wizard and rarely if ever hitting with one of my attack spells (not hyperbole, I have landed 4 spells in all that time...rarely rolling below a 10), honestly broke my heart and I had to leave that campaign because I just dreaded rolling and wiffing all my slots again and being useless to the party :c. First time I ever dreaded playing a ttrpg, honestly (in sixteen years of experience, mostly as GM).

(I know CC is super strong and the like, but that wasn't my character and I don't like playing that type of class)

I just want my attack spells to hit, I don't want any damage buffs, I just want to hit in encounters.

I was extremely excited for pf2 and loved about every moment of pouring over the CRB, and with all the fun my players have, I was really looking forward to being a player in it.

I still host for my players because they have such a great time, but my fire is very much dimmed at this point, especially with how much of a let down Secrets of Magic was and how bad some of the BotD spoilers have been. Vampire is one of the worst archetypes in the game until like level 17; feels more akin a series of voluntary flaws without any real benefit until past 15 (which most tables don't see) and even then, that's going 9 levels of maybe not dying in sunlight immediately but being a sitting duck until nightfall or indoors.

There is a problem of being dedicated to the same weaknesses but not even remotely emulating the power or survivability. Daywalker should have been slowed 1 at most with an attack penalty and/or dazzled.

I know balance is important but like... maybe tone down damage or something else to at least make it feel better? Lower HP to start but maybe a passive regen sans some of the offensive ability?

Apologies for the tirade, I'm just very crestfallen with how things have gone.


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, LO Special Edition, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber
Gisher wrote:
Aaron Shanks wrote:
The Advanced Player's Guide Errata is live.

Yay!

(The list is missing the changes to Eldritch Archer. The Dedication no longer grants an extra cantrip if you have pre-existing spell slots.)

Source?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:
Gisher wrote:
Aaron Shanks wrote:
The Advanced Player's Guide Errata is live.

Yay!

(The list is missing the changes to Eldritch Archer. The Dedication no longer grants an extra cantrip if you have pre-existing spell slots.)

Source?

Second printing PDF.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Blave wrote:
Ed Reppert wrote:
Gisher wrote:
Aaron Shanks wrote:
The Advanced Player's Guide Errata is live.

Yay!

(The list is missing the changes to Eldritch Archer. The Dedication no longer grants an extra cantrip if you have pre-existing spell slots.)

Source?
Second printing PDF.

Yes. Specifically, Ed Reppert, they removed the paragraph that granted a second cantrip to those who already had spell slots.

APG, p. 172 wrote:

Eldritch Archer Dedication

You blend magic with your archery, leading to powerful results.
If you don’t already cast spells from spell slots, you learn to cast spontaneous spells and gain the Cast a Spell activity. You gain a spell repertoire with one cantrip of your choice, from a spell list of your choice. You choose this cantrip from the common spells on your chosen spell list or from other spells to which you have access on that list. This cantrip must require a spell attack roll. You’re trained in spell attack rolls and spell DCs for that tradition. Your key spellcasting ability for these spells is Charisma.

If you already cast spells from spell slots, you learn one additional cantrip from that tradition. If you’re a prepared caster, you can prepare this spell in addition to your usual cantrips per day; if you’re a spontaneous caster, you add this cantrip to your spell repertoire.
You also gain Eldritch Shot.

Given that the Beast Gunner and Cathartic Mage dedications copied that paragraph, I would expect them to get the same errata eventually.


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Paizo has a policy that all classes with “witch” in their name must be disappointing. The Witch must be lame so that the Starfinder Witchwarper can continue to suck.


Pathfinder PF Special Edition Subscriber
Xenocrat wrote:
Paizo has a policy that all classes with “witch” in their name must be disappointing. The Witch must be lame so that the Starfinder Witchwarper can continue to suck.

I can honestly 110% believe this.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
NikkiGrimm wrote:
dmerceless wrote:
Being totally honest here, this mentality of "things being slightly too good is a huge problem, but things being bad is not an issue at all" that the designers and a big chunk of the community seem to have is slowly chipping away at all the excitement I once had about the game.

I just want my attack spells to hit, I don't want any damage buffs, I just want to hit in encounters.

Electric Arc.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I just made it so witches get a feat at first level as most spell casting classes like wizard, druid, or bard have a thing which basically grants them a feat.

No idea why witch missed out but we don't play PFS so we can tweak things as we see them.


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Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Admittedly, I think part of the issue is that the community picks up on ideas that I don't think are necessarily accepted as fact internally. Like the question of if the Witch even really needs buffs, I kinda don't think it does and I'm playing one right now as a dedicated healer with Life Boost and Flexible Preperation.

Some more lessons would generally be nice just to have more focus magic tailored to what role you want your witch to fulfill, the way Life Boost is ideal for my goals. But overall I think it succeeds in being a fairly average PF2e class-- I wouldn't say its particularly better or worse than the Druid really.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
The-Magic-Sword wrote:

Admittedly, I think part of the issue is that the community picks up on ideas that I don't think are necessarily accepted as fact internally. Like the question of if the Witch even really needs buffs, I kinda don't think it does and I'm playing one right now as a dedicated healer with Life Boost and Flexible Preperation.

Some more lessons would generally be nice just to have more focus magic tailored to what role you want your witch to fulfill, the way Life Boost is ideal for my goals. But overall I think it succeeds in being a fairly average PF2e class-- I wouldn't say its particularly better or worse than the Druid really.

The druid having daily access to all common primal spells vs the witch having a spellbook is a pretty visible power divergence. But I do think beyond that they're fairly comparable. The witch gets more stuff at level 1 and the druid gets more flexibility over the long run.


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Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Sporkedup wrote:
The-Magic-Sword wrote:

Admittedly, I think part of the issue is that the community picks up on ideas that I don't think are necessarily accepted as fact internally. Like the question of if the Witch even really needs buffs, I kinda don't think it does and I'm playing one right now as a dedicated healer with Life Boost and Flexible Preperation.

Some more lessons would generally be nice just to have more focus magic tailored to what role you want your witch to fulfill, the way Life Boost is ideal for my goals. But overall I think it succeeds in being a fairly average PF2e class-- I wouldn't say its particularly better or worse than the Druid really.

The druid having daily access to all common primal spells vs the witch having a spellbook is a pretty visible power divergence. But I do think beyond that they're fairly comparable. The witch gets more stuff at level 1 and the druid gets more flexibility over the long run.

Hmm, I'm not so sure, when I played a Wizard 1-17 (with some levels skips) I didn't even use all my spellbook picks-- while obviously being able to get a few of the interesting-but-situational utility spells is nice and probably not neutral, I'd be wary of overvaluing it, especially when a Witch/Wizard can still fit in a few of the most useful situational spells on top of their bread and butter spells for combat or other regularly occurring situations. Especially since normally a prepared caster (like the Druid) has to dedicate the slots at daily preparation, rather than right when they come up against a problem a given spell is perfect for.


Gisher wrote:
Blave wrote:
Ed Reppert wrote:
Gisher wrote:
Aaron Shanks wrote:
The Advanced Player's Guide Errata is live.

Yay!

(The list is missing the changes to Eldritch Archer. The Dedication no longer grants an extra cantrip if you have pre-existing spell slots.)

Source?
Second printing PDF.

Yes. Specifically, Ed Reppert, they removed the paragraph that granted a second cantrip to those who already had spell slots.

APG, p. 172 wrote:

Eldritch Archer Dedication

You blend magic with your archery, leading to powerful results.
If you don’t already cast spells from spell slots, you learn to cast spontaneous spells and gain the Cast a Spell activity. You gain a spell repertoire with one cantrip of your choice, from a spell list of your choice. You choose this cantrip from the common spells on your chosen spell list or from other spells to which you have access on that list. This cantrip must require a spell attack roll. You’re trained in spell attack rolls and spell DCs for that tradition. Your key spellcasting ability for these spells is Charisma.

If you already cast spells from spell slots, you learn one additional cantrip from that tradition. If you’re a prepared caster, you can prepare this spell in addition to your usual cantrips per day; if you’re a spontaneous caster, you add this cantrip to your spell repertoire.
You also gain Eldritch Shot.

Given that the Beast Gunner and Cathartic Mage dedications copied that paragraph, I would expect them to get the same errata eventually.

This change still isn't included in the Official Errata, and immanuel_aj has noted that Archives of Nethys still has the original text.

I know that we usually don't get official responses on errata, but given that the actual book contradicts both of the official online sources, some clarification on which is wrong would be great.

Paizo Employee Lead Designer

10 people marked this as a favorite.

Thanks for the note on the eldritch archer! The FAQ page was, in fact, missing the errata, and has now been updated.


Logan Bonner wrote:
Thanks for the note on the eldritch archer! The FAQ page was, in fact, missing the errata, and has now been updated.

Thank you!

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