The new series of Doctor Who starts this Saturday on the BBC.


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Nevynxxx wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

Er, in the episode?

Spoiler:
The GI jumps into the Doctor's timestream and tries to kill him at multiple points in his timeline. Clara jumps in and stops him. The Doctor is not otherwise in danger because his timestream unfolds just as it did before.

Dark Archive

Oh, yeah, I'm not arguing that's what she did. I'm simply saying, there was nothing to imply that that is *only* what she did. ;)

Certainly the TARDIS scene implies to me that there was a lot more to it than that.


I just have the feeling that your dissapointment with Moffat makes you look much harder for problems in episodes than perhaps other people. I personally think this season was the weakest of the new who seasons, with only a handful of episodes I really liked. That said I enjoyed the last two episodes and thought for the most part there were remarkably few plotholes that really snagged my attention. I don't necessarily need every explicit plot point explained in detail...

The Exchange

MMCJawa wrote:
I just have the feeling that your dissapointment with Moffat makes you look much harder for problems in episodes than perhaps other people. I personally think this season was the weakest of the new who seasons, with only a handful of episodes I really liked. That said I enjoyed the last two episodes and thought for the most part there were remarkably few plotholes that really snagged my attention. I don't necessarily need every explicit plot point explained in detail...

When I watch doctor who I'm always activly looking for things to like, since the execution of many episodes (in older seasons as well) is often lacking in many aspects. I ignore things and suspend my disbelief quite a lot. It's just that in the Moffat era, I feel like the show is not being treated with respect by the writer. The kind of flaws I pointed out here are rife in all Moffat episodes, I don't have to work very hard to see them. It seems like Moffat thinks he can just do whatever with the plots, that he dosen't need to make sure they make sense because it's sceince fiction, so who cares.

I'm also very troubled when I see the Doctor being sexist, needlesly aggresive or stuipd (and with all the questions he is NOT asking latley, he is being stuipd), because, well, that's not the show I want to see.


On Clara and the GI

Spoiler:

The GI was not always attacking the doctor directly, he was changing his timeline, he set up little diversions, go left where the doctor went right, take this door as its unlocked when it used to be the other. Clara was simply changing things back to how they should have been. Look back at some of the things he has done and change one little option and maybe he lived, but failed.

Like the scene with the Tardis theft, he was gonna take one, she pointed him to another,the GI could easily have arranged him to think he was taking a good one by changing the data and he was in fact taking the incorrect one. After all that very decision as to which one to steal had a massive butterfly effect. Can you think of all the changes with a working Tardis and no mad man in a blue box?

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Thoughts on episode:

*shrug* Meh.

Liked the bits with Clara at the beginning. The rest... it wasn't bad but I couldn't quite get hooked.


Umm...

Spoiler:
We were just reintroduced to the Great Intelligence in the episode "The Snowmen" which was Clara's first appearance on the show. I don't think that any explanation was needed in the finale considering the Doctor just encountered him again at the beginning of this season.

Grand Lodge

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Shadowborn wrote:
Umm...** spoiler omitted **

Actually her first appearance was in "Asylum of the Daleks".

The Exchange

Shadowborn wrote:
Umm...** spoiler omitted **

What I knew about the Great Intelligence from the christmas episode can kind of be summed up as, "it's evil and doesn't have a body". Not much to go on, really.

Think, for example, how much do you know of the Slitheen, a completley random and unimportant villain race featured in the first season of the renewed series. Compare this with hom much you know about the G.I. Seems absurd to me that there's such a considerable difference.


LazarX wrote:
Shadowborn wrote:
Umm...** spoiler omitted **
Actually her first appearance was in "Asylum of the Daleks".

Fair enough. It was the first episode she actually gets to interact with the Doctor as a human.

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Minor random thing, for anyone who's seen both Classic Who (7th Doctor specifically) and the latest episode:

Spoiler:

When Clara is looking for the 7th Doctor and he's hanging off the ice cliffs on Iceworld, is it me or does she bear a strange resemblance to the character Ray from "Delta and the Bannermen"?

It's interesting because Ray was another possible candidate for new Doctor Who companion (it was between her and Ace, and interestingly Sophie Aldred had also auditioned for Ray). But I can't figure out if they did that as an intentional headnod (the shot is from "Dragonfire" which is the episode after Delta) or it's just that Jenna Louise Coleman looks a little like Sara Griffiths (the actress who played Ray).

For requisite 7th Doctor references, I like to think that the Doctor's mention of "beekeeping" was a nod to Garonwy, also from "Delta and the Bannermen."

Sovereign Court Contributor

DeathQuaker wrote:

Minor random thing, for anyone who's seen both Classic Who (7th Doctor specifically) and the latest episode:

** spoiler omitted **

Something:
Beekeeping
, I think, might also be a Sherlock reference. Matt Smith was in the running.
Dark Archive

MMCJawa wrote:
with only a handful of episodes I really liked

Out of 8 episodes, liking a "handful" isn't too bad ;)


I only caught the last half of The Name of the Doctor but found it disappointing. Only a couple of years ago the Turn Left episode already did the

Spoiler:
The Doctor gets removed from the timeline retroactively by being killed
idea, with considerably more elegance and simplicity to the execution of it to my mind.
This season seems to have had a disjointed and at times contrived feel to it in places, which is a shame because there have been episodes I've enjoyed.
Ah well.

Liberty's Edge

I think my biggest issue with this season (series...whatever) is it's format. The "Blockbuster of the Week" doesn't work for me. I think someone said it up-thread, if the episodes were given even 30 more minutes I don't think it would be so bad, but it all feels rushed, and it's hurting the characters.

I want to like Clara. I'm all for her, I think she'll be a great companion...if we ever get a chance to get to know who she is. I don't feel like we've had that. It's like at the end of Nightmare in Silver, when Clara and the kids are getting off the the Tardis after their adventure and she yells back to the Doctor "See you next Wednesday!" And it clicked, because that's what it feels like. It's that person that you just met and you really would like to get to know them better, but you can only meet once a week. For forty-five minutes. And it's never a quiet relaxing lunch or a stroll through the park, you're always either playing paint ball or running a marathon...or both. Then it's over and you wave to each other, or maybe an awkward hug, and it's "see you next Wednesday!"

The beginning of the season wasn't bad. We had Amy and Rory. We've spent two seasons already getting to know them and it felt more like seeing old friends that you used to hang out with everyday all day and now you've only got a chance to see them once a week. So "see you next Wednesday" isn't so awkward, it's looked forward to...and a tiny bit sad, because you remember all the fun you guys have had in the past and you realize, that's all over now.

When we fist met Amy and Rory, and Donna, and Martha, and Rose, and the past companions (my memory's fuzzy on Classic Doctor Who - I was a kid and PBS was the only way to watch and they weren't too reliable airing the show), we had time to get to know them, the episodes had more consistency and, it seemed to me anyway, more time for character development.

Don't get me wrong, I've enjoyed the episodes. I like Clara, and I think Jenna-Louise Coleman is a great actress. But I don't feel like we've gotten to KNOW who Clara is, and it's not the usual new companion syndrome. The show has been much more focused on "Blockbuster of the Week" and less "lets take some time to get to know who our characters are".

So here's hoping that Moffat realizes his little experiment doesn't really work and goes back to how it was.

I'm all for new ideas, but I'm also for getting rid of those ideas when they don't deliver. And I certainly don't think the "Blockbuster of the Week" delivers.

At all.

/back to lurk mode

The Exchange

AlricLightwind, Clara actualy had more character development in "Bells of Saint John" and "Rings of Akahatan" than Amy and Rory had during their entire 2.5 seasons traveling with the Doctor... but I see what you mean. She really dosen't get anything after these two episodes, and when, in the last episode,

Spoiler:
she is willing to sacrifice herself for the Doctor

It feels more like a plot device than an actual act the character might do, because frankly wev'e never seen her go anywhere near the depth of emotion it would take to do something like that, and the nature of her relationship with the Doctor is as vague as anything else about her.


Lord Snow,

Spoiler:
I agree with you to a point about that, and I think just given the choice it would be out of place. But she was confronted with the facts that she had already made that choice since the doctor had met her in those very timelines where the Great Intelligence went. So for her the choice was already made, a circular time travel thing. That made the difference for me.

Shadow Lodge

Part of the reason we haven't gotten to know Clara as much as some companions in the past is that she WAS the mystery for series 7B. I would expect that in series 8, we get to know her a lot more.


There's a lot to like about the finale and even this season but unfortunately there also seemed to be a lot of missteps in plotting, and story in favour of whiz bang pacing. The GI has a lot of potential as a villain but seemed really undeveloped and underused.
I'd much rather see an interesting and developed story with characters and a compelling antagonist than a lot of clever plot tricks (that come off more often than not as simply contrived).
That said this episode was a nice nod to the history of the show and hopefully is a good tee-off into the anniversary special.

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 16

With Rory Williams, we had a companion who was older, in the sense of lived through more years, than the Doctor.

With Clara, we now have a companion who knows the Doctor almost as well as we do.

Liberty's Edge

So if Matt Smith is actually the 12th Doctor, will BBC go for a full-on reboot after Smith eventually departs?


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Andrew Turner wrote:
So if Matt Smith is actually the 12th Doctor, will BBC go for a full-on reboot after Smith eventually departs?

No. Even if he's the 12th, there's still one more incarnation left: Time Lords can REGENERATE 12 times. Being born doesn't count as a regeneration, so they have 13 lives.

Liberty's Edge

Andrew Turner wrote:
So if Matt Smith is actually the 12th Doctor, will BBC go for a full-on reboot after Smith eventually departs?
Werthead wrote:
No. Even if he's the 12th, there's still one more incarnation left: Time Lords can REGENERATE 12 times. Being born doesn't count as a regeneration, so they have 13 lives.

Brilliant.

The Exchange

Werthead wrote:
Andrew Turner wrote:
So if Matt Smith is actually the 12th Doctor, will BBC go for a full-on reboot after Smith eventually departs?
No. Even if he's the 12th, there's still one more incarnation left: Time Lords can REGENERATE 12 times. Being born doesn't count as a regeneration, so they have 13 lives.

That, plus I'm pretty sure that if they want, the showrunners can EASILY work their way around the 13 regenerations thing and just have another one. There were some far greater gaps in continuity, and this happens to be one most fans should be thrilled to see...

Plus, someone told me that in classic who there's a scene where a female time lord (who's name I can't remember) just sort of regenerated multiple times until she found a look she likes... so it's not as if the 13 regenerations things as a hard and set rule even now...

Dark Archive

Spoiler:
River Song dumped a ton of energy into the Doctor, basically giving up all her regenerations to save the doctor's life in "Let's kill Hitler" so there is your way out, he's got a fresh set of regenerations just waiting to happen.

Romanna changed her appearance several times before deciding on the Lalla Ward version. Not sure if those actually count as regenerations since they all occurred off-screen.

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I don't think so Marik, even after <redacted's> regneration in Let's Kill Hitler, she was still making minor changes, if she could do that effectively untrained (assuming she's only on her second or third regeneration at that point) I'd assume all of Romanna's appearance changes were within the 'regeneration allowance'.

Shadow Lodge

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I think an interesting way to deal with the 14th Doctor would be to have 13 dying, assuming that this is finally the end...and then he regenerates. The Doctor has no more of a clue why it happens than the viewers. And this adds in a bit more danger to the series...the Doctor never really knows if this regeneration is the last one or not.


Kthulhu wrote:
I think an interesting way to deal with the 14th Doctor would be to have 13 dying, assuming that this is finally the end...and then he regenerates. The Doctor has no more of a clue why it happens than the viewers. And this adds in a bit more danger to the series...the Doctor never really knows if this regeneration is the last one or not.

Already been done (by Moffat) in The Curse of Fatal Death. Hugh Grant (the 13th Doctor) regenerates into Joanna Lumley for no other reason than the universe can't bear to be without the Doctor. When did this happen? I'll explain later....

Cheers
Mark


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Actually, Hugh Grant was the 12th doctor, making Joanna Lumley the 13th. The problem at that point was not that the Doctor had run out of regenerations but that Hugh Grant's Doctor was killed in a way that (supposedly) prevented regeneration.

But for going past 12 regenerations, we have a precedent in the Master, by various acts of villainy, gaining extra regenerations beyond the standard 12. Even though the Doctor supposedly has two regenerations left, can we rule out the possibility that some extreme situation connected to the Time War might have driven him to a similar act? Maybe, to Time Lords, it is actually less evil to effectively wipe out the entire Time Lord race than to steal regenerations from them for your own use in the process of doing so? In that case, the apparent joke on the Sarah Jane adventures about him having hundreds of regenerations left would actually be a rather sinister confession.

That is my current theory.

Liberty's Edge

Marik Whiterose wrote:

** spoiler omitted **

Romanna changed her appearance several times before deciding on the Lalla Ward version. Not sure if those actually count as regenerations since they all occurred off-screen.

That was in Destiny of the Daleks. It happened so fast, I think I thought it was a kind of joke. Interesting.

Also, she wasn't dying, so maybe that requires less energy.

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David knott 242 wrote:

Actually, Hugh Grant was the 12th doctor, making Joanna Lumley the 13th. The problem at that point was not that the Doctor had run out of regenerations but that Hugh Grant's Doctor was killed in a way that (supposedly) prevented regeneration.

But for going past 12 regenerations, we have a precedent in the Master, by various acts of villainy, gaining extra regenerations beyond the standard 12.

He gained a new regeneration cycle during the Time War. His prior incarnations post Death-face Master (which was technically the Delgado Master horrifically disfigured, even though he was played by another actor), but prior to the Master in the new series, were not regenerations. He transferred his awareness into a host body (Consul Tremas and a van driver, IIRC).

Now, the Time Lords have tried to BRIBE the Master with a new regeneration cycle before, which means it is possible to give extra regenerations to characters; likewise the Valeyard was promised the Sixth Doctor's extra regenerations (which given who the Valeyard was, I'm not sure how that works, but I assume that he was just going to be given 5-6 extra lives--and of course the Valeyard was supposed to be "somewhere between his twelfth and final incarnation" so obviously he was desperate for more lives).

And of course, everyone knows in your 13th/final incarnation, you are given etheric beam locators, so some probably want to get more lives just to avoid the embarrassment. ;)

Quote:


Even though the Doctor supposedly has two regenerations left, can we rule out the possibility that some extreme situation connected to the Time War might have driven him to a similar act? Maybe, to Time Lords, it is actually less evil to effectively wipe out the entire Time Lord race than to steal regenerations from them for your own use in the process of doing so? In that case, the apparent joke on the Sarah Jane adventures about him having hundreds of regenerations left would actually be a rather sinister confession.

It would be interesting if the Doctor "killed the Time Lords" by stealing all of their regenerative power. It would also explain why he seems to have so much to give around.

Liberty's Edge

OK, I guess I never thought of the '99 movie as part of the canon. It's not, really. Really?

<<sad face>>

Dark Archive

Yes, it is. McGann is considered the eighth Doctor.

Liberty's Edge

Just re-watched Destiny of the Daleks with my wee ones this morning. I forgot how totally awesome it is. You know, I was positively frightened of the Daleks when I was a kid. There was, to my seven year old mind, nothing scarier in all the world.


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It is interesting how some old Doctor Who material is taking on a greater relevance than when it first aired. I recently saw the end of the 4th Doctor special, which showed a scene where the Doctor had an attack of conscience just before he would have put two wires together to wipe out the Daleks at their creation. One thing he said was that if he carried out that act, he would be no better than they were.

Now fast forward to the newest Doctor Who, which began after the Doctor had basically wiped out the Daleks as well as his own people to end the Time War. That quote from the 4th Doctor has obviously haunted him ever since.


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The rules of regeneration appear to be:

1) You have a period of a bit under a day after regeneration in which your body still has regeneration energy clinging to it. You can change your features cosmetically (as Romana) did in this time without 'wasting' a regeneration. You can also have your hand cut off and it will regrow in this time period.

2) Regeneration is a form of genetic engineering: Gallifreyans are not born with it but receive it when they become Time Lords by going through the Academy. The Rassilon Imprimature, a form of genetic imprinting which also allows Time Lords to bond with TARDISes and survive lengthy exposure to time travel, appears to be the method by which regeneration is enabled.

3) You can receive the Imprimature once and once only. If you have a set of regenerations, a second set cannot be added to the same body. Presumably it has no effect or an adverse effect. This is why Borusa concocted such a ludicrous scheme in 'The Five Doctors' to extend his lifespan rather than simply sneaking in an extra set of regenerations. The Master got around this by transferring his consciousness to other bodies (one Treman and human) which were then given new sets of regenerations.

4) Time Lords can regenerate safely twelve times, giving them thirteen lives. An attempt to regenerate again is not necessarily fatal, but can leave you a withered husk with not further ability to regenerate (as befell the Master). Time Lords can also voluntarily suspend regeneration if they wish to die (as the Master did in his John Simm incarnation). Regenerating in a TARDIS is preferable, as the TARDIS helps the process along. Other Time Lords can also help in some unspecificed fashion. Sometimes potential future incarnations can step back and aid the regeneration in a time loop (as with the Watcher).

5) Regeneration appears to have been created by Rassilon as a stop-gap in his quest to find the secret of immortality. Rassilon eventually succeeded, but felt that the secret was too corrupting and refused to give it up, instead going to permanant suspension. However, as the Rassilon who appeared in the Time War (Timothy Dalton) looked very different to the Rassilon who went into suspension (some bloke), it appears that Rassilon's secret still involved regeneration. It may simply have removed the limit on the number of regenerations possible.

6) Regeneration results in total cellular reconstruction, including of the brain. Memories and certain core characteristics are retained across regeneration but it is not certain consciousness is. It's possible that the Doctor does actually die as a person each time he regenerates and 'someone else walks away' (as the Tenth put it) with his memories. This means that regeneration is not an easy way out of a situation: there may be continuity of body and memory, but not consciousness or 'soul', if you will. I imagine this is a point of philosophical discussion amongst Time Lords.

Methods by which the Doctor can get around the limitation:

I: He inherited River Song's remaining 10 incarnations, thus we don't have to worry about it until we get to the Twenty-Third Doctor.

II: The Time Lords somehow overcame the limitation during the Time War - possibly using Rassilon's unspecified immortality technique - and 'upgraded' all Time Lords including the Doctor to make them more effective soldiers. It seems to be unlikely Rassilon would share his secret with the Time Lords, however.

III: The limitation was artificially imposed by the Time Lords. With them gone, the limitation no longer exists and the Doctor can regenerate indefinitely (the BBC website seemed to support this hypothesis for a while). This also seems unlikely, as Borusa could have gotten around his own problem this way.

IV: The Doctor will also have his consciousness transferred to another body and will be able to find a way of implanting new regenerations (maybe even the TARDIS is capable of doing so?), just like the Master.

V: The show will ignore the limitation and turn it into a story point.

VI: The show will ignore the limitation altogether and just let fans get on with arguing about it :)

Shadow Lodge

Marik Whiterose wrote:
Yes, it is. McGann is considered the eighth Doctor.

I consider McGann canon, but very little else about the movie to be canon. Especially the Doctor being half-human, and the snake-Master.

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Kthulhu wrote:
Marik Whiterose wrote:
Yes, it is. McGann is considered the eighth Doctor.
I consider McGann canon, but very little else about the movie to be canon. Especially the Doctor being half-human, and the snake-Master.

IIRC, the "snake-Master" was in fact a "cat-Master" and was continuity carried over from the last regular episode of the classic series Survival, which was in fact most definitely canon. I think they handled it poorly but they were trying to carry over something from the old series.

The showrunners seem to have gone out of their way to de-canonize the "half-human" comment, however, as the new series has asserted the Doctor's non-human-ness many times. The adventure is considered more or less canon, the comment we can write off as either a philosophical comment or regeneration induced madness, or a strange way of referencing something else (like the Doctor receiving a human blood transfusion, which during his regeneration crisis did something temporarily weird to him).

Shadow Lodge

By snake-Master, I'm not talking about the Master as Eric Roberts having weird eyes. I'm talking about the fact that what escapes from the little box that the Doctor carries away from the Master's trial/execution was a little worm/snake thing. Essentially, if you show that film to someone who doesn't know anything about Doctor Who, they would come away thinking that the Master was an alien snake that could possess people. Because that's essentially what he was in the film.

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I don't even remember that. I'll have to buy the DVD before i can see what you're talking about.


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Lord Snow wrote:
Plus, someone told me that in classic who there's a scene where a female time lord (who's name I can't remember) just sort of regenerated multiple times until she found a look she likes... so it's not as if the 13 regenerations things as a hard and set rule even now...
Marik Whiterose wrote:
Romanna changed her appearance several times before deciding on the Lalla Ward version. Not sure if those actually count as regenerations since they all occurred off-screen.

This caused a lot of controversy among DW fans over the years. I always found it interesting that people forget the concept of projection regeneration. This is where the Time Lord who wishes to regenerate creates a projection of themselves in the form they want to become and then merge with that form when they actually regenerate. This way they can control what their new appearance looks like. The projection is malleable and this is almost certainly what Romana was doing in Destiny of the Daleks. It seems to have the advantage of having no regeneration crisis attached to it when it is done correctly.

This form of regeneration was introduced to Doctor Who at the time of the 3rd Doctor's regeneration into the 4th. It was done by an old mentor of the Doctor's who happened to be on Earth. The 4th Doctor tries to use this method when he goes to regenerate into the 5th...and proves himself to be very bad at it.

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Nice theory Feros. I also always accepted that the Doctor was just bad at regeneration (he did only pass the Academy barely on the third attempt, after all :)). I've never thought that Romana was regenerating multiple times just to choose a body, I just assumed she was very good at controlling the process. The projection idea makes loads of sense, and I'd forgotten the influence of Kanpo Rimpoche (did I get it right?)... the old mentor (if I didn't get it right).

I really need to rewatch some Pertwee/early 4th stuff. I'm not a big 3rd Doctor fan so I have very few of his eps on DVD (on VHS, but I don't know how they've held up over time). But they introduced a lot of key concepts carried on in the series from his time onward through Tom Baker's era so I really should reacquaint myself with the era.


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K’anpo is correct. There is even a reference to the Doctor not knowing how to do what she is doing in Destiny of the Daleks, if I recall correctly.

And thanks! For some reason, I have never seen this theory put forward, just a bunch of irate fans who felt that regeneration is too important to be treated so lightly. Just because the Doctor treats it as a last resort doesn't mean the other Time Lords held the same belief.

Liberty's Edge

Feros wrote:

K’anpo is correct. There is even a reference to the Doctor not knowing how to do what she is doing in Destiny of the Daleks, if I recall correctly.

And thanks! For some reason, I have never seen this theory put forward, just a bunch of irate fans who felt that regeneration is too important to be treated so lightly. Just because the Doctor treats it as a last resort doesn't mean the other Time Lords held the same belief.

I just watched it yesterday--he was concerned with her picking the appearance of an actual person (the princess).


The Doctor also tends to get violently killed before doing it. That may may it a bit trickier to control than if you're doing it intentionally.


I believe the old FASA Doctor Who RPG specifically stated that some Time Lords had more control over regeneration than others with Romana being called out as having particularly good control, to the point where she could take a specific form.

Now, why she would waste one of her 13 (or however many) lives when she wasn't injured to the point of death doesn't make sense. Then again, I was always more of a fan of Romana I anyway.


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Kthulhu wrote:
Marik Whiterose wrote:
Yes, it is. McGann is considered the eighth Doctor.
I consider McGann canon, but very little else about the movie to be canon. Especially the Doctor being half-human, and the snake-Master.

It is canon that the Doctor said he was half-human in the movie.

Fortunately, the new series has also established it as canon that the Doctor occasionally lies. ;)


In the Sarah Jane Chronicles cross over, the Doctor mentions he can regenerate up to 507 times, although it was said in a jokey manner.

At any rate...I doubt BBC will completely end Dr. Who forever once the time limit is reached...

The Exchange

Ah, alright, the Romana regeneration thing makes more sense now. I always wondered about that, given that regeneration is a death to a certain aspect of a time lord, so it seemed wierd so many Romanas in a row were willing to die because thier look wasn't all that amazing.

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Legendarius wrote:
Now, why she would waste one of her 13 (or however many) lives when she wasn't injured to the point of death doesn't make sense. Then again, I was always more of a fan of Romana I anyway.
Lord Snow wrote:


Ah, alright, the Romana regeneration thing makes more sense now. I always wondered about that, given that regeneration is a death to a certain aspect of a time lord, so it seemed wierd so many Romanas in a row were willing to die because thier look wasn't all that amazing.

Of course, the real reason Romana had to regenerate was because Mary Tamm decided to leave in the middle of filming her last serial, so they had no time to write her out. But that doesn't make a great story. ;)

I have a vague memory of her having been ill or poisoned or something in the Armageddon Factor, and in my personal fanon, she had a relapse, and realizing she was dying, initiated regeneration in enough time that she could control the process. Of course, I could be misremembering. It would also be like Romana to accidentally hurt herself in the TARDIS or something and then try to brush it off as nothing when of course she'd just gotten herself killed. She distracts the Doctor with all the shapechanging than drawing his attention to why she was regenerating to begin with.

I never thought Romana was just dying over and over again, that's never even occurred to me as a possibility. I always just figured she was in a particular state where her form was temporarily malleable.

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