Druid Class Preview

Monday, July 23, 2018

Druids are practitioners of primal magic, which blends vital essence (the essence of life, instinct, and faith) with material essence (the essence of matter and the natural world). Thus, primal traditions are rooted in an instinctual connection with and faith in the surrounding world: the cycle of day and night, the turning of the seasons, and the natural selection of predator and prey. Druids are the iconic primal spellcasters; they call upon the power of nature for magic through their deep faith, as opposed to primal sorcerers, who harness the power of fey or other natural creatures that flows through their blood to access the same sorts of primal energies.

Since this is the last class, before we go deeper into the druid's mechanics, I want to show you some extra pieces each class has that you might not know about. Every class entry starts with some bullet points to help you get a feel for what playing the class might be like.

Playing a Druid

Players of druid characters might approach gameplay in the following ways:

  • During combat, you call upon the forces of nature to defeat your enemies and protect your allies. You can cast spells drawing upon primal magic to summon deadly animals to fight at your side, grant resilience to you and your friends, or heal their wounds. Depending on your bond to nature, you might also call upon powerful elemental magic or even change shape into a terrifying beast to fight with tooth and claw.
  • During social encounters, you represent balance and a reasoned approach to problems, looking for solutions that not only are best for the natural world, but also allow the creatures within it to live in harmony and peace. You often propose compromises that allow both sides to gain what they truly need, even if they can't have all that they desire.
  • In exploration mode, your skills in nature are invaluable. You can track down enemies, navigate through the wilderness, or use your spells to detect any magical auras around you. You might even ask wild animals to assist your group in your travels with their extraordinary senses and scouting abilities.
  • In downtime mode, you might craft magic items or potions. Alternatively, your tie to nature might lead you to tend to an area of the wild, befriending its beasts and healing the wounds caused by civilization. You might even attempt to teach people sustainable techniques that allow them to subsist off the land without harming the natural balance.

Roleplaying a Druid

Druids are the living embodiment of nature, acting as its agent; you protect the wild places from harm and speak for their interests in more civilized lands.

If You're a Druid, You Likely...

  • Have a deep and meaningful respect for the power of nature.
  • Are in constant awe of the natural world, eager to share it with others but cautious of their influence.
  • Treat plants and animals as allies in your quest, working with them toward your goals.

Others Probably...

  • View you as a representative of nature, and might even assume you can control it.
  • Assume you're a recluse who avoids society and cities, preferring to live in the wild.
  • Treat you as a mystic, similar to a priest, but answering only to the forces of nature.

Illustration by Wayne Reynolds

Spellcasting

Druids are full prepared spellcasters, able to cast the same number of spells per day as the cleric and bard, rather than gaining extra spells through bloodlines or schools as the sorcerer and wizard do. However, just as the cleric has channel energy and the bard has compositions, the druid has more than enough tricks up her sleeve to make her a primal powerhouse. And figuring those out starts with...

Orders

As the druid's initial architect, Jason pulled the concept of orders from the sidelines of lore directly into the spotlight, making your choice of order a major part of your druid. As with the bard's muse, you can choose abilities that belong to another order, but unlike for the bard, you gain extra benefits from feats and abilities that belong to your own order, incentivizing you to check out your own order's feats first. An order member gains a new skill and an order power that druids of other orders can't gain, and each order adds its own component to the basic druid anathema forbidding actions like despoiling nature. The four orders presented in the playtest are animal, leaf, storm, and wild, though more orders are all but certain to arise.

Animal

An animal druid (known by names like druid of the claw or druid of the wing depending on her preferred animal) has a strong connection to animals. She is trained in Athletics, which is a signature skill for her. She also gains the heal animal order power (exclusive to that members of order) and the Animal Companion feat. Committing wanton cruelty to animals or killing them unnecessarily is anathema to her. (This doesn't prevent her from defending herself against animals or killing them cleanly for food.)

This is the order that's all about having the coolest animal companion. Other druids can easily get an animal companion (and they're a solid choice for all druids) and take the same upgrade feats, but with each feat, the animal order druid will get something cool or extra for the animal. As an example, an animal druid's companion can have multiple specializations, which are like animal companion archetypes, if the animal druid commits more to this path.

Leaf

A druid of the leaf reveres plants and the bounty of nature, acting as a caretaker and warden for the wilderness, teaching sustainable techniques, and helping areas regrow after disasters or negligent humanoid expansion. She is trained in Diplomacy, which is a signature skill for her. She also gains the Leshy Familiar druid feat and the goodberry order power (exclusive to that members of order). Committing wanton cruelty to plants or killing plants unnecessarily is anathema to her. (This doesn't prevent her from defending herself against plants or harvesting them if necessary for survival.)

This style of druid is all about plants, with options including Verdant Metamorphosis, where you flat-out become a plant, and the druid of the leaf's leshy familiar, which has more powers than a typical familiar. Let's check out Verdant Metamorphosis to see a special benefit only druids of the leaf receive:

Verdant Metamorphosis Feat 18

Druid

Leaf Order

You transform into a plant version of yourself. You gain the plant trait and lose any trait that's inappropriate for your new form (typically humanoid). You can change from a form that looks mostly like your old self into a tree or any other non-creature plant as an action (this action has the concentrate trait). Perception checks don't reveal your true form, but a creature can attempt a Nature or Survival check against your class DC to determine that the plant is new to the surrounding area. While in this form, you can observe everything around you, but you can't act other than to spend an action (this action has the concentrate trait) to change back, which ends your turn. In this form, your AC is 30, your TAC is 20, only conditional bonuses, conditional penalties, and circumstance bonuses and penalties can affect you, and you treat all successes and critical successes on Reflex saves as failures.

Special If you are a druid of the leaf order, if you transform into a non-creature plant and take your daily rest during daylight hours, the rest restores you to maximum Hit Points and removes all non-permanent drained, enfeebled, sluggish, and stupefied conditions.

Storm

A druid of the storm carries nature's fury within her, channeling it to terrifying effect and riding the winds and storms. She is trained in Acrobatics, which is a signature skill for her. She also gains the Storm Born druid feat and the tempest surge order power (exclusive to that members of order). Creating unnatural weather patterns that could be damaging to the local environment (such as by using a 9th-level control weather ritual) is anathema to her.

In addition to healing magic, the primal list contains powerful energy blasts, including fireball and other spells newly available to druids. Armed with this magic, druids of the storm are elemental dynamos who focus on the power of the tempest, flying around in storms and ignoring penalties from weather. Notably, their tempest surge order power is an extremely good blast for a 1 Spell Point power, particularly after if they take a feat that ups the d10s to d12s. Let's take a look, since you'll be slinging it around a bunch of times each day.

Tempest Surge Power 1

Air

Electricity

Evocation

Casting [[A]] Somatic Casting, [[A]] Verbal Casting

Range 30 feet; Targets one creature


You surround a foe in a swirling storm of violent winds, roiling clouds, and crackling lightning. The storm deals 1d10 electricity damage to the target, depending on their Reflex saving throw.

Success Half damage.

Critical Success No damage.

Failure Full damage, and the target is sluggish 1 for 1 round.

Critical Failure Double damage, and the target is sluggish 2 for 1 round.

Heightened (+1) The damage increases by 1d10.

After increasing the damage to d12s, the damage scales at the same rate as lightning bolt. But it doesn't just deal damage! The sluggish condition penalizes AC, attack rolls, and Reflex saves, so taking double damage on the critical failure is just the beginning of the horrible pain. When we were playtesting, every creature that critically failed against tempest surge was in for a very bad round.

Wild

The savage, uncontrollable call of the natural world infuses a druid of the wild, granting her the ability to change her shape into the ferocious form of a wild creature. She is trained in Intimidation, which becomes a signature skill for her. She also gains the Wild Shape druid feat and the wild claws order power (exclusive to that members of order). Becoming fully domesticated by the temptations of civilization is anathema to her. (This doesn't prevent her from buying and using processed goods or staying in a city for an adventure, but she can never come to rely on these conveniences or truly call such a place her permanent home.)

Notice the wild order druid starts with Wild Shape? Any druid with Wild Shape feats gets a free extra casting of certain polymorph spells, heightened to her highest possible level, eventually rising up to two free castings if the druid takes enough Wild Shape feats. But the thing that makes a wild order druid particularly different is that, in addition to these, she gains a number of additional bonus castings of these spells equal to her Strength modifier (if it's more than 1). That means a druid of the wild tends towards higher Strength than a typical member of other orders.

Druid Features

Aside from an order, you gain spellcasting and primal spell proficiency at the same levels as all the other spellcasters, new spell levels at every odd level save 19th, expert proficiency in primal spells at 12th level, master proficiency at 16th level, and legendary proficiency at 19th level. You also get the secret Druidic language (don't teach it to nondruids—that's anathema!) and wild empathy, which lets you use Diplomacy to Make a Request of animals, and possibly of plants if you're a leaf order aficionado.

Druid Feats

I covered many feats that connect to orders, but many feats aren't affiliated, like this powerhouse:

[[F]] Leyline Conduit Feat 20

Druid

Metamagic

Frequency once per minute

Trigger You start to cast a spell of 5th level or lower that has no duration and a maximum of 2 spellcasting actions.


You add a Somatic Casting action to the casting of the triggering spell, and you don't expend the prepared spell as you cast it.

This means every minute, you can cast a 5th level or lower spell without expending it. That's really useful! There are some interesting effects of how Jason designed this feat, though, that make it more than just a simple repetition, particularly the fact that you can use Leyline Conduit only if you were already able to cast the spell, meaning you had to prepare it and then avoid using it up by casting it without Leyline Conduit. So the feat gives you somewhat limitless uses of the spell, but if you really need to cast it again before the minute is up, while Leyline Conduit is unavailable, you'll expend the spell for real (at least for the rest of the day).

Animal Companions

Before I go, let's talk about animal companions. While Jason was deep in preliminary design of the druid, he bestowed upon me a strange primal chart of flowing options, almost in Druidic itself, and explained it to me. This chart combined all the best aspects of the 4th- and 7th-level animal companion advancements with animal companion archetypes and new unique features for each different animal, all while moving away from having to make tons of basic feat selections for the companion. What I built from that chart was the first draft of the animal companion system in the playtest. Let's show off the companion most often overlooked in Pathfinder First Edition, the noble bear. The bear has generated a plethora of threads dedicated to how neglected it is, so let's see how the playtest handles it.

Bear

Your companion is a grizzly, panda, polar bear, or other type of bear.

Size Small

[[A]] UnarmedStrikes jaws, Damage 1d8 piercing;

claw (agile), Damage 1d6 slashing

Abilities Str, Con

Hit Points 8

Skill Intimidation

Senses scent

Speed 35 feet

Work Together Benefit Your bear mauls your enemies when you create an opening. Until your next turn, all your weapon Strikes against a creature your bear threatens deal 1d8 additional slashing damage. If your bear has a specialization, the additional slashing damage increases to 2d8.

Advanced Maneuver Bear Hug

[[A]]Bear Hug

Requirements Your last action was a successful claw Strike.


Make another claw Strike against the same target. If your Strike hits, the target is also grabbed, as if you had succeeded at the Grapple action.

The bear starts out Small. Don't worry—when it grows up, it can eventually become a Large bear (in the first book, too; there's no need to wait). The bear's boost in Strength and d8 damage die for its jaws make it the most directly damaging companion, tied with the snake, which it edges out in terms of Constitution, Hit Points, and land Speed. (The snake, for its part, has better AC and lots of special Speeds.) The Work Together benefit is something you can have the bear do instead of attack, and it again deals the most direct damage, adding 1d8 (later 2d8) to the damage of your weapon Strikes. The bear is a great companion for someone who plans, much like the bear itself, to wade into the thick of the fight. Finally, the bear can eventually learn the Bear Hug advanced maneuver. This maneuver essentially means that if the bear hits twice in a row, it gets a free automatic grapple. Handy for keeping foes in place!

So that about wraps up the druid. If you were a druid, which of the four orders would you be?

Mark Seifter
Designer

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Druids Lini Pathfinder Playtest Wayne Reynolds
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BryonD wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
BryonD wrote:
I keep seeing signature skill, but I missed the definition and can't find it. Thanks
Signature skills are ones you can eventually raise to master and then legendary, non signature can't be raised past expert it seems.
thank you

The archetypes blog showed that there was at least one way to get additional signature skills so you aren't locked in to only what your class provides.


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Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Both mental and vital essences can exist without faith.
Sure can! Faith is a manifestation of the vital essence, but you can easily have vital essence and have a distinct lack of faith (but if you lack all vital essence, you don't have the capacity for it). Just like squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares.

I think the issue Drejk is addressing is that all vital casters appear to have a religious component, which seems to be grating.

I think that Druids can easily be a non-religious option, though. They are mystics for sure and a lot of them probably are religious, but faith doesn't seem to be a mandatory component.


Bardarok wrote:
BryonD wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
BryonD wrote:
I keep seeing signature skill, but I missed the definition and can't find it. Thanks
Signature skills are ones you can eventually raise to master and then legendary, non signature can't be raised past expert it seems.
thank you
The archetypes blog showed that there was at least one way to get additional signature skills so you aren't locked in to only what your class provides.

As did the backgrounds blog (or was it ancestry).


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Also, can we finally cut off that dumb a**-pulled association of life magic with faith, please?
Vital essence is the prana, or life force, that animates living things and presides over things like instinct, intuition, and faith. Even a creature with limited mental essence, or in some cases mindless creatures with no mental essence at all, can have instincts that cause them to take particular actions or push them towards such actions. A creature with neither mental or vital essence would need to basically be programmed to respond in very specific ways.

I really don't like these essences. They feel like a grab bag of random New Ageisms, not something connected to the spell lists that have been fairly consistent for 40 odd years now. Life = faith is just bizarre for one thing, and doesn't tie to the animal/plant focus that's actually central to the class.

I'm not sure what these arbitrary divisions do to benefit the game. I get that the druid is now getting some wizard spells out of the deal, but what various classes are losing (and clearly some should be losing spells with this new model) seems very glossed over.

There is a reshaping going on here that seems unnecessary, and I'm not clear how its connected to the game or the setting.
Has an overwhelming "Master Qui-Gon, sir, what are Midichlorians?' feel to it.


Bardarok wrote:
BryonD wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
BryonD wrote:
I keep seeing signature skill, but I missed the definition and can't find it. Thanks
Signature skills are ones you can eventually raise to master and then legendary, non signature can't be raised past expert it seems.
thank you
The archetypes blog showed that there was at least one way to get additional signature skills so you aren't locked in to only what your class provides.

Thanks also. I kinda guessed that there would likely be other ways to customize. I appreciate the confirmation.


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Mark Seifter wrote:
1of1 wrote:

I wonder what our magic animals do when we aren't paying attention to them.

If a bear is stabbed by a goblin, and the druid isn't around to donate actions, does the bear make a sound?
There's a default, but basically in most situations they try to use actions to get out of danger and protect themselves. Also, animal order druids can eventually always get at least one chosen action out of their companion even when they aren't using an action to Command it.

Hmmm. Interesting. With a couple of glaring examples like the honey badger, even most predatory animals IRL don't actually go all out in a fight. The risk for an injury is too high, when a tiger whose leg gets busted is a tiger that can't catch prey which is a dead tiger. So animals fighting on instinct against credible threats tend to prioritize defense and intimidation over all out offense. Animals killing food is probably another story.

Quote:
Maybe it takes an action for them to listen and process the command.

That would probably be pretty realistic. It is pretty hard to hold the attention of a dog, after all, and they often struggle to figure out what you want them to do. I'm reminded of many a pooch who gets too excited when company comes over and won't stop jumping, or how a dog desperate for a treat will sometimes cycle through every trick they know in the hopes that one will happen to be the trick the treat holder was asking for. Even at dog shows, the dog seems to pretty much be under constant guidance of their owner.

There are probably some notable exceptions to this 2 actions idea. There are pitbulls which have been bred and/or abused into clamping down on an opponent and not letting go despite whatever damage. But an abused dog like that is the sort of beast that flips out and eats toddlers on the street, and a well adjusted pitbull tends to still be pretty rambunctious. Neither of which seems to jive with the focused obedience we expect from an animal companion. They need to be constantly attentive to their master's commands if the tavern owner is going to let it rest at your feet under the table.

Quote:

t depends on what you want, I think. A Sorc can tackle three or four fights with a top-level polymorph with even less investment now. Your stats don’t matter anymore (except for health, and even that has some temp hp). Druid invests a bunch into not touching spell slots.

But, PF1 let you use a metamagic rod of extend spell and be a dragon for 24 minutes, enough for a social encounter. My shapeshifting bloodline Sorc can spend 24/7 as a dragon. It seems like that sort of thing is gone. I’m bummed about that, since it’s what I liked about polymorphs- being something else.

Yeah, polymorph seems rather more potent out the box this edition. And I'd certainly wait to see all the feats, school abilities, etc for polymorphers before I fret too much on the duration.

I also expect the non-combat spells like Disguise Self to have significantly higher duration. Maybe there's some sort of heightened Disguise spell that lets you adopt the form of a dragon but none of the bonuses? Certainly illusion spells could emulate this effect.


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Amaranthine Witch wrote:
gwynfrid wrote:
Well, one of the major design goals of PF2 is to make the game more usable at high levels. I have high expectations about that, and the previews so far have shown a lot of steps in that the good direction (spells per day reduced, spell don't auto-scale with caster level, simplified action economy, less bonus types, 4 degrees of success sharply reducing save-or-die situations, etc). We'll have to see at the playtest how this goes.
And that is a noble goal, but sometimes it feels like instead of fixing high level play they are stretching the low levels.

And I think that's OK. In many cases, PF1 classes were severely front-loaded. That's why we had level dipping as a primary min-maxing technique. Of course, getting rid of the front-loading mandates some stretching over several levels, unless you're going to cut class features out altogether.

Now, of course when I say this will be fine, I mean it under the condition that every single level in the progression from 1 to 20 remains interesting for every class.


willuwontu wrote:
As did the backgrounds blog (or was it ancestry).

I missed that, nice. I was not a fan of signature skills at first but as long as there are ways to get other ones I am not too worried about it.


Can the druid get mountable companions or enable companions to be mountable?

Also is there any reason why the Wild Order Druid can't be based on Dex? Sometimes I envision a wild man just darting quickly in the forest being agile with hit and run tactics. It kind of sucks that it is Str only. It would be cool if it was "Str or Dex, which ever is higher".


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Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Both mental and vital essences can exist without faith.
Sure can! Faith is a manifestation of the vital essence, but you can easily have vital essence and have a distinct lack of faith (but if you lack all vital essence, you don't have the capacity for it).

So neither undead nor sapient golem's/AI have capacity for faith? Purely mental sprits?

Vital essence is critical to life itself. It is only indirectly relevant to faith, calling out faith in the way the text calls it implies more special relationship between those two than simply one way reliance while it's mind that is the essential factor for faith, not life.


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gwynfrid wrote:
Amaranthine Witch wrote:
gwynfrid wrote:
Well, one of the major design goals of PF2 is to make the game more usable at high levels. I have high expectations about that, and the previews so far have shown a lot of steps in that the good direction (spells per day reduced, spell don't auto-scale with caster level, simplified action economy, less bonus types, 4 degrees of success sharply reducing save-or-die situations, etc). We'll have to see at the playtest how this goes.
And that is a noble goal, but sometimes it feels like instead of fixing high level play they are stretching the low levels.

And I think that's OK. In many cases, PF1 classes were severely front-loaded. That's why we had level dipping as a primary min-maxing technique. Of course, getting rid of the front-loading mandates some stretching over several levels, unless you're going to cut class features out altogether.

Now, of course when I say this will be fine, I mean it under the condition that every single level in the progression from 1 to 20 remains interesting for every class.

The flip side is if the lower levels are such a drag those levels are going to probably be skipped over when it comes to campaigns. Or players just drop the system.

Balancing for high level play is a decent idea given how often it seems to descend into rocket tag(My own experience ends before level 10). But if the low levels aren't interesting, and then can't be given that we don't want min max to be a thing with cross class, they why play that section? Just auto level to the point the game becomes fun again. Never mind locking/moving things around that could limit RP ideas(Hi, I'm X class who's history is based around Y ability. I don't have that till level 5 so... how's my story work?)

Meh, we'll see how it turns out in play. But given how people argue what levels are best/interesting to play now, I don't have high hopes of 1-20 being a fully interesting build path all the way through.

EDIT:
So actually using an Animal companion has been reworked to "Handle Animal" checks now? Well not an actual check, but use an action to tell the animal to do stuff?

Gonna be the same for Undead? Constructs? Summons? Anything that you have made/bonded with is going to take an action to do anything of note in battle?


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Stone Dog wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Both mental and vital essences can exist without faith.
Sure can! Faith is a manifestation of the vital essence, but you can easily have vital essence and have a distinct lack of faith (but if you lack all vital essence, you don't have the capacity for it). Just like squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares.

I think the issue Drejk is addressing is that all vital casters appear to have a religious component, which seems to be grating.

I think that Druids can easily be a non-religious option, though. They are mystics for sure and a lot of them probably are religious, but faith doesn't seem to be a mandatory component.

Exactly. A lot of fiction presents druids as spiritually connected to nature but without any faith.

Wider speaking, highlighting faith when speaking of vital essence and life itself has very bad connotations.


Still has a lot of weird disparate powers. Still looks looks like a pain to try to run...


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ThePuppyTurtle wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
BryonD wrote:
I keep seeing signature skill, but I missed the definition and can't find it. Thanks
Signature skills are ones you can eventually raise to master and then legendary, non signature can't be raised past expert it seems.
Yuck. Very video gamey. Do not like.

I don't really understand this complaint. But suffice to say it's a new way of reflecting how certain classes or trainings give you a leg up on different skills. One can get new signature skills from anywhere; we know the pirate archetype gets you acrobatics as a signature skill for the cost of one feat, for example, and you get one from your background IIRC.

But I don't see anything "video gamey" about signature skills representing how a cleric is better at religion than a fighter than class skills representing the same in PF1.


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Why do you have to be cruel to animals to be an evil animal Druid? Isn’t it more you just decide to enlist the help of the most cruel animals, Wolf, Tiger, Bear.... and corrupt them into being more ferocious and wild.


I'd say that undead and sapient golems gave a Vital essence or they wouldn't have drive and motivation. It might be a twisted essence in the case of essence, hungry and cannibalistic , but still Vital.


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Drejk wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Both mental and vital essences can exist without faith.
Sure can! Faith is a manifestation of the vital essence, but you can easily have vital essence and have a distinct lack of faith (but if you lack all vital essence, you don't have the capacity for it).

So neither undead nor sapient golem's/AI have capacity for faith? Purely mental sprits?

Vital essence is critical to life itself. It is only indirectly relevant to faith, calling out faith in the way the text calls it implies more special relationship between those two than simply one way reliance while it's mind that is the essential factor for faith, not life.

Ghoul priest's advocate for a second, while faith as vital is tbh unexpected (and not something I'm terribly keen on), for undead at least it doesn't conflict.

Mark has previously stated that negative energy tainted undead are still sort of running on vital, but rather negative energy being used for vital in the same way positive energy would be, but negative wants to run off and play in the glorious fires of entropy and really shouldn't be used like that. TL;DR this mucks up native instincts because it's a destructive force doing the wrong job, causing stuff like messed up hungers and desires.
With this expanded to faith, it would explain the really messed up belief systems of the generically evil sapient undead, as the sort of thing they instinctively crave is all wrong. So yadda yadda blasphemous priests of dark and hateful gods, headless bodies bouncing down ziggurats into the grasp of ravenous throngs, a dark rapture whereon the dread beast seeks to swallow the world a-hole.

Edit: A lack of robot priests would be sad though, hallowed be their serial numbers.


Drejk wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Both mental and vital essences can exist without faith.
Sure can! Faith is a manifestation of the vital essence, but you can easily have vital essence and have a distinct lack of faith (but if you lack all vital essence, you don't have the capacity for it).

So neither undead nor sapient golem's/AI have capacity for faith? Purely mental sprits?

Vital essence is critical to life itself. It is only indirectly relevant to faith, calling out faith in the way the text calls it implies more special relationship between those two than simply one way reliance while it's mind that is the essential factor for faith, not life.

Which is especially ridiculous when you consider the fact that there are constructs and AI capable of generating divine spells. Why would someone like Brigh or Unity give power through an aspect they don't care for (or possibly even have)?


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Storm Druid losing their powers if they create weather patterns harmful to their environment sounds very badly designed. Considering all but the slightest changes can be pretty devastating.

Really need to see if "killing them unnecessarily" is further clarified in actual publication. There are some really nasty invasive species that breed so fast over 50% of the population needs to be killed EACH YEAR to prevent population growth (Big example is the North American feral boar). I really hope culling invasive species that will destroy the environment doesn't cause a druid to fall.


Stone Dog wrote:
I'd say that undead and sapient golems gave a Vital essence or they wouldn't have drive and motivation. It might be a twisted essence in the case of essence, hungry and cannibalistic , but still Vital.

It was mentioned that instincts could be programmed instead of having a Vital essence, and any further drive could come from Mental (i.e. a given course of action has been calculated to agree with their programmed directive) or spiritual (itself the alignment-based override for base desires as a whole)

Sovereign Court

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The Sideromancer wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Both mental and vital essences can exist without faith.
Sure can! Faith is a manifestation of the vital essence, but you can easily have vital essence and have a distinct lack of faith (but if you lack all vital essence, you don't have the capacity for it).

So neither undead nor sapient golem's/AI have capacity for faith? Purely mental sprits?

Vital essence is critical to life itself. It is only indirectly relevant to faith, calling out faith in the way the text calls it implies more special relationship between those two than simply one way reliance while it's mind that is the essential factor for faith, not life.

Which is especially ridiculous when you consider the fact that there are constructs and AI capable of generating divine spells. Why would someone like Brigh or Unity give power through an aspect they don't care for (or possibly even have)?

Constructs with divine spells are usually called out as having souls, i.e. vitality.


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Wow, I’m really impressed with the character creation options that are available in PF2. It looks great!

With all of these options, I’m just wondering how I’m going to make (or know how to play... or playtest) a level 17 character. Hmmm…


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PossibleCabbage wrote:
ThePuppyTurtle wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
BryonD wrote:
I keep seeing signature skill, but I missed the definition and can't find it. Thanks
Signature skills are ones you can eventually raise to master and then legendary, non signature can't be raised past expert it seems.
Yuck. Very video gamey. Do not like.

I don't really understand this complaint. But suffice to say it's a new way of reflecting how certain classes or trainings give you a leg up on different skills. One can get new signature skills from anywhere; we know the pirate archetype gets you acrobatics as a signature skill for the cost of one feat, for example, and you get one from your background IIRC.

But I don't see anything "video gamey" about signature skills representing how a cleric is better at religion than a fighter than class skills representing the same in PF1.

I believe the problem here is that yes, the cleric is better at religion than a Fighter. That makes sense.

It feels kinda video gamey, though artificial I think is better term maybe arbitrary(?), that the cleric is better because the fighter has a Brick Wall in their skill. And bigger than just a +3 that PF has with class skills.

Now we can discuss any number of reasons as to why a PF1 fighter might want Knowledge Religion, along with any number of bonuses said fighter can pick up to boost it. But in PF2, it seems there's just this wall that you can not get past unless it is a signature skill. No amount of bonuses will help with this(More so since they seem to want to remove bonuses, at least tone them down).

The only way to move past this wall is to pick up a Feat(Skill or otherwise), that removes this barrier and gives you access to the next level. Rather than trying to figure out ways around it, you have to pick it up. You have to spend your point on unlocking something, basically like a skill tree in a video game. To use a different skill, it feels weird that you can ONLY do some things at Master Diplomacy and can't at Expert Diplomacy, no matter what you do/bonuses you turn on.

Is this a good or bad thing? I think that depends on each person. But this is how it feels video gamey. At least that's how I read it.


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Elleth wrote:

Ghoul priest's advocate for a second, while faith as vital is tbh unexpected (and not something I'm terribly keen on), for undead at least it doesn't conflict.

Mark has previously stated that negative energy tainted undead are still sort of running on vital, but rather negative energy being used for vital in the same way positive energy would be, but negative wants to run off and play in the glorious fires of entropy and really shouldn't be used like that. TL;DR this mucks up native instincts because it's a destructive force doing the wrong job, causing stuff like messed up hungers and desires.
With this expanded to faith, it would explain the really messed up belief systems of the generically evil sapient undead, as the sort of thing they instinctively crave is all wrong. So yadda yadda blasphemous priests of dark and hateful gods, headless bodies bouncing down ziggurats into the grasp of ravenous throngs, a dark rapture whereon the dread beast seeks to swallow the world a-hole.

Edit: A lack of robot priests would be sad though, hallowed be their serial numbers.

I saw an Andriod Cleric that cast through math formulas. That was pretty creative actually.


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Delicious crunchy blog post is delicious and crunchy. To be expected, since the release date is next week, no less, so I suppose some limiting reigns can be pulled, but it's still nice to have these. I also absolutely love the descriptive text of this blog, Mark. Props to you for the prose you present (even though it sounds like Druids are a Natural Paladin from my reading, it makes sense here since they are Heralds of Nature).

Regardless, I'll dig into it:

Playing a Druid/Roleplaying a Druid:
I compiled these two points together, because there's not really anything "mechanical" in these ones, but I will say that these are a good idea for presenting what we can expect a Druid to (approximately) be capable of, and I think stuff like this is what a blog post should include. I am certain that these are merely examples, of course; perhaps there are Druids who can create Scrolls instead of Potions, or even fashion natural equipment to rival that of its metallic counterparts. Maybe not in Core, but hopefully with follow-up books, we can have special Wooden items that are just as resilient as Metal items. (Maybe Ironwood can be a special material instead of just a temporary spell augmentation? It's possible, given Resonance and all that.) Okay, I better stop rambling here, there are more points to go over.

Class Features:
For some reason, I feel like Druids are stealing the Cavalier's thunder with the Order class feature. I'm not saying it doesn't make sense (there are many Druidic fantasy clans identified as an "Order," such as the Order of the Fang, Order of the Paw, etc.), but that it seems strange to me. Maybe I'll get used to it the more I play it.

The Animal Order is mostly self-explanatory, and solid enough to not warrant much of an explanation. (At least you don't have to sacrifice personal spell slots or Resonance to heal your companion!)

The Plant Order seems lackluster, but that's mostly because we don't know what a Leshy familiar can do. The high level feat is interesting due to the enhanced Rest it grants; I otherwise wouldn't use it for safe reconnaissance or anything like that, since you're kind of a sitting duck if you're discovered.

Storm Druids got some nice damaging power spam; with the D10/D12 dice and the ability to heighten it for those "nova" moments, I'm looking forward to playing one of these and just destroying enemies as I see fit.

Also, HELL YES, DRUIDS CAN CAST FIREBALL WITHOUT A DOMAIN!! Hopefully they can cast more intuitive spells than just this, but I like the step in this direction; I found it weird they could cast Call Lighting (which was meh), but not Lightning Bolt (which was a lot more useful), or even Chain Lightning. Or that they could cast really powerful spells like Flame Strike (sooner than anyone else, I might add), but not Fireball.

The Wild Order is basically the Wild Shape choice of PF1 with some added flair. It might seems nice on paper (and to me), but I think this needs to be more flexible than simply "You get Intimidate because changing into animals is scary,"; I imagine some Druids (and by relation, some players) don't want to be able to turn into something scary. Maybe they want to be something cute and cuddly (such as a little kitten or puppy), or even something that's not what it seems (such as a camouflaging Chameleon getting Disguise/Deception as a signature skill). There might be something like this here, but I haven't seen it, so I'm merely pointing out that this can be more fleshed out than what we have here. Either way, it appears the Battle Druid still exists, which is cool enough for me.

Druid Feats:
One little problem with the anathema section, and it's a bit of Chicken/Egg. If someone is a Druid, they already know Druidic (as it's a feature of the class), and if someone isn't a Druid, but wants to become one, they won't be able to learn Druidic until they take a level in the class (as prior to that, they are a non-druid), but when they do take a level in Druid, they would get the bonus language regardless of if someone taught them or not. So I'm not sure this anathema makes any sense, since teaching a non-druid Druidic is anathema, but trying to train someone who wishes to become a Druid is impossible by the same rules. I mean, I could flavor it as a "Whispers of Nature teaching you the way of the Druid" thing, but learning or teaching Druidic doesn't make any sense due to the above issue from what I can tell. This should be addressed ASAP!

The Leyline Conduit feat is basically a reskinned Wellspring Spell metamagic feat. Which isn't bad, since Wellspring Spell (from what I can tell) is Sorcerer only, and only works with Spontaneous effects, so a Prepared version makes sense also. There are two problems I have with it. First, why do we need two different feats for effects that are identical? Just because one is for Spontaneous and one is for Prepared? Most Metamagic feats worked with both types of casting, so I fail to see the relevance of splitting them like this, much less keeping them class-locked. Second, like the Wellspring Spell, the potential you give up for this option is not worth it in the grand scheme of things. You're basically getting "super cantrips," in exchange for one of your most powerful feats and abilities you can ever get as a class. I would much rather have access to 10th level spells any day of the week, since the scale of this game doesn't assume that I'll be using lower tier spells all of the time; and if it does, then I really question the balance point of 10th level spells in comparison to the rest for them to be barred behind a feat (a 20th level feat no less). Regardless, I do appreciate the "power play" footnote you give it, so it's more useful in this sense, but it's still not worth losing access to stronger features, such as 10th level spells.

Animal Companions:
Awesome, a stat block! The only problem I have with it is that several entries seem confusing or even counterintuitive to what I can understand. Does a Bear companion only ever get 8 HP, or is that its base value, to be modified with Constitution, Hit Dice, etc. Or is it the Hit Dice it has, gaining an amount equal to how many Hit Dice the Druid owner has? What's the relevance of the Abilities section, does it get an increase in those values? If so, how much? I imagine this will be detailed in the Animal Companion rules, but since we don't know what those are, it's merely speculation at this point.

Overall, I'm pretty pleased with this. To answer the final question, I'd be a Storm Druid. Heck, I'd be any Druid really. Simply because if anyone tries to argue with me, my rebuttal would be "I throw Fireballs, your argument is invalid."

I also noticed that the parenthetical "exclusive to that members of order" is grammatically incorrect; it should be "exclusive to members of that order." Maybe it got confused in the translation from Druidic. Oops.


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I'm very interested in the potential of turning into ANY non-creature plant. It is any non-creature plant, isn't it?

The party needs to get to the top of a tower? Turn into a giant redwood tree for them to climb.

Need to hide? Become a teeny tiny blade of grass... or something even smaller. Apparently, the world's smallest flowering plant is a duckweed which is the size of a grain of rice. If I don't care about flowering plants, how about algae? Fresh water green algae is unicellular, making them less than 25 micrometers long.

Can I turn into an apple tree and feed my friends with apples (without taking damage)? I know, that's not a huge deal at level 18, but it's still a question. Can pieces of the plant be removed and used?

If I become a rose bush, what happens if a rose is plucked from the bush. Damage? Or not. Does the rose remain? Maybe all of that falls under the old "parts removed from a polymorphed character return to normal" but what would be normal?

If I become a flower, rooted in the ground, do I need to remain in the ground? What if someone plucks me out of the ground and carries me somewhere else, perhaps to give to his girlfriend?

Is there any sort of thing like a World Tree, a massive (but non-creature) plant?

How about becoming a hazard? Is a yellow mold a non-creature plant?

Some plants will change sex (presumably without using an action) under certain stimuli. Can a druid who becomes a plant make use of that ability? And if so, will the sex change remain after becoming their normal self again?

This ability just raises so many questions. Will there be a Non-Monster Manual for non-creature plants?


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gwynfrid wrote:
Amaranthine Witch wrote:
gwynfrid wrote:
Well, one of the major design goals of PF2 is to make the game more usable at high levels. I have high expectations about that, and the previews so far have shown a lot of steps in that the good direction (spells per day reduced, spell don't auto-scale with caster level, simplified action economy, less bonus types, 4 degrees of success sharply reducing save-or-die situations, etc). We'll have to see at the playtest how this goes.
And that is a noble goal, but sometimes it feels like instead of fixing high level play they are stretching the low levels.

And I think that's OK. In many cases, PF1 classes were severely front-loaded. That's why we had level dipping as a primary min-maxing technique. Of course, getting rid of the front-loading mandates some stretching over several levels, unless you're going to cut class features out altogether.

Now, of course when I say this will be fine, I mean it under the condition that every single level in the progression from 1 to 20 remains interesting for every class.

What PF builds was dipping a primary min-maxing technique? The only majors ones were 2 in Fighter for proficiencies+feats, 2 in monk for a bunch of feats, 2 in Paladin for proficiencies+divine grace and 1 in Oracle for immunity to fatigue (and Rogue 1 for Arcane Trickster via Practiced Sneak Attacker, but entering a dual advancement class with minimum requirements hardly counts.). There really isn't much incentive to multi-class in PF compared to 3.5. Only Monk, Fighter and Paladin were all that front loaded (fatigue immunity is only good due to Rage's mechanics, not its own merits)


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I too am curious about metal armor anathama. After so many levels of hafling druid it started to get old when I had to pass up all magic armor and shields.

Also how will spell casting work in wild shape? If it works at all (feat)? And wild shape, will it be a stat stack like in PF1?

I'll miss the duration for utility shifting for the purposes of scouting.

Silver Crusade

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PossibleCabbage wrote:
ThePuppyTurtle wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
BryonD wrote:
I keep seeing signature skill, but I missed the definition and can't find it. Thanks
Signature skills are ones you can eventually raise to master and then legendary, non signature can't be raised past expert it seems.
Yuck. Very video gamey. Do not like.

I don't really understand this complaint. But suffice to say it's a new way of reflecting how certain classes or trainings give you a leg up on different skills. One can get new signature skills from anywhere; we know the pirate archetype gets you acrobatics as a signature skill for the cost of one feat, for example, and you get one from your background IIRC.

But I don't see anything "video gamey" about signature skills representing how a cleric is better at religion than a fighter than class skills representing the same in PF1.

What is going on in-universe to stop my fighter from continuing to learn to pick ever more complicated locks if he wants to?

I had forgotten that there were other sources of signature skills besides classes... but there still needs to be a generic way of getting them for me to find this system acceptable. Do we know if there's a skill feat to grab an extra one? I think that'd be good enough, sort of like how you can grab armor proficiencies you didn't start with and get extra class skills with Additional Traits. I certainly can accept that a fighter has to go farther out of his way to learn lock-picking, which is what that would represent.

And for the sake of clarification: A gamey mechanic in a game is one that likely makes sense from a design perspective as a balancing measure, but is confusing in-universe. In Call of Duty multiplayer, respawning is a gamey mechanic. I choose that example to point out that gameyness is not always bad, but it tends to break verisimilitude, which is undesirable for a TRPG.

A mechanic is further video gamey if it limits player creativity. Hence: if there is a magical block preventing fighters from learning to pick the best locks or engage in high-tier diplomacy, it's video gamey, because the player is being prevented from doing something that, in-universe, it makes no sense at all for them not to be able to do.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Sounds like many druids of Erastil would go Leaf based on this write up. Gozreh would fit a storm Druid well.

The Storm Druid does make me wonder how a storm caller would work out. The druids near the Eye that want to call on the storm.


I'm going to have some fun with the term any non-creature plant.

Paizo Employee Designer

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Darksol the Painbringer wrote:
Overall, I'm pretty pleased with this. To answer the final question, I'd be a Storm Druid. Heck, I'd be any Druid really. Simply because if anyone tries to argue with me, my rebuttal would be "I throw Fireballs, your argument is invalid."

It's funny because this weekend, after writing this blog, even more of my poor foes got wrecked by the sluggish condition from our storm druid's tempest surge, even at an off level for the damage. It turns out if you have a storm druid, a bard, and some daze and flanking going on, lots of crits start building up!

I guess it goes to show how much a -1/-2 can help out!

Plus...fireball! (but this storm druid doesn't have that spell quite yet)


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MerlinCross wrote:
I saw an Andriod Cleric that cast through math formulas. That was pretty creative actually.

That's pretty cool. Sounds like it could be linked to the PF LN deities and outsiders and whatnot.

I feel like, if I ever adapt the implied vital+faith lore I rambled about above, I'd probably be tempted to do it with constructs designed to be that level of absurdly dangerous, I'll probably run with as follows:

  • Make machines capable of thought.
  • Entomb within their design the bones of dead humanoids.
  • Use the bones as a material focus for hooking up negative energy backwards as a guiding force, much like undead.
  • Beneath a false prophet, deliver unto them unholy scripture, such that they can be used for purposes of war, conquest, and the enforcement of the will of a single twisted and decadent mind.
  • Have the robots feel manipulated, and renounce the false prophet with steel and blood.
  • Have the robots revere the spirit of the scripture still. Have them elect one of their own as the New True Prophet.
  • Have the New True Prophet, in their delusions, believe themselves to experience signs and revelations they add to the scripture, which is writ on the body of each of these.

    I feel like, this would probably end up somewhere between Cybermen, Necrons, and Mummies? A cult of machines ran by bloodthirsty marauders, possibly open to newcomers, convinced in the supremacy of those hallowed in steel, and built on dark pillars of sacrifice and horror for reasons that, now lost, were originally intended to make them effective tools of enforcement and terror.

    Anyone want to name them, as I might keep them.


  • Smurftastic!
    I liked this druid ^^


    Lots of feats grant signature skills. Pickpocket does for example IIRC. They usually also provide some additional bonus on top of that so the tax factor is low.

    On faithful golems: aren't golems literally spirits bound to inanimate bodies in pathfinder? The sentient ones definitely are at least something in that vein.

    As far as granting divine powers to a construct as a God, I don't find that any weirder than imbuing a wand with a divine spell or using an animate object spell from the divine lisg


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    Elleth wrote:
    MerlinCross wrote:
    I saw an Andriod Cleric that cast through math formulas. That was pretty creative actually.

    That's pretty cool. Sounds like it could be linked to the PF LN deities and outsiders and whatnot.

    I feel like, if I ever adapt the implied vital+faith lore I rambled about above, I'd probably be tempted to do it with constructs designed to be that level of absurdly dangerous, I'll probably run with as follows:

  • Make machines capable of thought.
  • Entomb within their design the bones of dead humanoids.
  • Use the bones as a material focus for hooking up negative energy backwards as a guiding force, much like undead.
  • Beneath a false prophet, deliver unto them unholy scripture, such that they can be used for purposes of war, conquest, and the enforcement of the will of a single twisted and decadent mind.
  • Have the robots feel manipulated, and renounce the false prophet with steel and blood.
  • Have the robots revere the spirit of the scripture still. Have them elect one of their own as the New True Prophet.
  • Have the New True Prophet, in their delusions, believe themselves to experience signs and revelations they add to the scripture, which is writ on the body of each of these.

    I feel like, this would probably end up somewhere between Cybermen, Necrons, and Mummies? A cult of machines ran by bloodthirsty marauders, possibly open to newcomers, convinced in the supremacy of those hallowed in steel, and built on dark pillars of sacrifice and horror for reasons that, now lost, were originally intended to make them effective tools of enforcement and terror.

    Anyone want to name them, as I might keep them.

  • Why is it that we always assume an iron heart is more inclined to evil than good?

    Paizo Employee Designer

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    Captain Morgan wrote:


    On faithful golems: aren't golems literally spirits bound to inanimate bodies in pathfinder? The sentient ones definitely are at least something in that vein.

    As far as granting divine powers to a construct as a God, I don't find that any weirder than imbuing a wand with a divine spell or using an animate object spell from the divine lisg

    Also androids and some other constructs do have vital essence.

    That's a good analogy, but an even closer-hewn one might be incorporeal arcane casters, like a ghost wizard. Arcane magic definitely does have material essence, but you can cast the spells if you know how, even if you personally don't have any material essence.


    The Sideromancer wrote:
    Why is it that we always assume an iron heart is more inclined to evil than good?

    I don't. I was merging ideas of golems, helmed horrors, and ghoul cults, and wondering if there could be any reason for certain baddie stereotypes. I actually normally like having sympathetic robots (and in fact would like to include lovable constructs in my playtest game), while in my current campaign everything is morally grey (TL;DR the universe's architects run on blue and orange morality).


    The Sideromancer wrote:
    Elleth wrote:
    MerlinCross wrote:
    I saw an Andriod Cleric that cast through math formulas. That was pretty creative actually.

    That's pretty cool. Sounds like it could be linked to the PF LN deities and outsiders and whatnot.

    I feel like, if I ever adapt the implied vital+faith lore I rambled about above, I'd probably be tempted to do it with constructs designed to be that level of absurdly dangerous, I'll probably run with as follows:

  • Make machines capable of thought.
  • Entomb within their design the bones of dead humanoids.
  • Use the bones as a material focus for hooking up negative energy backwards as a guiding force, much like undead.
  • Beneath a false prophet, deliver unto them unholy scripture, such that they can be used for purposes of war, conquest, and the enforcement of the will of a single twisted and decadent mind.
  • Have the robots feel manipulated, and renounce the false prophet with steel and blood.
  • Have the robots revere the spirit of the scripture still. Have them elect one of their own as the New True Prophet.
  • Have the New True Prophet, in their delusions, believe themselves to experience signs and revelations they add to the scripture, which is writ on the body of each of these.

    I feel like, this would probably end up somewhere between Cybermen, Necrons, and Mummies? A cult of machines ran by bloodthirsty marauders, possibly open to newcomers, convinced in the supremacy of those hallowed in steel, and built on dark pillars of sacrifice and horror for reasons that, now lost, were originally intended to make them effective tools of enforcement and terror.

    Anyone want to name them, as I might keep them.

  • Why is it that we always assume an iron heart is more inclined to evil than good?

    Anthropomorphizing.


    MerlinCross wrote:
    gwynfrid wrote:
    Amaranthine Witch wrote:
    gwynfrid wrote:
    Well, one of the major design goals of PF2 is to make the game more usable at high levels. I have high expectations about that, and the previews so far have shown a lot of steps in that the good direction (spells per day reduced, spell don't auto-scale with caster level, simplified action economy, less bonus types, 4 degrees of success sharply reducing save-or-die situations, etc). We'll have to see at the playtest how this goes.
    And that is a noble goal, but sometimes it feels like instead of fixing high level play they are stretching the low levels.

    And I think that's OK. In many cases, PF1 classes were severely front-loaded. That's why we had level dipping as a primary min-maxing technique. Of course, getting rid of the front-loading mandates some stretching over several levels, unless you're going to cut class features out altogether.

    Now, of course when I say this will be fine, I mean it under the condition that every single level in the progression from 1 to 20 remains interesting for every class.

    The flip side is if the lower levels are such a drag those levels are going to probably be skipped over when it comes to campaigns. Or players just drop the system.

    Balancing for high level play is a decent idea given how often it seems to descend into rocket tag(My own experience ends before level 10). But if the low levels aren't interesting, and then can't be given that we don't want min max to be a thing with cross class, they why play that section? Just auto level to the point the game becomes fun again. Never mind locking/moving things around that could limit RP ideas(Hi, I'm X class who's history is based around Y ability. I don't have that till level 5 so... how's my story work?)

    Meh, we'll see how it turns out in play. But given how people argue what levels are best/interesting to play now, I don't have high hopes of 1-20 being a fully interesting build path all the way through.

    I'm working from the assumption that low levels will remain interesting. You're working from the assumption they will be a drag. Neither of us knows, so yes, I guess we'll need the playtest to tell who was correct.

    Scarab Sages

    In regards to the whole Signature Skill thing, I think the idea was that a Signature skill for classes wasn't the only one that could be bumped up to Legendary, but rather one that was exemplified by your class choice and was perhaps easier to raise proficiency, and perhaps started higher.

    As far as everything else, it looks really good. I'm interested in seeing in what ways we get to modify our starting weapon proficiencies, because I love the idea of a melee-focused druid that harries using his animal companion's Work Together to be a potent damage boost utilizing Agile weapons. Can't wait to see what we have to work with. I also noticed no mention of metal armor/etc. in this class bio. Wonder if that's still a thing.


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    I will say druids getting one more skill from their order widens the gap between them and fighters, which I dislike.


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    Well, my opinion about the video-gamey talk.
    This is a class-based system. Classes have abilities, unique abilities which other classes do not have. If anyone can have any ability, what one wants is a class-less system.
    This *is* a game, after all.


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    I still hate druids—filthy hippies that they are—but all of these mechanics seem pretty cool. I am really excited to see the full Animal Companion rules.


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    Yeah, and why must I have to declare "Give fighters more skills!" in the middle of the Druid preview?! It's so depressing...

    Anyway, it's good to see that wild shapers need to invest some growth on Strength.


    Captain Morgan wrote:
    On faithful golems: aren't golems literally spirits bound to inanimate bodies in pathfinder? The sentient ones definitely are at least something in that vein.

    A tangent, but this was always what bugged me about the creating-undead-is-evil-creating-golems-isn't thing. I wonder if we'll see a removal of the evil tag from undead this edition, like we've seen healing rightfully move to necromancy.


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    Captain Morgan wrote:
    I will say druids getting one more skill from their order widens the gap between them and fighters, which I dislike.

    Fighters getting intimidation as a signature skill is already a confirmed change which won't be reflected in the printed playtest book, right?


    This is beginning to look more like 5E.

    Liberty's Edge

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    PossibleCabbage wrote:
    Captain Morgan wrote:
    I will say druids getting one more skill from their order widens the gap between them and fighters, which I dislike.
    Fighters getting intimidation as a signature skill is already a confirmed change which won't be reflected in the printed playtest book, right?

    It's not quite confirmed that it will happen, but Mark Seifter confirmed it as something they were strongly considering.

    I really hope Barbarians get Survival as a Signature Skill in order to keep up (or something else I guess, but Survival seems most appropriate).

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