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Don't use the statistics from the PFSRD please, there's been some errors discovered in them and they include 3PP monsters for their bestiary stats. Instead, use the updated bestiary statistics for the updated benchpress document. With these numbers you can calculate the average feint DCs accordingly, taking into account the bonuses to DCs for being nonhumanoid and low int. This means that for CR's 6/8/10, the respective feint DC's are 23/27/30.

Either way though, I don't really care about the DPR argument, I just wanted to clear up what numbers should be used for it.


Duplicate post, Main Thread Here


No, it doesn't count as Dimension door, nor does it have language allowing it to be used with those feats.


bbangerter wrote:
In order to counterspell you need to be able to perceive the caster as they are casting so that you can identify the spell (and cast the same spell as a counter). So no you cannot counter at the receiving end of teleport (unless of course it is a very short range teleport where you can also see the caster pre-teleport).

Dispel magic also works for counterspelling (just has a check). Are you saying that a caster on the other side of a force wall (no LOE, but able to see the spell being cast and thus identify) but within range of the destination, would actually be able to counterspell a teleport/ddoor?

bbangerter wrote:
A teleport spell is not completed until the targets have disappeared from one location AND re-appeared at a new location. Both locations need to be free of AMF. Just like a fireball is not complete until it has appeared at your finger, then traveled to the target point and exploded. Likewise an AMF at the source or destination (and everywhere inbetween as it is not instantaneous travel) foils the fireball.

Nor is a Stone Discus or Arrow Eruption spell complete until it hits the target under that logic. All 3 still work through AMFs as far as I'm aware.

If those fail to work, what does work then? I'm genuinely curious to know which Instantaneous Conjurations you think work inside an AMF, and which do not. I'm also curious how you think instantaneous non-conjuration spells interact with AMF as well, e.g. fabricate.


Diego Rossi wrote:
zza ni wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
Mysterious Stranger wrote:

An antimagic field suppresses any spell or magical effect used within, brought into, or cast into the area, but does not dispel it. Time spent within an antimagic field counts against the suppressed spell's duration.

The section about suppressing any effect brought into or cast into the area would prevent something from being teleported into the area.

It would stop teleportation circles, for sure, but

Quote:
The effects of instantaneous conjurations are not affected by an antimagic field
Thus things like Teleport would function.
i think that part mostly talk about stuff brought over magically that are not magical themselves (so they are also not effected by sr) like acid splash. so some1 who uses acid splash and aim into an anti-magic zone would have the spell effect work (as the acid is created outside the zone and is then hurled there.)

Or stuff that was "created" by conjuration and, after creation, is a permanent part of the universe.

But Telepotation works at both ends when the spell is cast. If you don't connect at the terminus point because it is within an Anti-Magic Field, there is no "instantaneous" effect as the spell fizzle before creating it.

BTW, the citation is shortened, changing its meaning:

Quote:
(The effects of instantaneous conjurations are not affected by an antimagic field because the conjuration itself is no longer in effect, only its result.)
When the spell is in the process of being cast, the conjuration is very much in effect.

Sure and you might have a point if the spell targeted a point inside the AMF.

Quote:
Range personal and touch

Once the spell is cast, all that's left is the result of the spell. Or are you saying that someone with a readied action to counterspell at the destination of teleport can counterspell it?


Mysterious Stranger wrote:

An antimagic field suppresses any spell or magical effect used within, brought into, or cast into the area, but does not dispel it. Time spent within an antimagic field counts against the suppressed spell's duration.

The section about suppressing any effect brought into or cast into the area would prevent something from being teleported into the area.

It would stop teleportation circles, for sure, but

Quote:
The effects of instantaneous conjurations are not affected by an antimagic field

Thus things like Teleport would function.


FAQ wrote:

Items as Spells: Does using a potion, scroll, staff, or wand count as "casting a spell" for purposes of feats and special abilities like Augment Summoning, Spell Focus, an evoker's ability to do extra damage with evocation spells, bloodline abilities, and so on?

No. Unless they specifically state otherwise, feats and abilities that modify spells you cast only affect actual spellcasting, not using magic items that emulate spellcasting or work like spellcasting.

Since abilities don't affect spells from magic items, even if you somehow included the ability in the scroll, it still wouldn't affect the spells cast by the scroll.


They should be asking in the PFS forums if they want a PFS answer (hence why I've flagged it as being in the wrong forum).

As AD said, it doesn't matter when they do the test, as it only cares that they've slain a devil with HD greater than their own at some point in their career while being witnessed by a Hellknight.


Quote:
Gunslinger isn't as egregious because it takes 5 levels before you get it, but you still get Dex to damage

TBF, Gunslinger only has 5 levels in it, so it makes sense as a capstone for it. It's just not really worth going past that in the class most of the time.


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Obviously, the druid that grappling them.


MYrmidarch doesn't actually get spell combat with ranged weapons, just something that's similar to it. Therefore, how spell combat works has no bearing on jt and they just do what the ability tells them. Note that you only get to attack while delivering a ranged touch attack from a spell, whereas spell combat allows you to make regular attacks with any extra attacks you have left over after doing so.

A better archetype to ask about, would have been Eldritch Archer, which actually does get to use spell combat with ranged weapons. But I suspect you deliberately avoided it because it does call out removing the need for a free hand.


The same way it does for any other school of magic, they each add +1 (+2 with both) to the DCs of saving throws for your spells from the abjuration school.


Performing modifications on one's own construct requires the Craft Construct feat, and the creator must pay any additional crafting requirements and/or costs associated with the modification. Completing a modification requires 1 day per 1,000 gp of the modification's base price (minimum 1 day).

While similar, Construct Modifications are not crafting, therefore you cannot ignore requirements, nor can you speed them up like with crafting.


If you have the ability to make cognatogens instead of mutagens, you would gain the ability to create mutagen as an Alchemist of your hit dice - 4. If you have the ability to make mutagens, it would remove the penalties from them.

It has no effect on cognatogens, they're separate from mutagens.


Exactly, and since neither sleep nor unconsciousness make your drop items or fall prone, you can hold onto your items while standing up after getting struck with those conditions.


Diego Rossi wrote:
willuwontu wrote:
Similarly, an Unchained Rogue 5/Slayer 3 gets 4d6 (3d6+1d6) dice of sneak attack when they qualify, despite both class features not stacking and them having the same name.
No, as for the above-mentioned FAQ, they don't stack. That character has two different sneak attack dice pools and can use one or the other.

We've discussed this before, with your agreement on how it works. They do "stack" for dealing damage (as long as the requirements of both are met).

---

To clarify, a Ranger 5/Hinterlander would not stack with each other for determining the progression of their Favored Enemy class features (as per the FAQ) and instead have their own pool of Favored Enemies. This would leave them with the following:

- Favored Enemy (Ranger) 2 Picks
- Favored Enemy (Hinterlander) 1 Pick

This means that they could have:
- Favored Enemy (Ranger, <Any Ranger Favored Enemy Choice>) +4
- Favored Enemy (Hinterlander, <Any Hinterlander Favored Enemy Choice>) +2

or

- Favored Enemy (Ranger, <Any Ranger Favored Enemy Choice>) +2
- Favored Enemy (Ranger, <Any other Ranger Favored Enemy Choice>) +2
- Favored Enemy (Hinterlander, <Any Hinterlander Favored Enemy Choice>) +2

If they have:

- Favored Enemy (Ranger, Outsider (Evil)) +4
- Favored Enemy (Hinterlander, Outsider (Evil)) +2

When they attack an Outsider with the Evil subtype, they gain a +6 (+4 (ranger), +2 (hinterlander)) bonus to attack and damage rolls against them since they meet the requirements of both abilities. However, they only count as having a +4 Favored Enemy Bonus (highest of +4 and +2) for the purposes of feats and abilities that require such or use such to determine their effects.


Belafon wrote:
Precision damage does not normally stack with other sources of precision damage, unless an ability specifically says otherwise.

Source for that? Because as far as I can remember, that's not an actual rule, and a search through the PDF of the CRB turns up nothing.


Taja the Barbarian wrote:
Claxon wrote:

...

Right, because the bonus attack/damage is an untyped bonus and will stack.
...Unless they are from the same source, which they are in this case (the 'Favored Enemy' class feature).

Name does not matter, Favored Enemy (Ranger) and Favored Enemy (Hinterlander) are 2 different class features from 2 different classes and would therefore stack. Similarly, an Unchained Rogue 5/Slayer 3 gets 4d6 (3d6+1d6) dice of sneak attack when they qualify, despite both class features not stacking and them having the same name.


They don't stack for progression, the bonuses do stack since they're untyped bonuses from different sources.


Melee Tactics Toolbox p. 8 wrote:
Using the total defense action prevents you from attacking— including making attacks of opportunity—but you still threaten foes for the purposes of flanking.


Diego Rossi wrote:
Those are the rules on flanking in the CRB, and they say explicitly that you need to threaten to give a flanking bonus.
Combat Rules wrote:
You threaten all squares into which you can make a melee attack, even when it is not your turn.

Correct, and you threaten squares you can melee attack into. The ability to make AoOs is separate from whether or not you're able to flank. Similarly, using up all your AoOs does not prevent you from flanking.


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Claxon wrote:
And to point out further, unarmed strikes are not one handed or light weapons. They sit in a weird place on the chart called "unarmed".

No?

CRB Pg. 141 wrote:
An unarmed strike is always considered a light weapon.


Belafon wrote:

Yes. You are trying to extend the FAQ farther than its subject area.

Even if you’re willing to ignore the intention of the FAQ, you can’t choose to treat one sentence as exactly correct:

Quote:
In general, use the (normal, lower) spell level or the (higher) spell slot level, whichever is more of a disadvantage for the caster.

and then ignore another sentence

Quote:
Heighten Spell is really the only metamagic feat that makes using a higher-level spell slot an advantage instead of a disadvantage.

Not sure what you're saying here or what you and bbangerter are arguing over, but yes, a heightened spell counts as a spell of it's level + the adjustment from heighten for all intents and purposes. E.G. Save DCs, globe of invuln, how many spell levels it uses from spell turning, etc. (Note that other metamagics do not adjust DCs, change whether a spell can penetrate a globe of invlun, or adjust how many spell levels it counts as for spell turning).

However, the final adjusted level of the spell (original spell level + heighten adjustment + other metamagic adjustments) is still used to determine whether you have the ability score to cast spells of that level, along with determining the DCs of concentrations checks, or whether your metamagic rods can affect spells of that level.


Effects of Metamagic Feats on a Spell: In all ways, a metamagic spell operates at its original spell level, even though it is prepared and cast using a higher-level spell slot.

To cast a spell, you must concentrate. If something interrupts your concentration while you’re casting, you must make a concentration check or lose the spell. When you make a concentration check, you roll d20 and add your caster level and the ability score modifier used to determine bonus spells of the same type. Clerics, druids, and rangers add their Wisdom modifier. Bards, paladins, and sorcerers add their Charisma modifier. Finally, wizards add their Intelligence modifier. The more distracting the interruption and the higher the level of the spell you are trying to cast, the higher the DC (see Table 9–1). If you fail the check, you lose the spell just as if you had cast it to no effect.

Injury: [...] DC equal to 10 + the damage taken + the level of the spell you’re casting. [... or] DC equal to 10 + 1/2 the damage that the continuous source last dealt + the level of the spell you’re casting. [...]

Spell: [...] DC is 10 + the damage taken + the level of the spell you’re casting. [... or] spell’s saving throw DC + the level of the spell you’re casting. [... or] DC that the spell’s saving throw would have if a save were allowed (10 + spell level + caster’s ability score).

Grappled or Pinned: [...] (DC 10 + the grappler’s CMB + the level of the spell you’re casting) [...]

Vigorous Motion: [...] (DC 10 + the level of the spell you’re casting) [...]

Violent Motion: [...] (DC 15 + the level of the spell you’re casting) [...]

Violent Weather: [...] DC is 10 + the level of the spell you’re casting. [...]

Casting Defensively: [...] (DC 15 + double the level of the spell you’re casting) [...]

Entangled: [...] (DC 15 + the level of the spell you’re casting).

Note that concentration checks are based on the level of the spell that you're casting, and not the spell slot you're using. This would mean that concentration checks are made as if it were a 1st level spell instead of a 3rd. However:

FAQ wrote:

Metamagic: At what spell level does the spell count for concentration DCs, magus spell recall, or a pearl of power?

The spell counts as the level of the spell slot necessary to cast it.

For example, an empowered burning hands uses a 3rd-level spell slot, counts as a 3rd-level spell for making concentration checks, counts as a 3rd-level spell for a magus's spell recall or a pearl of power.

In general, use the (normal, lower) spell level or the (higher) spell slot level, whichever is more of a disadvantage for the caster. The advantages of the metamagic feat are spelled out in the Benefits section of the feat, and the increased spell slot level is a disadvantage.

Heighten Spell is really the only metamagic feat that makes using a higher-level spell slot an advantage instead of a disadvantage.

The FAQ makes it count as a 3rd-level spell when doing so is more disadvantageous for the caster. This means that it counts as a 3rd level spell for concentration checks, and the ability score required to cast a spell of that level.

Similarly, a lesser rod of Empower cannot be used on Quickened Burning hands, despite being able to be used on 3rd level or lower spells (which are not the same as spell slots), since it counting as a 5th-level spell is more disadvantageous for the caster. However, that same rod could be used on a Burning hands cast from a 5th level slot, since it still counts as a 1st level spell.


Ryze Kuja wrote:
He attempts to cast an Empowered Burning Hands out of a 3rd level slot while he's threatened by another creature

Except he cannot attempt to do so, since it counts as a 3rd-level spell for this (most disadvantageous for the caster) and he lacks the 13 cha necessary to be able to cast 3rd-level spell.

He could instead cast Burning Hands without any metamagics (or a metamagic that only increases the spell level by 1) in a 3rd-level slot, since it would count as a 1st-level (or 2nd-level) spell.


The improved uncanny dodge would be based off the level of the class that granted it to you (note that it stacks with other classes that grant the feature). So if you were a warrior poet 8/fighter 6, the enemy would need 12 rogue levels to sneak attack you via flanking.


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No, targeting doesn't matter outside of when you're casting a spell. You being dead doesn't make the spells disappear, similarly, moving out of range or moving more than 30ft from another person who also had haste cast on them doesn't end the spell.


Quote:
If you do not release the grapple, you must continue to make a check each round, as a standard action, to maintain the hold. If your target does not break the grapple, you get a +5 circumstance bonus on grapple checks made against the same target in subsequent rounds. Once you are grappling an opponent, a successful check allows you to continue grappling the foe, and also allows you to perform one of the following actions (as part of the standard action spent to maintain the grapple).

That merely sets the default action for maintaining a grapple to a standard action. Nothing in there restricts you to using other standard actions if you have a way to change your maintain to another action via greater grapple or something similar. In fact, things like throat slicer imply the lack of such restrictions.


Diego Rossi wrote:

From where comes the citation?

I don't find it in AoN.

Page 14 of the Alchemy Manual

Duplicate Thread Main Thread Here


Also note, that the feat doesn't allow you to cast while raging, so you'd require other feats/abilities to let you do so (like the furious metamagic).


Diego Rossi wrote:

We are speaking of the concentration check, which is modified by the ability score modifier used to determine bonus spells of the same type.

When the CRB was written several casting classes didn't exist, especially the Oracle, so the list is incomplete. Arcane casters and spells can use charisma or intelligence (Wizard and Sorcerer), and Divine classes can use charisma (Oracle, Paladin) or wisdom (Ceric, Druid). Monster SLAs use charisma.
The Brimorak CL is 6; the concentration bonus is +8, its stat are int 12, wis 12, cha 15.

Hold up a moment, are you arguing that:

Quote:
the ability score modifier used to determine bonus spells of the same type.

Gives sorcerers the ability to use Int for their concentration checks, and wizards the ability to use Cha for theirs?


Diego Rossi wrote:
The casting stat of the monster is charisma, not intelligence or wisdom.

Sure, and the caster level of a scroll is determined by the scroll and not what classes you have.


Diego Rossi wrote:
The bolded part says what stat a monster use for the DC of his SLA abilities.

Yes? It was never in question what ability score SLAs used for their DCs.

Are you arguing that the DC of a spell is what's used for determining their concentration bonus? Not sure what you're trying to say here ...


Diego Rossi wrote:

Based on your reasoning, what is the concentration bonus of an Efreeti when it cast Wish?

- his caster level of 11 plus his intelligence bonus for a total of 12;
- or it is 21 as Wish has a minimum caster level of 17 and a minimum intelligence requirement of 19?

It could even be higher since you can make scrolls with a higher caster level. If you mean what the concentration check of its spell-like abilities would be, well, you should probably brush up on the rules for spell-like abilities.

Spell-like Abilities UMR wrote:
The creature’s caster level never affects which spell-like abilities the creature has; sometimes the given caster level is lower than the level a spellcasting character would need to cast the spell of the same name.

Since it'd be able to cast them as a caster level of 11 and using it's Cha stat (the default stat for SLAs), it has a +13 bonus for its concentration check.

Diego Rossi wrote:

Even better example: something that has its concentration bonus in the statblock.

Demon, Brimorak
Spell-Like Abilities (CL 6th; concentration +8)
3/day—dispel magic, heat metal (DC 14), produce flame
1/day—air walk, fireball (DC 15), greater teleport (self plus 50 lbs. of objects only), summon (level 3, 1 brimorak 50%)

The concentration bonus is based on its CL (6) and its Cha (15).

Air walk is a 4th level spell with a minimum caster level of 7 and a minimum stat of 14, so the default concentration bonus is 9.
The concentration bonus of the Brimorak changes when it cast it as a consequence of your citation?

As stated above, the concentration check is as listed (+8), but for a scroll it'd use the scroll's stats instead.

---

But since you want to bring up the topic of reading whole quotes, you should probably read yours all the way through.

Quote:

Concentration

To cast a spell, you must concentrate. If something interrupts your concentration while you’re casting, you must make a concentration check or lose the spell. When you make a concentration check, you roll d20 and add your caster level and the ability score modifier used to determine bonus spells of the same type. Clerics, druids, and rangers add their Wisdom modifier. Bards, paladins, and sorcerers add their Charisma modifier. Finally, wizards add their Intelligence modifier. The more distracting the interruption and the higher the level of the spell you are trying to cast, the higher the DC (see Table 9–1). If you fail the check, you lose the spell just as if you had cast it to no effect.

To use your example above, since a monster's SLAs are presumed to go wizard/sorc -> cleric:

Spell-like Abilities UMR wrote:
A monster’s spell-like abilities are presumed to be the sorcerer/ wizard versions. If the spell in question is not a sorcerer/ wizard spell, then default to cleric, druid, bard, paladin, or ranger, in that order.

That means that the Brimorak's Air Walk ability is from the cleric class (and thus divine). The ability score used for clerics is their wisdom modifier, which for the Brimorak is only a 12 (+1).

Does a Brimorak have a:
A) +8 modifier to its concentration check? (CL 6, Cha 15)
B) +7 modifier to its concentration check? (CL 6, Wis 12)

How about if it attempts to cast the same spell from a scroll of Air Walk (Cleric, CL 7)?
A) +8? (CL 6, Cha 15)
B) +7? (CL 6, Wis 12)
C) +9? (Scroll CL 7, Cha 15)
D) +9? (Scroll CL 7, minimum 14 Wis to cast)

What if it attempts to cast a spell from a scroll that isn't an SLA it has, like Searing Light (Cleric 3, CL 5), what would its concentration check be for that spell? Same as above?
---

And for a different scenario, how about if solo-classed fighter with 14 Int, 12 Wis, 13 Cha attempts to cast a scroll of Fireball (Wizard, CL 12), what would their concentration bonus be:
A) +0 (They have no spellcasting, and thus no bonus to their concentration check.)
B) +2 (Int 14)
C) +15 (CL 12 Fireball)


CRB wrote:

Caster Level

A spell’s power often depends on its caster level, which for most spellcasting characters is equal to her class level in the class she’s using to cast the spell.

You can cast a spell at a lower caster level than normal, but the caster level you choose must be high enough for you to cast the spell in question, and all level-dependent features must be based on the same caster level.

Concentration checks use the caster level of the spell for their bonuses, therefore you'd use the scroll's caster level for the check.

Similarly, if a caster had Varisian Tattoo, spell specialization, or other feats/abilities that increased the caster level of a spell they cast, they'd benefit from it during their concentration checks for that spell.


Your own stats don't apply to spells cast from scrolls, so you would use the caster level of the scroll and the lowest ability score needed to cast the spell by the class that the scroll was made by for concentration checks involving that scroll. Similarly, you would use the lowest ability score needed to cast the spell for calculating the DC.


Diego Rossi wrote:
It doesn't say it works as the standard ability, actually, it works differently from the standard ability. So, it isn't the same ability.

Again, that is incorrect, altering an ability means that they keep it.

Diego Rossi wrote:
Now SKR test:

Doesn't apply, they still have the ability.


Artificial 20 wrote:

I went searching for the FAQ, which I managed to find here.

Note that that FAQ doesn't apply, as the ability doesn't replace the mesmerist tricks class feature, and only alters it. For an an example of how ability replacements are worded, look further down in the archetype at Feign Destiny.

Quote:
This replaces touch treatment.


Diego Rossi wrote:
Quote:
Prerequisites: Mesmerist tricks class feature.
Quote:

Subject of the Stars (Su)

...
This alters mesmerist tricks and manifold tricks.
The "Mesmerist tricks class feature" has been altered and remained "Subject of the Stars". The Chart Caster lacks the required feature and can't take the Swap Trick feat.

Altering the ability still counts as having that ability, it's only when the ability is removed that you no longer count as having it. So they still qualify for the feat.


doc the grey wrote:
But, does one have to identify the spell within a wand before they can use UMD on it, or can they just UMD it and see what happens?
Quote:
Spell Trigger: Spell trigger activation is similar to spell completion, but it’s even simpler. No gestures or spell finishing is needed, just a special knowledge of spellcasting that an appropriate character would know, and a single word that must be spoken. Spell trigger items can be used by anyone whose class can cast the corresponding spell. This is the case even for a character who can’t actually cast spells, such as a 3rd-level paladin. The user must still determine what spell is stored in the item before she can activate it. Activating a spell trigger item is a standard action and does not provoke attacks of opportunity.

All UMD lets you do, is bypass the need for it to be on your class's spell list, you still need to identify it to use it.


Diego Rossi wrote:
AoN shows only the more recent version because it replaces the older version. It isn't an alternative version, the more recent version is the Paizo official version.

Except it doesn't always do so.

Diego Rossi wrote:
Paizo official policy is that more recent versions of a class, ability, spell, mystery, etc. replace older versions.

That is incorrect, only reprints override older versions.

No FAQ Required: This is not a rules FAQ for any Pathfinder RPG product, but rather a question about our publishing practices on pick-ups. When a new book comes out in the RPG line, chances are at this point that there have been Player Companions, Campaign Settings, or other products on a related topic at some time in the past, but these products have smaller print runs than RPG line products. At product launch meetings, staff members including the developers of these previous products suggest other books to reference for pick-ups. A pick-up essentially means that a rules element begs for a broader audience, rather than asking a freelancer to produce something new but almost identical without regard to the essential foundation built from the design and development work on the previous lines. That said, a pick-up is not a reprint: those pick-ups receive multiple additional development passes just like the new material for the book, refining them beyond their original version. Sometimes these development passes won’t yield any change, and sometimes they lead to substantial changes.

The fully refined version will be Paizo's default version for adventures, NPC compilations, and the like moving forward, since it benefited from two development cycles and is available on the PRD, but as always feel free to use the version that your group prefers, or make your own variant. In Pathfinder Society, always check the Additional Resources page to see what versions are legal and the Campaign Clarifications page for the Pathfinder Society team’s updates on how to use those options in the Pathfinder Society campaign.

The only policy is that the default version they use for their publications going forward will be the latest version, however, the previous version is perfectly valid to use and they even encourage you to use the version that your group likes. Similarly, pick-ups only affect the material after them, and you shouldn't change previously printed material to account for such.


Taja the Barbarian wrote:
It looks like Pathfinder #39: The City of Seven Spears introduced the Juju Mystery for Oracles, which is not really connected to the 'Zombie' template of the same name ('Juju' is 'a spiritual belief system incorporating objects, such as amulets, and spells used in religious practice in West Africa' so the term encompasses far more than just a single type of undead).

Except that it was originally far more related to controlling undead and making them. For some reason, AoN only shows the reprinted version, but the other version was far different originally, similar to how Pact Wizard was completely different in its reprint.


Wasp familiar outright prevents having multiple familiars. Otherwise:

Levels of different classes that are entitled to familiars stack for the purpose of determining any familiar abilities that depend on the master's level.

So basically, you can only ever have one familiar.


Quote:
These subtle blades can only be used by catfolk with the cat's claws racial trait.

No? It clearly states that you need to be a catfolk with that specific racial trait, not a catfolk with claw attacks.


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Quote:
If a bard uses the horn to start a bardic performance, all effects of that performance are calculated as if the bard were 6 levels higher.
Quote:
A sound striker gains the following type of bardic performance

They're bardic performances, I don't see why it wouldn't work. As for the words thing, maybe they blow the horn before they begin speaking to empower their words with its magic. Who knows, it's a magic item in a fantasy world. The mechanics of how the two interact is clear though, they would gain the benefit of three reasons to live.

If you want a PFS ruling though, you should ask in the PFS forums.


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It does not, because it does not say it is.


Wonderstell wrote:

"Special: A 5th-level monk or character with the weapon training (monk) class feature can use Ascetic Style with any monk weapon, in addition to the chosen melee weapon."

Which allows you to use the versatile design spear even though you didn't select it for Ascetic Style. That is, you can take Ascetic Style (Cestus) and it will apply to your Versatile Design Elven Branched Spear as it is part of the monk weapon group.

A monk weapon is a weapon with the monk special ability, not a weapon in the monk fighter group. So it wouldn't let you use the versatile design spear with it, unless you're able to select spears with ascetic style (because you happen to have one spear with versatile design on it).


There's always the fun Possession rules.

The most relevant of which I think is:

Quote:
The possessor uses her skill ranks, along with any feats the possessor has for which she still qualifies in the host’s body. The possessor doesn’t gain any of the host’s feats or skill ranks, but does apply bonuses and penalties associated with the host’s body. For example, when attempting Fly checks, a character who possessed a bird would use her own ranks in the Fly skill, but the bird’s Dexterity modifier and racial, size, and maneuverability bonuses.

How I read that, you still use your own statistics for determining your abilities, and only modify their bonuses based on the physical characteristics of the host.


Temperans wrote:
2.B) Additional damage does not get multiplied on a crit so the 1d4 fire from the poi would not get multiplied, just like how the +1 fire damage from a lit torch wouldn't get multiplied.

Sure, if it was additional damage, it wouldn't be multiplied, but it's not, the weapon's base damage is 1d4 (fire) for medium size.

Temperans wrote:
The listed damage is - or 0 +1d4 fire.

Really? Show me where it's listed as either of those. It's definitely not listed as that on AoN or in the book, so it'd be good to know what errata you're looking at for that info.


Diego Rossi wrote:

If you have a +2 flaming weapon, to what is applied the enhancement?

to the physical damage, not to the energy damage.

It increases the listed damage of the weapon, which you may notice is 1d4 (fire) for battle poi. If I have a +2 longsword, it deals +2 slashing damage, does this mean that if I have a +2 warhammer, it deals +2 slashing damage in addition to its regular bludgeoning damage? No, instead the enchantment increases the damage based on the type that the weapon deals, and battle poi deal fire damage. That's all there is to it. I see absolutely no reason why in a world where magic can generically increase the damage of weapons, why that enchantment would not increase the effectiveness of the flames that are produced when the battle poi are lit.

Unless you're actively selling replacement heads for the poi and priced out the fuel used per time they're lit along with the duration they stay lit, I don't see the reason to consider the fuel to be separate from battle poi itself for the purposes of determining if it's a weapon. UI guess you could be saying that you can enchant the fuel they're soaked in, and purchase different types of enchanted fuels for them ... but I doubt you've made that many homebrew rules for them.

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