Exploring AI's Role in Enhancing Pathfinder Games: Share Your Experiences!


Pathfinder Second Edition General Discussion


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

As technology evolves, our role-playing experiences do too. Have you ever explored how AI can revolutionize your Pathfinder games? Here's how I've been using AI to elevate my gaming experience:

1. Character Development: I often use AI to check spelling, grammar, and sentence structure in my character bios. For characters created as thought experiments, AI helps craft filler bios, lending depth and completeness to the character sheets.

2. Artistic Endeavors: Finding the right character art can be challenging, especially for unique or unusual characters. Here, AI steps in as my initial sketch artist. I start with AI-generated images and then refine them in Photoshop. This process enhances my art workflow significantly, offering creative poses, features, and styles I might not have considered. When creating tokens for Foundry, I use AI to generate backgrounds (like city streets or forests) before adding them to our template with the character portrait on top. This method results in more dynamic and interesting character tokens than my previous methods.

3. Game Mechanics and Rules: AI has been a game-changer in quickly answering rules questions and referencing game mechanics. With Chat GPT linked to AoN, I get accurate, verbal responses for my queries, which has greatly accelerated our gameplay and minimized extended rules debates.

TLDR:
This is how AI has improve my Pathfinder roleplaying experience. How has it helped you?
- Character Bios: AI assists in spellchecking and creating engaging bios.
- Character Art: AI jumpstarts the creation process for distinctive character art.
- Game Mechanics: AI offers quick and accurate rules referencing, enhancing game flow.

I'm eager to hear about your experiences. How have you integrated AI into your Pathfinder games? Have you observed any improvements in gameplay or storytelling? Please share your methods, successes, and even the challenges you've faced with AI in gaming. I'm excited to read about your AI-powered adventures!


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I use it for character images now almost exclusively. I'm not much of an artist, but I love seeing what I can get Chat GPT to render with a well written description. Some of it has been very cool. This is just the start of what it will do someday.

I don't like it much for writing. If you're not a great writer, probably works great for you. I'm not a great artist, so I use it for images. I can write extremely well, so I don't find it is useful or satisfying as writing bios myself.

Though I may use it if I want to let it take a shot at writing some bio for a character to get ideas. That might be interesting.

As my memory fades from old age, I may use it for mechanics. I can search fast and memorize most of the mechanics. Not using Chat GPT much for mechanics.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I haven't, and as far as I know, will never, use AI-generated art or scripts for my games.

If I want an image, I'll either draw it myself, ask a friend to do it, or find someone online and pay them. (Or ask a friend and pay them.)

Between AoN and PDF's of the books, I already have all the rules answers I need; I don't want an automated script to do my thinking for me, or try to guess what I wanted it to do.

This may be related to how I handle rules questions at a table I'm GM'ing: If it can be answered in less than a minute, I may hear you out. Otherwise, I'll make a ruling on the spot and move on, with the understanding that we can have a longer discussion during break time or between sessions. So I don't need any kind of sophisticated rule-searching algorithm; if there isn't a fast and simple answer to it, then as GM, I'll make one.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Deriven Firelion wrote:
I don't like it much for writing. If you're not a great writer, probably works great for you. I'm not a great artist, so I use it for images. I can write extremely well, so I don't find it is useful or satisfying as writing bios myself.

Yeah, I'm in a similar place when it comes to writing. I like what AI can do, but I do it SO much better. Still, it's a great grammar/spellchecker and sometimes helps me find better sentence structure. It's also great at making short filler stories too for those characters that are more mechanical builds / thought experiments, and I just want to fill the space to make the character sheet look nice.

I haven't used AI as a brainstorming tool yet, not unless I already had an idea and was just brainstorming the details.

I do enjoy using it for smaller bits of writing though. My gnome fey bloodline sorcerer has a cheat sheet of really awesome spell incantations that has really improved my acting presence in live games. I also have a cheat sheet of nature-themed bon mots for said primal sorcerer.

Arbalester wrote:
If I want an image, I'll either draw it myself, ask a friend to do it, or find someone online and pay them. (Or ask a friend and pay them.)

What do you do if you're on a time crunch?

Arbalester wrote:
Between AoN and PDF's of the books, I already have all the rules answers I need; I don't want an automated script to do my thinking for me, or try to guess what I wanted it to do.

AI hardly does the thinking for anyone. It's a tool that still requires direction.

Arbalester wrote:
This may be related to how I handle rules questions at a table I'm GM'ing: If it can be answered in less than a minute, I may hear you out. Otherwise, I'll make a ruling on the spot and move on, with the understanding that we can have a longer discussion during break time or between sessions. So I don't need any kind of sophisticated rule-searching algorithm; if there isn't a fast and simple answer to it, then as GM, I'll make one.

I largely GM this way as well, though I'm happy to use any tool that can help speed up rules referencing and prevent drawn out arguments at the table.


1. Character Development:

I like it as a spellcheck and grammar tool, but I am not a fan of it for creative purposes. Everything written by chat tends to have a bit of a formulaic chat Ai taint to it. Struggling to creative through lines and using a lot of words for very little depth.
I do use it as an advanced thesaurus at times during prep though.

2. Artistic Endeavors:

It has been great for this, I use sketches and 3D mock-ups with some colour guidance via image to image to get really nice images and I will use image to image as a final pass to add a consistent medium and style to all my player's token images for foundry.

3. Game Mechanics and Rules:

Yeah integrated chatgpt search is really good. Less so for actual rules interpretation but for finding contextual rules and edge cases it can find things way faster than someone looking it up will.
I tend not to search things too much at the table. But I really like consistency so searching afterwards efficiently helps me spend more time putting the ruling in my play document and using concise language instead.


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1. Character Development: I personally find that most AI's tend to be super generic in what they come up with character-wise, unless you find a way to like, trick them into thinking they're someone else? Like telling the AI "Pretend you are a famous horror author, who is making a character with these traits". Just telling it to generate a character with traits you want often turns out incredibly bland regurgitation of what you typed.

Personally, I find it more trouble than it's worth. The time it takes to finely craft and narrow down on a description means it's not good for creating stuff on a time crunch that a simple RNG prompt generator couldn't replicate. And without the time crunch, I already have enough time to write a flavorful idea without needing the AI.

2. Artistic Endevours: Yeah this is basically a great boon for anyone without art skills. I personally rarely need this due to my massive hoarding of character art scrounged from all over the internet over the course of like, 15 years I've been into TTRPGs and creative writing. But on those rare occasions you need something like "Elf whose skin is made of wood with vine dreadlock hair" it cane save me time to create than then trying to find it in my massive collection or find something similar on google.

3. Game Mechanics and Rules: Do not do this. The AI is very dumb and will lie all the time. My friend has ended up making wrong rulings or giving out treasure that doesn't exist because he used AI as if it were google to "Find me interesting treasure for a level 3 pathfinder 2e party." or "Tell me the pathfinder 2e rules for using a rope to cross a river." It has generated loot from 5e and 3.5, loot with 0 rules on how they work, said once than a Moderate Healing Elixer heals 2d12+12, and that monsters can use an extra action at the end of initiative if they are a higher level than the party.

The AI is f%@@ing stupid and a pathological lair. Do not rely on it for rules.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

RNG prompt generator? What's that?

LOL @ pathological liar.

I guess your friend didn't upload his PDFs and link to Archives of Nethys, Paizo.com, an the Pathfinder Wiki, and instruct the AI to pull exclusively from those sources first, did he?

I can just pull up the app on my phone, verbally ask it for a description of a spell, condition, feat or something similar and have a beautiful melodic voice read it aloud to me.

I can also ask for information from tables, such as when asking for the Lump sum starting funds for a 6th-level character.

If I feed it a module, I can have it generate a fully formatted reference sheet for my players that summarizes and organizes all of the notable characters, locations, organizations, and events.


Tuesday, November 28, I ran the first game session of a Starfinder mini-campaign. We had to make tokens to represent the seven new characters in Roll20. For example, my wife plays a Kiirinta Precog, where Kiirinta are a Small moth-shaped fey species. She found a face view of a luna moth, but the moth was gripping onto plant stems, making it look moth-sized. I edited the image in the GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) to replace the stems with an image of a Star Trek tricorder, making it look more technological and much bigger. Likewise, another player is playing a Stellifera Mystic. Stellifera are Diminutive cuttlefish that telekinetically for a humanoid body of water around themselves. I searched the Internet for pictures of water elementals, chose a faceless one, and edited a cuttlefish image into the middle of it.

On the other hand, my elder daughter plays an Entu Colony Solarian. Entu Colonies are fungal spores that cooperate to form a shapeable ooze. The Archives of Nethys entry has a picture that my daughter could have used for a token, but she decided to use her own image. Though she is an artist, she took a shortcut and used Free AI Art Generator to make a purple humanoid with antenna wearing a spacesuit of the same shade of purple.

This daughter had taught me about Photoshop, though I use the free GNU Image Manipulation program instead.

My interest in AI is mostly academic. I used to apply simple machine-learning algorithms, such as Hadoop MapReduce data analysis, on my job. After 8 years of retirement, I am way behind in keeping up with new developments.

By the way, when I search the Internet for Pathfinder or Starfinder images for tokens, I sometimes spot one labeled "Ravingdork." Is that artist the Ravingdork here?


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Ravingdork wrote:

As technology evolves, our role-playing experiences do too. Have you ever explored how AI can revolutionize your Pathfinder games? Here's how I've been using AI to elevate my gaming experience:

1. Character Development: I often use AI to check spelling, grammar, and sentence structure in my character bios. For characters created as thought experiments, AI helps craft filler bios, lending depth and completeness to the character sheets.

2. Artistic Endeavors: Finding the right character art can be challenging, especially for unique or unusual characters. Here, AI steps in as my initial sketch artist. I start with AI-generated images and then refine them in Photoshop. This process enhances my art workflow significantly, offering creative poses, features, and styles I might not have considered. When creating tokens for Foundry, I use AI to generate backgrounds (like city streets or forests) before adding them to our template with the character portrait on top. This method results in more dynamic and interesting character tokens than my previous methods.

3. Game Mechanics and Rules: AI has been a game-changer in quickly answering rules questions and referencing game mechanics. With Chat GPT linked to AoN, I get accurate, verbal responses for my queries, which has greatly accelerated our gameplay and minimized extended rules debates.

** spoiler omitted **

I'm eager to hear about your experiences. How have you integrated AI into your Pathfinder games? Have you observed any improvements in gameplay or storytelling? Please share your methods, successes, and even the challenges you've faced with AI in gaming. I'm excited to read...

Did you also use AI to write this post?


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Mathmuse wrote:
By the way, when I search the Internet for Pathfinder or Starfinder images for tokens, I sometimes spot one labeled "Ravingdork." Is that artist the Ravingdork here?

I do use this handle elsewhere, but I'll need to see what you're referencing to know for sure if it's my work or not.

Perpdepog wrote:
Did you also use AI to write this post?

I wrote the post myself, then had AI check my work for grammatical and spelling errors, and make suggestions for wording certain aspects more clearly.


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Ah, thought so.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Perpdepog wrote:
Ah, thought so.

Practicing your AIadar are we? :P


Ravingdork wrote:
Perpdepog wrote:
Ah, thought so.
Practicing your AIadar are we? :P

Kinda, though honestly AI composed or assisted messages can be pretty easy to spot sometimes. This isn't always true, but bots like Chat GPT have a few writing conventions they lean on. I was mostly twigged by the three-part structure akin to the five paragraph essay format, but with lists, and sprinkling of buzzword-type expressions like "revolutionized," "game-changer," and some very business-centric terms like "dynamic," and "workflow."

Edit: I should also mention that this isn't me expressly claiming I've got an AI-dar or anything, though; like I'm unsure if I'd have drawn the connection if this thread wasn't expressly about AI, and if I hadn't been reading your posts for some time and noticed the discrepancy.


I use AI for many of my personal characters and scenes of my games but I still primary use many images taken from WEB (google images) instead of AI.

For write my texts I usually don't use it. I usually like to play my game at improvise or use a pre-made material like an AP. So I most never use an AI to write. But I use AI (GPT) to help me to interpret many of my most complex NPCs usually describing the NPC personality, context, knowledge and how the players primary interact with it as ask the GPT to interpret it based in all provided info answering the PC interactions with it on the fly. This gives me pretty fun, interesting, and unexpected interactions that I probably never will think like and avoid most of my own repeated way to do the things (my personality insertion into the char) yet this is done with supervision because the GPT sometime goes a bit more far than I want that the char need to be.


I've used AI to generate NPC portraits and I've tried to use it to help me write a professional message. Overall, I've been far from impressed. I've rewritten the message entirely and only kept a single sentence. As for portraits, they were ok for NPCs but I ask for higher quality for my PCs art.

Now, I consider myself quite maniac. It may not be felt because it's mostly directed towards myself but I dislike imperfections of any kind (spelling/grammar errors, messy environments, tactical mistakes, etc...). As such, AI generated content is too imprecise for my taste.


SuperBidi wrote:

I've used AI to generate NPC portraits and I've tried to use it to help me write a professional message. Overall, I've been far from impressed. I've rewritten the message entirely and only kept a single sentence. As for portraits, they were ok for NPCs but I ask for higher quality for my PCs art.

Now, I consider myself quite maniac. It may not be felt because it's mostly directed towards myself but I dislike imperfections of any kind (spelling/grammar errors, messy environments, tactical mistakes, etc...). As such, AI generated content is too imprecise for my taste.

Ironically, I believe where AI is truly going to shine is in bridging the inertia gap by filling in a blank page with some word vomit. It's much easier to revise existing text then to create text from scratch.


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Jacob Jett wrote:
Ironically, I believe where AI is truly going to shine is in bridging the inertia gap by filling in a blank page with some word vomit. It's much easier to revise existing text then to create text from scratch.

It has been the only advantage I've found using AI-generated text: It pushed me to "start". It's rather handy to fight blank page syndrome.


Perpdepog wrote:
Edit: I should also mention that this isn't me expressly claiming I've got an AI-dar or anything, though; like I'm unsure if I'd have drawn the connection if this thread wasn't expressly about AI, and if I hadn't been reading your posts for some time and noticed the discrepancy.

It's funny, I got the exact same impression for those same reasons. I thought RD might have just done it for the lulz.


I am bad at names. I find it's useful that an algorithm can give me like 20 potential names for the town blacksmith and I can figure out one of them from that data set.


I've used it for portraits to use in Foundry, particularly the Theatre Inserts module, because having faces of *some* sort on screen to correspond with characters does a lot to help everyone keep track of who is who. I don't particularly trust it with actual writing, though. Using it to generate names seems doable, though there's plenty of more tradiional name generators that can actually pull from Golarian lore to get lore-friendly names. Dungeon Alchemy as a program seems interesting as that's probably the only way I'd bother with 3D maps, a way to quickly bullshit battlemaps, but I'm not entirely sure how much of that is "AI" versus having a reasonable handmade algorithm for defining room types and making sure things like food are placed on top of plates. I enjoy making maps in applications like Dungeondraft so I'd rather spend the time to make something that's actually designed to be fun to play in and has a bit more thought put into the visuals, but I can see someone wanting something prettier than older dungeon generation tools.

Basically, it's not great at anything, so its applications are gonna be limited to when the alternative is gonna be even worse, like my shaky hands trying to draw something. That works out pretty well for home games, but obviously nobody wants to pay money for something an "AI artist" made (and then there's the broader issues of companies salivating at the thought of not needing to pay artists, or at least holding AI over their heads to argue for lower compensation).


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I hold with the concept that use of “creative” “tools” like ChatGPT and Midjourney AI deleterious to both the development of individual human creativity and human-centred society... I can only begin to imagine the reasons why someone would dabble in such technology, but none of them seem to be very good. I haven’t seen any good ones here. Apologies if that feels harsh.

The ethics of AI are murky at best and poorly understood at worst, and the recklessness with which “consumers” and “user generators” are picking up these new toys are only increasing the damage and promoting the furtherance of such technology. And the entrepreneurs who supply them are laughing all the way to the bank without even a thought or nod to what they are doing.

If you can’t be creative, why would you get someone else to do it for you? It doesn’t matter whether it is a machine or not. As Nick Cave said, art is supposed to take effort, not shortcuts.


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Oceanshieldwolf wrote:
If you can’t be creative, why would you get someone else to do it for you? It doesn’t matter whether it is a machine or not. As Nick Cave said, art is supposed to take effort, not shortcuts.

That's absurd. Say I want some nice paintings on the walls of my domicile. Sadly I lack the talent to create them. So then it's a bad thing for me to hire an artist---let's say a human---to make some for me? I get my paintings, the artist gets the money they need to survive. But somehow I've sinned against creativity itself?

I can think of many more such examples, but not of any that come close to justifying "If you can't be creative, why would you get someone else to do it for you?" It's nonsense.


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Creative Art tools will just improve the ability of artists to produce more content at a faster pace by reducing time spent on busywork. Artists will still use the creative tools the best and adapt new tools to use with them to improve their art. That is what I see happening.

Dark Archive

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1 - Character Development: I don't see any reason to use an AI for this like, at all. If I'm theory crafting I don't care about a bio or anything like that for a character. If I'm running something and I need a character on the fly, I'm a creative guy with some Improv training, I can make up an NPC faster than typing some junk into an input box. There is nothing in this realm that AI can do better or faster than me. Useless.

2 - Artistic Endeavors: I've tried using art for characters. I hate it. Very little pulls me out of my game faster than "Hey look at this picture of my character!" It does less than nothing for me. When my friends and I were starting a Return of the Runelords game I got all excited and comissioned art of my character so I could show her off. I've looked at it like three times, showed it to my friends once, and then it's just sitting in a corner of my drive unused. Waste of money. When I play online over some VTT, I can just grab an image of a sword or a bow or whatever weapon my character is using. If I'm feeling really picky I can design a character in hero forge or something, download the png, and then make a token out of a part of that. No endless typing of lengthy descriptions that you have to retype and retype and fiddle with words or anything like that. So again, AI is useless.

3 - Game Mechanics/Rules: Theoretically I am already using an AI to look up information on AoN or whatever. I just use the search bar on AoN, or Google, or whatever. Just as fast, get my results, and works within my whole "Okay, we're going to give it 3 minutes before I make up a ruling that we can revisit later." Three in a row, AI is useless.

Honestly, aside from my pedantic gripe that it isn't AI it's just some advanced algorithims, I honestly cannot find a use AI at all in my life. I'm not saying that my life and 'AI' don't interact, just that I don't make any effort to use it.

Especially the first part, and I hate to get all boomer, but this is a game about creativity and you want to hand that over to an algorithim? I mean, there are also dice programs that you can feed into your algorithim, and I suppose if you clone your algorithim enough you could just have it play the game for you and you can go off and do other things?


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Keirine, Human Rogue wrote:

1 - Character Development: I don't see any reason to use an AI for this like, at all. If I'm theory crafting I don't care about a bio or anything like that for a character. If I'm running something and I need a character on the fly, I'm a creative guy with some Improv training, I can make up an NPC faster than typing some junk into an input box. There is nothing in this realm that AI can do better or faster than me. Useless.

2 - Artistic Endeavors: I've tried using art for characters. I hate it. Very little pulls me out of my game faster than "Hey look at this picture of my character!" It does less than nothing for me. When my friends and I were starting a Return of the Runelords game I got all excited and comissioned art of my character so I could show her off. I've looked at it like three times, showed it to my friends once, and then it's just sitting in a corner of my drive unused. Waste of money. When I play online over some VTT, I can just grab an image of a sword or a bow or whatever weapon my character is using. If I'm feeling really picky I can design a character in hero forge or something, download the png, and then make a token out of a part of that. No endless typing of lengthy descriptions that you have to retype and retype and fiddle with words or anything like that. So again, AI is useless.

3 - Game Mechanics/Rules: Theoretically I am already using an AI to look up information on AoN or whatever. I just use the search bar on AoN, or Google, or whatever. Just as fast, get my results, and works within my whole "Okay, we're going to give it 3 minutes before I make up a ruling that we can revisit later." Three in a row, AI is useless.

Honestly, aside from my pedantic gripe that it isn't AI it's just some advanced algorithims, I honestly cannot find a use AI at all in my life. I'm not saying that my life and 'AI' don't interact, just that I don't make any effort to use it.

Especially the first part, and I hate to get all boomer, but this is a game about creativity and you want to hand that...

I'm going to be brutally honest, it feels less like this is a shortcoming of AI art as much as it is that you as a person simply do not have interest in certain kinds of creative expression. Not caring what your character looks like and seeing biography as irrelevant doesn't seem like it's something exclusive to AI art, at least from my pov.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

Leaving aside the critique of their personal character, even if what you’re saying is true, doesn’t that all the more emphasize their point that AI has little utility to them, personally?


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Ravingdork wrote:

As technology evolves, our role-playing experiences do too. Have you ever explored how AI can revolutionize your Pathfinder games? Here's how I've been using AI to elevate my gaming experience:

1. Character Development: [...]

2. Artistic Endeavors: [...]

3. Game Mechanics and Rules: [...]

** spoiler omitted **

I'm eager to hear about your experiences. How have you integrated AI into your Pathfinder games? Have you observed any improvements in gameplay or storytelling? Please share your methods, successes, and even the challenges you've faced with AI in gaming. I'm excited to read...

1. Not so much yet. Might try in the future

2. Similar for me to. Serves from time to time either to get some "good enough" image versions - although I again and gain found my self triggering "rerolls" for so long time that one could think of it rather as a sort of mini game by itself. Or a secondary hobby - AI art whisperer. (rolling eyes)

3. Tried very few times to get a rule answer via AI. Went back to HI way, rather quickly. And back to guys like you.

Reasons: It seems to be that AI class now gets feat Confabulator for free, at first level. They use it all the time. ;-)

BTW: I find confabulation a more fitting term than hallucination. One might argue that biological brains do that stuff as well. But there is still something there, apparently, that allows us to meaningfully grasp concepts and their relation to ourself and the perspective of others, as well as second-guessing ourself better than the new (albeit pretty impressive) systems.


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It has enhanced my games by me knowing that any game that does not use any AI whatsoever is the experience I want to have.

AI is art theft and tecnhocrats are using AI in another attempt to perpetuate the infinite growth capitalistic fallacy.


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I have absolutely no use for media generation algorithms in my games.

Character Generation: for PBP, I prefer a level of intentional theming and narrative construction that an algorithm is strictly incapable of. For RL games, I just throw together whatever seems fun at the time.

Character Art: I find algorithmically generated images quite ugly and often nonsensical. Regardless, I can rummage through Pinterest for a suitable representation for PBP games and never really need them for RL games.

Rules Reference: I am perfectly capable of checking rules by myself and interpreting them. AON's search functions can be a bit esoteric but not so much that I require an algorithm with a worrying habit of lying to me to reference things for me.

I've considered the options, listened to voices on both side of the debate, and can only come down hard against its use. Ethically, the current media generation algorithms are a nightmare but ultimately an intensely mundane and flawed one. I refuse to assist in making a space for the technology in any of my hobbies as everything I've seen indicates that bad actors and corporate interests are eager to flood markets with minimum viable product and choke out actual creatives who want to earn a living making art. There are reasons that the WGA made restrictions on AI a major point during their strikes.

I'm not really here to argue any of these points but rather in an attempt to answer your question in good faith.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Please keep the focus of the thread on how AI has or has not worked to improve your gaming experience.

If you want to get into the morality and ethics of AI, I've created another thread specifically for that. I do not want to see it overflow into this conversation.

It's fine to say you tried it out and then explain why it didn't work out for you and your play group. Howerver, saying you'd never try it is off-topic and unhelpful, so please don't waste everyone's time. Ranting about the negative societal impacts outside the game in a thread clearly intended to discuss the potential benefits is both off-topic and antagonistic.

Any post that not specifically address the primary topic at hand and that insists on debating the morality, ethics, or broader social impact of AI will be flagged as off-topic and baiting.


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It hasn't been for pf specifically, but I've gotten some good use out of it for gaming in general. Portraits and boilerplate personalities and histories that can be expanded upon, generating variations on existing map assets, generating maps themselves. Even used it to generate custom enemy designs by feeding it a vague outline sketch and letting it fill it out with dynamic prompts. It's not perfect by any means, but it has saved me a lot of trouble and is nicer than using the same handful of tokens, maps, remixed gamemastery tile sets, etc over and over again.


AnimatedPaper wrote:
Leaving aside the critique of their personal character, even if what you’re saying is true, doesn’t that all the more emphasize their point that AI has little utility to them, personally?

I mean, I took it as them saying things like character art and bios have no use for anyone, period. It very obviously will hold no value to them personally just as a new ferrari holds little value to me. I who get nervous if going faster than 60 MPH/97 KPH and who can't drive a stick shift have literally 0 purpose in this pure stick shift racing car. Character portraits and writing prompts are the only thing the AI does competently besides voice mimicking, which would take way too much time to process to be pragmatic to a game. If you don't value character portraits or writing prompts, AI is more worthless than Cortana on Windows.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Crouza wrote:
If you don't value character portraits or writing prompts, AI is more worthless than Cortana on Windows.

LOL. That's more true than not I suppose, at least for now. People are coming up with new ways to use AI all the time.

Here's hoping one of those people share some of their ideas with us! :)


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As a player, I've only ever used AI for character art.

As a GM I used it to create a mood board for a specific location and to generate the basic bones of an enemy group the players fought. I still spent two days making the group a base for the players to assault and every encounter was hand-crafted by me. I probably wouldn't use AI for anything plot or encounter-related again unless I was pressed for time and creatively burnt out but I wanted to test what Chat GPT could do so I used it once to see what kind of results it could give.

Dark Archive

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Crouza wrote:
AnimatedPaper wrote:
Leaving aside the critique of their personal character, even if what you’re saying is true, doesn’t that all the more emphasize their point that AI has little utility to them, personally?
I mean, I took it as them saying things like character art and bios have no use for anyone, period. It very obviously will hold no value to them personally just as a new ferrari holds little value to me. I who get nervous if going faster than 60 MPH/97 KPH and who can't drive a stick shift have literally 0 purpose in this pure stick shift racing car. Character portraits and writing prompts are the only thing the AI does competently besides voice mimicking, which would take way too much time to process to be pragmatic to a game. If you don't value character portraits or writing prompts, AI is more worthless than Cortana on Windows.

Hey, I just want to clarify something real quick. I never said that Character bios or physical descriptions or anything like that is useless. I write character bios for all my characters. I come up with bios for the NPCs that the party meet. Maybe some of the bios and descriptions are more indepth with characters that recurr as opposed to one-offs, but I still make them. What I said what that I have no use for AI to do them. I like them. I find them fun and enjoyable. I also admitted that I have some improv training so I can build an NPC from scratch pretty quickly, quick enough for the scene that I need them for at least. It's one of my favorite parts of the game and the idea of handing it off to some program to spit out something baffles me.

Character art, I just don't care for it, and it annoys me to no end when I sit down at something like a society game and the ONLY thing a person does to introduce their character is flash a picture on their tablet. It tells me nothing. It gives me absolutely nothing to play with, nothing to interact with, nothing to bounce off of. I can't have my character interact with a pretty picture on your tablet, tell me about your character. What do they talk like? How do they move? How do they react to the world around them? All you need is like a five sentence introduction to give me ways to have my character know how to play off yours.

OP asked for thoughts on and experiences of using AI to better Pathfinder/Starfinder gaming. I see no need to use AI at all in my game, and I gave reasons. Maybe we disagree, that's fine. Baskin Robbins makes 31 flavors for a reason.


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Translation!

So, I'm not a native English speaker — in fact, I GM in both Spanish and Portuguese. Since these two languages are so full of cognates, though, the actual act of translating anything from English to either of these two languages can be confusing. I can't do it on the spot, not with precision. So, I'd have to sit down and actually translate these little blue room descriptors that Paizo puts in premade adventures to be read out loud. That... could take a bunch of time. Certain words don't translate easily. I remember spending a good thirty minutes trying to translate the word alcove, for example.

But today, it really is a matter of just quickly copying the text and asking ChatGPT to translate it. Running online, I can even do it on the spot! It's a breeze.


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Travelling Sasha wrote:

Translation!

So, I'm not a native English speaker — in fact, I GM in both Spanish and Portuguese. Since these two languages are so full of cognates, though, the actual act of translating anything from English to either of these two languages can be confusing. I can't do it on the spot, not with precision. So, I'd have to sit down and actually translate these little blue room descriptors that Paizo puts in premade adventures to be read out loud. That... could take a bunch of time. Certain words don't translate easily. I remember spending a good thirty minutes trying to translate the word alcove, for example.

But today, it really is a matter of just quickly copying the text and asking ChatGPT to translate it. Running online, I can even do it on the spot! It's a breeze.

Have you considered dedicated actual language things like DeepL?


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Ravingdork do you do commission work? I don't care how its done I just want to get a few portraits done for new ancestries that I'm working on. Btw I love your characters their stories and artwork.

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