Did you know...?


Off-Topic Discussions

4,401 to 4,450 of 6,213 << first < prev | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | next > last >>

3 people marked this as a favorite.

The first draft of the Beatles' 'Yesterday' ran as follows.

"Scrambled eggs
Oh my baby, how I love your legs
Not as much as I love scrambled eggs."


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Limeylongears wrote:

The first draft of the Beatles' 'Yesterday' ran as follows.

"Scrambled eggs
Oh my baby, how I love your legs
Not as much as I love scrambled eggs."

And this is why John wrote most of the Beatles' lyrics. You can see this level of lyricism pop up again during Paul's solo career.

Bip bop, bip bip bop / Bip bop, bip bip band / Dig your bottom dollar / Put it in your hand

Or, even better:

I'm gonna do it to you, gonna do it / Sweet banana, you'll never give up / We're gettin' hi hi hi in the midday sun

Paul McCartney should stick to playing bass and occasionally fronting a Nirvana reunion show (this actually happened).


1 person marked this as a favorite.

If you paste text on Google translator, you can have use the listen tool to have it read for you.

It's somewhat nice to do it with RPG books.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

During pre-production for Boaz Davidson's 1987 film Going Bananas (written by Menahem Golan and released by the Cannon Group), Davidson and Golan originally intended to have the character of Bonzo the Ape be portrayed by an orangutan named Manis (best known for portaying the character Clyde in 1978's Every Which Way But Loose, opposite Clint Eastwood). Golan eventually went so far as to schedule a boardroom meeting with Manis in which Golan pitched the script to the orangutan. According to Golan and Davidson, the orangutan declined, and the role of Bonzo ended up going to the human actor/stuntman Deep Roy (Blake's 7, Big Fish, Star Trek) dressed in an ape costume.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The role of Andre "The Puppetmaster" Toulon in Charles Band's 1999 direct-to-video prequel film Retro Puppet Master was apparently difficult to cast. Though numerous actors tried out for the role (including a pre-fame James Franco), the role eventually went out to 20-year-old Greg Sestero (in his earliest credited film appearance), who was hired on the spot due to his ability to speak with a French accent.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The album cover art to Canadian rock band Rush's 1981 album Moving Pictures is a visual pun on the title, and a triple entendre. The first meaning is represented by the movers carrying pictures, with the second by the people watching them who are emotionally moved by the pictures. The third meaning is shown on the back cover, where the entire scene is revealed to be a set for a motion picture.

The film crew shown on the back cover actually shot the scene with motion picture film, and the album's front cover is a single frame from this film. This was revealed to Rush concertgoers several years after the album's release, when the still image was projected on a large screen behind the band, and then suddenly came to life as a full-motion film sequence.

Though originally released in 1981, Moving Pictures was played live in its entirety for the first time to open the second set of each show during Rush's 2010–11 Time Machine Tour.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

And "classic rock" radio has made me hate the song "Tom Sawyer" with the fury of a 1,000 suns.

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
And "classic rock" radio has made me hate the song "Tom Sawyer" with the fury of a 1,000 suns.

I never really grasped how annoying this was until they put Courage the Cowardly Dog on Boomerang...


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

The 1982 TV-Movie (starring Anthony Andrews, Sam Neill, and John Rhys-Davies [and Julian Glover in a rare good-guy part as King Richard the Lionheart]) is shown in Sweden on every News Year Day.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber
Rysky wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
And "classic rock" radio has made me hate the song "Tom Sawyer" with the fury of a 1,000 suns.
I never really grasped how annoying this was until they put Courage the Cowardly Dog on Boomerang...

A Swedish kid's show when I was little used the Beatles "Obla-di, obla-da" as its theme tune, meaning I'm one of the few people who actually enjoy that song.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kajehase wrote:
The 1982 TV-Movie (starring Anthony Andrews, Sam Neill, and John Rhys-Davies [and Julian Glover in a rare good-guy part as King Richard the Lionheart]) is shown in Sweden on every News Year Day.

Youuuuu...forgot to name the movie.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
The 1982 TV-Movie (starring Anthony Andrews, Sam Neill, and John Rhys-Davies [and Julian Glover in a rare good-guy part as King Richard the Lionheart]) is shown in Sweden on every News Year Day.
Youuuuu...forgot to name the movie.

Or DID he?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
The 1982 TV-Movie (starring Anthony Andrews, Sam Neill, and John Rhys-Davies [and Julian Glover in a rare good-guy part as King Richard the Lionheart]) is shown in Sweden on every News Year Day.
Youuuuu...forgot to name the movie.

It doesn't need to be named! (But it's Ivanhoe)


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Hey, I got it. :-)

Scarab Sages

Sissyl wrote:
Hey, I got it. :-)

I call unfair advantage! You live in a First-World Country!


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

When Donald Sumpter (probably most famous as Maester Luwin in early Game of Thrones seasons these days) appeared as "The President" in the last episode of Doctor Who season 9 (Hell Bent), it was his third appearance on the show.

The first one was as "Enrico Casali" in the 1968 episode The Wheel in Space (with Patrick Troughton as the Doctor), and the second was as "Commander Ridgeway" in the 1972 episode The Sea Devils (with Jon Pertwee as the Doctor).


2 people marked this as a favorite.

During an early 1960 tour, several members of The Silver Beetles (later known simply as The Beatles), adopted pseudonyms: singer/guitarist John Lennon became Long John; lead guitarist George Harrison became Carl Harrison (after "Blue Suede Shoes" singer Carl Perkins), bassist Stuart Sutcliffe became Stuart de Staël (after painter Nicolas de Staël), and singer/guitarist Paul McCartney became Paul Ramón (note that The Silver Beetles did not at this point have a drummer.

In 1974, musician Douglas Colvin began calling himself "Dee Dee Ramone," in homage to McCartney, and his new as-of-yet-unnamed band (composed of ex-members of Tangerine Puppets and Sniper) decided to take "Ramone" as both a pseudonymous surname and band name. Over the years, the Ramones have included numerous members, including bassist/singer Dee Dee Ramone (Douglas Colvin), guitarist Johnny Ramone (John Cummings), singer Joey Ramone (Jeffrey Hyman), drummer/producer Tommy Ramone (Tamás Erdélyi), drummer Marky Ramone (Marc Bell), drummer/singer Richie Ramone (Richard Reinhardt), drummer Elvis Ramone (Clement Bozewski), and bassist/singer C.J. Ramone (Christopher Ward).


7 people marked this as a favorite.

"LOL" or "lol" (IPA pronunciation: /lɑl/, /loʊl/), derived from an acronym for laugh(ing) out loud, a popular element of Internet slang, was first documented in the Oxford English Dictionary in March of 2011. Those of you who feel that this is a corruption of the language should remember that the common English word "goodbye" derives from the Middle English abbreviation "godbwye" ("God Be With Ye"), which started being fully pronounced during the Early Modern period and eventually arrived at its modern spelling.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Honey keeps a long time. Like, REALLY long. Honey found by modern archaeologists in the tombs of Pharaohs was still edible.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Anything dry enough, salty enough, or sugary enough keeps virtually forever. Jam opened and then left for a decade in the fridge will most likely be perfectly fine. The only way to get something to keep even longer is to remove all oxygen from it. Tin cans and bog corpses both function along that principle. But if you DO get a little air in, the environment will become anaerobic, opening the door to infection by various anaerobic bacteria. Of these, clostridium botulinum is the best-known. It has a poison, among the strongest poisons known to man, that causes paralysis. Of course, this poison is what people inject in their foreheads to look younger, botox.

Scarab Sages

2 people marked this as a favorite.

"'It's like I've had a mild stroke, but I feel so good about myself!'"
- Robin Williams, stand-up joke about Botox patients


2 people marked this as a favorite.
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:

"'It's like I've had a mild stroke, but I feel so good about myself!'"

- Robin Williams, stand-up joke about Botox patients

Now I am sad. :(


2 people marked this as a favorite.
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Honey keeps a long time. Like, REALLY long. Honey found by modern archaeologists in the tombs of Pharaohs was still edible.

If you have honey that has been unused long enough to crystallize, it hasn't gone bad; some people prefer the crystallized honey as it takes longer to "melt" in your mouth and is usually less sweet. To return your honey to liquidness, fill a 1-1/2 to 2 quart mixing bowl 3/4 full with water, and microwave it for around 4-5 minutes (until hot, but not boiling). Then set your honey jar in the bowl of hot water and allow the crystallized honey to re-melt.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The title screen for the 2005 superhero film Elektra bears pseudo-Greek lettering that, when read as actual modern Greek, reads "Slsktrl."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The 1973 motorcycle film Electra Glide in Blue has no pseudo-Greek lettering and is awesome.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

American punk rock bassist Kira Roessler (of DC3, Black Flag, Dos, and Twisted Roots) largely retired from music in the early 2000s in order to focus on her career as a Hollywood film sound and dialog editor. She has worked on numerous films, including Under The Tuscan Sun (2003) and Twilight: New Moon (2009).

Roessler has won two Primetime Emmy awards for Outstanding Sound Editing, the first in 2008 for the miniseries John Adams, and the second in 2012 for her work on the television series Game of Thrones. In 2016, she also won a Best Sound Editing Oscar for the 2015 film Mad Max: Fury Road.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

American actor Rami Malek (The Pacific, Mr. Robot) was born in 1981 in Los Angeles, California to Egyptian parents. Malek got his start in acting providing "additional voices" for the 2004 video game Halo II.

Malek made his feature film debut in the 2006 comedy film Night At The Museum. His character in Night At The Museum, Pharaoh Ahkmenrah, is one of a very small number of Egyptian characters in a major American motion picture that have been portrayed by Egyptian actors.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The famous "always be closing" monologue spoken by Alec Baldwin's character Blake in James Foley's 1992 film Glengarry Glen Ross was not part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning 1984 David Mamet play from which it was adapted. Mamet added the monologue to his screenplay adaptation in order to pad its length. The monologue is Alec Baldwin's only appearance in the film.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Of the 88 Academy Awards ("Oscars") for Best Picture, none have been awarded for a science fiction film, and only one has been awarded for a genre fantasy film (Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)).

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King also holds the record for the highest Oscar "sweep" of all time, winning all 11 Academy Awards for which it was nominated (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, Best Original Song, Best Visual Effects, Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Make-up, Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing), and is also tied with James Cameron's Titanic (1997) and William Wyler's Ben-Hur (1959) for the most Academy Awards won by a single film.

The Return of the King is also one of only two sequels to win a Best Picture award, the other being Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather Part II (oddly enough, both films also won the award for Best Director).


3 people marked this as a favorite.

One of the earliest known uses of the epithet "dumbass" or "dumb ass" can be found in 2 Peter 2:16 of the King James Bible (1611):

"...[T]he dumb ass speaking with man's voice forbad the madness of the prophet."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

That Adam Driver is a driver named Paterson, in Paterson?

film coming out in the Cannes film Festival.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The 1988 American release of the video game The Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System was the first home video game released in cartridge form to contain an internal battery backup for saving data-- the original 1986 Japanese game (The Legend of Zelda: The Hyrule Fantasy, for the Family Computer (Famicom) Disk System) had been released on Nintendo's proprietary Disk Card floppy disks. The American cartridge version, which included the save feature was re-released in Japan in 1994 as The Legend of Zelda 1.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber
David M Mallon wrote:
Of the 88 Academy Awards ("Oscars") for Best Picture, none have been awarded for a science fiction film.

2001: A Space Odyssey wasn't even nominated - the nominees for the 1969 awards being: Midnight Cowboy; Anne of the Thousand Days; Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid; Hello, Dolly!; and Z.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:

American actor Rami Malek (The Pacific, Mr. Robot) was born in 1981 in Los Angeles, California to Egyptian parents. Malek got his start in acting providing "additional voices" for the 2004 video game Halo II.

Malek made his feature film debut in the 2006 comedy film Night At The Museum. His character in Night At The Museum, Pharaoh Ahkmenrah, is one of a very small number of Egyptian characters in a major American motion picture that have been portrayed by Egyptian actors.

Season 2 of Mr. Robot premieres July 13.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:

American actor Rami Malek (The Pacific, Mr. Robot) was born in 1981 in Los Angeles, California to Egyptian parents. Malek got his start in acting providing "additional voices" for the 2004 video game Halo II.

Malek made his feature film debut in the 2006 comedy film Night At The Museum. His character in Night At The Museum, Pharaoh Ahkmenrah, is one of a very small number of Egyptian characters in a major American motion picture that have been portrayed by Egyptian actors.

I knew a very bright and ambitious Egyptian-American in middle-school. True to stereotype, his parents wanted him to be a doctor, and he went that way for a time, but evidently he got way into acting in high school and has had a great deal fewer obstacles and misfortunes in pursuing that dream than I have - so keep your eyes peeled for one Sohail Najafi!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

American actor Rami Malek (The Pacific, Mr. Robot) was born in 1981 in Los Angeles, California to Egyptian parents. Malek got his start in acting providing "additional voices" for the 2004 video game Halo II.

Malek made his feature film debut in the 2006 comedy film Night At The Museum. His character in Night At The Museum, Pharaoh Ahkmenrah, is one of a very small number of Egyptian characters in a major American motion picture that have been portrayed by Egyptian actors.

Season 2 of Mr. Robot premieres July 13.

He's also the only Egyptian I can think of who's played a Cajun on TV.

Snafu scrubs drums for no man.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

In director Jun Gallardo's 1988 B-movie action film The Firing Line, an American commando (played by B-action veteran Robert "Reb" Brown) leads a group of rebels against a corrupt Central American government. The country is never specifically named, but in one scene, a map of the country's capitol city is shown-- a map of Melbourne, Australia.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The real-life American soldier Albert Blithe was portrayed in the HBO miniseries Band Of Brothers (based on the book by Stephen Ambrose) by actor Marc Warren. In the series, Blithe is shot in the neck shortly after the Battle of Carentan and sent home, dying a few years after the war.

However, the real-life Blithe was shot in the shoulder and spent the rest of the war in a military hospital. After a brief career with Westinghouse Electric, he rejoined the US Army and served on bases in Korea, Taiwan, and Germany from 1957 to 1967. He died of a perforated ulcer in 1967 at the age of 44.

Easy Company veterans interviewed while writing the book and mini-series had believed that Blithe was wounded in the neck, and that he did not recover and as such Ambrose's book stated that Blithe had died in Philadelphia in 1948. This carried over into episode 3, "Carentan," which ends with a slide stating that "Albert Blithe never recovered from the wounds he received in Normandy. He died in 1948." Though his family publicly corrected this error, not all editions of the book, or of the series, have the correction.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

"Ye" when not a pronoun is not a historical real word; the original symbol used that got rendered as a "Y" was actually pronounced the same as the modern letters "th" would be. Thus, "Ye Olde Book Shoppe" would actually be properly rendered "The Olde Book Shoppe" in modern text.

The reason why a "Y" was used was because the first printing presses in Germany lacked the proper symbol and improvised.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The word "brandy" (a spirit produced by distilling wine) comes from the English "brandywine," itself derived from the Dutch "brandewijn" or "gebrande wijn," meaning "burned wine."


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The genus Basilosaurus, meaning "king lizard" actually represents a number of primitive whales. The first fossil of B. cetoides was discovered in the United States and was initially believed to be some sort of reptile, hence the suffix -"saurus", but it was later found to be a marine mammal. Renowned English naturalist Sir Richard Owen wished to rename the creature Zeuglodon ("yoked tooth"), but, per taxonomic rules, the creature's first name remained permanent.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Balsamic vinegar, both the traditional (TBV) and more common, inexpensive (BVM) versions, does not actually contain balsam. The word balsamico (from Latin balsamum, from Greek βάλσαμον) means "balsam-like" in the sense of "restorative" or "curative".


3 people marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:
The genus Basilosaurus, meaning "king lizard" actually represents a number of primitive whales. The first fossil of B. cetoides was discovered in the United States and was initially believed to be some sort of reptile, hence the suffix -"saurus", but it was later found to be a marine mammal. Renowned English naturalist Sir Richard Owen wished to rename the creature Zeuglodon ("yoked tooth"), but, per taxonomic rules, the creature's first name remained permanent.

Basilosaurus is the largest well known member of the family Basilosauridae, which comprise the sister group to the clade Neoceti, which includes both baleen whales and toothed whales. Other basilosaurids known from North America include the fairly small Cynthiacetus and the medium-sized Zygorhiza. Basilosaurids were thought to have gone extinct by the Eocene, but there is some evidence that Basilosaurid like whales such as Kekenodon from New Zealand survived into the Oligocene, alongside the first baleen whales and echolocating toothed whales.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Did you know that "Brontosaurus" has popped in and out of classification for existence? While originally it was another, more famous name for the Apatosaurus, new research suggests the Brontosaurus actually existed as a distinct group of animals. They're closely related to the Apatosaurus.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-brontosaurus-is-back1/


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The turkey is a large bird in the genus Meleagris, which is native to the Americas. Despite the name, turkeys are not found in the region (and modern nation-state) of Turkey, though the area does factor into two conflicting explanations for the bird's name:

1. When Europeans first encountered turkeys in America, they incorrectly identified the birds as a type of guineafowl – i.e., as members of a group of birds which were thought to typically come from the country of Turkey. The name of the North American bird thus became "turkey fowl", which was then shortened to just "turkey."

2. The birds came to England via merchant ships from the Middle East where they were domesticated successfully. These merchants were called "Turkey merchants" as much of the area was part of the Ottoman Empire. Hence the name “Turkey birds” or, soon thereafter, “turkeys."

In 1550, the English navigator William Strickland, who had introduced the turkey into England, was granted a coat of arms including a "turkey-cock in his pride proper." William Shakespeare used the term in Twelfth Night, believed to be written in 1601 or 1602. The lack of context around his usage suggests that the term had widespread reach.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The facial features of the alien character Mordin Solus from the Mass Effect series of video games were based on those of actor Clint Eastwood.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The 1983 German Atari 2600 game UFI und Sein Gefährlicher Einsatz was released in the United states as both Alien's Return and E.T. Go Home. The title on the cover art in all versions reads, "E.T. Go Come."


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Despite the popularity of Rickrolling and "Never Gonna Give You Up" garnering millions of hits on YouTube, Rick Astley has earned almost no money from the meme, receiving only ~$12* (U.S.) in royalties from YouTube for his performance share*. Songwriter Pete Waterman has only received ~$17* (U.S.) in YouTube royalties for it.

* As of August 2010


That... needs to change.


Despite winning back-to-back World Series championships in 1907 and 1908 (becoming the first Major League team to play in 3 consecutive Fall Classics and the first to win it twice), the Chicago Cubs baseball team have not won the World Series in 107 years, the longest championship drought of any major North American professional sports team.

4,401 to 4,450 of 6,213 << first < prev | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Gamer Life / Off-Topic Discussions / Did you know...? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.