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In 1971, American computer programmer Ray Tomlinson (1941-2016) implemented the first e-mail system on the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET), an early packet switching network that formed the basis for the modern Internet.

E-mail was the first system able to send mail between users on different hosts connected to ARPANET. (Previously, mail could be sent only to others who used the same computer.) To achieve this, Tomlinson used the @ sign to separate the user from their machine, which has been used in e-mail addresses ever since.

The first e-mail Ray Tomlinson sent was a test e-mail. It was not preserved, and Tomlinson describes it as insignificant, something like "QWERTYUIOP". This is commonly misquoted as "The first e-mail was QWERTYUIOP". Tomlinson later commented that these "test messages were entirely forgettable and I have, therefore, forgotten them."

At first, Tomlinson's e-mail messaging system wasn't thought to be a big deal. After showing it to his colleague Jerry Burchfiel, Tomlinson reportedly told Burchfiel "Don't tell anyone! This isn't what we're supposed to be working on."


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During the War of the First Coalition of the French Revolutionary Wars, General of Division Jean-Charles Pichegru was commanding the autumn 1794 campaign during which the conquest of the Netherlands occurred. The French Army entered Amsterdam on 19 January 1795 in order to winter there. Well informed, the General Pichegru found out that a Dutch fleet was anchored at the port of Den Helder, approximately eighty kilometers north from Amsterdam, on what was then the shallow bay of Zuiderzee (the Zuiderzee was closed off and partly pumped out in the 20th century, and what is left of it now forms the freshwater IJsselmeer).

Pichegru ordered the appropriately-named General of Brigade Jean-Guillaume de Winter to lead a squadron of the 8th Hussars. De Winter had been serving with the French since 1787, and would later command the Dutch fleet in the Battle of Camperdown. General de Winter arrived at Den Helder with his troops during the night of 23 January 1795. The Dutch fleet was there as expected, trapped by ice due to the unusually cold winter.

Each hussar had brought on the rump of his horse an infantryman of the 15th Line Infantry Regiment. After a careful approach to avoid awakening the Dutch sailors (the hussars had covered the horses' hooves with fabric), Lieutenant Colonel Louis Joseph Lahure launched the assault. The ice did not break, and the hussars and infantrymen were able to board the Dutch ships. The French captured the Dutch admiral and the vessels' crews, with the French suffering no casualties.

The capture completed, the French conquest of the Netherlands was brought to an end, with the French Army having captured 14 warships, 850 guns, and several merchant ships. It is the only time in known military history in a fleet of ships was captured by a cavalry assault.


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During the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905), future Polish leader Józef Piłsudski tried to negotiate with Japan organization of uprising in Russia-occupied partition of Poland which would allow Poland to regain independence. His main political opponent Roman Dmowski at the same time was trying to dissuade Japanese from agreeing to this proposal. In fact both of them accidentally bumped into each other while visiting Tokyo.

Dmowski was mostly successful in convincing Japanese government to not to stage uprising (which he considered to be doomed to failure). Still, the Japanese gave Piłsudski a large sum of money that was used to arm PPS (Polish Socialist Party which he was leading) paramilitary units.


David M Mallon wrote:
Most people remember Metallica's 2003 album St. Anger as "the bad Metallica album."

I thought that was the '91 Black Album? That and everything after it has been "not Metallica," according to my friends who (were) Metallica fans.


I loved the Black album, and am a big fan of Load and Reload. But St. Anger and Death Magnetic pretty much ended my affair with them. That and the a$$hole attitude they've developed since they became big rock stars.

Scarab Sages

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We really should stop making fun of mimes.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
We really should stop making fun of mimes.

So you are saying we need to watch out for land mimes?


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In my old 2e campaign there was an assassin's guild made up entirely of silent, unspeaking killers. My players were terrified of pissing off mimes.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
We really should stop making fun of mimes.

I actually like mimes, never really understood the derision and mockery they receive.

Scarab Sages

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I've had an idea for a long time for a Mime class as a kind of variant Bard who utilized 3.5 Tome of Magic Shadow Magic.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Hm, you might also be able to use an Kineticist.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Most people remember Metallica's 2003 album St. Anger as "the bad Metallica album."
I thought that was the '91 Black Album? That and everything after it has been "not Metallica," according to my friends who (were) Metallica fans.

As someone who has listened to quite a bit of Metallica I can say that the Black Album is a major tonal shift from previous albums. Same thing with St Anger. If I didn't know any better I could easily believe that Metallica's pre-Black Album music, St Anger, and all the albums between them were done by three different bands. Death Magnetic kind of goes back towards Black Album...kinda...but it is still not quite the same style of music as anything before it (for better or worse). If someone was really into the style of the early stuff, then I could understand them hating everything from Black Album onwards because it isn't "Metallica" anymore. Not the Metallica they were a fan of, anyway.

Scarab Sages

Rysky wrote:
Hm, you might also be able to use an Kineticist.

Laaaaaame.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
In my old 2e campaign there was an assassin's guild made up entirely of silent, unspeaking killers. My players were terrified of pissing off mimes.

But surely they were easily defeated once trapped in their imaginary boxes?


Limeylongears wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
In my old 2e campaign there was an assassin's guild made up entirely of silent, unspeaking killers. My players were terrified of pissing off mimes.
But surely they were easily defeated once trapped in their imaginary boxes?

LOL!!!!

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Hm, you might also be able to use an Kineticist.
Laaaaaame.

Sorry, I just thought you could use the air one to enforce mime effects on others or something.


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I dunno, I think a lamé kineticist could work. You'll have to work out the element effects for lamé are, as well as its oppositional element (pleather? tweed? chiffon?).


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens Subscriber
Hunt, the PugWumpus wrote:
I dunno, I think a lamé kineticist could work. You'll have to work out the element effects for lamé are, as well as its oppositional element (pleather? tweed? chiffon?).

Glitter.

That $#!+ is anti-EVERYTHING.


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Hunt, the PugWumpus wrote:
I dunno, I think a lamé kineticist could work. You'll have to work out the element effects for lamé are, as well as its oppositional element (pleather? tweed? chiffon?).

Oh please, please, please let us have an Acolyte of Liberace prestige class!


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little red goblin games can satisfy your mime needs


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Limeylongears wrote:
Hunt, the PugWumpus wrote:
I dunno, I think a lamé kineticist could work. You'll have to work out the element effects for lamé are, as well as its oppositional element (pleather? tweed? chiffon?).
Oh please, please, please let us have an Acolyte of Liberace prestige class!

And a mesmerist archetype wielding gaze pouts (su) such as Blue Steel, Le Tigre, and Magnum?

Scarab Sages

christos gurd wrote:
little red goblin games can satisfy your mime needs

My goal was to make my own, though. I had my own ideas. You're kinda missing the point.


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Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

During the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin, there was a twice daily truce so that the ducks on St Stephen's Green could be fed.

(Source Tom Holland.)

(The historian. Not Spiderman.)


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St. Francis of Assisi had a brief career as a knight (or warrior on horseback, anyway, since nobody actually knighted him) before entering the religious life.


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Ramesses II (AKA Ramesses the Great, 1303 BC - 1213 BC), the longest-reigning pharaoh of Egypt, is known in Greek sources as "Ozymandias." The name "Ozymandias" is a Greek transliteration of the first part of Ramesses' regnal name, Usermaatre Setepenre, meaning "The Justice of Ra is Powerful; Chosen of Ra."

The poem Ozymandias, by English poet Percy Bysshe Shelley (AD 1792 – AD 1822), contains the phrase, "I am great OZYMANDIAS," saith the stone / The King of Kings; this mighty City shows / The wonders of my hand." These three lines are themselves a paraphrasis of the Greek historian Diodorus Siculus (AKA Diodoros of Sicily, fl. 60 BC - 30 BC), who translated an inscription from Ramesses' time as, "King of Kings am I, Osymandias. If anyone would know how great I am and where I lie, let him surpass one of my works."


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Greek historian Diodorus Siculus was one of the first historians to give a detailed account of the Celtic peoples. According to Book V of his Bibliotheca Historica (Greek: Ἱστορικὴ Βιβλιοθήκη, "Historical Library"):

"Physically the Celts are terrifying in appearance with deep-sounding and very harsh voices. In conversation they use few words and speak in riddles, for the most part hinting at things and leaving a great deal to be understood. They frequently exaggerate with the aim of extolling themselves and diminishing the status of others. They are boasters and threateners, and given to bombastic self-dramatization, and yet they are quick of mind and with good natural ability for learning."


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Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

During the development of the mp3 file format, the song used to check how well it worked was Tom's Diner by Suzanne Vega, which was inspired by the same diner that provided the exteriors for the Seinfeld characters' favourite hangout.


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In H.P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith's Cthulhu Mythos works, a fictional tome bears the German title Unaussprechlichen Kulten, or "Nameless Cults" in English. The title is in the dative case, making "Von unaussprechlichen Kulten" ("Of/On the Nameless Cults") a more accurate title. Finally, in modern vernacular German, "unaussprechlichen Kulten" more accurately reads as "unpronounceable cults" or "cults with unpronounceable names" (accurate, if you've read Lovecraft).


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Found out two days ago that the only Pope not buried in Europe, Pope Saint Clement I (Pontiff between 88 and 97 A.D.) rests about two hundred miles south from where I'm currently standing, in the small chilean town of Linares.

Apparently, the nineteen-hundred year old relic was donated by Pope Pious XI in the late 1930's in celebration of the reconstruction of Linare's cathedral, which had been destroyed by an earthquake.

Interestingly enough, save for some of the locals, this has gone completely unnoticed by most of the population, unaware that the Fourth Pope's entire body is on display inside a crystal coffin in an otherwise quiet rural town. I had to call the bishop's office to confirm this wasn't just an urban myth.

Scarab Sages

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David M Mallon wrote:
In H.P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith's Cthulhu Mythos works, a fictional tome bears the German title Unaussprechlichen Kulten, or "Nameless Cults" in English. The title is in the dative case, making "Von unaussprechlichen Kulten" ("Of/On the Nameless Cults") a more accurate title. Finally, in modern vernacular German, "unaussprechlichen Kulten" more accurately reads as "unpronounceable cults" or "cults with unpronounceable names" (accurate, if you've read Lovecraft).

Lovecraft was an erudite, self-deprecating guy. This might not have been an accident.

Scarab Sages

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Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Found out two days ago that the only Pope not buried in Europe, Pope Saint Clement I (Pontiff between 88 and 97 A.D.) rests about two hundred miles south from where I'm currently standing, in the small chilean town of Linares....

You've got me looking up pictures of saint relics - if you ever needed help knowing how a lich ought to look, THIS is just about it!


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
In H.P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith's Cthulhu Mythos works, a fictional tome bears the German title Unaussprechlichen Kulten, or "Nameless Cults" in English. The title is in the dative case, making "Von unaussprechlichen Kulten" ("Of/On the Nameless Cults") a more accurate title. Finally, in modern vernacular German, "unaussprechlichen Kulten" more accurately reads as "unpronounceable cults" or "cults with unpronounceable names" (accurate, if you've read Lovecraft).
Lovecraft was an erudite, self-deprecating guy. This might not have been an accident.

Distinctly possible.


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Paul Simon & Art Garfunkel's song "Bleecker Street" (from their 1964 album Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.) contains the lines "Thirty dollars pays your rent / On Bleecker Street." Today, the average rent for an apartment on Bleecker St. in New York City is around $3,000 per month, an increase of 9,900% over the 52 years since the song's release.


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The "Reaper horn" sound effect from the Mass Effect video game series is based on an audio recording of a metal dumpster lid opening and closing.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Paul Simon & Art Garfunkel's song "Bleecker Street" (from their 1964 album Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.) contains the lines "Thirty dollars pays your rent / On Bleecker Street." Today, the average rent for an apartment on Bleecker St. in New York City is around $3,000 per month, an increase of 9,900% over the 52 years since the song's release.

Maybe the high rent is why Doctor Strange sold his Sanctum Sanctorum to Pinkberry. ;)


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The nuckelavee or nuckalavee (Bestiary 3) is a centaur-like demon from Orcadian mythology that combines equine and human elements. Originating in Norse mythology and the most horrible of all the demons of the Scottish islands, the nuckelavee's breath can wilt crops and sicken livestock, and the creature was held responsible for droughts and epidemics on land despite its being predominantly a sea-dweller.

A graphic firsthand description of the nuckelavee as it appears on land was given by an islander who claimed to have had a confrontation with it, but accounts describing the details of the creature's appearance are inconsistent. In common with many other sea monsters, it is unable to tolerate freshwater; therefore, those it is pursuing have only to cross a river or stream to be rid of it. The nuckelavee is kept in confinement during the summer months by the Mither o' the Sea, an ancient Orcadian divine and the only one able to control it.

Orcadian folklore had a strong Scandinavian influence, and it may be that the nuckelavee is a composite of a water horse from Celtic mythology and a creature imported by the Norsemen. As with similar malevolent entities such as the kelpie, it offered an explanation for incidents that simple islanders could not otherwise understand.


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C-list R&B artist Mike Posner (of the songs "Cooler Than Me" and "Bow Chicka Wow Wow") was a star cross-country runner in high school, and later attended Duke University, where he graduated magna cum laude in 2010 with a degree in sociology.


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Before director J.J. Abrams was selected to direct the 2015 film Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens, he was one of two main contenders for the job, the other being actor/director Ben Affleck.


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Director Troy Duffy's 1999 film The Boondock Saints went through a long and difficult casting process before finally settling on the final lineup of actors. Only one of Duffy's first-choice actors (comedian Billy Connolly, playing the character of Noah "Il Duce" McManus) made it into the film.

For the protagonists, twin brothers Connor and Murphy McManus, (played in the film by Sean Patrick Flanery and Norman Reedus, respectively) Duffy wanted actors Stephen Dorff and Mark Wahlberg, and when they both declined, Brendan Fraser, Nicky Katt, and Ewan McGregor were considered. For the character of FBI agent Paul Smecker (eventually played by Willem Dafoe), Duffy sought both Kenneth Branagh and Patrick Swayze. Sylvester Stallone, Bill Murray, Mike Myers, Kevin Spacey, and Robert DeNiro were also considered for the part.

Actors Brad Pitt, Keanu Reeves, and Ethan Hawke expressed interest in roles in The Boondock Saints, but were rejected by Duffy for various reasons.


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In the Star Fox series of video games, the character Peppy Hare often suggests to Fox McCloud that he "do a barrel roll" to get himself out of trouble. However, the aeronautical move executed by Fox McCloud's ship in nearly all of the games is actually an aileron roll.


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Since its introduction in the 1993 video game Doom, the "Doom door" stock sound effect has achieved memetic status, making its way into numerous other media. For example:

  • The SGC blast doors on the 1997-2007 sci-fi television series Stargate SG-1
  • The opening sequence and commercial interstitials on the documentary series Modern Marvels (1995-present)
  • Doors on the titular ship in the 1997 horror / sci-fi film Event Horizon
  • Doors on the NSEA Protector in the 1999 comedy sci-fi film Galaxy Quest
  • The character JP's (Joel David Moore's) office doors in the 2006 comedy Grandma's Boy

In addition, the sound effect was also used for the character Rey's speeder transport in J.J. Abrams' 2015 film Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens.


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After the release of director Anthony Page's 1979 comedic mystery film The Lady Vanishes, the once prolific Hammer Film Productions did not have a single release until 29 years later with 2008's web serial Beyond the Rave. Hammer's next film didn't come until 2010, with director Matt Reeves' critically-acclaimed Let Me In, a remake of the 2008 Swedish film Let The Right One In. Since then, Hammer Film Productions has released several more horror films, though not nearly as many as were released during the 1955-1972 "golden era," including The Resident (2011), The Woman In Black (2012), and The Quiet Ones (2014).


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David M Mallon wrote:
In the Star Fox series of video games, the character Peppy Hare often suggests to Fox McCloud that he "do a barrel roll" to get himself out of trouble. However, the aeronautical move executed by Fox McCloud's ship in nearly all of the games is actually an aileron roll.

I really thought you were going to link to this!


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Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals, which all have in common their eponymous asbestiform habit: long (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic "fibrils" that can be released by abrasion and other processes. They are commonly known by their colors, as blue asbestos, brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos. (I always thought it was manufactured. Learned something new today).

Asbestos mining existed more than 4,000 years ago, but large-scale mining began at the end of the 19th century, when manufacturers and builders began using asbestos because of its desirable physical properties: sound absorption, average tensile strength, its resistance to fire, heat, electrical and chemical damage, and affordability. It was used in such applications as electrical insulation for hotplate wiring and in building insulation. When asbestos is used for its resistance to fire or heat, the fibers are often mixed with cement or woven into fabric or mats. These desirable properties made asbestos a very widely used material, and its use continued to grow throughout most of the 20th century until the knowledge of carcinogenic effects of asbestos dust caused its effective demise as a mainstream construction and fireproofing material in most countries.

It is now known that prolonged inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause serious and fatal illnesses including lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis (a type of pneumoconiosis). Health issues related to asbestos exposure can be found in records dating back to Roman times. By the beginning of the 20th century concerns were beginning to be raised, which escalated in severity during the 1920s and 1930s. By the 1980s and 1990s asbestos trade and use started to become banned outright, phased out, or heavily restricted in an increasing number of countries.

The severity of asbestos-related diseases, the material's extremely widespread use in many areas of life, its continuing long-term use after harmful health effects were known or suspected, and fact that asbestos-related diseases can emerge decades after exposure ceases, have resulted in asbestos litigation becoming the longest, most expensive mass tort in U.S. history and a much lesser legal issue in most other countries involved. Asbestos-related liability also remains an ongoing concern for many manufacturers, insurers and reinsurers.


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The English rights to Mach GoGoGo were acquired by syndicator Trans-Lux, and Speed Racer premiered on American television in the fall of 1967. In the series, Speed’s full name was Go Mifune, in homage to Japanese film star Toshiro Mifune. His name, Americanized, became Speed Racer. His adventures centered on his powerful Mach 5 car, his girlfriend Trixie, Pops Racer (his father), his little brother Spritle (with his pet chimp Chim-Chim), and his mysterious older brother, Racer X.

For American consumption, major editing and dubbing efforts were undertaken by producer Peter Fernandez, who also provided the voices of many of the characters, most notably Racer X and Speed Racer himself. Fernandez was also responsible for a rearrangement of the theme song's melody, written by Nobuyoshi Koshibe, and subsequently wrote its English lyrics. The theme was performed in the opening and closing titles (uncredited) by Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:

The English rights to Mach GoGoGo were acquired by syndicator Trans-Lux, and Speed Racer premiered on American television in the fall of 1967. In the series, Speed’s full name was Go Mifune, in homage to Japanese film star Toshiro Mifune. His name, Americanized, became Speed Racer. His adventures centered on his powerful Mach 5 car, his girlfriend Trixie, Pops Racer (his father), his little brother Spritle (with his pet chimp Chim-Chim), and his mysterious older brother, Racer X.

For American consumption, major editing and dubbing efforts were undertaken by producer Peter Fernandez, who also provided the voices of many of the characters, most notably Racer X and Speed Racer himself. Fernandez was also responsible for a rearrangement of the theme song's melody, written by Nobuyoshi Koshibe, and subsequently wrote its English lyrics. The theme was performed in the opening and closing titles (uncredited) by Danny Davis and the Nashville Brass.

Peter Fernandez.

You will be enshrined with Harmony Gold and Carl Macek in the shrine of hate.


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Angie Bowie (David Bowie's ex-wife) auditioned for the role of Wonder Woman in the early '70s, but failed her screen test by refusing to wear a bra.


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Limeylongears wrote:
Angie Bowie (David Bowie's ex-wife) auditioned for the role of Wonder Woman in the early '70s, but failed her screen test by refusing to wear a bra.

She also (in 1975) secured the TV rights to Daredevil and the Black Widow for a duration of one year and planned a TV series based on the two characters. Bowie had photographer Terry O'Neill take a series of pictures of herself as Black Widow and actor Ben Carruthers as Daredevil (with wardrobe by Natasha Kornilkoff) to shop the project around to producers, but the project never came to fruition.


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Using a knife, if one cuts a "fun size" Nestle Crunch candy bar at the second upright of the "N" and just after the second upright of the "H" in "CRUNCH," the candy bar now reads "INCH" and measures one inch in length.


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Director Sammo Hung wanted to name his 1984 martial arts comedy (filmed on location in Barcelona, Spain, and starring Jackie Chan and Yuen Biao) "Meals On Wheels," but the title was changed to "Wheels On Meals" by superstitious executives at Golden Harvest Studios due to their previous two "M"-titled films (Megaforce and Menage A Trois) being box office failures.

Wheels on Meals was the first of two films which paired star Jackie Chan against kickboxer Benny "The Jet" Urquidez (the other being the 1988 film Dragons Forever). At one point in the final battle between the pair, a spin-kick performed by Urquidez is so quick that the resulting airflow extinguishes a row of candles. This is shown on-screen, with no cuts or trick photography.

By 1984, shooting in Hong Kong had become practically impossible – firstly, because the stars had become so famous that they could not walk through the streets with impunity, and secondly due to the mounting difficulties in obtaining a permit from the government in order to film in Hong Kong. When Hung took his cast and crew to Barcelona, he wanted to strongly establish the locations in Barcelona as real, and to avoid shooting interiors at Golden Harvest. In comparison to Hong Kong, the Spanish authorities were very cooperative in allowing the use of locations for filming, even for car chases and fight scenes.

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