Did you know...?


Off-Topic Discussions

4,151 to 4,200 of 6,203 << first < prev | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | next > last >>

The bunyip (Bestiary 2) is a large mythical creature from Australian Aboriginal mythology, said to lurk in swamps, billabongs, creeks, riverbeds, and waterholes. The origin of the word bunyip has been traced to the Wemba-Wemba or Wergaia language of Aboriginal people of South-Eastern Australia. However, the bunyip appears to have formed part of traditional Aboriginal beliefs and stories throughout Australia, although its name varied according to tribal nomenclature. In his 2001 book, writer Robert Holden identified at least nine regional variations for the creature known as the bunyip across Aboriginal Australia. Various written accounts of bunyips were made by Europeans in the early and mid-19th century, as settlement spread across the country.


I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
CBDunkerson wrote:
Goddity wrote:

Gandalf uses a lot of light and protection spells. He mostly casts bursts of light, apart from speaking to animals and summoning eagles. He has the occasional banishment type spell against Sauron. He doesn't use a spell book and doesn't know common wizard spells like feather fall or knock.

Gandalf is a cleric.

Gandalf is an angel. He doesn't have class levels.
He does cast something like fire seeds (and perhaps even one or two other fire spells) in The Hobbit.

You could argue that if he was a wizard, he would just blast the monsters directly. There is evidence he has druid levels (Eagles anyone?), or is maybe just a samsaran.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

According to the mythology, I understand he would be much like a solar. Immortal, with huge powers, directly beneath the gods, leader of huge projects, good, almost divine himself. It kinda puts a damper on the heroics.


Though famous for being a film director, noted filmmaker George Lucas has only directed seven feature-length films over the course of his fifty-year career:

THX 1138 (1971)
American Graffiti (1973)
Star Wars (AKA Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope) (1977)
Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999)
Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002)
Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (2005)
Red Tails (2012)

By comparison, Lucas has been the primary screenwriter for seventeen feature films (including all of the above), as well as a producer for twenty-six feature films. With the exception of THX 1138 and American Graffiti, Lucas has produced every film he has written or directed.


8 people marked this as a favorite.

Three out of every four people make up 75 percent of the world's population.


During pre-production on the 1999 film Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, singer Michael Jackson lobbied Lucasfilm intensely to play the role of Jar Jar Binks. Director George Lucas eventually turned Jackson down due to creative differences (Jackson wanted to play the character using prosthetics and makeup, while Lucas wanted an all-digital character), and the role went to award-winning stage actor Ahmed Best. According to Best, Jackson harbored a grudge against him for years afterward.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

Kenneth Colley who played Admiral Piett in Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi also appeared in Life of Brian where he played Jesus.

Editor

4 people marked this as a favorite.

If you took a person's intestines and stretched them out in a straight line...that person would die.


People think of intestines as a rope coiled in someone's tummy. They are not. They are more like a large, folded sheet going to a central root, with the intestine on the outside edge of the sheet. I have no idea why people get this wrong.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Josh Vogt wrote:
If you took a person's intestines and stretched them out in a straight line...that person would die.

A certain dwarf confirmed this for you, didn't she?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kajehase wrote:
Kenneth Colley who played Admiral Piett in Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi also appeared in Life of Brian where he played Jesus.

Already said, but bears repeating.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The costumes used for the soldiers of the Earth Federation in director Paul Verhoeven's 1997 satirical military sci-fi film Starship Troopers were re-used five years later by director Joss Whedon as the costumes for the soldiers of the Union of Allied Planets in his 2002 sci-fi western TV series Firefly.

Likewise, the space suit costumes used by the crew of Serenity on Firefly were originally created for the 1998 military sci-fi film Soldier, directed by Paul W.S. Anderson and starring Kurt Russell.

In addition, the "sonic rifle" prop used by the Alliance soldiers on Firefly was redressed and re-used by Whedon as the "death ray" in his 2008 tragicomic musical sci-fi film Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:

The costumes used for the soldiers of the Earth Federation in director Paul Verhoeven's 1997 satirical military sci-fi film Starship Troopers were re-used five years later by director Joss Whedon as the costumes for the soldiers of the Union of Allied Planets in his 2002 sci-fi western TV series Firefly.

Likewise, the space suit costumes used by the crew of Serenity on Firefly were originally created for the 1998 military sci-fi film Soldier, directed by Paul W.S. Anderson and starring Kurt Russell.

In addition, the "sonic rifle" prop used by the Alliance soldiers on Firefly was redressed and re-used by Whedon as the "death ray" in his 2008 tragicomic musical sci-fi film Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog.

he steals costumes in addition to storylines. My hatred for him has only increased.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

During the 1960s, a British prop house acquired a number of RAF Windak high-altitude pressure suits, which were first used in 1966 on the second serial of the fourth season of the British sci-fi television series Dr. Who, titled The Tenth Planet.

A decade later, American filmmaker George Lucas rented the suits for use in his 1977 science fantasy film Star Wars (AKA Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope), where one appears as the costume of Tatooine cantina patron BoShek (played by a now-unknown extra). A different pressure suit appears in Lucas' 1980 follow-up, The Empire Strikes Back (AKA Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back), worn by the bounty hunter Bossk (played by Alan Harris). Finally, a number of the suits were used in the trilogy's 1983 final installment, Return of the Jedi (AKA Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi), as the flight suits for the Rebel Alliance's A-Wing Interceptor pilots.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Since the death of singer David Bowie on 10 January 2016, eighteen of his albums have re-entered the UK album charts (not counting his most recent release, Blackstar, which currently rests at #1). Of the nineteen currently charting albums, ten of them are in the top 40. In addition, thirteen Bowie singles have entered the top 100, including the song "Heroes," currently holding its highest top 100 position of all time (it peaked at #24 in 1977, and currently occupies the #12 slot). Of the thirteen currently charting singles, five of them are in the top 40.

Source: BBC News, 15 January 2016


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

Glen Cook used to share a bed (and an, apparently tiny, apartment) with Fritz Leiber.


10 people marked this as a favorite.

If one were to inject reality into metaphor, given the properties of the metal, a cast-iron alibi would, ironically, be weaker and more brittle than a forged one.


David M Mallon wrote:
If one were to inject reality into metaphor, given the properties of the metal, a cast-iron alibi would, ironically, be weaker and more brittle than a forged one.

beautiful.


Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
If one were to inject reality into metaphor, given the properties of the metal, a cast-iron alibi would, ironically, be weaker and more brittle than a forged one.
beautiful.

Mostly stolen from Nikolas "Lindybeige" Lloyd, partially taken from a realization I had at work while trying to pull frozen copper off of a spool without breaking it.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

British character actor Burn Gorman, famous for his roles as Karl Tanner on the HBO fantasy series Game of Thrones, Major Edmund Hewlett on the AMC historical drama series Turn: Washington's Spies, and Dr. Hermann Gottlieb in director Guillermo del Toro's 2013 film Pacific Rim, also performs on stage as a beatboxer under the name of "BB Burn."

Gorman performed as a member of human beatbox / hip-hop outfit Drool Skool alongside performer Simon "Shlomo" Kahn, and was crowned the BBC 1Xtra Human Beatbox Champion of 2003 after defeating performer Desebel in the championship round.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

The "W" and "C" keys are separated only by the "D" key on a QWERTY keyboard, meaning that you're just one finger-slip away from accidentally turning in a term paper on the history of armed wombat.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

On a related note, the layout of a standard English keyboard is based off of the same configuration that was put on typewriters - and the reason for this particular layout? Several of the most commonly-used letters (like, E, A, and S) were put on the left side of the keyboard so that the right-handed majority of typists would face a slight handicap in reaching them, thus preventing those keys from sticking after being hit too frequently, the original mechanical typewriters being vulnerable to such things - this, of course, would turn out to be a big win for us Computer-Age lefties!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Legendary actor Toshirô Mifune, though ethnically Japanese, was born in Qungdao, Shandong Province, China (to Japanese immigrant parents), and raised in Dalian, Liaoning Province. Mifune never set foot in mainland Japan until he was drafted by the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service at the age of 20, where he served for the duration of World War II attached to the Aerial Photography Unit.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Alfred "Weird Al" Yankovic acquired his future stage name while studying architecture at California Polytechnic State University. Yankovic originally chose the name for his stint as a college radio DJ (in tribute to Dr. Demento), and retained the name after beginning his career in musical comedy.


I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
On a related note, the layout of a standard English keyboard is based off of the same configuration that was put on typewriters - and the reason for this particular layout? Several of the most commonly-used letters (like, E, A, and S) were put on the left side of the keyboard so that the right-handed majority of typists would face a slight handicap in reaching them, thus preventing those keys from sticking after being hit too frequently, the original mechanical typewriters being vulnerable to such things - this, of course, would turn out to be a big win for us Computer-Age lefties!

Note that a large number of common letters are also out to the sides of the keyboard layout. This is intentional. The middle four rows (those meant to be used with the index fingers) hold rtyu/fghj/vbnm while the most common letters in english by frequency are (said to be, I am unsure) etaoinshrdlu. This is five of twelve. Again, the idea is to maximize the time used between keys pressed.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

American comic strip hero The Phantom, created by writer Lee Falk and artist Ray Moore in 1936, was the first published* fictional hero to wear the skintight costume which has became a hallmark of comic-book superheroes, and was the first shown in a mask with no visible pupils. Comics historian Peter Coogan has described the Phantom as a "transitional" figure, since the Phantom has some of the characteristics of pulp magazine heroes like The Shadow and the Spider, as well as anticipating the features of comic book heroes such as Superman, Batman, and Captain America.

During World War II, U.S. Soldiers received care packages containing Phantom comics. The soldiers stationed in Papua New Guinea shared these comics with natives there, and The Phantom became extremely popular among the tribes. The Papuan people who could read English would read the stories and share the images with others. Since the character's introduction, The Phantom's image can often be found painted on ceremonial shields or alongside other tribal art.

*early designs of Superman from 1934-1935 show the character's familiar underpants-over-leotard costume design, but the character would not see print until 1938.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Finally, an explanation of why The Phantom is inexplicably purple.


The Phantom, along with fellow pulp heroes Doc Savage, Tarzan, and Korak, are some of the very few non-public domain characters (i.e. Hercules, Count Dracula, etc.) to appear in comics published by both Marvel Inc. and DC Inc.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

In-universe, The Phantom's skull ring was originally owned by the Roman emperor Nero, and was forged from the nails with which Jesus was hung from the cross. This ring, known as the Ring of Evil, is worn on The Phantom's right hand, and is used to mark villains and evildoers (generally by way of The Phantom punching them in the face). Lesser-known is the Ring of Good, worn on The Phantom's left hand, which is used to mark fellow heroes and those under The Phantom's protection (generally not by punching them, though).


The 1999 historical fiction action film The 13th Warrior is based on Michael Crichton's 1976 novel Eaters of the Dead, which is itself based both on the medieval epic poem Beowulf and Ahmad ibn Fadlān's AD 922 journal of his journey through eastern Europe.

The film was initially directed by Die Hard and Predator director John McTiernan. However, after production issues, novelist/producer Michael Crichton took over the film's direction, pushing back the film's release date by over a year as it was re-cut re-scored, and partially re-shot.

By the time of its release, The 13th Warrior had cost Touchstone Pictures over $160 million USD. Even though the film debuted at #2 at the box office (behind M. Night Shyamalan's The Sixth Sense), it grossed only $61.7 million USD worldwide, making it the largest box office bomb in world history when adjusted for inflation, and the third largest when unadjusted.


Director Carl Rinsch's 2013 debut film 47 Ronin (starring Keanu Reeves and Hiroyuki Sanada) is the world's largest box office bomb, unadjusted for inflation, and the second largest when adjusted. The film, marred by re-shoots, massive studio interference, production staff changes, and an unintelligible story nearly unrecognizable from its historical source material (the 1703 Akō vendetta, in which a band of samurai avenged the death of their fallen lord), cost $225 million to produce and distribute, but grossed only $152 million USD worldwide.


The top 10 box office bombs of all time worldwide, adjusted for inflation (title, date, production/distributor, director, top-billed star, estimated losses in constant $):

1. The 13th Warrior (1999, Touchstone Pictures / Buena Vista Pictures), directed by John McTiernan, starring Antonio Banderas (~$183 million)
2. 47 Ronin (2013, H2F Entertainment / Universal Pictures), directed by Carl Rinsch, starring Keanu Reeves (~$152 million)
3. Cutthroat Island (1995, Carolco Pictures / Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer), directed by Renny Harlin, starring Geena Davis (~$138 million)
4. Mars Needs Moms (2011, Walt Disney Pictures), directed by Simon Wells, starring Seth Green (~$137 million)
5. The Adventures of Pluto Nash (2002, Castle Rock Entertainment / Warner Bros.), directed by Ron Underwood, starring Eddie Murphy (~$127 million)
6. The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964, Samuel Bronston Productions / Paramount Pictures), directed by Anthony Mann, starring Sophia Loren (~$127 million)
7. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (2001, Square Pictures / Columbia Pictures), directed by Hironobu Sakaguchi, starring Ming-Na Wen (~$126 million)
8. John Carter (2012, Walt Disney Pictures), directed by Andrew Stanton, starring Taylor Kitsch (~$125 million)
9. The Lone Ranger (2013, Walt Disney Pictures), directed by Gore Verbinski, starring Johnny Depp (~$122 million)
10. Sahara (2005, Bristol Bay Productions / Paramount Pictures), directed by Breck Eisner, starring Matthew McConaughey (~$122 million)


The top 10 box office bombs of all time worldwide, unadjusted for inflation (title, date, production/distributor, director, top-billed star, estimated losses):

1. 47 Ronin (2013, H2F Entertainment / Universal Pictures), directed by Carl Rinsch, starring Keanu Reeves (~$150 million)
2. Mars Needs Moms (2011, Walt Disney Pictures), directed by Simon Wells, starring Seth Green (~$131 million)
3. The 13th Warrior (1999, Touchstone Pictures / Buena Vista Pictures), directed by John McTiernan , starring Antonio Banderas (~$129 million)
4. John Carter (2012, Walt Disney Pictures), directed by Andrew Stanton, starring Taylor Kitsch (~$122 million)
5. The Lone Ranger (2013, Walt Disney Pictures), directed by Gore Verbinski, starring Johnny Depp (~$120 million)
6. R.I.P.D. (2013, Dark Horse Entertainment / Universal Pictures), directed by Robert Schwentke, starring Jeff Bridges (~$115 million)
7. Jack the Giant Slayer (2013, New Line Cinema / Warner Bros.), directed by Bryan Singer, starring Nicholas Hoult (~$101 million)
8. Sahara (2005, Bristol Bay Productions / Paramount Pictures), directed by Breck Eisner, starring Matthew McConaughey (~$100 million)
9. Stealth (2005, Original Film / Columbia Pictures), directed by Rob Cohen, starring Josh Lucas (~$97 million)
10. The Adventures of Pluto Nash (2002, Castle Rock Entertainment / Warner Bros.), directed by Ron Underwood, starring Eddie Murphy (~$96 million)


2013 was a s@+@ year for movie studios.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I can't believe "Ishtar" didn't make the list.

Scarab Sages

I remember thinking The Adventures of Pluto Nash (the only one out of any of those movies I've seen) was okay. Hardly the greatest movie ever, but it's not supposed to be, and I don't understand why people are as 'down' on it as they are.


I once saw an interview in which Warren Beatty explained, in much detail, that Ishtar was in fact a financial success, and everyone who called it a "bad" movie had just lost all perspective, OKAY?!

Scarab Sages

financial success/failure =/= good/bad product

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I'm sad about John Carter, it was awesome :(

The original title was supposed to be Princess of Mars but execs shot it down saying boys wouldn't want to go see a movie with "Princess" in the title.

Oooookkaaayy...

So they came back with John Carter of Mars but that got shot down too, with the reasoning that girls wouldn't watch a movie with "Mars" in the title.

Wut.


If you omitted only one of those backslashes, Warren Beatty would agree with your statement. I leave it to you to decide which backslash.

Scarab Sages

If he's really one of those people who believe what you're implying he does, then he's a world-class idiot. Simple.


I don't know what to tell you; this is the same guy who starred in Bonnie and Clyde and Reds, but yeah.

Scarab Sages

To be fair, maybe he's genuinely proud of Ishtar (I dunno, why shouldn't he be? I've never seen it) and just happens to be throwing that detail out there to defend it.


Hitdice wrote:
I once saw an interview in which Warren Beatty explained, in much detail,
Wikipedia wrote:
...produced by Warren Beatty, who co-starred...
Warren Beatty wrote:
that Ishtar was in fact a financial success
Wikipedia wrote:
Against a $51 million production budget and up to another $20 million spent on prints and marketing costs the film is estimated to have lost $40 million. Ishtar has since become synonymous with the phrase "box office flop", and in 2014 the LA Times listed the film as one of the most expensive box office flops of all time.
Warren Beatty wrote:
, and everyone who called it a "bad" movie had just lost all perspective, OKAY?!
Wikipedia wrote:
Roger Ebert wrote for the The Chicago Sun Times that "Ishtar is a truly dreadful film, a lifeless, massive, lumbering exercise in failed comedy" and Gene Siskel called it "shockingly dull" and "dim-witted"; together they selected it as the worst film of 1987. Ishtar was nominated for three Golden Raspberry Awards including Worst Picture and Worst Screenplay, with Elaine May winning Worst Director. San Jose Mercury News claimed that "Time has not improved this film's reputation as being one of the worst ever made." Time Out suggested it was "so bad it could have been deliberate" and called it "one of the worst films ever made", while Hot Air referred to it as "The Citizen Kane of big-budget, A-list vehicular homicides." It was included in Michael Sauter's The Worst Movies of All Time book and Richard Roeper included it on his list of the 40 worst films he had seen. In 1999 Time placed the film on a list of the 100 worst ideas of the 20th century.


Ishtar does not appear on Wikipedia's Top 50 Box Office Bombs (by total net loss), but does appear on its unsorted List Of Films Considered The Worst. Ishtar also appears on The Forrester's Top 200 Box Office Bombs (by % budget gross), but doesn't make the top 100.

Scarab Sages

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Wikipedia wrote:

In one of Gary Larson's The Far Side comic strips, captioned "Hell's Video Store", the entire store is stocked with nothing but copies of the movie Ishtar. Larson later apologized, saying, "When I drew the above cartoon, I had not actually seen Ishtar... Years later, I saw it on an airplane, and was stunned at what was happening to me: I was actually being entertained. Sure, maybe it's not the greatest film ever made, but my cartoon was way off the mark. There are so many cartoons for which I should probably write an apology, but this is the only one which compels me to do so."[33]

Since its release, the film has gained a substantial cult following,[34] with some of its more famous admirers including directors Quentin Tarantino and Edgar Wright, who have both gone on record as stating that they liked the film.[35] Acclaimed filmmaker Martin Scorsese has also claimed that the film is one of his favorite movies of all time.

I liked Roger Ebert as a person, but I didn't always think he knew what he was talking about in his reviews. Sometimes he seemed to look down his nose at things he didn't understand, or carry certain prejudices and preoccupations into the theater with him rather than watching movies on their own isolated merits.

Gary Larson, on the other hand, I am pretty much willing to take at his word.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I have seen Cutthroat Island, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, The 13th Warrior, and Sahara. I would have to say that all of them had points that I liked. They were ambitious movies, but then didn't sell. Of those, the 13th Warrior is the one I would agree is completely idiotic (formation-riding cannibal neanderthals... wut?), but even that one had things like the language barrier scene, good sets, and so on. Even so many years later, it is a movie I remember, and I'd say that counts for something. There are too many movies that disappear from memory.

It has been lamented that the mid-budget movie is dead today. That may be a reason why producers try for big budgets instead, ending up with a big budget movie that draws a mid-budget crowd. Or it could have been a fault with the ad campaign. Or the wrong launch time. Or a hundred different things. Remember, New Line Cinema went belly-up, and they made the Lord of the Rings trilogy. It is obviously a difficult and unpredictable business.

People are way too critical.


The 1994 film The Fantastic Four, directed by Oley Sassone and produced by Roger Corman, was filmed on a $1 million budget and never officially released, a net loss of $1 million for production company Constantin Film Production.

The 2015 film Fantastic Four (AKA Fant4stic), directed by Josh Trank and produced by Simon Kinberg, was filmed on a $120 million budget, with an estimated additional $150-$200 million in marketing and distribution costs. During its theatrical run, Fantastic Four grossed a total of $167.8 million for production company 20th Century Fox, a net loss of approximately $100-$150 million.


The 1994 film WAS screened. In a local cinema somewhere in Italy, one time. See, they had to show it to keep the rights to do such a movie. Or at least, so goes the myth. How well did the other two FF movies do?


The 2005 film Fantastic Four, directed by Tim Story and produced by Ralph Winter, was filmed on a $100 million budget, with an estimated $100 million in marketing and distribution costs. During its theatrical run, Fantastic Four grossed a total of approximately $331 million worldwide for production company 20th Century Fox, a net gain of over $100 million.

Fantastic Four's 2007 sequel, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, also directed by Tim Story and produced by Ralph Winter, was filmed on a $130 million budget, with a likely distribution & marketing budget of another $100-$150 million. During its theatrical run, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer grossed a total of approximately $331 million worldwide for 20th Century Fox, a net gain of roughly $100 million.

Though both commercial successes, plans for a second sequel were shelved after Rise of the Silver Surfer did not perform as expected at the box office, and both films received negative to mixed reviews from many critics. Currently, Fantastic Four holds a 27% "Rotten" rating on film review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes (based on 203 reviews) and a score of 40/100 on aggregator Metacritic (based on 35 critics), while its sequel holds a 37% "Rotten" rating from Rotten Tomatoes and a 45/100 from Metacritic.

Between the two films, three Razzie award nominations were received, all for lead actress Jessica Alba. Fantastic Four also was nominated for the 2005 Saturn Award for best science fiction film, but lost to Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith.

4,151 to 4,200 of 6,203 << first < prev | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Gamer Life / Off-Topic Discussions / Did you know...? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.