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Freehold DM wrote:

Hey!

Box wine RULES!

guzzles

"Straight from our bladder to yours!" :D


Quark Blast wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:

Hey!

Box wine RULES!

guzzles

"Straight from our bladder to yours!" :D

I'll have to tell my dad that one.


Box wine (also known as cask wine) is wine packaged in a bag-in-box. Wine is contained in a plastic bladder typically with an air-tight valve emerging from a protective corrugated fiberboard box. It serves as an alternative to traditional wine bottling in glass with a cork or synthetic seal.

The process for packaging 'cask wine' was invented by Thomas Angove of Angove's, a winemaker from Renmark, South Australia, and patented by the company on April 20, 1965. Polyethylene bladders of 1 gallon (4.5 liters) were placed in corrugated boxes for retail sale. The original design required that the consumer cut the corner off the bladder, pour out the serving of wine and then reseal it with a special peg.

In 1967 Australian inventor Charles Malpas and Penfolds Wines patented a plastic, air-tight tap welded to a metallized bladder, making storage more convenient. All modern wine casks now use some sort of plastic tap, which is exposed by tearing away a perforated panel on the box. Over the following decades, bag-in-box packaging has primarily been preferred by producers of less-expensive wines, as it is cheaper to fabricate and distribute than glass bottles.

Box wine in Australia is colloquially referred to as "goon" or "boxy", in reference to its low price and high alcohol content. In Australia, the bag inside the box is sometimes known as a "goon bag."


A shamrock is a young sprig of clover, used as a symbol of Christianity in Ireland. Saint Patrick, Ireland's patron saint, is said to have used it as a metaphor for the Catholic Holy Trinity. The name "shamrock" comes from the Irish seamróg, which is the diminutive of the Irish word for clover (seamair) and means simply "little clover" or "young clover".

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

While we're talking about that area over there, the Unicorn is the national animal of Scotland.

Scarab Sages

Boxed wine has a seedy reputation from its early days, but it has many serious advantages over traditional bottles: It keeps far longer once opened, is cheaper for reasons that have nothing to do with quality, is easier to store and carry, and is better for the environment. The primary disadvantages are aesthetics and (the kicker that will keep bottles relevant) the fact that boxes are no good for aging wines.

Scarab Sages

Afghanistan's national animal is the snow leopard, its national bird is the eagle, and its national flower is

Care to guess?:
the tulip.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Afghanistan's national animal is the snow leopard, its national bird is the eagle, and its national flower is ** spoiler omitted **

Well it is culturally important to the Middle East.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Box wine (also known as cask wine) is wine packaged in a bag-in-box.

Mrs Gersen spent a year working at a vinyard in France. She said that box wine, oddly, doesn't carry the same stigma there that it does here. When I asked whether they had a better name for it, for PR purposes, she said, "No, it's called Le Bag-in-Box."


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I'm not surprised. From everything I've heard, the French have a completely different relationship with wine (yes, relationship, it's wine and they're French) than we do. That is, boxed/fresh/young wine is regarded like instant ice tea is the U.S; nothing you'd serve at a fancy dinner party, but nothing you'd hold against anyone, either.

. . .

Okay, look, maybe my consumption of young wine and instant ice tea say more about myself than either nation's population, but you get my point.


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Hitdice wrote:
instant ice tea is the U.S; nothing you'd serve at a fancy dinner party, but nothing you'd hold against anyone, either.

Careful now, pardner. I live here in Texas. Tea* is serious business. Folks drink it by the gallon. And nobody best be servin' no instant tea 'round these parts, nohow. Them's fightin' words.

*The hot variety doesn't exist, nor does the supersaturated glocuse solution they drink further east, so there's no need to specify "unsweetened iced tea".


Surely most tea (unless it's loose-leaf and brewed in a teapot) is pretty much instant?


Isn't everything just hot in Texas, though? When Texans fill a glass pitcher with water and tealeaves and just leave it on the windowsill, doesn't it catalyze into a natural brewing process just through the radiant heat of direct sunlight? Up here in New England, we have to boil our water, and that there feels unnatural when it comes to tea!

I actually prefer coffee, but if if you try to tell me that the "The best part of waking up is Folger's in your cup," I will punch you. Not in the face, in the coffee pot; I want to shatter it so that I prevent you from serving that swill to anyone, ever again.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
instant ice tea is the U.S; nothing you'd serve at a fancy dinner party, but nothing you'd hold against anyone, either.

Careful now, pardner. I live here in Texas. Tea* is serious business. Folks drink it by the gallon. And nobody best be servin' no instant tea 'round these parts, nohow. Them's fightin' words.

*The hot variety doesn't exist, nor does the supersaturated glocuse solution they drink further east, so there's no need to specify "unsweetened iced tea".

Bleh on you and your bland tea. Here* we take sugar with tea in it. I also like to drink tea hot right after it's been brewed.

Though I will agree with you on already-made tea, best not to bring it up around here.

*Tennessee


Southern Iced Tea should have so much sugar in it you can stand the spoon freely.


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Rysky wrote:
Here* we take sugar with tea in it.
DungeomasterCal wrote:
Southern Iced Tea should have so much sugar in it you can stand the spoon freely.

Why y'all got the diabetus.


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Hitdice wrote:
Isn't everything just hot in Texas, though? When Texans fill a glass pitcher with water and tealeaves and just leave it on the windowsill, doesn't it catalyze into a natural brewing process just through the radiant heat of direct sunlight?

At my house that's true, but most Texans keep the AC set to about 60oF, because reasons. When it's 110 outside, I usually need to bring a jacket with me wherever I go, unless I'll (thankfully) be outdoors all day.


I can only take sweet tea in small doses. One of my players makes it using her family recipe, which she will never share. I prefer the hot unsweetened stuff overall(as does she).


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Limeylongears wrote:
Surely most tea (unless it's loose-leaf and brewed in a teapot) is pretty much instant?

Technically that's true, but "instant iced tea" generally refers to the awful granular powders that, when added to water and stirred, produce a noxious brown liquid that usually tastes strongly of Aspartame.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Hitdice wrote:
Isn't everything just hot in Texas, though? When Texans fill a glass pitcher with water and tealeaves and just leave it on the windowsill, doesn't it catalyze into a natural brewing process just through the radiant heat of direct sunlight?
At my house that's true, but most Texans keep the AC set to about 60oF, because reasons. When it's 110 outside, I usually need to bring a jacket with me wherever I go, unless I'll (thankfully) be outdoors all day.

I would keep it at 57,myself.


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Freehold DM wrote:
I would keep it at 57,myself.

When Mrs Gersen is out of town I sneak it up to 80, because I pay the cooling bill and I'd rather spend the extra money on bourbon.


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Ah yes. The quaint custom of paying to bring your indoor temperature DOWN. I forget you guys are aliens sometimes. =)


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Actor Charles Bronson was born Charles Dennis Buchinsky in 1921 to Lithuanian immigrant parents in Ehrenfield, Pennsylvania. As a child, Bronson spoke only Lithuanian at home and Lithuanian and Russian at school, only learning English as a teenager. At the age of 10, Bronson's father died, and Bronson went to work in the coal mines to support his family, as well as attending school, and eventually becoming the first member of his family to earn a high school diploma. In 1943, Bronson enlisted in the United States Army Air Forces, serving in the Pacific Theater of World War 2, flying 25 combat missions and earning a Purple Heart for wounds received in battle.


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Rush bassist/vocalist Geddy Lee was born as Gary Lee Weinrib in Willowdale, Ontario in 1953.

Lee's parents, Morris and Mary Weinrib, were both Jewish Holocaust survivors from Poland who had survived the ghetto in their hometown of Starachowice, followed by their imprisonment at the Auschwitz concentration camp at the age of 13. "It was kind of surreal pre-teen s@~#," says Lee, describing how his father bribed guards to bring his mother shoes. After a period, Lee's mother was transferred to Bergen-Belsen and his father to Dachau. When the war ended four years later and the Allies liberated the camps, his father set out in search of his mother and found her at a displaced persons camp. They married there and eventually emigrated to Canada.

In Canada, Lee's parents gave him a Jewish education, with a bar mitzvah at age 13. His father was a skilled musician, but had died the year before from medical problems resulting from his imprisonment. This forced his mother to find outside work to support three children. Lee feels that not having parents at home during those years was probably a factor in his becoming a musician: "It was a terrible blow that I lost him, but the course of my life changed because my mother couldn't control us."

He turned his basement into practice space for a band he formed with high-school friends. After the band began earning income from small performances at high-school shows or other events, he decided to drop out of high school and play rock and roll professionally. His mother was devastated when he told her, and he still feels that he owes her for the disappointments in her life. "All the s~!@ I put her through," he says, "on top of the fact that she just lost her husband. I felt like I had to make sure that it was worth it. I wanted to show her that I was a professional, that I was working hard, and wasn't just a f+~&in' lunatic."

Today, Lee considers himself a cultural Jew. Jewish newspaper Jweekly featured Lee's reflections on his mother's experiences as a refugee, and of his own Jewish heritage. Lee's name, Geddy, was derived from his mother's heavily accented pronunciation of his given first name, Gary. This was picked up by his friends in school, leading Lee to adopt it as his stage name and later his legal name.

Scarab Sages

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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Here* we take sugar with tea in it.
DungeomasterCal wrote:
Southern Iced Tea should have so much sugar in it you can stand the spoon freely.
Why y'all got the diabetus.

In the spirit of the thread:

Did you know...that you can have tea with sugar (and even cream!) that is nonetheless still clearly tea and not uncarbonated cola syrup?


David M Mallon wrote:

Rush bassist/vocalist Geddy Lee was born as Gary Lee Weinrib in Willowdale, Ontario in 1953.

Lee's parents, Morris and Mary Weinrib, were both Jewish Holocaust survivors from Poland who had survived the ghetto in their hometown of Starachowice, followed by their imprisonment at the Auschwitz concentration camp at the age of 13. "It was kind of surreal pre-teen s~&@," says Lee, describing how his father bribed guards to bring his mother shoes. After a period, Lee's mother was transferred to Bergen-Belsen and his father to Dachau. When the war ended four years later and the Allies liberated the camps, his father set out in search of his mother and found her at a displaced persons camp. They married there and eventually emigrated to Canada.

In Canada, Lee's parents gave him a Jewish education, with a bar mitzvah at age 13. His father was a skilled musician, but had died the year before from medical problems resulting from his imprisonment. This forced his mother to find outside work to support three children. Lee feels that not having parents at home during those years was probably a factor in his becoming a musician: "It was a terrible blow that I lost him, but the course of my life changed because my mother couldn't control us."

He turned his basement into practice space for a band he formed with high-school friends. After the band began earning income from small performances at high-school shows or other events, he decided to drop out of high school and play rock and roll professionally. His mother was devastated when he told her, and he still feels that he owes her for the disappointments in her life. "All the s+%& I put her through," he says, "on top of the fact that she just lost her husband. I felt like I had to make sure that it was worth it. I wanted to show her that I was a professional, that I was working hard, and wasn't just a f~~!in' lunatic."

Today, Lee considers himself a cultural Jew. Jewish newspaper Jweekly featured Lee's reflections on his mother's experiences as a refugee, and of...

WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW


Sissyl wrote:
Ah yes. The quaint custom of paying to bring your indoor temperature DOWN. I forget you guys are aliens sometimes. =)

When the indoor temperature, uncooled, can easily reach 120oF (49oC) in a west-facing room under the eaves, you quickly change your tune.


In 1983, singer and multi-instrumentalist Maynard James Keenan (born as James Herbert Keenan in 1964 in Ravenna, Ohio), inspired by actor Bill Murray's performance in the 1981 film Stripes, joined the United States Army, with the intention of having the G.I. Bill fund his dream of attending art school.

Keenan initially served in the Army as a forward observer before studying at the United States Military Academy Preparatory School (West Point Prep School) from 1983 to 1984. In addition to completing a rigorous math and English curriculum, he wrestled, ran on the cross country team, and sang in the glee club. He was distinguished in basic and advanced training, but declined an appointment to West Point and instead chose to pursue a music career.


Most people remember Metallica's 2003 album St. Anger as "the bad Metallica album." What most people don't remember is that the international singles for the title track, "St. Anger," included not one, not two, but five Ramones cover songs, and no original Metallica tracks other than "St. Anger." The track listings are as follows:

International Single, Part 1:
1. "St. Anger"
2. "Commando" (Ramones cover)
3. "Today Your Love, Tomorrow the World" (Ramones cover)

International Single, Part 2:
1. "St. Anger"
2. "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue" (Ramones cover)
3. "Cretin Hop" (Ramones cover)

International 7" Vinyl Single:
1. "St. Anger"
2. "We're a Happy Family" (Ramones cover)

Japanese EP:
1. "St. Anger"
2. "Commando" (Ramones cover)
3. "Today Your Love, Tomorrow the World" (Ramones cover)
4. "Now I Wanna Sniff Some Glue" (Ramones cover)
5. "We're a Happy Family" (Ramones cover)

This genuinely baffles me.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Ah yes. The quaint custom of paying to bring your indoor temperature DOWN. I forget you guys are aliens sometimes. =)
When the indoor temperature, uncooled, can easily reach 120oF (49oC) in a west-facing room under the eaves, you quickly change your tune.

Yeah... that doesn't happen here in Sweden. 30-35 C is about the top for us. As I said, you guys are positively alien. =)

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
David M Mallon wrote:

In 1983, singer and multi-instrumentalist Maynard James Keenan (born as James Herbert Keenan in 1964 in Ravenna, Ohio), inspired by actor Bill Murray's performance in the 1981 film Stripes, joined the United States Army, with the intention of having the G.I. Bill fund his dream of attending art school.

Keenan initially served in the Army as a forward observer before studying at the United States Military Academy Preparatory School (West Point Prep School) from 1983 to 1984. In addition to completing a rigorous math and English curriculum, he wrestled, ran on the cross country team, and sang in the glee club. He was distinguished in basic and advanced training, but declined an appointment to West Point and instead chose to pursue a music career.

And I think him for this.


Sissyl wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Ah yes. The quaint custom of paying to bring your indoor temperature DOWN. I forget you guys are aliens sometimes. =)
When the indoor temperature, uncooled, can easily reach 120oF (49oC) in a west-facing room under the eaves, you quickly change your tune.
Yeah... that doesn't happen here in Sweden. 30-35 C is about the top for us. As I said, you guys are positively alien. =)

that sounds heavenly.


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There is a charming story about Gothia cup, a massive international football youth tournament in Sweden. It is held in the warmest part of summer (again, 25-35 C). One year, they interviewed a team from the Virgin Islands. When asked what they thought about it, they said "It was wonderful... But why do you hold it in the middle of winter?"


Sissyl wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
Ah yes. The quaint custom of paying to bring your indoor temperature DOWN. I forget you guys are aliens sometimes. =)
When the indoor temperature, uncooled, can easily reach 120oF (49oC) in a west-facing room under the eaves, you quickly change your tune.
Yeah... that doesn't happen here in Sweden. 30-35 C is about the top for us. As I said, you guys are positively alien. =)

Similar temperatures here in northern New York (though the last few years have seen some seriously unusual temperature spikes and swings).


Sissyl wrote:
There is a charming story about Gothia cup, a massive international football youth tournament in Sweden. It is held in the warmest part of summer (again, 25-35 C). One year, they interviewed a team from the Virgin Islands. When asked what they thought about it, they said "It was wonderful... But why do you hold it in the middle of winter?"

One of my two roommates during my freshman year of college was from the Virgin Islands. He was always complaining about how cold it was in Savannah, Georgia.


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Over the years, the appearances of numerous comic book characters have been based on real people. For example:

  • Both Marvel Comics character J. Jonah Jameson and DC Comics character Funky Flashman were created by artist Jack Kirby as satirical portrayals of writer Stan Lee.
  • John Constantine of Hellblazer was based on English musician Sting.
  • When X-Men's Wolverine (AKA Logan, AKA James Howlett) was finally unmasked in the late 1970s, his appearance was based on that of actor Paul D'Amato in the 1977 film Slap Shot.
  • Marvel Comics character Iron Man (AKA Tony Stark) is basically a carbon copy of American entrepreneur Howard Hughes.
  • The hairless head of X-Men's Professor X (AKA Charles Xavier) was inspired by that of Russian actor Yul Brynner.
  • The DC Comics villain Joker was inspired by German actor Conrad Veidt's performance in the 1928 film The Man Who Laughs.
  • Artist Jack Kirby based the appearance of DC Comics villain Darkseid on that of actor Jack Palance.
  • Originally, Marvel Comics character Quake (AKA Daisy Johnson) was drawn to look like actress Angelina Jolie in her role in the 1995 film Hackers.


American character actor Rondo Hatton (1894-1946) is famous for his unique appearance (caused by the hormonal disorder acromegaly), as well his as appearances in horror films and B-movies during the 1930s and 1940s (most notably, 1944's The Pearl of Death (AKA Sherlock Holmes and the Pearl of Death), 1946's House of Horrors (AKA Murder Mansion; The Sinister Shadow; Joan Medford is Missing), and 1946's The Brute Man).

However, as a young man, Hatton was known to be quite good-looking and athletic, becoming a star football and baseball player in high school. He went on to work as a sports journalist, and eventually served with the United States Army during World War I, both during the French campaign and the Pancho Villa Expedition. Following the war, Hatton was discharged due to his developing condition, which worsened considerably over the next several decades. He died of a heart attack in 1946, at the age of 51. Hatton's final film, The Brute Man, was released posthumously.


"[Pop culture in earlier time periods] was just as trashy, they just chose not to talk about their equivalent of The Real Housewives of New Jersey, and pretended that they only watched Leave It to Beaver."

- star quote from Cracked's The Spit Take: 6 Historic Events That Were Nothing Like You Pictured


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For the first few weeks of filming Kevin Reynolds' 1991 adventure film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, lead actor Kevin Costner tried his very best to deliver his lines with a British accent (the film, of course, being set in medieval England). However, Costner's accent proved to be so terrible that Reynolds told Costner just to deliver all of his lines in his normal West Coast American accent, and several scenes had to be re-shot. Aside from Costner's performance, the film is notorious for its bad accents, particularly the ham-fisted speech of Christian Slater's Will Scarlet, the over-the-top (though immensely entertaining) performance of actual British actor Alan Rickman as the Sheriff of Nottingham, and an unusually phoned-in performance by the legendary Morgan Freeman as the Moorish soldier Azeem.


During the prologue of Christopher Nolan's 2012 superhero film The Dark Knight Rises, shown before IMAX screenings of the film Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol in 2011, audiences found the dialog delivered by British actor Tom Hardy (in the role of the character Bane) so hard to understand (partially due to poor audio quality) that Hardy was asked to re-dub every single one of his lines for the final cut of the film. The original dub of Bane's voice can still be heard in clips of the 2011 prologue footage, as well as some of the film's trailers.

Hardy's line delivery in the final, dubbed cut of The Dark Knight Rises is also suspiciously similar to his line delivery in test footage for Stuart Baird's 2002 science fiction film Star Trek: Nemesis (AKA Star Trek Nemesis), in which Hardy played the character of Shinzon, a clone of Captain Jean-Luc Picard (played by fellow British actor Sir Patrick Stewart). For the final cut of Nemesis, Hardy's line delivery more closely matched that of Stewart.


Over the course of seven seasons on television and four films, Star Trek character Lt. Commander Deanna Troi (played by English-American actress Marina Sirtis) takes the helm of the USS Enterprise precisely twice (once in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations and once in the 2002 film Star Trek: Nemesis). Both times, she crashes the ship.*

*To be fair, the first time, the ship was already disabled, and Troi guided the saucer section of the Enterprise into a controlled crash-landing, and the second time, she deliberately rammed the Enterprise into the warship Scimitar on the orders of Captain Picard.


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In her early appearances as Counselor / Lt. Commander / Commander Deanna Troi, actress Marina Sirtis gave her half-alien, half-human character a unique accent based on a combination of Slavic and Middle Eastern accents. Over the course of the television series, and especially the four Star Trek: The Next Generation films, the accent managed to completely disappear, being replaced by Sirtis' normal Mid-Atlantic accent. Interestingly enough, shades of Troi's original accent reappeared in her performance as the alien Matriarch Benezia in BioWare's 2007 video game Mass Effect.


Chariots enter into the historical record at around ~2000 BCE, roughly 1500 years before riding on horseback became widespread.

The wealthiest athlete in recorded history is widely held to be the Hispano-Roman charioteer Gaius Appuleius Diocles (fl. CE 122 - CE 146), who retired at the age of 42 with a fortune of 35,863,120 brass sesterces (worth at least several hundred million modern US dollars, some estimates run to as many as 10 billion). 35.9 million sesterces was worth approximately the same as a year's supply of grain for the city of Rome, or two months' pay for the entire Roman army.


The top ten wealthiest documented athletes in modern times (including money earned outside of their sporting careers) are:

1. Ion Țiriac (1939- ), Romanian tennis and hockey player; net worth: ~2 billion USD

2. Michael Jordan (1963- ), American basketball player; net worth: ~1 billion USD

3. Michael Schumacher (1969- ), German racing driver; net worth: ~800 million USD

4. Vince McMahon (1945- ), American wrestler and wrestling promoter; net worth: ~750 million USD

5. Arnold Palmer (1929- ), American golfer; net worth: ~700 million USD

6. Floyd Mayweather Jr. (1977- ), American boxer; net worth: ~650 million USD

7. Tiger Woods (1975- ), American golfer; net worth: ~600 million USD

8. Roger Staubach (1942- ), American football player; net worth: ~600 million USD

9. Earvin “Magic” Johnson Jr. (1959- ), American basketball player; net worth: ~500 million USD

10. LeBron James (1984- ), American basketball player; net worth: ~450 million USD


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Despite the half-joking "rivalry" between Marvel Comics and DC Comics, a number of actors have appeared in movies and shows based on comics from both companies (not counting animated series--that's a whole 'nother rabbit hole to go down):

- Ben Affleck played Marvel hero Daredevil (Matt Murdock) in the 2003 film Daredevil, and DC hero Batman (Bruce Wayne) in the 2016 films Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad.

- James Marden played Marvel hero Cyclops (Scott Summers) in the X-Men films, as well as Richard White, fiancé of DC character Lois Lane in 2006's Superman Returns.

- Ryan Reynolds played DC hero Green Lantern (Hal Jordan) in the 2011 film Green Lantern, along with Marvel antihero Deadpool (Wade Wilson) in the 2009 film X-Men Origins: Wolverine and 2016's Deadpool, as well as Marvel character Hannibal King in 2004's Blade: Trinity.

- Chris Evans played two Marvel heroes: Human Torch (Johnny Storm) in two Fantastic Four films, and Captain America (Steve Rogers) in the Marvel Cinematic Universe films. Evans also starred in the 2010 film adaptation of DC's The Losers.

- Idris Elba also portrayed two Marvel characters: the Asgardian Heimdall in the Thor films, as well as the priest Moreau in the 2012 film Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance. Elba also starred with Chris Evans in DC's The Losers.

- Laurence Fishburne provided the voice of the character Silver Surfer (Norrin Radd) in the 2007 film Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (alongside Chris Evans), and has portrayed DC character Perry White in the two most recent Superman films (including alongside Ben Affleck in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice).

- Natalie Portman starred as Evey in the 2006 film V For Vendetta (based on the DC title), as well as starring as Marvel character Jane Foster in the Thor films (with Idris Elba).

- Hugo Weaving also starred in V For Vendetta as the eponymous V, as well as portraying Marvel villain Red Skull (Johann Schmidt) in 2011's Captain America: The First Avenger, which starred Chris Evans in the title role.

- Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje portrayed both Marvel villain Kurse in 2013's Thor: The Dark World and DC villain Killer Croc in 2016's Suicide Squad.

- Michael Fassbender played the young version of actor Ian McKellen's character Magneto (Erik Lensherr) in Marvel's X-Men films, as well as the villain Burke in DC's 2010 film Jonah Hex.

- Josh Brolin also starred in Jonah Hex as the titular character, and also provides the voice of Marvel villain Thanos in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

- Djimon Honsou portrayed the character Papa Midnite in the 2005 film Constantine and Marvel villain Korath the Pursuer in 2014's Guardians of the Galaxy.

- Tao Okamoto played Marvel character Mariko Yashida, love interest of Wolverine in the 2013 film The Wolverine, and also portrays the personal assistant to DC villain Lex Luthor in 2016's Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (alongside Ben Affleck and Laurence Fishburne).

- Ned Beatty played DC villain Lex Luthor's henchman Otis in the first two Superman films, and also played reporter Sam Kolawetz in the 1990 Marvel film Captain America.

- Tim Robbins played the scientist Phil Blumbertt in the 1986 Marvel film Howard the Duck, and also US Senator Robert Hammond in 2011's Green Lantern (with Ryan Reynolds).

- Morena Baccarin portrays DC character Dr. Leslie Tompkins on the TV series Gotham, as well as playing Wade Wilson's love interest, Vanessa Carlysle, in the 2016 Marvel film Deadpool.

- Tommy Lee Jones played DC villain Two-Face (Harvey Dent) in 1995's Batman Forever and Marvel character Col. Chester Phillips in 2011's Captain America: The First Avenger (also starring Chris Evans and Hugo Weaving).


I will never forgive Ryan Reynolds for what he has done. Ever.


Oh, come on. Two Guys and a Girl wasn't that bad, and Fillian didn't even join until the second season (which was still years before he joined the Tainted by Whedon list).

{dresses Freehold voodoo doll in a Captain Hammer cosplay}


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Freehold DM wrote:
I will never forgive Ryan Reynolds for what he has done. Ever.

Hey, man, National Lampoon's Van Wilder was a great movie...


The @ ("at symbol"), most commonly used as a component of e-mail addresses, was originally originally an accounting and commercial invoice abbreviation meaning "at a rate of." @ was first included on typewriter keyboards in the late 1880s, and became widely used on keyboards after its inclusion on the very successful 1900 Underwood Model No. 5.

There are several theories about the origin of the commercial at character. One theory is that the symbol developed as a mercantile shorthand symbol of "each at"—the symbol resembling a small "a" inside a small "e"—to distinguish it from the different "at" (symbolized by the mere letter "a") or "per." Another theory is that medieval monks abbreviated the Latin word "ad" (at, toward, by, about) next to a numeral. A theory concerning this graphic puts forward the idea that the form derives from the older form of lower case d : ∂, which persists as the partial derivative symbol. Yet another theory is that it derives from the Norman French "à" meaning "at" in the "each" sense.

Whatever the origin of @, the history of its usage is more well-known: it has long been used in Spanish and Portuguese as an abbreviation of "arroba," a unit of weight equivalent to 25 pounds, and derived from the Arabic expression of "a quarter" (الربع pronounced ar-rubʿ). An Italian academic claims to have traced @ to a 16th century mercantile document sent by Florentine Francesco Lapi from Seville to Rome on May 4, 1536. The document is about commerce with Pizarro, in particular the price of an @ of wine in Peru. In Italian, the symbol was interpreted to mean "amphora" (anfora). Currently, the word "arroba" means both the at-symbol and a unit of weight. In Italian, the symbol represents one amphora, a unit of weight and volume based upon the capacity of the standard amphora jar, and entered modern meaning and use as "at the rate of" or "at price of" in northern Europe.

Until now the first historical document containing a symbol resembling the @ as a commercial one is the Spanish "Taula de Ariza", a registry to denote a wheat shipment from Castile to Aragon in 1448. Even though the oldest fully developed modern @ sign is the one found on the above-mentioned Florentine letter.

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