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The modern English word "Earth" developed from a wide variety of Middle English forms, which derived from an Old English noun most often spelled eorðe. It has cognates in every Germanic language, and their proto-Germanic root has been reconstructed as *erþō. In its earliest appearances, eorðe was already being used to translate the many senses of Latin terra and Greek γῆ (): the ground, its soil, dry land, the human world, the surface of the world (including the sea), and the globe itself. As with Terra and Gaia, Earth was a personified goddess in Germanic paganism: the Angles were listed by Tacitus as among the devotees of Nerthus, and later Norse mythology included Jörð, a giantess often given as the mother of Thor.

Scarab Sages

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Kazuka wrote:

Magic in DnD is described as Vancian, yet actually works via a very different method than magic in the Vance novels; in the Vance novels, people were effectively charging themselves with magical energy that was set to go off. So the limit on spells wasn't a limit on how many you could remember, but on how much energy your body could store without killing you.

Huh. A justification for (at least partially) Constitution-based magic.

David M Mallon wrote:

"I will remove these restraints and leave the cell with the door open. ...and I'll drop my weapon."

Is it just me, or does it sound like he Americanized his accent for some reason?


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David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
"I will remove these restraints and leave the cell with the door open. ...and I'll drop my weapon."
Is it just me, or does it sound like he Americanized his accent for some reason?

Probably the same inexplicable reason that John Boyega did the film with an American accent (admittedly, he did quite a good job, unlike Craig).


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Top singer-songwriter Gil Scott-Heron's dad was the first black man ever to play for Scottish soccer/football club Celtic FC.


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In 2011, a German TV news program reporting on the killing of Osama bin Laden used a graphic of what they thought was the logo of United States counter-terrorism unit SEAL Team Six (United States Naval Special Warfare Development Group). Unfortunately, careless Googlers at the station used the logo of the Star Trek fan group Maquis Forces International SEAL Team VI instead. The logo in question includes a type II phaser pistol, a Klingon skull, and three Klingon bat'leth swords.


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When American football player Brett Favre was traded from the Green Bay Packers to the New York Jets in 2008, numerous media reports made comments about Favre "wearing a different shade of green." The Packers and Jets use the exact same shade of green (Pantone 5535).


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Upon the release of director Jon Favreau's 2008 film Iron Man, several news outlets referred to protagonist Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) as "Tony Spark." In addition, Metro.se accidentally swapped the name of Robert Downey Jr. with that of poet Robert Frost. Finally, Freeview.co.uk described the film as starring "Robert Downey Jr. as billionaire playboy Robert Stack."


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Though often confused -even by some medical institutions and universities-, the Caduceus Staff (the one with two snakes twisting around a stick) and the Rod of Asclepius (the one with a single snake) are different symbols with different meanings.

The former represents Hermes, Greek god of trade, messages, and a bunch of other things, and is properly used in economic-related institutions, while the second represents Asclepius, Greek god of medicine, which is the one doctors ought to employ.


David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

Bush was subsequently re-elected for a second term with a popular majority.

That's a lie; read Fooled Again by Mark Crispin Miller.
Granted, Miller also believes that Bush orchestrated the 9/11 terrorist attacks, so I'd take that with a king-sized brick of salt. I doubt Bush could successfully have orchestrated a weekend barbecue, much less a massive government conspiracy.

I don't think the book gives Bush the leadership role. Rather the organising blocs behind the Republican National Convention, the same kind of conspiracy that got William McKinley elected and thought that making Teddy Roosevelt his VP would shut the latter up.


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

Bush was subsequently re-elected for a second term with a popular majority.

That's a lie; read Fooled Again by Mark Crispin Miller.
Granted, Miller also believes that Bush orchestrated the 9/11 terrorist attacks, so I'd take that with a king-sized brick of salt. I doubt Bush could successfully have orchestrated a weekend barbecue, much less a massive government conspiracy.
I don't think the book gives Bush the leadership role. Rather the organising blocs behind the Republican National Convention, the same kind of conspiracy that got William McKinley elected and thought that making Teddy Roosevelt his VP would shut the latter up.

I believe we'd all agreed to drop that particular conversation thread on an earlier page. Not saying anyone's right or wrong, but I don't want this thread getting locked due to inevitable political bickering.


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Though the title was correctly spelled in English language versions, as well as on the poster and (later) VHS box cover, numerous English language film reviews (and subsequent film database entries) of the 1989 Toho kaiju film Godzilla vs. Biollante (AKA Gojira vs. Biollante) listed the title as Godzilla vs. Bioranch. No explanation was ever given.

Scarab Sages

David M Mallon wrote:

I believe we'd all agreed to drop that particular conversation thread on an earlier page. Not saying anyone's right or wrong, but I don't want this thread getting locked due to inevitable political bickering.

Makes me wonder how much good this thread is if we can't agree on facts. Election fraud isn't a "conspiracy theory;" it can be verified - and if one source is seen as dubious (for reasons that don't actually prove them wrong about a different topic), it isn't alone.

David M Mallon wrote:


Though the title was correctly spelled in English language versions, as well as on the poster and (later) VHS box cover, numerous English language film reviews (and subsequent film database entries) of the 1989 Toho kaiju film Godzilla vs. Biollante (AKA Gojira vs. Biollante) listed the title as Godzilla vs. Bioranch. No explanation was ever given.

Maybe they thought American audiences would find the Special Guest Monster more understandable if it were some sort of salad dressing?


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

I believe we'd all agreed to drop that particular conversation thread on an earlier page. Not saying anyone's right or wrong, but I don't want this thread getting locked due to inevitable political bickering.

Makes me wonder how much good this thread is if we can't agree on facts. Election fraud isn't a "conspiracy theory;" it can be verified - and if one source is seen as dubious (for reasons that don't actually prove them wrong about a different topic), it isn't alone.

Like I said, I don't care. Stop.

This is supposed to be a fun thread, not a soapbox. If you want to discuss politics, go right ahead, but do it somewhere else.

Silver Crusade

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Several clustered streets in suburban San Luis Obispo, CA are named after relatives of the city planners. Two (Donna Way and Patricia Drive) are named after my relatives.

Scarab Sages

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Anyone with an interest in octopuses knows they're all inherently bizarre - but the "Larger Pacific Striped Octopus" takes bizarre to a whole other level.


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The first appearance of the word "nerd" in the English lexicon is in the 1950 children's book If I Ran The Zoo, by Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel, appearing in the following passage:

And then, just to show them, I'll sail to Ka-Troo
And Bring Back an It-Kutch, a Preep, and a Proo,
A Nerkle, a Nerd, and a Seersucker too!

The word's first use in its modern context* dates to the following year (1951), in which Newsweek magazine reported on its popular use as a synonym for "drip" or "square" in Detroit, Michigan.

* nerd [nurd] noun, Slang.
1. a person considered to be socially awkward, boring, unstylish, etc.
2. an intelligent but single-minded person obsessed with a nonsocial hobby or pursuit: a computer nerd.


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To this day, anyone sworn in to any state office, county office, or judgeship in the US state of Kentucky must declare under oath that he has not participated in, acted as a second, or otherwise assisted in a duel.


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"Blinkenlights" is a hacker's neologism for diagnostic lights found on the front panels of old mainframe computers, minicomputers, many early microcomputers, and modern network hardware.

The online slang dictionary The Jargon File provides the following etymology:

This term derives from the last word of the famous blackletter-Gothic sign in mangled mock German that once graced about half the computer rooms in the English-speaking world. One version ran in its entirety as follows:

ACHTUNG!
ALLES TURISTEN UND NONTEKNISCHEN LOOKENPEEPERS!
DAS KOMPUTERMASCHINE IST NICHT FÜR DER GEFINGERPOKEN UND MITTENGRABEN! ODERWISE IST EASY TO SCHNAPPEN DER SPRINGENWERK, BLOWENFUSEN UND POPPENCORKEN MIT SPITZENSPARKEN.
IST NICHT FÜR GEWERKEN BEI DUMMKOPFEN. DER RUBBERNECKEN SIGHTSEEREN KEEPEN DAS COTTONPICKEN HÄNDER IN DAS POCKETS MUSS.
ZO RELAXEN UND WATSCHEN DER BLINKENLICHTEN.

This silliness dates back to least as far as 1955 at IBM and had already gone international by the early 1960s, when it was reported at the University of London's ATLAS computing site. There are several variants of it in circulation, some of which actually do end with the word "blinkenlights."

The Jargon File also mentions that German hackers have developed their own versions of the blinkenlights poster, in fractured English:

ATTENTION
This room is fullfilled mit special electronische equippment.
Fingergrabbing and pressing the cnoeppkes from the computers is allowed for die experts only!
So all the “lefthanders” stay away and do not disturben the brainstorming von here working intelligencies.
Otherwise you will be out thrown and kicked anderswhere!
Also: please keep still and only watchen astaunished the blinkenlights.

Liberty's Edge

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From the glossary in a Hewlett-Packard computer manual:
Endless Loop: see Infinite Loop
Infinite Loop
: see Endless Loop
Recursion
: see Recursion


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David M Mallon wrote:
On a 1999 episode of TV series 3rd Rock From The Sun entitled "Dick's Big Giant Headache, part 1," series protagonist Dick Solomon (John Lithgow) meets the character Big Giant Head (William Shatner) at the airport. During the scene, Big Giant Head mentions "seeing something on the wing of the plane," to which Dick replies, "the same thing happened to me!" This is a reference to the fact that both Shatner and Lithgow played variations on the same character in the 1963 Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet," and the "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet" segment of the 1983 film The Twilight Zone: The Movie, respectively.

Similar fanservice in-joke in the pilot eposide of the 1980s Buck Rogers TV show -- Gil Gerard, playing the main character who has been frozen for 500 years, meets an old-time pilot who makes some comment about comparative ages; they go back and forth a bit. The old-timer was played by Buster Crabbe, who portrayed Buck Rogers in the late '30s.


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Kazuka wrote:
in the Vance novels, people were effectively charging themselves with magical energy that was set to go off. So the limit on spells wasn't a limit on how many you could remember, but on how much energy your body could store without killing you.

You clearly have never read The Dying Earth. Let's please not just make up the "facts" that go in this thread out of whole cloth.


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The words "Winter is Coming" don't actually appear in any of George R.R. Martin's novels. They were invented by HBO as a catchy tag phrase for the TV series.

Spoiler:
This "fact" is totally bogus, of course.


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David M Mallon wrote:
To this day, anyone sworn in to any state office, county office, or judgeship in the US state of Kentucky must declare under oath that he has not participated in, acted as a second, or otherwise assisted in a duel.

The reason Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr had their famous duel in Wehauken New Jersey was that such things had already been outlawed in New York.

Liberty's Edge

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David M Mallon wrote:
On a 1999 episode of TV series 3rd Rock From The Sun entitled "Dick's Big Giant Headache, part 1," series protagonist Dick Solomon (John Lithgow) meets the character Big Giant Head (William Shatner) at the airport. During the scene, Big Giant Head mentions "seeing something on the wing of the plane," to which Dick replies, "the same thing happened to me!" This is a reference to the fact that both Shatner and Lithgow played variations on the same character in the 1963 Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet," and the "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet" segment of the 1983 film The Twilight Zone: The Movie, respectively.

That's about all I ever saw of Third Rock from the Sun. I really wanted to like that show; what could be better than a combination of science fiction, comedy, John Lithgow and Jane Curtain? But I just didn't like it.


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Once upon a time, Nick Nolte looked like this.

Also, in 1972, Nolte appeared in a Clairol advertisement alongside a 22-year-old Sigourney Weaver. How's that for an odd image.


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The common idiom "lock and load" originated in American English, supposedly as an instructional command to prepare an M1 Garand, the main rifle used during World War II, for battle, though it is disputed if the phrase was actually used this early. The first documented use of the phrase "lock and load" was a line of dialog uttered by John Stryker (John Wayne) in the 1949 war film Sands of Iwo Jima.

The most likely theory of the origin of the phrase connects this order to the operation of the M1 Garand rifle. Before loading the ammunition clip into the rifle, the operating rod handle is pulled to the rear until the bolt is securely locked open. According to the M1 Garand Manual, loading the clip without first locking the bolt could result in an accidental discharge of a round.

An alternate theory involves the transposition of "load and lock" - to load the ammunition clip into the rifle, then to lock the bolt forward (which forces a round into the chamber, readying a rifle for firing). This order is notably featured in the 2010 HBO miniseries The Pacific.


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The word "Japan" is an exonym, and is used (in one form or another) by a large number of languages. The Japanese names for Japan are Nippon (にっぽん) and Nihon (にほん). They are both written in Japanese using the kanji 日本.

The English word "Japan" has a circuitous derivation; but linguists believe it derives in part from the Portuguese recording of the early Mandarin Chinese or Wu Chinese word for Japan: "Cipan" (日本), which is rendered in pinyin as "Rìběn," and literally translates to "sun origin".

Liberty's Edge

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Many believe that the phrase "the whole nine yards" derives from the length of ammunition belts on early fighter planes. But the phrase appeared in print as early as 1907. The exact origin of the expression remains a mystery.


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A new set of Starfleet uniforms was intended to be introduced in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations, to be worn by the Enterprise-D crew. These new uniforms would have been similar to the television ones, except the collars would have been the same department color as the rest of the tunic and the rank pips would have been worn on the shoulder with a corresponding rank braid on the wrists. The uniforms were eventually nixed by producer Rick Berman.

The decision was then made to use both the uniforms from Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) as well as the uniforms from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993). However, toy company Playmates had already made an action figure line for the film with the Enterprise-D crew wearing the aborted uniforms. It was too late to retract the figures, which is the only place the aborted uniforms can be seen.

Patrick Stewart and Brent Spiner were the only cast members to have custom "color-top" uniforms (as used in seasons 1-5 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and later on in Star Trek: Voyager (1995)) made for use in the film. Jonathan Frakes had to borrow Avery Brooks' uniform and LeVar Burton had to borrow Colm Meaney's uniform from Deep Space Nine (Meaney having also appeared on The Next Generation), neither of which fit the actors very well (Frakes had to roll up the sleeves and Burton's was obviously too big for him).


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Star Trek's Starship Enterprise (in its various incarnations) has had ten captains featured in onscreen appearances (not counting alternate timelines or former captains):

- Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula); Enterprise NX-01; Star Trek: Enterprise
- Christopher Pike (Jeffrey Hunter); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek: the Original Series (pilot episode)
- James Kirk (William Shatner); Enterprise NCC-1701 and NCC-1701-A; Star Trek: the Original Series, Star Trek film series
- Willard Decker (Stephen Collins); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek film series
- Spock (Leonard Nimoy); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek film series
- John Harriman (Alan Ruck); Enterprise NCC-1701-B; Star Trek film series
- Rachel Garrett (Tricia O'Neil); Enterprise NCC-1701-C; Star Trek: The Next Generation
- Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart); Enterprise NCC-1701-D and NCC-1701-E; Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek film series
- William Riker (Jonathan Frakes); Enterprise NCC-1701-D; Star Trek: The Next Generation
- Edward Jellico (Ronny Cox); Enterprise NCC-1701-D; Star Trek: The Next Generation


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American professional wrestler, martial artist, and actor Dave Bautista (Guardians Of The Galaxy, Spectre) is an avid collector of vintage metal lunchboxes, with over a hundred in his possession. After the filming of Guardians Of The Galaxy wrapped, director James Gunn presented Bautista with a custom-made one-of-a-kind Drax the Destroyer lunchbox.


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David M Mallon wrote:

A new set of Starfleet uniforms was intended to be introduced in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations, to be worn by the Enterprise-D crew. These new uniforms would have been similar to the television ones, except the collars would have been the same department color as the rest of the tunic and the rank pips would have been worn on the shoulder with a corresponding rank braid on the wrists. The uniforms were eventually nixed by producer Rick Berman.

The decision was then made to use both the uniforms from Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) as well as the uniforms from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993). However, toy company Playmates had already made an action figure line for the film with the Enterprise-D crew wearing the aborted uniforms. It was too late to retract the figures, which is the only place the aborted uniforms can be seen.

Patrick Stewart and Brent Spiner were the only cast members to have custom "color-top" uniforms (as used in seasons 1-5 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and later on in Star Trek: Voyager (1995)) made for use in the film. Jonathan Frakes had to borrow Avery Brooks' uniform and LeVar Burton had to borrow Colm Meaney's uniform from Deep Space Nine (Meaney having also appeared on The Next Generation), neither of which fit the actors very well (Frakes had to roll up the sleeves and Burton's was obviously too big for him).

COOOOOOOOOOL


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Freehold DM wrote:
Daved M Mallon wrote:
A new set of Starfleet uniforms was intended to be introduced in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations...
COOOOOOOOOOL

For the record, Star Trek is the poster child of nerd subculture. It could therefore be considered the very antithesis of "cool."


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Kung Fu Joe wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Daved M Mallon wrote:
A new set of Starfleet uniforms was intended to be introduced in the 1994 film Star Trek Generations...
COOOOOOOOOOL
For the record, Star Trek is the poster child of nerd subculture. It could therefore be considered the very antithesis of "cool."

Damn, beat me to the response...


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David M Mallon wrote:

Star Trek's Starship Enterprise (in its various incarnations) has had ten captains featured in onscreen appearances (not counting alternate timelines or former captains):

- Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula); Enterprise NX-01; Star Trek: Enterprise
- Christopher Pike (Jeffrey Hunter); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek: the Original Series (pilot episode)
- James Kirk (William Shatner); Enterprise NCC-1701 and NCC-1701-A; Star Trek: the Original Series, Star Trek film series
- Willard Decker (Stephen Collins); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek film series
- Spock (Leonard Nimoy); Enterprise NCC-1701; Star Trek film series
- John Harriman (Alan Ruck); Enterprise NCC-1701-B; Star Trek film series
- Rachel Garrett (Tricia O'Neil); Enterprise NCC-1701-C; Star Trek: The Next Generation
- Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart); Enterprise NCC-1701-D and NCC-1701-E; Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek film series
- William Riker (Jonathan Frakes); Enterprise NCC-1701-D; Star Trek: The Next Generation
- Edward Jellico (Ronny Cox); Enterprise NCC-1701-D; Star Trek: The Next Generation

You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".

I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.

The only person who'd really disagree is safely dead.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.
The only person who'd really disagree is safely dead.

?


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Rysky wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.
The only person who'd really disagree is safely dead.
?

The only person who ever said that TAS was not canon was Gene Roddenberry. But like many of his positions, he wasn't always consistent on it. Various authors have given homage to TAS. Robert April even appeared as a character in Star Trek: Into Darkness.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.
The only person who'd really disagree is safely dead.
?
The only person who ever said that TAS was not canon was Gene Roddenberry. But like many of his positions, he wasn't always consistent on it. Various authors have given homage to TAS. Robert April even appeared as a character in Star Trek: Into Darkness.

Ah, k.


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".

Wasn't he a commodore by the time he appeared on TAS?


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David M Mallon wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
Wasn't he a commodore by the time he appeared on TAS?

I believe he was. I'd have to watch the episode again. It's on Netflix so I might do that later.


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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.
The only person who'd really disagree is safely dead.
?
The only person who ever said that TAS was not canon was Gene Roddenberry. But like many of his positions, he wasn't always consistent on it. Various authors have given homage to TAS. Robert April even appeared as a character in Star Trek: Into Darkness.

He was in the comic book series, Star Trek: Countdown to Darkness, but not in the movie Star Trek: Into Darkness.

Liberty's Edge

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David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
007 James Bond actor Daniel Craig is a huge science fiction fan, in particular the television series Firefly, Doctor Who, and especially Star Trek. A self-described "old-hand Trekkie," Craig auditioned for the role of Montgomery "Scotty" Scott in director J.J. Abrams' 2009 Star Trek film reboot, but lost out to Hot Fuzz actor Simon Pegg.
the latter allows me to forgive the former.

Craig is also a fan of the Star Wars films, and after pleading with J.J. Abrams, got to portray an unnamed First Order stormtrooper (a fairly extensive cameo, but uncredited) in 2015's Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens.

"I will remove these restraints and leave the cell with the door open. ...and I'll drop my weapon."

I have heard that his Storm Trooper ID is JB007, but I cannot verify that.


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Theconiel wrote:
I have heard that his Storm Trooper ID is JB007, but I cannot verify that.

That was a fan nickname (and a good one at that), but in the game LEGO Star Wars: The Force Awakens, his name is listed as FN-1824. Writer Pablo Hidalgo later confirmed that all names provided by the game for previously unnamed characters were considered canon.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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Kirth Gersen wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
On a 1999 episode of TV series 3rd Rock From The Sun entitled "Dick's Big Giant Headache, part 1," series protagonist Dick Solomon (John Lithgow) meets the character Big Giant Head (William Shatner) at the airport. During the scene, Big Giant Head mentions "seeing something on the wing of the plane," to which Dick replies, "the same thing happened to me!" This is a reference to the fact that both Shatner and Lithgow played variations on the same character in the 1963 Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet," and the "Nightmare At 20,000 Feet" segment of the 1983 film The Twilight Zone: The Movie, respectively.
Similar fanservice in-joke in the pilot eposide of the 1980s Buck Rogers TV show -- Gil Gerard, playing the main character who has been frozen for 500 years, meets an old-time pilot who makes some comment about comparative ages; they go back and forth a bit. The old-timer was played by Buster Crabbe, who portrayed Buck Rogers in the late '30s.

I didn't know that. I'll have to go back and watch BRit25C again. Buster Crabbe also played Flash Gordon, a character who primarily existed because Alex Raymond was such a fan of Buck Rogers.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
You forgot Robert April, voiced by James Doohan, NCC-1701's first captain, who preceded Pike, as shown in the TAS episode "The Counter-Clock Incident".
I thought about him, too. But I'm not sure ST:TAS is considered canon.
The only person who'd really disagree is safely dead.
?
The only person who ever said that TAS was not canon was Gene Roddenberry. But like many of his positions, he wasn't always consistent on it. Various authors have given homage to TAS. Robert April even appeared as a character in Star Trek: Into Darkness.

The T in James T. Kirk standing for Tiberius was from the animated series. As is a precursor to the holodeck, just called the Rec Room.

Dark Archive

Simon Pegg, if I'm not mistaken, had a hand in writing the newest Star Trek movie: Into Darkness. I believe.


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NenkotaMoon wrote:
Simon Pegg, if I'm not mistaken, had a hand in writing the newest Star Trek movie: Into Darkness. I believe.

Simon Pegg was co-writer (with Doug Jung) of the screenplay for Star Trek Beyond (2016). He also served as creative consultant for J.J. Abrams' Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens (2015).

Dark Archive

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David M Mallon wrote:
NenkotaMoon wrote:
Simon Pegg, if I'm not mistaken, had a hand in writing the newest Star Trek movie: Into Darkness. I believe.
Simon Pegg was co-writer (with Doug Jung) of the screenplay for Star Trek Beyond (2016). He also served as creative consultant for J.J. Abrams' Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens (2015).

Good on him and fantastic work. The new Star Wars was excellent and The Trek movie that came out I'm hear some nice thing about.

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