Skull

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Organized Play Member. 585 posts (686 including aliases). No reviews. No lists. No wishlists. 15 Organized Play characters. 5 aliases.


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Ive always wanted to do a Swashbuckler character in 1e as a Dwarf with Picks. Never got around to it. I like most things dwarf, and turning the tables on a finesse style character with a dwarf and picks felt like an awesome idea :)

Glad someone is doing it ^_^


Pretty much what everyone is saying.

If your shield has hardness 5. And the enemy is doing 6 damage to you when you use the block reaction. 5 of the damage is mitigated by the hardness of the shield. You and the shield each takes 1 damage.


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Matthew Downie wrote:
Because (a) the game is more fun when the one nimble little halfling in the party doesn't force everyone to move at a slower pace so as not to leave them behind, and (b) why not?

Except in the case of (a)

- Dwarves are the only race(ancestry) to move at 20 feet.

And yes, they do get an ancestry feat to help with this. But now they have to spend a feat to not get slowed by heavy armour, just so they wont fall behind everyone else.

It's a problem I've had with the dwarves since the 1st playtest was released.


Dr. Zerom Brandercook wrote:
You know, I think it is totally bizarre. I may just remove both the flexible and the noisy traits from both armors and call it a day. This satisfies me, but hopefully there aren't any other rules repercussions I am missing.

I was also looking for the actual penalty "noisy" gives, but after reading your post: I think I get what they might have gone for:

Flexible - you don't apply the armour check penalty to Acrobatics and Athletics.

Noisy - Apply armour check penalty to stealth, even if you have enough strength to negate it.

Thoughts?


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sherlock1701 wrote:
Pit Wizard wrote:
I asked the same question earlier. As written, it's not totally useless but it doesn't seem to be a very good use of your money. Adamantine shields, on the other hand, would be very useful.

The Sturdy enchantment for shields is cheaper and stronger than Adamantine, and comes online earlier (compare 7th-level Sturdy to 8th-level Adamantine, and 13th-level Sturdy to 16th-level Adamantine). It's also not Invested, so doesn't count against your 10-item limit.

Only advantages of an adamantine shield would be in an anti-magic field, which you will hardly ever encounter due to rarity. Overall, adamantine doesn't seem too useful for defense.

Wouldn't you be able to make a Sturdy Adamantine shield?


Gorignak227 wrote:
Skull wrote:

Secondly Dwarven Weapon Familiarity (the initial feat in the chain) has this flavour text:

Archives of Nethys wrote:
Your kin have instilled in you an affinity for hard-hitting weapons, and you prefer these to more elegant arms. You are trained with the battle axe, pick, and warhammer.

So it looks like Dwarves favour big heavy weapons. Which I totally agree with.

So it wouldn't make sense for the follow up feats to help with the light versions of their beloved weapons.

Big heavy weapons you say?

What would your RAI ruling be about the Greatpick?

Sadly the same. They seem to like heavy one handed weapons. Anything 'Agile' has other bonuses that apply to them, smaller multi attack penalty etc. So having bonuses for some flavourful non 'agile' weapons makes sense.

I have to add that if it was me, id include Greataxe, Maul and Greatpick for the critical specialization affects. Just not swords :P (an easy change for most GMs)


Awesome. This was what I was missing. An easy breakdown to compare proficiency. :)

While making my character for the Sunday game, I had to keep jumping between tabs and try and keep track of things.


Kaine573 wrote:
Skull wrote:

I don't think it would apply.

Firstly because I've never thought of the light hammer being a mini version of a warhammer. Same with picks, but I can see where you are coming from.

Secondly Dwarven Weapon Familiarity (the initial feat in the chain) has this flavour text:

Archives of Nethys wrote:
Your kin have instilled in you an affinity for hard-hitting weapons, and you prefer these to more elegant arms. You are trained with the battle axe, pick, and warhammer.

So it looks like Dwarves favour big heavy weapons. Which I totally agree with.

So it wouldn't make sense for the follow up feats to help with the light versions of their beloved weapons.

Yes, I can see your reasoning and re-reading the prereq. feat; it makes sense.

Thank you for your input!

have a great one!

Cool. Always a pleasure to help a fellow Dwarf player :)

Have a good two!


Good catch.

I also found it funny that monks start as trained in unarmed, but fighters start as expert in unarmed.


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I don't think it would apply.

Firstly because I've never thought of the light hammer being a mini version of a warhammer. Same with picks, but I can see where you are coming from.

Secondly Dwarven Weapon Familiarity (the initial feat in the chain) has this flavour text:

Archives of Nethys wrote:
Your kin have instilled in you an affinity for hard-hitting weapons, and you prefer these to more elegant arms. You are trained with the battle axe, pick, and warhammer.

So it looks like Dwarves favour big heavy weapons. Which I totally agree with.

So it wouldn't make sense for the follow up feats to help with the light versions of their beloved weapons.


Eltacolibre wrote:
Skull wrote:

Had my 1st session in an Age of Ashes game yesterday. I went fighter for some "shield shenanigans".

It was a lot of fun. My shield only took damage from one attack. I completely blocked 3 or 4 attacks.

It took 5 damage. But for the life of me I cannot find the repair DC for a steel shield. It's probably in the manual, but I cannot find it on Archives of Nethys.

I got to 15 on me repair check, which I assume is enough, but I want to know the DC :)

It depends on what kind of shield and your proficiency in crafting:

p. 277 lists all the shields and their HP and BT.

A Buckler has 6 HP while a steel shield has 20 HP for example.

All shields have no items levels listed, making them Level 0 items.

p. 503 lists dcs by level , a level 0 item has a dc of 14 by default without any other adjustments (going to assume your GM didn't consider the task worth adding modifiers)

You roll the repair roll, got dc 15, which is a normal success.

If you are untrained in crafting, you would restore 5 hp for the 10 minutes you spent repairing the shield. The number of hp repaired increases depending on your proficiency, if you are trained, you would restore 10 hp to the shield.

But yeah you did succeed in repairing the shield even if you were untrained.

Thanks for the detailed reply.

I already knew the rest. I also left out that I am trained in craft with Speciality Crafting Blacksmithing (Just realised I didnt add the +1 from this feat so I actually got to 16) :)

There were no special penalties for the check. We were some place safe and secure, and had plenty of time to do the repairs. I am going to be focusing on the Craft skill and looking forward to crafting my own items later.


Alex319 wrote:
The repair DC of an item is the same as the DC to craft it. A steel shield is a level 0 common item, so the repair DC is 14 (on the DC by level table)

Thanks!

I knew the craft and repair DC is the same, but both only list "GM's call" on the site.


Had my 1st session in an Age of Ashes game yesterday. I went fighter for some "shield shenanigans".

It was a lot of fun. My shield only took damage from one attack. I completely blocked 3 or 4 attacks.

It took 5 damage. But for the life of me I cannot find the repair DC for a steel shield. It's probably in the manual, but I cannot find it on Archives of Nethys.

I got to 15 on me repair check, which I assume is enough, but I want to know the DC :)


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It works the same as old Toughness, which is fine.

1hp per level. I think it's great on anyone.

The only difference between PF1 and 2 toughness, is it use to start you out on 3hp, and then +1 for every level after 3rd.


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Just some feedback after our 1st 2e session. It felt a lot better than the playtest ever did. I cannot pinpoint anything specific, but a lot of nice changes. It felt smoother as well.

So good job, looking forward to the next session.


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I was very skeptical, and negative after playing 2 playtest games.

However, we are starting an Age of Ashes game later today. And I literally spent most of yesterday jumping around on the Archives of Nethys page, comparing classes and having a hard time to pick.

The cleric page was a bit confusing, as it didn't explain the "Cleric Focus Powers" section, but a friend who has the PDF could easily steer me to the correct answers.

Ended up rolling a Fighter, because Ive never been a fan of casters. I really like how a lot of it has turned out. Only actual play will let me decide if I like it better.

I also watched some review/reveal clips on youtube. One of which was almost 2 and a half hours... So yeah, I am exited to give it a go.


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Awesome!

This looks good!

We are starting a Age of Ashes game later today, and I will be using this sheet :)


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I think when rolling for stats. The best option is if everyone rolls one set, and this set is open to the table. Anyone can use an array that was rolled. This will help make it a little easier to get a fair stat array per player.

GM should still be free to disallow really low or high stat array. :)


Wow, those are bismal stats. But I would also not roll with the second set.

If I rolled those I would make a Halfling Bard, and stand back and do a more support roll.

Bard stats id go:
7/5
10/12
10
7
10
10/12

Use a halfling sling, and sing.


Voss wrote:
Richard Crawford wrote:
NikkEatsRocks wrote:
I just think it sucks that we're never going to have any real nation in the inner sea region that isnt human centric because halflings are okay with being humanity's butlers, gnomes suffer from magical dementia that apparently small country life is sufficient enough to stave off but nation building or anything larger than a village can't and because goblins are now being portrayed simultaneously as everyone's best friend/comic relief AND vermin scourge that must be eradicated.
Everyone forgets Kyonin and the Five Kings Mountains. And to a lesser extent Belkzin and the worldwound.
With good reason. Golarion is relentlessly human centric, and the other races are either slaves (halflings), idiots and cowards (elves), irrelevant (gnomes and dwarves) or monsters (orcs and goblins).

I wouldn't really call Dwarves irrelevant, but after some thought: They do not feature a lot.

Bonus points for calling Elves cowards and Goblins monsters. :)


I'm going to miss dwarven movement speed.

As it stands now, 10ft movement in Full Plate, because I want to still resemble a dwarf as much as possible.


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LordVanya wrote:
David knott 242 wrote:
LordVanya wrote:
NikkEatsRocks wrote:
...2E is set further in the timeline ...

Not as far I know, it isn't.

Personally, I think they should set the 2e timeline to 100 to 200 years later and swap out the signature characters for their descendants.
That way the major differences in the game system can be chalked up to 'this is how things are done now'.

Paizo advanced the timeline by about 10 years, from the date that PF1 was published to the expected publication date of PF2. During that time, the official story is that all PF1 adventures were completed successfully by their respective PC parties, and other changes will presumably be detailed later as needed.

Good to know, thanks.

I still think they should bump that up by at least 10 fold.

Wait, I always thought that Kingmaker takes a few decades to finish at least?


I'm sure Halflings are content to just have settlements of their own. I don't think they care too much to establish their own country.

I've never been able to get my head behind Gnomes.

As for Goblins...

I suspect there is a whole sect of Torag Paladins who made it their personal mission to make sure Goblins do not have a large settlement of their own.

Dwarves after my own heart :)

Sadly, Goblinoids are no longer listed under the Dwarves' listed enemies.


I like the fire resistance idea, but not the flavour behind it.

Sure, there would be dwarves in the desert, those poor fools are also cleanly shaven (I remember reading something along those lines for Dwarven monks in some desert).

But why would they have heat resistance where others don't? Id rather say it comes from years of working in the forges, being stubborn dwarves, I'm sure they just get used to the heat :)

I still think the poison resistance is the option for me. I had fun failing a save, but taking reduced damage, and recovering super fast from it in one of the sessions we played. It also helps with drinking.


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Lady Melo wrote:
Crayon wrote:

I don't know, I think I'd prefer if they dropped the mechanics from Ancestry all together and made it a purely aesthetic choice.

It's simpler, makes more sense, is more balanced, and presents more character options.

Pretty tough when you have races that for story reasons have innate differences, biology, or special abilities and all the NPCs have these and the PCs have no access to such things, or if NPCs also do not get it, it feels very flat and setting voiding to strip all those traits from things that did have them considering they are maintaining the same world.

Just realised that he poor NPCs all need to have these choices made too. This sounds like a lot of admin that no one asked for.

I still think all races need to have their racial abilities. Heritage and ancestry feats should be there to add extra flavourful options, or simply to advance existing abilities.


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sherlock1701 wrote:
They really should just go back to the 30 foot speed as a baseline and reinstate general maneuvers like Charge and Run.

I like this plan. 25ft was a weird number from the start. I also find it very strange that all the small races are now just as fast as humans.

Poor dwarves are the only race to move at 20ft (10 in full plate). Sure you can get a heritage feat to negate 5ft of this, but now you are a weird looking human, who can see in the dark.

Earlier I complained that playing a dwarf felt very bland, now it has been made more so.

I probably shouldn't mention Darkvision, or they will change this to a heritage feat as well.


I don't play casters much myself, but arcane casters that melee are the Magus and the Blood Rager. Bards might also qualify to some extent.

Im not a fan of the Blood Rager, as a barbarian that can cast spells even while raging sounds a bit on the "stronger than most base classes" side of the spectrum... :P


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Archimedes Mavranos wrote:
Aether Seawolf wrote:

Everyone seems to have some issue with this area of the game, and I wanted to collect all the ones I've seen and experienced in one post. The problems appear to be:

>Growing into a race is weird roleplay wise. The game assumes I'm an adult adventurer, why am I still developing core racial abilities.
>The races feel really flat and flavorless.
>General Training and Natural Ambition are so far out of the league of everything else it hurts
>Race abilities (for the most part) are situational to the point of being painful
>Low incentive for players to branch out of human

The best example I can give is that an arcane caster elf has no incentive to take two of their strongest abilities - weapon familiarity and otherworldly magic, leaving Ancestral Longevity as the good pick with little growth. The other abilities are situational or not beneficial to a build. While abilities don't all need to line up for a build (I'm personally a big fan of suboptimal play - halfing barbarian and all) it would help if there were some flavor synergy that felt good.

100% agree. Love the concept and the variation in speed and hit points, but the ancestry feats are not powerful or meaningful enough, and we need more of them to make characters unique at first level.

Compare a Pathfinder Elf to a D&D 5E Elf

Pathfinder Elf
Hit points 6
Speed 30
Low-Light Vision
1 Ancestry Feat (Otherworldly Magic grants 1 cantrip)

D&D 5E Elf
Speed 30
Darkvision 60 ft.
Keen Senses (proficiency in Perception)
Fey Ancestry (Advantage versus charm saves, can't be put to sleep)
Trance (sleep less)
Subrace (even more customization, for example, High Elf)
Elf Weapon Training
Cantrip (grants 1 cantrip)
1 Extra Language

Hands down the 5E elf is cooler. The Pathfinder 2E elf is about 5 abilities short. Customizing our elf-iness over 20 levels is a cool optimization over 5E, but more power needs to be front loaded.

If Pathfinder 2E added about 2-3 more ancestry feats at first level and made...

Wow, just checked out the 5E dwarf (1st time taking a look at it)

So ironically, PF2's playtest is pointing me to a dwarf that looks a lot more dwarfy than their own...

For those interested:
Dwarf Traits
Your dwarf character has an assortment of inborn Abilities, part and parcel of dwarven Nature.

Ability Score Increase: Your Constitution score increases by 2.

Age: Dwarves mature at the same rate as humans, but they’re considered young until they reach the age of 50. On average, they live about 350 years.

Alignment: Most Dwarves are lawful, believing firmly in the benefits of a well-ordered society. They tend toward good as well, with a strong sense of Fair Play and a belief that everyone deserves to share in the benefits of a just order.

Size: Dwarves stand between 4 and 5 feet tall and average about 150 pounds. Your size is Medium.

Speed: Your base walking speed is 25 feet. Your speed is not reduced by wearing Heavy Armor.

Darkvision: Accustomed to life underground, you have superior vision in dark and dim Conditions. You can see in dim light within 60 feet of you as if it were bright light, and in Darkness as if it were dim light. You can’t discern color in Darkness, only shades of gray.

Dwarven Resilience: You have advantage on Saving Throws against poison, and you have Resistance against poison damage.

Dwarven Combat Training: You have proficiency with the Battleaxe, Handaxe, Light Hammer, and Warhammer.

Tool Proficiency: You gain proficiency with the artisan’s tools of your choice: smith’s tools, brewer’s supplies, or mason’s tools.

Stonecunning: Whenever you make an Intelligence (History) check related to the Origin of stonework, you are considered proficient in the History skill and add double your proficiency bonus to the check, instead of your normal proficiency bonus.

Languages: You can speak, read, and write Common and Dwarvish. Dwarvish is full of hard consonants and guttural sounds, and those characteristics spill over into whatever other language a dwarf might speak.


My suggestion would be to give each character 1 ancestral feats and 1 heritage feat @ lvl1. This way the "stronger" heritage feats are still limited and you get to at least feel like your ancestry.

As a level 1 dwarf, I didn't feel like a real dwarf. I had a slower speed, darkvision and resistance to poison. I would have felt a lot better had I had Stonecunning, hatred or giantbane. This same character also played the level 9 playtest. By level 9, it looked silly to get a +1 damage to 2 types of creatures.


Was planning on adding this feat to a fighter I was brainstorming, but then picked up that it was a reaction feat. So I rolled with Hardy again.

Also, I am not a fan of the very limited "ancestry" abilities you get for free. Mechanically all that separated my dwarf from the human and even elves was darkvision, slower movement and that I resisted poison.

I suppose this is not too bad, but the ancestry felt very watered down. Id feel a lot better if you start @ lvl1 with 2 ancestry feats (obviously only one heritage; in fact, force one as a heritage feat and one other).


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Kerobelis wrote:
FireManed_Viking wrote:

So I’m not sure if I’m interpreting this correctly… But with the Giant totem you gain the Titan Mauler ability. Which allows you to use a larger weapon like last edition, and you get a bonus to your conditional damage while raging. However, you gain sluggish 1 as well which adversely affects the character.

Am I correct in my calculations?

When Raging without larger weapon:
+2 Damage, -1 AC, +Temp HP

When Raging with Lager weapon:
+3 Damage, -2 AC, +Temp HP, -1 Dex Checks, -1 Reflex Saves.

I haven’t played this character yet and I’m assuming the choice to add the Sluggish 1 to the ability is for balancing however in the end I’m only getting an addition 1 to damage when all is said and done. I feel that you could have applied the slowed condition to this ability instead leaving the rage bonuses as they were would work better thematically. You would still get the +2 dam, but only have 2 actions a round.

It doubles the rage bonus damage, so +4 damage. Where it gets confusing is some people are also adding in the large weapon change that was in a sidebar somewhere (I don't have my book on me). I do not think it gets that bonus.

Also, give back barbarians shields! I want my Viking raider.

I am also a little confused as to why Barbarians are not trained in shields. In PF1 I always went two hander, because there was a 1.5x Str mod bonus, but now I would be keen to go with a shield. Esp for an Ulfen Raider type character. I suppose I will need to roll fighter for the same feeling, but without rage.


I am also underwhelmed by the initial Ki Strike ability.

It costs 1 Spell Point, for a +1 on a single attack roll. Would it be too powerful if it applied to all attacks for the rest of the turn?

For the rest, I mostly like what they have done with the monk.


Prethen wrote:
I must be missing something obvious. Why am I seeing these Paladin builds with Celestial as a free language?

That was one of the 1st things I noticed in the builds, then I noticed that humans learn an extra language for free at 1st level


PossibleCabbage wrote:

I've also struggled with Dwarven Paladins, since you can't start with a Charisma more than 14, which locks your strength at 16 if you use your free ancestral bonus.

I guess Str 16 Dex 12 Con 14 Wis 12 Int 10 Cha 14 might be playable. Boost Str, Con, Cha, and any other thing you want at level 5 (dex 12 is sufficient for full plate, and you are a dwarf so you want the heaviest thing imaginable.)

Barring piercing being better than slashing, the Dwarven Waraxe is better than the bastard sword but I'm not sure if it is worth a feat or two, but sweep and the axe critical specialization work for "I am supposed to be standing in the middle of everybody."

I had fun with my Dwarven Paladin in a game yesterday. You should be able to get to 14 Charisma. I used my free Dwarven boost to counter the Cha flaw. Then I also boosted it with 1 of the 4 you get at the end. I used my background for Str and Con to get both to 16. I had 23 Hit points. And of course the one Lay on Hands I used I rolled a 1 on a d6, for 2 healing.

Also had fun with the poison resistance, taking 0 damage from it twice.
I rolled 1, 2, something low again, 17 and something low again on the saves.

I also helped another character get rid of their poison, because I had a healer's tools and medicine is signature and trained thanks to hospice knight.

Was good and fun all round. I am just sad that I didn't get to use Retribution Strike, the one time it might have applied, the monster missed.


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Wait... so there isnt even a "champion powers" list, you need to go through all the spells to find them?

Ouch. Guess i will make a list myself then at some point. Havent taken a look in a few days, but I also missed the part where you can pick these as class feats.

EDIT: okay, now I see how it works. They are listed under paladin feats. Then they tell you to check out the power later in the book.not as confusing as I initially thought.


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Trust me; youre gonna love this. This is my base form a dwarf; aargh, now this is a dwarf, that has ascended past a normal dwarf. Lets call this a dwarlf lvl5. Aaargh; now this is a dwarf that has ascended past an ascended dwarf. I call this a level9. And this... is to go... even further beyond....

Aaaaarrrrgggghhhhh!

At least that is how monks can play it off?

Not a fan of the unlock racial abilities later in your life thing either.


Must admit I only came here looking for these powers too. Will need to take a look at the pdf again, i was under the impression I had to go through all spell discriptions to find them, as lay on hands was there, but not in any spell lists. And lay on hands is the only one called out. :P


Dont have the pdf on me atm. Iirc sweep was similar to cleave and fighters had access to it? I did go through some classes late last night, so might be wrong.


The title made me LOL.

I made a batman themed Ninja for PFS ages ago.

He was a Half-Orc who took Perform dance, fought with improved unarmed strike and took Vanish the 1st chance he got.

Currently I would make a martial artist if I wanted to recreate the character.


ohako wrote:

well, I would say summoner, because then you could make a tanky eidolon.

But all but the core classes are out, and said tank player doesn't want to be a front-liner?

Play a druid.

1) You can turn into a bear.
2) You can have a bear animal companion.
3) You can summon a ton of bears onto the field with summon nature's ally spells.

How's that?

I second the Druid plan. Look forward to turning into a giant octopus later in life (unsure if this was possible at level 6 or 8)

I haven't played a Druid past low PFS levels, but I like the class.

Alternatively I would suggest going Paladin, those swift Lay on Hands on yourself work wonders (esp if you have Fey Foundling as your lvl1 feat!)


Iron_Matt17 wrote:
HWalsh wrote:
Iron_Matt17 wrote:
Skull wrote:

Hoping Divine Grace returns to how it was. (as a resistance bonus would be nice, except normal magic armour now covers that).

Also something I noticed was that Aura of Courage no longer grant immunity to fear. I am a little sad to see that go. As a paladin, being immune to fear is sort of part of the class for me.

I love smite evil, but found detect evil a bit clunky. I myself have tried smiting a flesh golem, just to learn that it was not an evil creature, just because it was made of dead humanoid parts...

I havent played many paladins sadly. Would love to keep liking the class.

I also like how paladins get the best armour prof

I'm quite sad about the Divine Grace and immunities nerf, but in the end I trust Paizo and how we Paladins may need the nerf for the betterment of the game as a whole. But again we don't have all the info on the classes. For all we know we may get those immunities at later levels...

Actually detect evil got buffed. It's now a intuitive ability, kinda like a Spidey-Sense... So cool. I got that info from the Paizo Twitch interview Mark.

https://www.twitch.tv/videos/260331209

That's not a buff. That's how they worked in 2nd edition.
Ok, cool. I've only played Pathfinder so I don't know about that. But it still way better than 1e...

Sounds cool if it works like a spidey sense. I had very little exposure to 2nd edition. Unfortunately if I follow that link I get:

"Sorry. Unless you’ve got a time machine, that content is unavailable.
In the meantime, take a look at these other videos instead."

But I will go look up how it worked in 2nd E. :)

Can some


Hoping Divine Grace returns to how it was. (as a resistance bonus would be nice, except normal magic armour now covers that).

Also something I noticed was that Aura of Courage no longer grant immunity to fear. I am a little sad to see that go. As a paladin, being immune to fear is sort of part of the class for me.

I love smite evil, but found detect evil a bit clunky. I myself have tried smiting a flesh golem, just to learn that it was not an evil creature, just because it was made of dead humanoid parts...

I havent played many paladins sadly. Would love to keep liking the class.

I also like how paladins get the best armour prof


Merellin wrote:
My party keeps telling me to stop thinking so much about it and just play what I want to play.. But I want to be useful to the party.. xD I like dwarves too, But havent played one yet.. My favorite class is the Alchemist (Currently playing one) But I'd like to try a martial class with no spells again sometime too.. And I keep changing my mind so my alchemist has a bit of build whiplash..

Some of the most fun I've ever had was role playing a dwarven fighter.


Personally id say play what you want.

Cleric or oracle/warpriest/paladin or whichever other "healer" class you can think of is nice, but out of combat healing is where most of the healing will happen.

In that party I would probably roll a dwarven cleric... Because I like dwarves, and a cleric could solve the spell/healing problem. Id still wade into Melee as much as possible and smack for Torag! :)


Most of the religious source material list dogmas, taboos and general attitudes toward certain activities and actions. That should be enough to get the feel of the deity's 'code'.


I get the feeling that a lot of paladin hate stems from people who simply *want* to hate the paladin.

Paladins are put in a bad light, from being played wrong. Their code is a personal one. Not one for the whole party.

Basically how it should play down when someone does something outside your code:
Not very paragon

Not attack them physically. Should it be a gregarious offence. Have an RP in-game chat with the offender. Paladins are also there to lead by example and inspire greatness and goodness in others. Not force it down their throats.


I like Hospitaler, and if I make another PFS character. This is what I will make :)

Currently playing one in a Rise of the Runelords game, but the game is 1 session a month, so not really a level where the archtype has had any affect on the abilities yet.


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Artemis Moonstar wrote:
Val'bryn2 wrote:
I have a plan for a skinwalker bat blooded, from Tian Xia, the Forest of Spirits, a brawler who calls himself King Guan, as in Japanese, near as I can tell from my limited knowledge, would be Guan-o.

Actually N is a sound by itself in the Japanese syllabary, as well as the sound "No". So Guan would sound like Guan.

Sauce: Studying Japanese.

O is the suffix they use to refer to kings in Japanese, so Guan-O would still work :P

I watch too much anime...


I always remember that what is good for the players, is also good for the monsters.

Fighting orcs with greataxes suddenly becomes a lot more scary. (Not to mention redcaps with their Scythes!).


Scott Wilhelm wrote:
He was talking about being a Draconic Druid, a Dragon Disciple, a Barbarian, and a Bloodrager with a Draconic Bloodline.

I don't think you can be both a barbarian and a bloodrager. I remember seeing that a hybrid class cannot take levels in a parent class when they were introduced.

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