Rolling d100?


Rules Questions


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Could someone please tell me what you'd have to roll on two d10's to get between 1-10? I have dice that say 10, 20, 30, etc. all the way to 00, and d10's that simply have 1-10(or 1-00). One of the thoughts I've had on how to remedy this is to tell my players to select two differently colored die to represent tens and singles.

In my last session, the same player rolled consecutively and got 1 and 00, and 10 and 00. Did both really hit at 100? I think even he was confused.

Another thought on die representing tens and singles, would a 10 (on a 1-10) and 90 (on a 10-00) represent 100?


How my GM does it is just roll 2 10 sided die back to back and add put numbers together.

Ex: a 1 and an 8 is an 18, a 9 and a 2 is a 92, etc.

Obviously this doesn't work if one of them is a 10, but all you gotta do is just assume a 10 on the first number is 100 and a 10 on the second is a 1.

Edit: The point of this post is "I ain't got no clue, but here's a simpler way to do it in case you might be looking for one.", since as I re-read the OP that's not what you were asking.


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Rynjin is almost right, but a 10 on either is considered a 0, with the exception of both being 10s in which case it's a 100.

In your case, OP, the dice with 10, 20, etc is your 10 digit dice. If it comes up as 00, then you're in the 1-9 range, and 100 if the other one comes up 0 or 10.

The rolls your player made would have been a 1 on the 1 + 00 and a 100.

A 10 on the single digit and a 90 on the double digit dice represents a 90, as the 10 is a 0.

Look at them the other way, with the double didgit first and then just put them together, and interpret a 10 on second as 0. 00+1 = 001 = 1. 90+(10) = 90+0 = 90. 50+4 = 54. 00+(10) = 00+0 = 0 = 100


If you have a d10 and a 10's digit d10, then as long as the 10's digit is 00 then any result on the regular d10 other than 0 would be a roll less than 10(%).

A 0 + 00 is 100 (older tables that didn't assume use of a 10's digit die referred to 100 as 00)


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00 + 6 = 6

30 + 1 = 31

90 + 10 = 100

--------

00 + 1 is 1

00 + 10 is 10


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There are more solutions. Some do it like Erikkerik, but this I see almost never being used (I know only one player who does it this way).
Typically you have one die for the tenners (00,10,20,30,40.50,60,70,80,90) and one die for the "Einser" (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. german, I don't know the english term for that)

You just add the numbers like Erikkerik with one exception

00 + 0 = 100 not 0
-----
00 + 10 will never happen if you use the right dice combination.


The advantage of Erikkerik's method is you don't switch between the "meaning of "numbers (00 being 100) The advantage of Turgan's method is your tenners dice is always the "tenners" dice gives you the right "tens" (20+0 being 20 and not 30)
Both work, just make sure you decide before you roll.


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Yeah, make sure the tens and 'ones' dice are clearly identified too. No flubbing the dice to get the 'better result'. Yeah I know, last time I rolled the red die was the tens and the blue was the ones, but THIS time its the other way around!


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Erikkerik wrote:

00 + 6 = 6

30 + 1 = 31

90 + 10 = 100

--------

00 + 1 is 1

00 + 10 is 10

For most of this example he is correct. But not all of it.

90 + 0 (on the 1-10 die) = 90

00 + 0 = 100

90 + 6 = 96

Liberty's Edge

silverhair2008 wrote:
Erikkerik wrote:

00 + 6 = 6

30 + 1 = 31

90 + 10 = 100

--------

00 + 1 is 1

00 + 10 is 10

For most of this example he is correct. But not all of it.

90 + 0 (on the 1-10 die) = 90

00 + 0 = 100

90 + 6 = 96

All the players I know would agree with silverhair2008. But as long as everyone at the table agrees with Erikkerik's rule then use that.

I have heard of 100-sided dice, but I have never seen one. I have heard that they are too nearly spherical to be much use.


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Geez, the whole point of the die with the "10, 20, 30..." etc. numbers is to EXPLICITLY be the "tens" digit while the "1, 2, 3..." etc. die is the "ones" column.

The only thing that MIGHT be a bit confusing is when you roll "00" and "0". That is intended to be read as "100". A "1" and a "00" is a "1". There is no roll of "0" possible. The die provide a result from "1" to "100".

Most folks just use two different colored die and call out which color is the 10s and which is the 1s and read it the same way.


die 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9
00 100 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39
40 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49
50 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59
60 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69
70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79
80 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89
90 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

This is be best I can chart it in a post.


It's amazing how confused people can get about percentile dice.
I remember when we used to use d20s that were labeled 1-0 and had '+' or '-' on the die. It was easy to decide which was the ten die and which was the one die. And since everyone was big on collecting dice, we always had two colors (or more) of dice. So there was no cheating (unless someone was hiding behind a pile of books.

And I do have a few sets of the 10, 20, 30 etc dice and that makes it easy to "not cheat" :)

People still look at me strange when I pull out the old 20s and insist I am not confused by the numbers like they are.


cmastah wrote:

Could someone please tell me what you'd have to roll on two d10's to get between 1-10? I have dice that say 10, 20, 30, etc. all the way to 00, and d10's that simply have 1-10(or 1-00). One of the thoughts I've had on how to remedy this is to tell my players to select two differently colored die to represent tens and singles.

In my last session, the same player rolled consecutively and got 1 and 00, and 10 and 00. Did both really hit at 100? I think even he was confused.

Another thought on die representing tens and singles, would a 10 (on a 1-10) and 90 (on a 10-00) represent 100?

If one die reads 00 and the other reads 1 it is 1.

If one die reads 10 and the other reads 0 it is 10.
If one die reads 90 and the other reads 0 it is 90.
If one die reads 00 and the other reads 0 it is 100.

The die with the double numbers on it is always read first on a percentile system. If your using an actual D10 with 1-10 printed on it instead of 1-0, assume the 10 is read 0 when rolling it with a Percentile Die that is numbered 00-90.

Results of 1-10 on a set of percentile D10's are:

00 & 1 = 1
00 & 2 = 2
00 & 3 = 3
00 & 4 = 4
00 & 5 = 5
00 & 6 = 6
00 & 7 = 7
00 & 8 = 8
00 & 9 = 9
10 & 0 = 10

This assumes two 10 sided dice made as a percentile set, where one die is marked 0-9 and the other is 00, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 & 90.

If you have only (2) simple 10 sided dice numbered 0-9 then use 2 of different colors and call which color is first before rolling both.

So you roll a red and a green 10 sider, red is 'first' and they come up Red 4 and Green 8 you have rolled 48.

OR

Roll one die twice taking the number results in order.

In all cases of the last two methods results of 0 & 0 = 100, all other results are read as they roll.

Hope this helps.


Thanks for your help, I'll go with the suggestion of 00 and 0 being 100 and for other instances, 00 plus 1-9 gives 01-09 (I'm assuming 10 and 0 give 10?). There IS a hundred sided die suspended in a globe, but apparently from the comments I read, it's really unstable and hard to read due to being suspended in a globe.

One of my players rolled twice and at first got 10 and 0 and read it as 100, then got 00 and 1 also read that as 100 :P


Turgan wrote:
one die for the "Einser" (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. german, I don't know the english term for that)

I don't think that there is an English term for that.

;-)

Liberty's Edge

StarSlayer wrote:

die 0 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 - 9

00 100 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09
10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39
40 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49
50 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59
60 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69
70 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79
80 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89
90 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

This is be best I can chart it in a post.

That is how we do it. The "ones" dice is 0-9, except when double 0's are rolled( 100 )


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Axl wrote:
Turgan wrote:
one die for the "Einser" (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. german, I don't know the english term for that)

I don't think that there is an English term for that.

;-)

Units. Mathematically, single-digits in Base-10 are "units", with the progressively higher orders being "tens", "hundreds", "thousands", etc. Linguistically, "Einser" ("ones") means the same thing, since the number "One" is also referred to as "Unity" (particularly in probability, but let's not go there).

Back on topic, for 00-90 and 0-9 dice, I'm with the majority in reading exactly what the dice say, with 00+0 being read as 100.


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I can't think of a single situation I have come across in PF where I would need to roll percentils. Even for a 20% or 50% miss chance I prefer to roll 1d10.


Ciaran Barnes wrote:
I can't think of a single situation I have come across in PF where I would need to roll percentils. Even for a 20% or 50% miss chance I prefer to roll 1d10.

You know, that's actually an interesting idea. There are rarely any times when a specific digit would change the outcome (like rolling on tables for items or their effects).

I'll pass both suggestions along to my players and see what they go with (as it stands, they're trying to speed up combat and I have a habit of forgetting the 20% miss chance in dim light as well).

Thanks for your help guys :)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Erikkerik wrote:

00 + 6 = 6

30 + 1 = 31

90 + 10 = 100

--------

This is how I do my d% rolls also.

00 + 0 = 10; since ingame d10's only go from 1 to 10

And when it comes to a % roll with a 0 on the end, I too roll one d10 or a d% to get the total to. Makes it easier as well


Erikkerik wrote:

00 + 6 = 6

30 + 1 = 31

90 + 10 = 100

--------

00 + 1 is 1

00 + 10 is 10

90 + 10 in this case would be = 90 because the 10 on the one-digit-die is the zero. Top get 100 you need to roll the 10 (or 00) on both dice.

The idea is that you generate numbers from 1 to 100. Therefore the 00+0 or 00+10 is the 100.
But using a + sign is somewhat misleading in this case because normally you use the + to sum up stuff.


Zauath wrote:
Erikkerik wrote:

00 + 6 = 6

30 + 1 = 31

90 + 10 = 100

--------

This is how I do my d% rolls also.

00 + 0 = 10; since ingame d10's only go from 1 to 10

00+0=100

01+10=10


Any die that divides wholly into 100 can be used as a "percentile die" if the margin of accuracy is above the divisor.

In other words, if you only need 10% accuracy, then a single d10 can be used as "percentile dice". If you need 5% accuracy, then a single d20 can be used. If you only need 25% accuracy, then a d4 can be used.

Mathematically you have the same chance of rolling a 25% chance whether you get a "1" on a d4, a "1 - 3" on a d12, a "1 - 5" on a d20, or a "01 - 25" on a set of "percentile dice".

This is all basic math stuff. In my games we've always used whatever dice make sense. There are some cases where you need 1% accuracy, and in those cases you have to roll the set of percentile dice. But for many, if not most, cases you can get away with rolling a single die after figuring out the roll needed.

In that sense EVERY die roll you make in the game is a "percentile" chance. If you hit with a d20 roll on an 11, then you have a 50% chance to hit and you can resolve the attack by flipping a coin.


There are 100sided dice btw. But they are large, can only be used on really flat surfaces and often roll off the table if you don't pay attention.


Umbranus, I would have to be very firmly convinced that a 100 sided die could possibly be made with any true randomness. With that many sides the margin of error for a particular side to have some divot or bulge which would affect its precision would be unbelievably small. Even most d20s have some problems with true randomness. I would probably stick to the two d10s before I relied on a die that could become unreliable simply by falling off a table and hitting a "corner" on a tile floor.


I've used the D100.. It's terrible, I wouldn't wish it on anyone. Another possible way you can simplify the two d10 technique:

Just assume all 0's and 00's are actual zero's. Read the tens die first then the singles die. Add 1 to your roll. You should get all numbers between 1-100 that way.

00 + 0 = 1
90 + 9 = 100

We personally don't do it this way, but it's a possibility for a simpler readout.


Dr Grecko wrote:

I've used the D100.. It's terrible, I wouldn't wish it on anyone. Another possible way you can simplify the two d10 technique:

Just assume all 0's and 00's are actual zero's. Read the tens die first then the singles die. Add 1 to your roll. You should get all numbers between 1-100 that way.

00 + 0 = 1
90 + 9 = 100

We personally don't do it this way, but it's a possibility for a simpler readout.

Why do it in such a strange way when you can just read it as it shows?

With the normal reading (if you have the right dice) the only part where you have to actually think is 0 on both dice. As you want numbers from 1 to 100 the only number containing to zeros is the 100.

@AD: I never used an actual d100. Too hard to use and too silly expensive.


Ciaran Barnes wrote:
I can't think of a single situation I have come across in PF where I would need to roll percentils. Even for a 20% or 50% miss chance I prefer to roll 1d10.

50% miss chance:

1d10 rolls 5

What is 50%? technically a miss if you pick low, technically a miss if you hit high, then you have to roll the 1's

(or, you could just flip a coin)


Adamantine Dragon wrote:

Any die that divides wholly into 100 can be used as a "percentile die" if the margin of accuracy is above the divisor.

In other words, if you only need 10% accuracy, then a single d10 can be used as "percentile dice". If you need 5% accuracy, then a single d20 can be used. If you only need 25% accuracy, then a d4 can be used.

Mathematically you have the same chance of rolling a 25% chance whether you get a "1" on a d4, a "1 - 3" on a d12, a "1 - 5" on a d20, or a "01 - 25" on a set of "percentile dice".

This is all basic math stuff. In my games we've always used whatever dice make sense. There are some cases where you need 1% accuracy, and in those cases you have to roll the set of percentile dice. But for many, if not most, cases you can get away with rolling a single die after figuring out the roll needed.

In that sense EVERY die roll you make in the game is a "percentile" chance. If you hit with a d20 roll on an 11, then you have a 50% chance to hit and you can resolve the attack by flipping a coin.

This is a very good point, I think I'd personally be happier rolling a 1d10 and will bring it up with my players.

@Umbranus, agreed, I saw the prices for the d100, it IS ridiculously expensive (especially when most if not all reviewers were saying it's extremely difficult to use).


KHShadowrunner wrote:
Ciaran Barnes wrote:
I can't think of a single situation I have come across in PF where I would need to roll percentils. Even for a 20% or 50% miss chance I prefer to roll 1d10.

50% miss chance:

1d10 rolls 5

What is 50%? technically a miss if you pick low, technically a miss if you hit high, then you have to roll the 1's

(or, you could just flip a coin)

Err, no. On a d10, a 5 is here:

1
2
3
4
5 <---
----- (halfway) -----
6
7
8
9
0

Behold the power of even numbers.


Is 5 a hit or a miss? Decide at the table and set the standard.


Oladon wrote:
KHShadowrunner wrote:
Ciaran Barnes wrote:
I can't think of a single situation I have come across in PF where I would need to roll percentils. Even for a 20% or 50% miss chance I prefer to roll 1d10.

50% miss chance:

1d10 rolls 5

What is 50%? technically a miss if you pick low, technically a miss if you hit high, then you have to roll the 1's

(or, you could just flip a coin)

Err, no. On a d10, a 5 is here:

1
2
3
4
5 <---
----- (halfway) -----
6
7
8
9
0

Behold the power of even numbers.

The point being, numerically, why would 0 be greater than 9 (or 1 for that matter).

Yes, obv. most people will see the logic and figure it out or plan it ahead of time. :) Just mentioning that it can still be confusing.

Lantern Lodge

When rolling 50% miss chance, I state in advance "Odd misses" and then roll.

Dark Archive

It’s a pity that none of Paizo didn’t give an opinion on this issue.
Because, you can't get by with the banal - "decide it before the game." This is the question that you are faced with in fact, without expecting such a discrepancy. Especially harsh when it affects taking damage :)


on its face this just won't die


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the dice with 2 digits creates your 10's digit, the single digit dice creates your 1's digit

this means it can generate numbers from 000 to 99

just ream them as is
the exception is 00+0 = 100

so 10+1 = 11
10+0 = 10


TxSam88 wrote:

the dice with 2 digits creates your 10's digit, the single digit dice creates your 1's digit

this means it can generate numbers from 000 to 99

just ream them as is
the exception is 00+0 = 100

so 10+1 = 11
10+0 = 10

If you read them the proper way of 00-90 and 1-10, you generate 1-100 without having any special exceptions.


willuwontu wrote:
TxSam88 wrote:

the dice with 2 digits creates your 10's digit, the single digit dice creates your 1's digit

this means it can generate numbers from 000 to 99

just ream them as is
the exception is 00+0 = 100

so 10+1 = 11
10+0 = 10

If you read them the proper way of 00-90 and 1-10, you generate 1-100 without having any special exceptions.

Part of the confusion people have might come from the fact that there are 3 variations of the d10…

The standard 1-10 d10, the 0-9 d10, and the 00-90 d10. When rolling a “d100” or “d%” you should always use one of the 00-90 d10s plus either one of the other two… depending on which of the other two you use can impact how you read them…

00+0 = 100 or 90+10=100 are both perfectly valid and understandable readings… and for any result other than 10 or 0 on your choice of ones die will always have the same reading regardless of dice choice. 50+1 is always 51. 00+9 is always 9.

However if you own a proper d% set then you should have both a 00-90 and a 0-9 and use the 00+0=100 reading… 90+10 should only ever be used if you lack a 0-9 d10 and are using a standard 1-10 in its place.


willuwontu wrote:
If you read them the proper way of 00-90 and 1-10, you generate 1-100 without having any special exceptions.

Depends on whether your d10 is 1-10 or 0-9. Both versions exist. For the latter version, you either need to interpret the 0 as a 10, or you need a roll under - either one works, but either one is a "special exception". As one of the two creates an exception in 10% of rolls and is more easy to forget, while the other creates an exception in just 1% of rolls and is immposible to forget as it occurs only when adding the dice values together doesn't produce a valid result, I'd use the roll under method.


willuwontu wrote:
TxSam88 wrote:

the dice with 2 digits creates your 10's digit, the single digit dice creates your 1's digit

this means it can generate numbers from 000 to 99

just ream them as is
the exception is 00+0 = 100

so 10+1 = 11
10+0 = 10

If you read them the proper way of 00-90 and 1-10, you generate 1-100 without having any special exceptions.

the proper way is to read them as 00+0 through 90+9 to generate number 00-99, of which 00 is read as 100.

nice and easy, 1 dice is ALWAYS the 10's digit, the other dice is ALWAYS the 1' digit.

It can even be done with single digit dice. 0+0 through 9+9, again digits 00-99, of which 00 is 100. just decide before you roll which is the 10's digit (usually a dice of a different color than the set

It cam also be done with dice numbered 1-10, just treat the 10 as a 0. One dice is still the 1's digit and the other the 10's digit, just treat the 10 as a 0. so 00-99 again, with 00 being 100. when using the dice singly, I.E. just rolling d10 and not d100, then the 10 comes in handy as it's a 10

this isn't a very complicated thing, the key is one dice is the 10's digit, the second the ones. you can even add a third d10, to generate a number from 000-999 and so on.

other game systems do d66, rolling 2 6-sided dice, with 1 dice being the 10's digit, the second being the 1's digit, generating a possible 36 combinations, but strangely numbers 11-16, 22-26, etc.

Dark Archive

In CRB Pathfinder 1ed. on page 8 it says:

Quote:
"Generally speaking, rolling high is better than rolling low. Percentile rolls are a special case, indicated as rolling d%. You can generate a random number in this range by rolling two differently colored ten-sided dice (2d10). Pick one color to represent the tens digit, then roll both dice. If the die chosen to be the tens digit rolls a “4” and the other d10 rolls a “2,” then you’ve generated a 42. A zero on the tens digit die indicates a result from 1 to 9, or 100 if both dice result in a zero. Some d10s are printed with “10,” “20,” “30,” and so on in order to make reading d% rolls easier. Unless otherwise noted, whenever you must round a number, always round down."

It would seem that the issue has been resolved. 00 + 0 = 100; 00 + 1 = 1; 10 + 0 = 10; 20 + 0 = 20, etc.

But, there are people who do not consider this to apply to the second edition and Starfinder.


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Unbegreiflich wrote:
on its face this just won't die

2012. I remember it like it was 10 years ago.


This poor thread just wanted some peace after 10 years. lol


basically it's about 'die-ing twice' *dodges spare old stone discuses thrown by pun haters as I rolled 007*

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