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Locked door? Locked chest? Locked manacles? Forget ranks in Disable Device, just jam a durable adamantine arrow into the lock and wiggle it around!


Does this mean durable adamantine arrows are legal for play?

If so, that's a great cheap way to bypass a lot of stuff's hardness. Dig through solid rock with an arrow!


Meh, save for half spells would finish him right fast, since he's got no evasion.


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Rumors have it the head is actually a long lost artifact, the Head of Vecna!

Oh wait, wrong universe.


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Pick a small race, like halfling or gnome.

Select the medium class.

Pick up a wand of enlarge person.

Congratulations! You're a Small Medium Enlarged!


A Trap the Soul gem attached to a pig, covered in barbecue sauce.

If that fails, swap the pig with the Paladin, and double the sauce.


In response to most of the above theorycrafters, I'll submit my own experiences playing the Invulnerable Rager class. I played one near exclusively for Pathfinder Society, and it rocked out quite hard in damn near every scenario I played.

For example, at 5th level we fought the skeleton of an undead dragon. Being a mindless creature, it showed no tactics and would simply attack the closest living target. So, I walked up to it, hunkered down with Stalwart and Total Defense, and simply ate every attack it threw at me. The combat lasted 15 rounds, letting us conserve resources by whittling away at the creature using cheap ranged attacks, and in total it cost me two charges of a cure light wounds wand to restore the lost hit points afterwards.

The basics of the build I used are below the spoiler, due to length.

Invulnerable Rager:
Race: Half-Orc
Alternate Racial Traits: Mystic, Dusksight
Class: Barbarian
Archetype: Invulnerable Rager
Stats (20 Point Buy)
Str:
15 +2 Racial
Dex: 14
Con: 14
Int: 13
Wis: 12
Cha: 8
Favored Class: Barbarian
Favored Class Bonus: +1/3 to the bonus from the superstition rage power each level
Traits: Hermean Paragon, Fate's Favored
Feats: Endurance (Shaman's Apprentice), Diehard (1st)

2nd
Rage Power:
Superstition

3rd
Feats:
Combat Expertise

4th
Rage Power:
Reckless Abandon
+1 Strength

5th
Feat:
Stalwart

6th
Rage Power:
Witch Hunter

7th
Feat:
Power Attack

8th
Rage Power:
Spell Sunder
+1 Intelligence

9th
Feat:
Additional Traits (Pragmatic Activator, Underlying Principles)

10th
Rage Power:
Eater of Magic

11th
Feat:
Improved Stalwart

12th
Rage Power:
Strength Surge
+1 Strength

Here's an example of what the build looks like at 12th level.

The cornerstone of this build is rage cycling through use of Allnight. In combination with Superstition, Witch Hunter and Spell Sunder, it lets our combatant Sunder through most defensive spells and maintain extremely high saving throws, with a free action reroll on failed saving throws using Eater of Magic.

Pre-fight buffs are consuming Allnight and a potion of Fly, then using Haste from boots and entering a rage as a free action. Beyond that, strategy revolves around closing to melee with the enemy as quickly as possible in order to bring the pain before they have time to cast too many spells, cycling a rage as a free action whenever possible.

Offensively the focus is on melee damage to put the enemy down, and the greatsword attack sequence isn't counting Reckless Abandon or Haste to improve the attack bonus. Against extremely high AC enemies, the strategy would be to target any spells boosting defences by using the opening bonus Haste attack to perform a Strength Surge Spell Sunder (usually +37 with Haste and Reckless Abandon vs. DC 25 + CL to dispel, ignoring any miss chance caused by a spell or spell-like ability) against an ongoing effect on the target, dispelling things like Mirror Image, Barkskin or Shield of Faith. Note this provokes an attack of opportunity from the enemy, as the build does not include the Improved Sunder feat. Assuming free actions to cycle rage can occur between iterative attacks, this can possibly strip the opponent of multiple spells per round of full attacks, though many GMs limit free action rage cycling to once per round.

Defenses include strong saving throws against magic including rerolls (once per rage using Eater of Magic, once per day with +4 Luck using Lucky Horseshoe) on failed saves, generous amounts of hit points, and the option to use Combat Expertise with Improved Stalwart to increase the DR from 6/- to 14/- at the expense of -4 to hit. If Strength Surge is unused during the current rage, it can be used defensively to add +12 to CMD vs. a single combat maneuver instead. All favored class bonuses have been put towards increasing the saving throw bonus of Superstition via human heritage. There's just enough ranks in Use Magic Device to activate wands on anything but a natural 1, and skills already include the skill penalty of Allnight and ACP. Scrolls are a riskier proposition, but available if required, mainly to counter invisible or stealthed opponents.

Half-Orc barbarian (Invulnerable Rager) 12 (Advanced Player's Guide)
N Medium humanoid (human, orc)
Init +10; Senses low-light vision, darkvision 60 ft.; Perception +16
--------------------
Defense
--------------------
AC
20, touch 11, flat-footed 17 (+9 armor, +3 Dex, -2 rage)
hp 161 (12d12+72)
Fort +22, Ref +14, Will +17; +9 vs. spells and spell-like and supernatural abilities, +4 and one size larger to resist effects of wind
Defensive Abilities invulnerability, extreme endurance (hot); DR 6/-; Resist fire 3

--------------------
Offense
--------------------
Speed
40 ft., fly 60 ft. (good)
Melee +1 furious greatsword +20/+15/+10 (2d6+27/19-20)
These numbers assume rage and power attack are active. It does not include attack bonuses from haste or reckless abandon, or damage bonuses from witch hunter.

Special Attacks greater rage (29 rounds/day), rage powers (reckless abandon +4, superstition +9, witch hunter +4, spell sunder, strength surge +12, eater of magic)

--------------------
Statistics
--------------------
Str
27, Dex 16, Con 22, Int 14, Wis 16, Cha 8
Base Atk +12; CMB +20; CMD 31 (41 vs. disarm)
Feats endurance, diehard, combat expertise, stalwart, power attack, additional traits, improved stalwart
Traits fate's favored, hermean paragon (steaming sea), underlying principles, pragmatic activator
Skills Acrobatics +16, Fly +18, Intimidate +12, Perception +16, Spellcraft +12, Use Magic Device +18
Languages Common, Orc, Abyssal
SQ fast movement, orc blood, sacred tattoo [ARG], shaman's apprentice[ARG], dusksight[BoS]

Consumables potion of enlarge person, potion of feather step, potion of protection from evil, potion of remove fear, potion of remove sickness, potion of touch of the sea, potion of countless eyes, potion of displacement, potion of fly x3, potion of haste, potion of heroism, potion of gaseous form, potion of good hope, potion of protection from energy: fire, potion of remove blindness/deafness, scroll of glitterdust x5, scroll of mirror image x5, scroll of see invisibility x5, scroll of invisibility purge x2, scroll of wind wall x2, wand of divine favor, wand of lead blades, wand of faerie fire, wand of long arm, wand of obscuring mist, wand of shield

Weapons and armor +1 furious greatsword, +3 mithral breastplate

Other gear belt of physical perfection +2, headband of inspired wisdom +4, boots of speed, cloak of resistance +4, cracked magenta prism ioun stone (UMD), cracked pale green prism ioun stone (attack), cracked pale green prism ioun stone (saves), cracked dusty rose prism ioun stone, goz mask[ISWG], lesser talisman of freedom[OA], lesser talisman of danger sense[OA], lesser talisman of warrior's courage[OA], lucky horseshoe[OA], pathfinder's kit, locked gauntlet, weapon cord, spring-loaded wrist sheath, allnight


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The Dandy Lion wrote:

Oh I meant to ask, what route did you take for this?

This is one of those builds I always wanted to do but could never quite make to satisfaction.

I did one for Pathfinder Society, and it rocked out quite hard in damn near every scenario I played.

The basics of the build are below the spoiler, due to length.

Invulnerable Rager:
Race: Half-Orc
Alternate Racial Traits: Mystic, Dusksight
Class: Barbarian
Archetype: Invulnerable Rager
Stats (20 Point Buy)
Str:
15 +2 Racial
Dex: 14
Con: 14
Int: 13
Wis: 12
Cha: 8
Favored Class: Barbarian
Favored Class Bonus: +1/3 to the bonus from the superstition rage power each level
Traits: Hermean Paragon, Fate's Favored
Feats: Endurance (Shaman's Apprentice), Diehard (1st)

So a few notes regarding alternate racial features and traits. Mystic gets you a free feat towards the prerequisites for Stalwart and a +1 luck bonus to all saves. This is by far the best package for you. Due to the +1 luck bonus, you want the Fate's Favored trait to double this as well. The final trait is simply a way to get +2 initiative without spending your combat trait, which you'll want later. You'll never regret having a higher bonus to initiative. The final alternate racial trait is Dusksight, which trades your racial weapon proficiencies away for low-light vision, a good trade considering you're already proficient with martial weapons and the exotics aren't really worth worrying over. With low-light vision, you can see 80 ft. distance by torchlight in darkness, better than your own 60 ft. Darkvision.

2nd
Rage Power:
Superstition

3rd
Feats:
Combat Expertise

4th
Rage Power:
Reckless Abandon
+1 Strength

5th
Feat:
Stalwart

6th
Rage Power:
Witch Hunter

7th
Feat:
Power Attack

8th
Rage Power:
Spell Sunder
+1 Intelligence

9th
Feat:
Additional Traits (Pragmatic Activator, Underlying Principles)

10th
Rage Power:
Eater of Magic

11th
Feat:
Improved Stalwart

12th
Rage Power:
Strength Surge
+1 Strength

Here's an example of what the build looks like at 12th level.

The cornerstone of this build is rage cycling through use of Allnight. In combination with Superstition, Witch Hunter and Spell Sunder, it lets our combatant Sunder through most defensive spells and maintain extremely high saving throws, with a free action reroll on failed saving throws using Eater of Magic.

Pre-fight buffs are consuming Allnight and a potion of Fly, then using Haste from boots and entering a rage as a free action. Beyond that, strategy revolves around closing to melee with the enemy as quickly as possible in order to bring the pain before they have time to cast too many spells, cycling a rage as a free action whenever possible.

Offensively the focus is on melee damage to put the enemy down, and the greatsword attack sequence isn't counting Reckless Abandon or Haste to improve the attack bonus. Against extremely high AC enemies, the strategy would be to target any spells boosting defences by using the opening bonus Haste attack to perform a Strength Surge Spell Sunder (usually +37 with Haste and Reckless Abandon vs. DC 25 + CL to dispel, ignoring any miss chance caused by a spell or spell-like ability) against an ongoing effect on the target, dispelling things like Mirror Image, Barkskin or Shield of Faith. Note this provokes an attack of opportunity from the enemy, as the build does not include the Improved Sunder feat. Assuming free actions to cycle rage can occur between iterative attacks, this can possibly strip the opponent of multiple spells per round of full attacks, though many GMs limit free action rage cycling to once per round.

Defenses include strong saving throws against magic including rerolls (once per rage using Eater of Magic, once per day with +4 Luck using Lucky Horseshoe) on failed saves, generous amounts of hit points, and the option to use Combat Expertise with Improved Stalwart to increase the DR from 6/- to 14/- at the expense of -4 to hit. If Strength Surge is unused during the current rage, it can be used defensively to add +12 to CMD vs. a single combat maneuver instead. All favored class bonuses have been put towards increasing the saving throw bonus of Superstition via human heritage. There's just enough ranks in Use Magic Device to activate wands on anything but a natural 1, and skills already include the skill penalty of Allnight and ACP. Scrolls are a riskier proposition, but available if required, mainly to counter invisible or stealthed opponents.

Half-Orc barbarian (Invulnerable Rager) 12 (Advanced Player's Guide)
N Medium humanoid (human, orc)
Init +10; Senses low-light vision, darkvision 60 ft.; Perception +16
--------------------
Defense
--------------------
AC
20, touch 11, flat-footed 17 (+9 armor, +3 Dex, -2 rage)
hp 161 (12d12+72)
Fort +22, Ref +14, Will +17; +9 vs. spells and spell-like and supernatural abilities, +4 and one size larger to resist effects of wind
Defensive Abilities invulnerability, extreme endurance (hot); DR 6/-; Resist fire 3

--------------------
Offense
--------------------
Speed
40 ft., fly 60 ft. (good)
Melee +1 furious greatsword +20/+15/+10 (2d6+27/19-20)
These numbers assume rage and power attack are active. It does not include attack bonuses from haste or reckless abandon, or damage bonuses from witch hunter.

Special Attacks greater rage (29 rounds/day), rage powers (reckless abandon +4, superstition +9, witch hunter +4, spell sunder, strength surge +12, eater of magic)

--------------------
Statistics
--------------------
Str
27, Dex 16, Con 22, Int 14, Wis 16, Cha 8
Base Atk +12; CMB +20; CMD 31 (41 vs. disarm)
Feats endurance, diehard, combat expertise, stalwart, power attack, additional traits, improved stalwart
Traits fate's favored, hermean paragon (steaming sea), underlying principles, pragmatic activator
Skills Acrobatics +16, Fly +18, Intimidate +12, Perception +16, Spellcraft +12, Use Magic Device +18
Languages Common, Orc, Abyssal
SQ fast movement, orc blood, sacred tattoo [ARG], shaman's apprentice[ARG], dusksight[BoS]

Consumables potion of enlarge person, potion of feather step, potion of protection from evil, potion of remove fear, potion of remove sickness, potion of touch of the sea, potion of countless eyes, potion of displacement, potion of fly x3, potion of haste, potion of heroism, potion of gaseous form, potion of good hope, potion of protection from energy: fire, potion of remove blindness/deafness, scroll of glitterdust x5, scroll of mirror image x5, scroll of see invisibility x5, scroll of invisibility purge x2, scroll of wind wall x2, wand of divine favor, wand of lead blades, wand of faerie fire, wand of long arm, wand of obscuring mist, wand of shield

Weapons and armor +1 furious greatsword, +3 mithral breastplate

Other gear belt of physical perfection +2, headband of inspired wisdom +4, boots of speed, cloak of resistance +4, cracked magenta prism ioun stone (UMD), cracked pale green prism ioun stone (attack), cracked pale green prism ioun stone (saves), cracked dusty rose prism ioun stone, goz mask[ISWG], lesser talisman of freedom[OA], lesser talisman of danger sense[OA], lesser talisman of warrior's courage[OA], lucky horseshoe[OA], pathfinder's kit, locked gauntlet, weapon cord, spring-loaded wrist sheath, allnight


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Similarly to the above, I believe defensive barbarians are an underrated build. Specifically, the invulnerable rager archetype with the stalwart feat, stacking up the DR/- to negate the need for AC.

Having played one to great effect, I find they're a refreshing type of character that employs a variety of tactical choices to dominate the battlefield. Pairing the reckless abandon rage power with the combat expertise feat feeding through stalwart to trade AC for DR, they can bring a hefty amount of damage dice whilst still soaking up generous levels of punishment without significantly denting their hit point pool, extending their staying power long after many other classes would be looking for a fast exit.

Pairing this with spell sunder at later levels is almost cheating.


Make him a strictly consensual necromancer. He only animates dead bodies who have given written consent to their remains being animated prior to their death. He offers cash to their families in compensation. He views it as simply a more extreme form of organ donation.


On the flip side, it is quite possible to play a character with extremely poor stats effectively, so long as you focus on characters whose abilities aren't based on their stat rolls.

A summoner with a focus on pimping out their eidolon, a druid focused on buffing their animal companion and using summon nature's ally, or any 9th level spellcaster that uses the summon monster spells can effectively contribute to a combat encounter even with very poor initial stats.

In essence, if your own stats are poor, borrow something else's stats instead.


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1. A novelty scroll case bearing the inscription "World's Best Wizard"
2. A stuffed weasel with a brass plaque that reads "Trouser, Familiar #4"
3. Guidebook entitled "Top 20 Haunted Mansions of Ustalav"
4. Architectural plans for a wizard's tower labeled "Wizard Willy's Extendable Erection"
5. A "Wizard's Weekly" magazine, with a succubi centerfold.


Actually, the rules do point to summons being specific, individual entities rather than figments.

But that being said, from a game mechanics perspective, they follow your orders to the best of their ability, even if that wouldn't normally be their usual behavior. Demons would ordinarily try to rip apart any mortal creature, but the magic of the summoning spell compels them to instead obey your commands.

Many GMs often overlook the communication aspect, especially when it comes to intelligent creatures such as elementals. If you speak Terran, for example, you can hold a (likely rather dull) conversation with a small earth elemental for the duration of the spell. However, there's a lot of languages out there, so you'd be lucky to get more than basic auto-pilot tactics from most summoned creatures.


From the shadowdancer prestige class in the core rulebook:

Summon Shadow (Su)
At 3rd level, a shadowdancer can summon a shadow, an undead shade. Unlike a normal shadow, this shadow’s alignment matches that of the shadowdancer, and the creature cannot create spawn.


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So, to begin with, have you written up a formal code of conduct for your paladin? Two paladins might have very different approaches to the same problem, so it's useful to have a written code before you start.

For example, here's two different codes based on two core deities:

Quote:

Paladins Of Abadar

Paladins of Abadar defend the weak, protect the innocent and act as lawful authority figures wherever they travel.

• I am a protector of the roadways and keep travelers from harm. No matter their destinations or goals, if they are peaceable and legitimate travelers who harm no others on the road, I will ensure that they pass safely.
• Bandits are a plague. Under my will they come to justice. If they will not come willingly before the law, where they can protest for justice in the courts, they will come under the power of my sword.
• Corruption in the courts is the greatest corruption of civilization. Without confidence in justice, citizens cannot believe in their countries, and civilization begins to disappear. I will root out corruption wherever I find it, and if a system is fundamentally flawed, I will work to aid citizens by reforming or replacing it.
• I am an aid to the markets. I ensure equitable trade between merchants and citizens. Theft on either side is intolerable.
• I make opportunities, and teach others to recognize them. When I aid others, I open the way for them, but will not carry them—they must take responsibility.

Compare to the following:

Quote:

Paladins Of Shelyn

The paladins of Shelyn are peaceable promoters of art and beauty. They see the ugliness in evil, even when cloaked in the form of beauty, and their job is to prevent the weak and foolish from being seduced by false promises. Their tenets include:

• I am peaceful. I come first with a rose. I act to prevent conflict before it blossoms.
• I never strike first, unless it is the only way to protect the innocent.
• I accept surrender if my opponent can be redeemed—and I never assume that they cannot be. All things that live love beauty, and I will show beauty’s answer to them.
• I will never destroy a work of art, nor allow one to come to harm unless greater art arises from its loss. I will only sacrifice art if doing so allows me to save a life, for untold beauty can arise from an awakened soul.
• I see beauty in others. As a rough stone hides a diamond, a drab face may hide the heart of a saint.
• I lead by example, not with my blade. Where my blade passes, a life is cut short, and the world's potential for beauty is lessened.
• I live my life as art. I will choose an art and perfect it. When I have mastered it, I will choose another. The works I leave behind make life richer for those who follow.

A formal means of justifying your actions with the GM can go a long way towards avoiding alignment infractions in the first place, plus it makes a great roleplay tool!


If you're new to GMing and are looking for advice on building encounters for a three part story, it'll help to know the average party level of your group will be. If you're aiming for a CR 11 boss (which is a 12th level NPC with PC class levels), your party should all be around 9th level to keep the fight challenging but winnable, or 8th level for a super tough battle. If they're all about 12th level, they will likely steamroll the boss. If they're under 8th level, there's a good risk of a TPK if the boss is particularly optimized or has good luck on rolls.

Especially if you're new to running multiple NPCs on the board during combat, you don't want to pick a crunchy class like magus that uses a variety of situational bonuses and buffs unless you're intimately familiar with the class. Unless you regularly play a magus and know their quirks backwards, it'll be easier to build a more static build such as a fighter or barbarian.

The particular feat I'm discussing, Flickering Step, only requires 9 ranks in Knowledge (Planes) as a prerequisite, and adds the Dimensional Agility feat chain to a Fighter's combat feat list, so it's basically built for a BAMF fighter (pun intended). Of course, that's just my knee-jerk reaction to your request, without having any specific knowledge of your group's typical tactics in combat.


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In this scenario you're using the second function of the Gate spell, per the following:

Gate Spell wrote:
Calling Creatures: The second effect of the gate spell is to call an extraplanar creature to your aid (a calling effect).

So to know if you can use it this way, let's check the rules for a calling effect.

Conjuration Rules wrote:
Calling: a calling spell transports a creature from another plane to the plane you are on. The spell grants the creature the one-time ability to return to its plane of origin, although the spell may limit the circumstances under which this is possible. Creatures who are called actually die when they are killed; they do not disappear and reform, as do those brought by a summoning spell (see below). The duration of a calling spell is instantaneous, which means that the called creature can’t be dispelled.

So from this wording, we can see the following:

1. The Gate spell calls extraplanar creatures.
2. A calling effect transports a creature from another plane.

Thus, unless the Gate spell is cast on a different plane than the one where the 20th level monk currently resides, you can't use it to call them.

Also note that in no way is Gate limited to calling creatures of the outsider type. You can use a Gate spell to call a 1st level human commoner from the elemental plane of fire if you wish, so long as they're considered an extraplanar creature.


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ShroudedInLight wrote:
From a design perspective, its really handy to have a Chart I can use for my NPCs with class levels to build them without needing to bother with a good portion of bean-counting. I often apply ABP to my NPCs in order to keep them current with the PCs without flooding the PCs with hundreds of cloaks of resistance and rings of protection.

This is an awesome tip and I wanted to thank you for this idea. I'd never considered this route of applying ABP in generating NPCs, and I definitely agree that having unique, cool loot is far more interesting than, "you find each of the bandits has a cloak, ring and armor that detect as magical."

Definitely stealing this one. Any suggestions for a good chart for on-the-fly NPC generation? (Sorry for the derail to the OP)


As a player, I enjoy this game for the fun inherent in a story where outcomes are based on a degree of random chance. Introducing an extra layer of risk is, for my way of thinking, a good option so long as it doesn't completely derail the game.

For example, our group regularly plays with the Critical Fumble Deck, using the harshest interpretation of the rules (a natural 1 is an automatic fumble). This has resulted in some game-defining moments, such as when the monk fumbled his attack roll and lost the ability to use unarmed strike for four rounds, or whenever the kineticist rolls a fumble, and the table collectively groans and leans back, dreading the results (the spell fumbles are particularly nasty).

This very much depends on the group dynamic at your table. For us, it's always the same group of guys and gals sitting around a table each Friday night, drinking and snacking as we crack jokes and pursue wild fantasy adventures. A bit of random chance isn't going to ruffle anyone's feathers since we're not treating it as a competitive sport. For other tables, it might very well end in tantrums, torn up character sheets and eternal oaths of hatred.


Also consider trapping the room. Clerics get access to many 'Symbol of X' spells, which can have creatures excluded from the effect based on such things as alignment. Party enters the room, boom! Hit by Symbol of Pain, Symbol of Slowing, Symbol of Fear, etc.


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The NPC wealth should represent the gear which, under normal circumstances, the PCs might have access to using or selling.

A lich's phylactery is only going to be valuable to the lich, barring its inherent value as a quest McGuffin.

Likewise, I don't typically apply the cost of Permanency to spells on the NPC as a penalty to the loot.

The NPC wealth by level should simply be whatever the group loots once the lich's dusty bones hit the floor, provided he didn't have time to use it during the battle.


My last wizard typically opened battle with a Haste, followed by a Glitterdust or Fireball as appropriate, then applied leverage as needed. Frankly, that was about all my group ever required.

There's a big part of this question that comes down to your group's playstyle. For example, I got my group's monk to buy a 1st level Pearl of Power and used it to give them daily Mage Armor.

For most situational stuff, prepping a scroll is usually more effective than blowing a spell slot for the day on something you likely won't use. Resist Energy is a great example, where having a scroll in your backpack is going to be far more efficient in the rare case where you need that extra layer of protection.

What buffs do you feel are necessary?


First, you'd typically use a stat array for an NPC, rather than rolling them. For an NPC with PC class levels, that would be 15, 14, 13, 12, 10, and 8 before modifiers for race or templates.

Second, I'm sure you're aware of this already, but a big boss battle should always include minions. Due to the action economy, a single monster is almost always easier to overcome than several lower level monsters of an equivalent CR.

With this in mind, I'd suggest keeping the template you want, making the big boss some type of heavy hitting melee character with good mobility, and giving him some support cultists of Asmodeus to buff and heal him in battle, or some devil allies to add chaos to the battlefield.

There's a bunch of interesting stuff in the Planar Adventures book which might be fun to throw at your players, such as the feat that grants Dimension Door, for example. It would tie in well with the Dimensional Assault, Dimensional Agility and the rest of the feat chain from Ultimate Combat, provided you can squeeze in the feats. I know I'd be terrified if I was a Gunslinger or Sorcerer facing a melee character that can Dimension Door into my face and full attack afterwards.


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No problem! It took me awhile to muddle through this hot mess of rules when I included it in one of my games, so I'm glad I could help.

Also note that my math above was slightly off, in that it's a little over 100 days, not 1,000 days, before the business turns a profit. Still, the amount of return on investment is chump change for a PC that earns more loot in a single CR 2 encounter than the business makes in a month.


c7d5a6 wrote:

Thanks, I'll add them shortly!

And do you mean something like "all spells without touch range" by "exclude"?

For example, let's say I wanted to use your site to generate a list of spells suitable for making into a potion.

I'd want to filter results so that it only includes level 0 to 3, excludes spells with a range of personal, and excludes casting times of 1 minute or more. I'd probably also want to filter by searching for the 'harmless' or 'none' keyword in the saving throw description.

If that's not really the goal of your site, that's fine. Personally, I'd love a reference list of spells to filter for certain criteria, but I understand if your goal is just to make a mobile friendly spell list.


A summoner is also a battlefield control caster, in that they create a short term, persistent effect on the battlefield at a point of their choice which absorbs attacks, provides flanking bonuses, threatens the surrounding areas and blocks movement through the designated squares.

There's even the tongue-in-cheek use of the Mount spell known as Wall of Horse.

For spontaneous casters such as the Sorcerer or Oracle, the Summon Monster spells are a good option to pad out their spell list and provide flexibility in choice when you have a limited selection of spells to work with.


At some point in the near future, your characters will have enough resources that spending 750 gp on a wand of cure light wounds will be the equivalent of some spare change you found down the back of a couch. At this stage, there's really no good excuse not to top yourself up after every fight, and your standard actions in combat will be far more useful being spent on fighting instead of healing.

Simply put, the enemy's damage output will almost always exceed your ability to reverse by healing. Ergo, the best method of spending your action that round isn't healing, but doing something that stops the enemy's damage output instead. A battle is won when your enemy's hit points go below zero, so reaching this goal quickly should be your aim.

This doesn't mean that attacking is always the best strategy, but leveraging your own individual character's abilities to aid in reaching this goal will likely support your group far more than spending your limited build resources into improving your ability to make hit points go back up when there's so many cheaper methods of doing this instead.


Also note that domains and the like aren't strictly limited to deities.

Certain creatures, when worshiped, can grant mortals access to domain spells and abilities. What's interesting is that these creatures aren't themselves limited to these domains, or even necessarily have access to even the most basic powers from them.

For relevant examples, look at the entries for the Demon Lords. These pseudo-deities can be worshiped. They grant domain powers to their worshipers. Yet they aren't limited to these domains themselves.

By examining these pseudo-deities, we can see that they have access to many spells that aren't a part of their own portfolio. Baphomet can cast charm spells. Nocticula can cast teleportation spells.

We can infer from these that true deities likely aren't limited by their domains, though it's likely that they would show a preference for the type of actions that relate to their domains.

As for whether the god shows interest in the prayers of their worshipers, it likely depends on the deity. Some are far more attentive than others. Pazuzu would absolutely love it if you called him up, for example. Pharasma, on the other hand, probably isn't going to return your call, at least until you show up in person. Aroden? AFK BRB (JK LMAO).


Alternatively, pick the Phoenix bloodline next time, and get free wings, FOREVER, at 9th level!

Plus you can Fireball your team to heal them. I mean, what's not to love about this?


One last thing to note: As a player, I expect to be responsible for my own heals. I expect my allies to be responsible for their own heals too.

It doesn't matter whether I'm playing a double life oracle that can spend every single round dumping Selective Quickened Channel Energies, or a superstitious barbarian with a raging hard furious greatsword. One of my first purchases is a Wand of Cure Light Wounds. Then, if I can't use it, I give it to someone in the party who can, and tell them to use it on me.

I'd make sure your group understands that they are responsible for spending their own resources on their healing. They want to be topped off after a fight? No problem, you'll drop a group channel. Resting for the day? Okay, you'll burn off your unused slots on a few spontaneous cures before you sleep. But otherwise, your spells are your resource, not theirs. If they want on-tap cures, they'd better damn well buy you a wand.


What's your Wizard ally's typical tactic? Are they an evocation focused blaster? A conjuration controller build? A transmutation buffer?

You might want to talk them into carrying a few Summon Monster spells, and also prep some of your own spell slots with this one. You'll quickly find that in tabletop pen and paper games, the action economy means that spending a full round at the start of combat to summon an ally will make a significant difference to the battle's outcome.

A summoned monster can easily set up a flanking position for your party rogue if it appears on the opposite side of the enemy. They also automatically benefit from the bard's inspire courage, boosting them for free along with the rest of your party.

At 3rd level, they'll only be lasting 3 rounds, but you'll often find that 3 rounds is about the length of a typical combat anyhow. You'll probably have a staple tactic such as:

Round 1: Bard starts inspire courage, rogue moves to flank, wizard and cleric cast summon monster.

Round 2: Bard maintains performance and attacks from range, rogue readies to attack when flanking, summoned eagles appear as cleric casts bless and wizard casts sleep/grease/color spray.

Round 3+: Everyone keeps attacking.

A pair of summoned celestial eagles can really swing a fight your way, since you get 3 attacks per round from each one. Getting into higher levels, you get even better options at each tier, and the best part is how much flexibility it can afford your group depending on the situation. Flying enemies? No problem. Underwater combat? Easy peasy.


doomman47 wrote:
Jotunblood template for 4 levels would give you over 160 hp if you don't mind not having class levels. 10d10 racial hit die and +5 con(half giant 18 base with +2 from template) plus whatever feats/traits you can cobble together.

The Jotunblood Giant template is a 3rd party published material by Green Ronin, not Paizo.

Additionally, character creation rules don't support templates as a valid option for player characters. Any game that allows templates to be applied to player characters is verging into homebrew territory.


Yes, you use the full stat block of the previous creature, minus any spell-like abilities or spellcasting.

For example, if an intellect devourer ate the brain of an adult red dragon, they'd be able to use its flight speed, feats, skills, breath weapon, smoke vision, fire aura, dragon senses, frightful presence, spell resistance, damage reduction, and various immunities, but not its spells known or spell-like abilities.

Essentially, you treat the creature as being affected by Dominate Monster, but with no spellcasting.


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So, the assumption is that Ultimate Campaign is tracking time in units of downtime days, and resources in capital such as Goods, Influence, and Labor.

Remember that you can substitute 1 point of Goods or Labor for 20 gp, 1 point of Influence for 30 gp, and 1 point of Magic for 100 gp where appropriate.

To construct your Luxury Store, your player must invest 1,030 gp (or 28 Goods, 1 Influence, and 22 Labor). The added sewing room will cost an additional 300 gp (or 8 Goods and 7 Labor). Add all the time costs for the individual rooms to get your total for how long it takes to build this business before it can start to earn a profit.

Next add your team of Craftspeople. These cost 200 gp to recruit for your business (or 3 Goods, 2 Influence, and 4 Labor).

Now build your organization. To do this, add all the Earnings entries for your rooms and teams into one total.

Luxury Store
Furnishings (Storefront): Earnings +5 on the room’s check to generate capital
Office: N/A
Storage: Earnings gp +2
Storefront: Earnings capital +5 (of a type the building already generates)
Vault: N/A
Sewing Room: Earnings gp, Goods, or Influence +10
Craftspeople: Earnings gp, Goods, or Labor +4

Total: gp +26, Goods +26, Influence +22, or Labor +20

Also, a manager will cost a daily wage to watch the business. A good example here would be a Master Smith at 4 gp/day, but we'll call him a Master Tailor instead.

Now let's assume the business simply uses Take 10 for its daily check to generate capital. And remember, the rules for Earning Capital requires you spend half the cost of the capital generated in raw materials to create the finished product.

Thus, the organization generates 36 gold pieces per day, but costs 18 gold pieces per day in raw materials (or land taxes, wages, maintenance fees and what have you), plus an extra 4 gp per day for your manager.

So after spending 1,530 gp on building a business, your player earns...

14 gp per day profit!

In other words, the business will take more than 1,000 days of downtime to pay for itself, let alone earn your player a profit off their investment. So long as you don't give your character more than three years of downtime, you don't need to worry about this project throwing off their WBL.


Ahem.

Clockwork Creature Family wrote:
Clockwork creations, as their names suggests, must be wound up before they animate. The creator of a clockwork crafts a unique key for each creation. This key is typically inserted into the clockwork's back and turned clockwise to wind it. Turning the key counterclockwise has the effect of winding the machine down, though only a willing (or completely helpless) machine will allow itself to be unwound in this way, meaning either its creator or someone its creator has specifically designated can normally do so. Since each key is totally unique, construction of a new key (or bypassing a key entirely) requires a successful Disable Device check (DC = 20 + the clockwork's CR). Larger clockworks tend to have larger keys, and particularly huge keys require more than one set of hands to turn. Rather than seek assistance from other engineers, eccentric or hermetic inventors often rely upon other clockwork creations to help them turn keys or aid in the creation of more monumental constructs. Other times, engineers give copies of keys to their most trusted clockworks, which can be programmed to wind allies and even themselves as the situation requires.

Source


Syries wrote:
JDLPF wrote:

Barbarian (Geminate Invoker)

Wow. That’s a lot of hit points.

I’m curious as to why you suggest that archetype though. You don’t gain a Con bonus any faster and you lose out entirely on the strength bonus. With no strength bonus you don’t gain any additional Str bonus from amplified rage either. And considering power attack isn’t even considered until at least level 6 or 7 damage would fall quite a bit.

Yeah, I agree it's a sub-optimal choice for anything except the one fact that you get Diehard as a free 1st level feat. As the OP said, they wanted maximum hit points "even potentially at the risk of being completely unviable."


Race: Half-Orc
Stats: 20 Con
Level 1: Barbarian (Geminate Invoker)
Feat: Amplified Rage
Bonus Feat: Diehard
Level 2: Fighter (Eldritch Guardian, Mutation Warrior)
Level 3: Fighter (Eldritch Guardian, Mutation Warrior)
Feat: Sympathetic Rage
Level 4: Fighter (Eldritch Guardian, Mutation Warrior)

Hit Dice: 30 hp
Base Con: 20 hp
Amplified Rage (+8 Con): 16 hp
Mutagen (+4 Con): 8 hp
Potion of Bear's Endurance (+4 Con): 8 hp
Valet Familiar (Toad): 3 hp
Favored Class (Fighter): 3 hp
Diehard: 36 hp (Staggered)
Total: 124 hp

Requires 2 round buff time (1st round drink Mutagen, 2nd round drink Bear's Endurance), and for your last 36 hp you'll be staggered and taking -1 hp per round. Still, I think this is the largest pool of hit points you'll get as a level 4 character.


Useful filters would also include Range and Target.

Also a way to exclude results based on filters.


Obviously, you need something related to preventing her being discovered via divination magic.

So our young man must have a strange family heirloom, likely in the form of a necklace of shells or some such, which functions as an amulet of proof against detection and location.

Bonus points if it has some other function attached to it that prevents the wearer removing it, such as them losing the ability to breathe air if they take it off.


Deaths Adorable Apprentice wrote:
JDLPF: I feel like this is a reference to something.

You could be right.


Potions, wands with only one or two charges left, and scrolls are all good consumable magic items to pepper into loot tables for short games.

I also quite like the elemental gems, which are a fairly low level item, and let the party quickly add extra firepower into a tough fight. Having an extra pool of hit points and actions in combat can swiftly swing the course of battle.


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I do a similar 'every character kit' system that I use for Pathfinder Society games, where I have a standard list of items I feel are appropriate for every single 1st level character I create.

Whilst it might not be exactly what you're thinking, perhaps you might find it useful for your purposes.

Adventuring Equipment
----------------------------

Sack of Powder - 1 cp (1/2 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Invisible enemies at low levels suck. This is a ranged AC 5 attack that outlines them for a mere copper piece.

Chalk - 1 cp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
A cheap way to keep track of your movement in a dungeon, leave messages to others, or draw pretty pictures on walls.

Torch - 1 cp (1 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
You'd be surprised how often an open flame is handy. This also gives you a last-ditch effort weapon for swarms, even if it's only 1 point of damage per hit.

Earplugs - 3 cp (0 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
You get a +2 circumstance bonus to language-dependant spells or abilities whilst wearing these. Useful against enemies that you know will use enchantments, and incredibly cheap for their bonus.

4 Candles - 4 cp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Again, having an open flame handy is more useful than you'd expect.

Inkpen - 1 sp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Don't be an illiterate barbarian. Seriously, even barbarians should carry one of these and be ready to write down important information in character.

3 Oil Flasks - 3 sp (3 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Grease a flight of stairs. Add a fuse and throw it at a swarm. Rub it on yourself to slip out of a tight spot. In a pinch you could also light a lantern with it, I suppose.

Waterproof Bag - 5 sp (1/2 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Five times the cost of a regular sack, but temporarily protects your gear from water damage. Remember to keep your sack of powder, torch and other water sensitive items in this.

Wooden Holy Symbol - 1 gp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
A great litmus test to determine if the NPC is a vampire. Present this strongly at them and see if they recoil.

Grappling Hook - 1 gp (4 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Weighty, but handy to get your rope where it needs to be.

Potion Sponge - 2 gp (0 lbs) [Advanced Race Guide]
Keep one of these loaded with your go-to underwater combat potion and you'll never need to worry about putting ranks into Swim.

Spring-Loaded Wrist Sheath - 5 gp (1 lb) [Adventurer's Armory]
At lower levels keep a dagger handy. At higher levels keep a wand inside. Plus it's just plain cool.

Ink, 1 oz. vial - 8 gp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
For your inkpen, obviously.

Journal - 10 gp (1 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Always keep notes. Write down names of important NPCs, goals for the quest, riddles encountered, copies of maps, everything. Then you get to freely ask the GM to repeat themselves by simply saying "I wrote that down in character, so I check my journal."

50 ft. Silk Rope - 10 gp (5 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Lighter but more expensive than hemp. Worth the cost to keep your weight down. Also great if your character is into kinky stuff. Never leave home without rope!

Smoked Goggles - 10 gp (0 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Makes you all but immune to gaze weapons, plus you can wear your sunglasses at night.

Pathfinder's Kit - 12 gp (22 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
I prefer this kit over many others. You've got your obligatory hobo items like a backpack, bedroll, waterskin, flint and steel and rations, but doesn't load you up on torches and an iron pot like many class kits. You get a signal whistle for when you're in trouble because you split the party since it seemed like a good idea at the time. You get a whetstone for an extra +1 damage on your first hit with a bladed weapon. You get a dagger to put in your spring-loaded wrist sheath.

Total: 60 gp (38 lbs) - Leave your rations and bedroll at camp or on a mount to take 12 lbs off this total

Weapons
--------------

Alchemical Silver Cestus - 25 gp (1 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Your always-on melee threat item. Superior to a spiked gauntlet in pretty much every way. Make sure you do bludgeoning damage, as the piercing would suffer -1 damage penalty due to the material. A cheap means to bypass DR/silver too, if you're in a pinch.

Cold Iron Kunai - 4 gp (2 lbs) [Ranged Tactics Toolbox]
This one serves triple duty as a backup thrown weapon, a DR breaker for fey, demons and the like, plus the item text specifically calls out it can be used as a crowbar or piton without risk of damaging the weapon.

Total: 29 gp (3 lbs)

Pets
-------

Guard Dog - 25 gp [PRPG Core Rulebook]
It's a move action and DC 10 Handle Animal check to command your guard dog to defend you. You don't even need to be trained in the skill for this usage. Simply take 10 on this skill out of combat, or take 20 if you're exceptionally uncharismatic. Having an extra pool of hit points for this cost is great value for money.

Total: 25 gp

Alchemical Items
-----------------------

Tindertwig - 1 gp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
For when you need a fire RFN.

2 Sunrods - 4 gp (2 lb) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Light and vision is king. Unless your whole party has darkvision, carry a few of these and don't be stingy about using them.

Vermin Repellent - 5 gp (0 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Swarms suck at low levels. Vermin repellent isn't perfect, but it might just be enough to convince a swarm to go chew on someone else instead. Worth the cost.

Smokestick - 20 gp (1/2 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Blocks line of sight, but the rules are sketchy about whether you need to light it on fire first or if it self-activates as part of the use. If your GM is finicky about the activation, glue a tindertwig on it and call it a day. It's a handy item that can buy you total concealment against ranged attacks.

Smelling Salts - 25 gp (0 lbs) [Ultimate Equipment]
Okay, you beat the bad guys, but where do you go next? Easy, just grab one that hasn't bled out, stabilize him and then use smelling salts. Intimidate him for information about the bad guy's plans. Does your check fail? Kill him and try the next one. Also a really handy item to have in case the party healer is knocked out.

Holy Water - 25 gp (1 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Okay, it's not really an alchemical item, but it's close enough. It's also a decent way to contribute damage against both undead or evil outsiders, especially if they've got some kind of exotic damage reduction you don't have anything to bypass.

Smog Specialty Smoke Pellet - 40 gp (0 lbs) [Dungeoneer's Handbook]
Remember how much invisibility sucks? This is the sack of flour's big brother. Negate a creature's invisibility for 1d4 rounds if you throw it into their square.

Tanglefoot Bag - 50 gp (4 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Entangled, no save, 2d4 rounds. All you gotta do is hit them with it. Can be a lifesaver at low levels against bosses.

Air Crystals - 50 gp (0 lbs) [Pathfinder Society Field Guide]
Underwater combat sucks, but a bag of these can save your character if they're able to get them out in time. Just make sure you have them in your mouth before you get grappled by the kraken.

Total: 220 gp (7.5 lbs)

Potions
--------------

Potion of Touch of the Sea - 50 gp (0 lbs) [Advanced Player's Guide]
Never worry about water again. Get a 30 ft. swim speed for 1 minute. Keep this in your potion sponge.

Potion of Feather Step - 50 gp (0 lbs) [Advanced Player's Guide]
Difficult terrain can ruin your day. This lets you ignore that for 10 minutes.

Potion of Remove Sickness - 50 gp (0 lbs) [Ultimate Magic]
The bonus to saves isn't nearly as good as the ability to negate the sickened condition for 10 minutes. There's many creatures that can inflict this status, so a counter is always handy to have as a backup.

Potion of Protection from Evil - 50 gp (0 lbs) [PRPG Core Rulebook]
Typically the most common enemy type you'll face, and this one has a bunch of benefits. Deflection and resistance bonuses, prevention of mental domination, and that sweet protection from summoned creatures can shut a summoner down cold.

Total: 200 gp (0 lbs)


The players stumble across an island, the beach bearing the wrecked remains of a humble sailing boat.

Fortunately, the crew and passengers of the vessel survived their misfortune, forming a friendly, safe place for the group to rest and recover from their adventures.

The locals are good, simple folk, willing to offer their limited assistance in aid of the PCs. There's the Captain Grumby and his bumbling but well meaning accident-prone first mate Willie, the nobleman Sir Thurston and his wife Lovely, the bardic beauty Ginger, the Wizard Hinkley, and the endearingly innocent and virtuous young woman named Summer.


Yeah, you need an actual physical barrier, a la Wall of X spells, to provide you with total cover.

Total concealment is relatively easier, especially if you have the right equipment. A great magic item is the Goz Mask, which lets you see through all types of fog, in addition to a few other miscellaneous bonuses. This item, paired with such spells as Obsuring Mist, an item like the Eversmoking Bottle, or even a humble smokestick, can grant total concealment without penalty to your character.


lemeres wrote:
Trust no one. Suspect everyone. There might be experts hiding right in plain sight.

Also Adepts, Aristocrats, Commoners and Warriors.

Although I think they'd have to prestige to gain Hide in Plain Sight.


Question: Does your character engage in any form of mounted combat?

Otherwise, would you describe your character as lazy or hedonistic?

Let's assume your character has the habit of dismembering his victims. You've got all these extra spare limbs going to waste, so why not assemble them into a creature that can serve as a comfortable mount, provide relaxing massages, and lend an extra hand in combat when needed?

I'd call it: The Armchair.


Oli Ironbar wrote:
True, double HP is a lot, but a lower level enemy that is mechanically indistinguishable from a higher enemy is the issue for the character — a Hulk with power they don’t want to use unwisely.

In regards to a character gauging how much force is too much force, in general that kind of information can be the domain of a relevant Knowledge skill check. Especially for humanoids with class levels, a Knowledge (Local) check can be a good way to identify their relative strength via hit dice.

Of course, what the various Knowledge skills actually give you are a grey area of the rules, so best check with your GM to be sure.


Yeah, I'm a big fan of the Allip, since it opens so many wonderful possibilities as to the reasons behind the demise of the original creature.

In one scenario I created, I had a room full of small sized Allips, each of them resembling a murdered orc child that had been kidnapped from a local tribe. The PCs had earlier been told by human townsfolk nearby that the orcs were responsible for recent kidnappings, but they were smart enough to discover the orcs were innocent, and actually just as much victims as the townsfolk.


It depends on the CR of the scenario. If you're playing low level CR, typically you're looking for aberrations or outsiders as your capstone boss, and likely the story is that the wizard summoned one using Planar Binding and it escaped.

Qlippoth are a good choice for a variety of perverted, disgusting things-which-should-not-be. For example, the wizard whistled up a Shoggti, but fumbled the magic circle binding it and the horror from beyond drained the bumbling conjurer's wisdom, turning it into a mindless thrall. Like all Qlippoth, the Shoggti hates all life, and so uses his puppet wizard to wage war on the mortal plane by sending out monsters from his tower-fortress to destroy the living.

For higher CR adventures, you can't get more Lovecraftian than the Great Old Ones. Our wizard, seeking knowledge best forgotten, indulged in too many castings of Contact Other Plane, drawing the attention of those who reside beyond. They sent their emissaries to him, warping his mind beyond recognition and driving him to recreate his surroundings in a mirror of the otherworldly horrors his insane mind perceives.

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