The Windsong Testaments: The Acts of Iomedae

Thursday, November 7, 2019

We can learn much from the wisdom of the divine, but we can learn as much from their actions. The truly faithful understand that not even the gods themselves are infallible, and that words and promises do not always suffice. Those among us who see no fault in the gods are worse than zealots, worse than puppets. They taint the very idea of faith with their blind devotion. When a god makes a mistake, the results can be disastrous if their faithful do not understand the error. If they take that error as gospel, they are doomed to repeat the error and compound upon it again and again. And in so doing make the initial misstep into something more. In the worst of cases, these repeated mistakes can transcend to become the new order, and not even the gods themselves can turn them back.

Iomedae knows this well, for she was, not so long ago, among those who worshiped the gods herself.

Before her Ascension, Iomedae worshiped Arazni, the herald of the god of humanity, Aroden. When Arazni was defeated during the Shining Crusade, Iomedae turned her faith to Aroden. That Iomedae herself chose the path of a paladin was an indication of the strength of her convictions, for Arazni did not particularly embody the strictures of law, nor did Aroden particularly promote acts of goodness. But Iomedae saw the devotion to tradition and honor in Arazni’s deeds and could sense the underlying kindness and generosity in Aroden’s acts even if he didn’t notice them himself.

Even after she ascended to divinity herself, she continued to serve as Aroden’s new herald, and when the god of humanity perished unexpectedly at the dawning of the Age of Lost Omens, Iomedae did not lose hope. In the decades to follow, Iomedae’s faith grew and she inherited Aroden’s mantle. And as her church grew, she spread her wisdom to those who would listen. She told her followers to avoid her faults. To watch and judge themselves when she would misstep, and to not take her errors as gospel. For even before Iomedae’s apotheosis, she had noted imperfections in the gods she venerated, and as a goddess herself she vowed to never encourage the same unwavering zeal. And as such, she commanded that those who would worship her learn not solely from her words, but from her actions.

First came her memorable clash with legendary Nakorshor’mond, a gluttonous monstrosity spawned and abandoned by Lamashtu. The glutton consumed members of her adventuring group, and Iomedae had to cut her companions free from otherwise eternal slumber from the fiend’s supernatural gullets.

Next was her defeat of the Pallid Sisters, a coven of Garundi witches who had been terrorizing the city of Senghor. Here, Iomedae found triumph without ever drawing her blade, achieving victory through the clever use of wordplay and diplomacy alone.

The last of these initial acts performed before the Shining Crusade was the defeat of Segruchen the Iron Gargoyle, who had proclaimed himself the King of the Barrowood. Iomedae’s griffon-mounted battle saw the so-called King metaphorically dethroned in mid-air.

It wasn’t long after the Iron Gargoyle’s fall that the Shining Crusade began, and Iomedae was at the forefront of the battle from the start. During the Second Battle of Encarthan, Iomedae’s legacy grew as she took command of a regiment of mortally wounded knights and held back a wave of wraiths long enough for reinforcements to arrive at dawn.

The goddess Iomedae, helmetless, in full plate and a large flowing cape. wields a shield and glowing sword to fight a horde of skeletons, backing up another valiant knight.

Illustration by Dallas Williams

Erum-Hel, the Lord of the Mohrgs, was her next great triumph during the crusade—Iomedae defeated him during the Battle of Three Sorrows. She wasn’t able to slay the powerful undead monster, but sent him whimpering back into the Darklands nonetheless, and in so doing struck a crippling blow against one of the Whispering Tyrant’s most notorious and feared generals.

Soon thereafter, the Whispering Tyrant struck back against Iomedae and shattered her magical sword. Yet Iomedae didn’t let this deter her, and she simply rebuilt it and continued the fight, for she knew that it was not her sword that gave her the power to stand against evil—it was only a tool in that pursuit.

A month after the Shining Crusade came to an end, Iomedae visited Absalom with several other veterans of the war. Her visit to the temple of Aroden drew more adoration for her own acts than for Aroden herself, but it was a month after she left that another miracle took place when her image appeared at the same shrine—an image that healed the needy and spurned the wicked… including one false priest of Aroden who had secretly conspired with the cult of Asmodeus to convert those of faltering faith.

Although the Shining Crusade had ended, many of those who had fought for Tar-Baphon remained behind. Since the war was over, Iomedae sought to redeem those who had lingered. Her greatest work during these days was the redemption of the graveknight known only as the Black Prince. With her forgiveness, he was able to repent for his evil, bringing an end to his undead state and allowing his soul to pass on for judgement.

Elsewhere in Ustalav, Iomedae heard of nine forlorn knights who had fallen from favor among the church during the crusade, only to go missing soon after their excommunication. She sought them out and freed them from the vampire-mage Basilov, using nine drops of her own blood as payment in ransom. She was forced to slay the vampire soon thereafter, but with the knights’ aid, she also secured their return to the church.

Iomedae’s rule over the city of Kantaria began soon thereafter, but only lasted for a year and a day, but she never intended to rule for long—just long enough to protect the city from sinister shapechangers so that a legitimate ruler could take the role.

Finally came her eleventh act—an act that would end her time as a human and begin her life as a goddess. Iomedae cast her cloak down over the pit surrounding the Starstone Cathedral, transforming the garment into a bridge upon which she could cross the chasm and enter the edifice to take the Test of the Starstone.

Today, the faithful refer to these eleven deeds as the Acts of Iomedae. Iomedae has made it clear that the lessons, not the specifics, are important, and to her faith’s credit the vast majority understand this. What tends to get lost in the excitement of worship and admiration, though, is the fact that Iomedae didn’t set out at the start of her acts to perform eleven heroic accomplishments. They were, in truth, attempts by Iomedae to learn from the failings of those she respected, be they family or friend or even one of the gods.

About the Author

James Jacobs is the Creative Director for Pathfinder. While he was there at the beginning of Golarion’s creation, many of the deities worshiped by that world’s heroes and villains had already existed for decades before. Goddesses and gods like Desna and Rovagug, Sarenrae and Abadar, Achaekek and Zon-Kuthon first established their faithful among PCs and NPCs alike in James’ home campaign in the late 80s and early 90s. Sharing them with the world as deities of the Pathfinder setting, seeing players and creators come to love and hate them (and in some cases cosplay as them), has been a career highlight.

About the Windsong Testaments

On the northern reaches of Varisia’s Lost Coast stands Windsong Abbey, a forum for interfaith discussion tended by priests of nearly twenty faiths and led by a legacy of Masked Abbesses. At the dawn of the Age of Lost Omens, Windsong Abbey suffered as its faithful fought and fled, but today it has begun to recover. A new Masked Abbess guides a new flock within, and the Windsong Testaments—parables about the gods themselves—are once again being recorded within the abbey’s walls. Some of these Testaments are presented here as Golarion’s myths and fables. Some parts may be true. Other parts are certainly false. Which ones are which is left to the faithful to decide.

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Tags: Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Web Fiction The Windsong Testaments
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This is a level of Humility and Understanding that has NEVER been highlighted in Iomedae's write-up that I can recall.

It changes a significant perception that I had of her as a deity.

Thank you very much!


Uhm I thought Iomedae defended Eledar not Senghor for her Second act...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Thomas Seitz wrote:
Uhm I thought Iomedae defended Eledar not Senghor for her Second act...

The Acts of Iomedae, as listed on page 81 of Inner Sea Gods, are pretty clear in stating it was Senghor.

Whether or not that is an "error" that goes against what we might have said before or after, or whether it's a correction... I hope it's the later since Inner Sea Gods was meant to be a place where we could fix those sorts of errors and serve as a baseline for deity information.

AKA: Where did we say she defended Eledar? Asking for a friend... ;-P


James Jacobs,

The Pathfinder Wiki lists it and cites The Sixfold Trial. I'm not sure what page right off the bat. But if it's meant to be Senghor, I'll take your word for it James.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Thomas Seitz wrote:

James Jacobs,

The Pathfinder Wiki lists it and cites The Sixfold Trial. I'm not sure what page right off the bat. But if it's meant to be Senghor, I'll take your word for it James.

The Wiki isn't always 100% accurate, and it's sometimes frustrating to me that when we correct things or change things in the world lore that the Wiki doesn't always reflect those changes. I'm not trying to throw shade on the folks who work on the wiki, and they do a GREAT job at keeping it full of info—I use it all the time myself to help research topics... but it's not a primary source.

For content like this, were you see conflicts, it's best to compare the publication dates and "footprint" of the two products. In this case, Inner Sea Gods is more recent (and thus is where corrections like this would be printed, since traditionally we do not issue errata or corrections on a product-by-product basis for world lore), and it's footprint as a hardcover book that's specifically focused on presenting deity lore rather than being a softcover smaller book that's specifically focused on an adventure with the deity lore as support means that Inner Sea Gods is the correct information.


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It says on the wiki, that it was Eledar but I don't know where that info came from.

I also like that it explains how Iomedae ended up with her alignment and core beliefs despite being a follower of two deities that didn't exactly match that viewpoint.

I also like how there is an undertone, "Don't be Lawful Stupid, Stupid."

Shadow Lodge

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Unfortunately, another published product lists Eleder (citing Sixfold Trial rather than Inner Sea Gods) as well - however, society scenarios are easier to adjust since they're only sold as .pdf files, right?

PFS #5-13: Weapon in the Rift wrote:
She defeated a coven of Garundi witches, freeing the city of Eleder from their tyranny.

In the meantime, since I have a (rarely-used) log-in on the wiki, I just corrected the city there.

Also I must say that I am loving the Windsong Testaments, and would absolutely pick them up if they were ever collected, published, and sold as a book!


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

Be Moderate!

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Thomas Seitz wrote:

James Jacobs,

The Pathfinder Wiki lists it and cites The Sixfold Trial. I'm not sure what page right off the bat. But if it's meant to be Senghor, I'll take your word for it James.

The Wiki isn't always 100% accurate, and it's sometimes frustrating to me that when we correct things or change things in the world lore that the Wiki doesn't always reflect those changes. I'm not trying to throw shade on the folks who work on the wiki, and they do a GREAT job at keeping it full of info—I use it all the time myself to help research topics... but it's not a primary source.

For content like this, were you see conflicts, it's best to compare the publication dates and "footprint" of the two products. In this case, Inner Sea Gods is more recent (and thus is where corrections like this would be printed, since traditionally we do not issue errata or corrections on a product-by-product basis for world lore), and it's footprint as a hardcover book that's specifically focused on presenting deity lore rather than being a softcover smaller book that's specifically focused on an adventure with the deity lore as support means that Inner Sea Gods is the correct information.

I've always had a hard time figuring out what those stealth corrections are. I rarely notice a difference and the info is usually supplemental, not a replacement. If something gets removed, you never know whether it's because there wasn't wordcount (Arodenite hats!) or if it was decided it was no longer canon. (Erastil's various opinions... I THINK..?) I'm not surprised that the wiki has uncorrected info, as the Chelaxians might say. You guys have a hard bunch of world lore to keep up with! Fun as Golarion is to read about...

I do really love these things. I would love to see a book that's just full of stuff like this, and deity lore more generally.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Terminalmancer wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Thomas Seitz wrote:

James Jacobs,

The Pathfinder Wiki lists it and cites The Sixfold Trial. I'm not sure what page right off the bat. But if it's meant to be Senghor, I'll take your word for it James.

The Wiki isn't always 100% accurate, and it's sometimes frustrating to me that when we correct things or change things in the world lore that the Wiki doesn't always reflect those changes. I'm not trying to throw shade on the folks who work on the wiki, and they do a GREAT job at keeping it full of info—I use it all the time myself to help research topics... but it's not a primary source.

For content like this, were you see conflicts, it's best to compare the publication dates and "footprint" of the two products. In this case, Inner Sea Gods is more recent (and thus is where corrections like this would be printed, since traditionally we do not issue errata or corrections on a product-by-product basis for world lore), and it's footprint as a hardcover book that's specifically focused on presenting deity lore rather than being a softcover smaller book that's specifically focused on an adventure with the deity lore as support means that Inner Sea Gods is the correct information.

I've always had a hard time figuring out what those stealth corrections are. I rarely notice a difference and the info is usually supplemental, not a replacement. If something gets removed, you never know whether it's because there wasn't wordcount (Arodenite hats!) or if it was decided it was no longer canon. (Erastil's various opinions... I THINK..?) I'm not surprised that the wiki has uncorrected info, as the Chelaxians might say. You guys have a hard bunch of world lore to keep up with! Fun as Golarion is to read about...

I do really love these things. I would love to see a book that's just full of stuff like this, and deity lore more generally.

Welcome to my frustrations. The fact that we have never had a way to issue errata to world lore in a way that lets customers know... much less our own freelancers or employees know... when we make a mistake with lore that then gets fixed has bothered me for quite some time. The fact that you (rightfully) call them "stealth corrections" is a big part of the problem, and it's one of the reasons I try to shine a light on the errors whenever and wherever I can.

Silver Crusade

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A weathered tengu grandmother clad in shining mithril plate armor leans against a well-crafted darkwood staff.

"If more of the Silver Crusaders had this sort of ethic and understanding, they'd be invincible despite their frailty. Unfortunately, far too often we get all bound up in our preconceptions and what we think our beliefs mean, and a lot of folks don't stop to consider that. I've gotten lucky with Grandmother watching out for me, generally speaking I don't need the whap upside the back of the head but we're all mortal and we all make mistakes. Windsong Abbey isn't too far from my farm in Ravenmoor, I'll need to be taking a trip up there one of these days."


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I love this! past month I made a teacup with this message "Keep calm and smite evil" and the symbol of iomedae in the other side. I wish i could see more about the specifics of all the eleven acts. Iomedae was my first deity to "worship" and I love to see that she can crealy see her imperfections as a former mortal and also as a good, also I really liked the explanation of the lawful / good alignment.

Thanks for this James!

ps. Im from Chile so im reading about the Light of the Sword from the other corner of the world, isn that cool?

Cheers!

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

… when she ascended did she elevate her battle griffon into a servitor?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hey, lookit that, I like Iomedae more after reading this. Fancy that.


Loving these lore blogs. I'm a sucker for world building.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

So good! I didn't think it was possible, but I like her even more. Best deity 10/10 would smite evil for again.

Makes me want to know more about the lives of the ascended pre-ascension now.


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'Don't be a Zealot!', proceed to grant Zeal domain.

Liberty's Edge

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I am intrigued by Nakorshor’mond. What might it have been? As a spawn of lahamastu, I assume it is some monsterous entity, like a mutant hydra or multiheaded horror.


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Uchuujin wrote:
'Don't be a Zealot!', proceed to grant Zeal domain.

"I may not agree with your views and think you're Hell-bound for sure, but I'll fight with the last of my breath to GIVE you the right to make that choice. And I'll respect it as appropriate."

As a former member of the military I can respect this a heckuva lot more than "Lawful Goods Best Goods Yayyyy TEAM BEST GOOD IS GOODER!"


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I guess I'll have to wait until the Windsong Testaments is published by Paizo!!!

Paizo Employee Franchise Manager

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Regarding the Eleder/Senghor confusion, if I recall, that was changed because Eleder didn't exist yet when the associated Act took place, and Senghor was the nearest city we knew was definitely around then. My recollection could be muddled by sleep deprivation, though, so take that with a grain of salt.

Silver Crusade

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Get some sleep, Franchise Manager.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Uchuujin wrote:
'Don't be a Zealot!', proceed to grant Zeal domain.

Sometimes the lore and the rules butt heads, alas.

That said, you can have the things granted by the zeal domain without being a fanatical zealot, which is the point.


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I knew there was a reason I kept gravitating towards Iomedae being the patron of my paladin characters.


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Original blog post wrote:
{. . .} The truly faithful understand that not even the gods themselves are infallible, and that words and promises do not always suffice. Those among us who see no fault in the gods are worse than zealots, worse than puppets. They taint the very idea of faith with their blind devotion. When a god makes a mistake, the results can be disastrous if their faithful do not understand the error. {. . .}
Wei Ji the Learner wrote:


This is a level of Humility and Understanding that has NEVER been highlighted in Iomedae's write-up that I can recall.

It changes a significant perception that I had of her as a deity.

Thank you very much!

This is a level of Humility and Understanding that, to the best of my knowledge, has NEVER before appeared at all in the write-up of any deity or in the teachings of any of their faithful, IN ANY REALITY.

I wonder if Iomedae herself experienced significant redemption at the end of Wrath of the Righteous?


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The other neat side to this is that Iomedae and Cayden Cailean could theoretically have an ale together in a bar and commiserate over how zealotry is bad...

...and it wouldn't be HERESY!


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I really enjoyed reading this, especially because it highlights Iomedae's humility. That's honestly one of my favorite aspects about her.

My head-canon has Iomedae still thinking of herself as a paladin of Aroden, which subconsciously informs her choices, even though he's been gone over a century. Despite being a brave warrior goddess of truth, justice, and honor, she still thinks of herself as a knight sworn to a higher ideal.

Silver Crusade

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As a dedicated Iomedae fanboy, I absolutely ADORE this story. It not only fleshes out Iomedae's personality considerably well, but it also explains how a text titled The Acts of Iomedae contains more instruction than simply "here's what Iomedae did."

And I know from previous discussion on James' own thread that he generally favors more Chaotic types, so I like that he treats this very Lawful character with nuance and respect!


I wonder how Aroden ended up with a neutral good herald (and then a lawful good one later)?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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The Golux wrote:
I wonder how Aroden ended up with a neutral good herald (and then a lawful good one later)?

That's a different story entirely. One that I've not quite figured out myself though.


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The Golux wrote:
I wonder how Aroden ended up with a neutral good herald (and then a lawful good one later)?

Aroden thought he was the protagonist of a harem anime.

Whoops.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kasoh wrote:
The Golux wrote:
I wonder how Aroden ended up with a neutral good herald (and then a lawful good one later)?

Aroden thought he was the protagonist of a harem anime.

Whoops.

Doesn't scan, unless we're considering folks like Tar-Babyphon or whatnot as former members?

:>

It is more believable that personal feelings were involved and he was attempting to build a new surrogate 'family' to replace what was lost during Earthfall.


Rysky wrote:
… when she ascended did she elevate her battle griffon into a servitor?

Nope, the griffon still lives in the Barrow wood. Check Hell's Vengeance book 3 "The Inferno Gate."

Silver Crusade

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Two Headed Snake wrote:
Rysky wrote:
… when she ascended did she elevate her battle griffon into a servitor?
Nope, the griffon still lives in the Barrow wood. Check Hell's Vengeance book 3 "The Inferno Gate."

Thanks.

Unfortunately that would require me to read Hell’s Vengeance -_-


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Welcome to my frustrations. The fact that we have never had a way to issue errata to world lore...

Sounds like you're looking for... your own wiki.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

At the sake of a tangent, running, hosting, and providing a wiki is an exceptionally pricey and involved process. Even if it has crowd-sourced info, it still needs vetting.

I wonder what Iomedae would think of items like wikis, phones, etc.


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Wei Ji the Learner wrote:
Kasoh wrote:
The Golux wrote:
I wonder how Aroden ended up with a neutral good herald (and then a lawful good one later)?

Aroden thought he was the protagonist of a harem anime.

Whoops.

Doesn't scan, unless we're considering folks like Tar-Babyphon or whatnot as former members?

:>

Tar-Baphon has always struck me as a jilted lover or a 'notice me sempai.' with regards to Aroden.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber
Wei Ji the Learner wrote:
At the sake of a tangent, running, hosting, and providing a wiki is an exceptionally pricey and involved process.

Nope.

I mean, sure, if you're super popular it can add up. But I'm running a Wiki for my gaming groups on yet-another-VM on my existing, entry-level server. Running Confluence, which for 10 named editors is free (or maybe it was $10... it was certainly neglibile). And bandwidth is trivially available most places as well. I've got gigabit symmetric fibre to my home. So, for the low, low, price of "what I'm already spending", the deal is done and very likely has the performance scale to handle the Pathfinder community.

Now... data-entry... that's another story.

Quote:
Even if it has crowd-sourced info, it still needs vetting.

I was mostly tongue-in-cheek... a "haha only serious" thing. But really, I was suggesting one that Paizo put the content in, not the crowd.

Silver Crusade

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So, we would have Paizo's official lore wiki, the not-official PFWiki and the undead zombie of the Fandom wiki, which can't die because Fandom are wankers and there's always that one clueless person who will edit it instead of the official...wait, which one is official-official then?


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber
Gorbacz wrote:
So, we would have Paizo's official lore wiki, the not-official PFWiki and the undead zombie of the Fandom wiki, which can't die because Fandom are wankers and there's always that one clueless person who will edit it instead of the official...wait, which one is official-official then?

I hear you. This isn't a real-world possibility for even more reasons. Paizo is in the business of making this content. To write the books then paraphrase them for free is... awkward. I mean, the rules being OGL is one thing, but that makes the game more accessible and valuable, thereby generating sales. If PF1 was closed, my groups would have bought 0 more books than we did, and probably would have found something else to do instead.


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The Glorious Reclamation in Cheliax failed, Heart's Edge is now in the hands of Thrune (and has quite possibly been corrupted), Alexeara Cansellarion is either dead or damned to Hell (via sacrifice, evil spell, or betrayal of her vows), Last Wall is in ruins, the Whispering Tyrant is free, and old Erum-Hel is still around and is preying upon any divine scions Iomedae has sired with mortals.

As much as I respect Iomedae and admire her, she needs to start getting her act together I feel.

Silver Crusade

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I'm sorry, aside from Erum-Hel how is any of that Iomedae's fault?

Silver Crusade

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It's her fault that she hasn't yet descended from the heavens in a blaze of glory, arm in arm with Ragathiel and Torag, joined by all the Lawful Good heroes (and maybe some Neutral Good ones if they promise to repent) and then DESTROYED ALL EVIL using POWER OF GOOD so that Whispering Tyrant, Rovagug, Hellknights and Cayden Cailean would be gone FOREVER!!!

There are some lingering questions as to what would adventures have left to do after that scenario, but I'm sure there would be an odd colony of gelatinous cubes Io and her friends missed during The Radiant Cleansing.


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^Another plausible origin for the Gap and the disappearance of Golarion . . . .

Shadow Lodge

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Rysky wrote:
I'm sorry, aside from Erum-Hel how is any of that Iomedae's fault?

The people who proximately failed were her servants and as their master she is responsible for their actions and omissions.

Silver Crusade

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zimmerwald1915 wrote:
Rysky wrote:
I'm sorry, aside from Erum-Hel how is any of that Iomedae's fault?
The people who proximately failed were her servants and as their master she is responsible for their actions and omissions.

Blaming people and their goddess for getting nuked, adorable.


I really like this post also; the Windsong Testaments are a spectacularly satisfying set of things for me. Thank you, James.


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Berselius wrote:

The Glorious Reclamation in Cheliax failed, Heart's Edge is now in the hands of Thrune (and has quite possibly been corrupted), Alexeara Cansellarion is either dead or damned to Hell (via sacrifice, evil spell, or betrayal of her vows), Last Wall is in ruins, the Whispering Tyrant is free, and old Erum-Hel is still around and is preying upon any divine scions Iomedae has sired with mortals.

As much as I respect Iomedae and admire her, she needs to start getting her act together I feel.

None of this is her fault. Even Erum-Hel would only be her fault, if trying to stop him and barley surviving it could be called that.

And I think the list of her successes are a lot longer. But that is never mentioned in this kind of discussions. Wonder why.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The usual situation, LG deities get the "real life" God projected on them, which means that people who expect their Bestest Goodest deity to be infallible go after every their slightest mistake.

At the same time the people who think religion is opium for masses will go after that "not-Jesus" deity precisely because the first group treats them as representation of their real-world beliefs.

Notice that pretty much nobody ever pokes mistakes of Cayden, Shelyn or Desna despite the fact that you could probably write several books about all oopsies they made. But if Iomedae forgets to validate a parking ticket, it's knives out.

(And let's not forget the "the LG Jesus expy paladin god of taking the sword to evildoers is a woman? A WOMAN??? Oh Paizo, you'll suffer for this!" peeps.)


Gorbacz wrote:

Notice that pretty much nobody ever pokes mistakes of Cayden, Shelyn or Desna despite the fact that you could probably write several books about all oopsies they made. But if Iomedae forgets to validate a parking ticket, it's knives out.

*raises hand*

I give Shelyn stink eyes to this day for being directly responsible for every person dragged into the basement and getting Hellraiser treatment by the local Kuthite cultist.

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