What do you want from a Lost Omens: The Eye of Dread?


Lost Omens Campaign Setting General Discussion


We've now gone around the Inner Sea and hit nearly all the 10 core Meta-Regions with threads like this, but I'd like to cross off one of the remaining two today: the Eye of Dread! Belkzen, the Gravelands, the Isle of Terror, Lake Encarthan, Molthune, Nirmathas, Oprak, and Ustalav make up this area in the heart of Avistan, lands with a grim bent and a fair bit of 1e nostalgia behind them.

The threat of the Whispering Tyrant and his ceaseless ranks of undead defines the region; I imagine putting the hurt on him is going to either going to coincide with 2e Mythic rules or the end of the edition, if not both, but the area's too popular to wait forever for.

And that's what motivates this thread, really - I largely came in with the release of 2e, and so I'm utterly lacking nostalgia for the Eye of Dread. I want to know what you love about it, and what you'd love to see expanded on, added to, or finally resolved within its borders! While Knights of Lastwall offered a taste, I'm not currently a fan, but y'all managed to make me see the light in regards to the Saga Lands, and repeating that success here would be a real treat.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Everything! Joking aside the Eye of Dread is something that I've always held fondly. I love Ustalav and it's gothic/cosmic horror inspirations. I love the direction Paizo is taking the orcs of Belkzen in 2e. I love undead so the Gravelands is a wonderful playground to put whatever monstrosities I want in there. In addition I'm currently running an open world game set in the region, so every bit of information I could get would be useful. Names of orc Holds, names and levels of notable undead in the Gravelands, the political dynamics in Ustalav. The only things that I wouldn't be able to make much use out of would be things about Molthune, Nirmathas, and Oprak, and even then I read through Ironfang Invasion and intend to run it, so getting more info on that region and more context on characters is nice.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'd appreciate being sold on Molthune and Nirmathas some. I hate to say it, but both feel pretty dull to me - what am I missing when I see two feuding countries of militant humans?

Oprak rocks (pun mostly not intended), and Belkzen similarly scratches the itch for "monster" nations being given more nuance and depth than you normally see. I feel a little overexposed on the classic Hammer horror of Ustalav (and Ravenloft, and Innistrad), but its opportunities to get weird with things like the airships from Guns & Gears or its alien-serving cults get me very excited.

I'm not personally all that excited by Tar-Baphon as a bad guy (I've seen a big, mean lich plenty of times before), but the patchwork and tenuous nature of the alliance allayed against him is really compelling. The potential to have a stereotypical party consist of something like a Dhampir Inventor, a Hobgoblin Champion of Iomedae, an Orc Oracle sworn to Sarenrae, and a Skeleton Thaumaturge all together on horror-adjacent adventures is a lot of fun.

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Eye of the Dread is kinda interesting region since its common connecting factor is "countries directly on path of Tar-Babhon's invasion". Lot of the countries wouldn't other wise really fit together in the same group.

Isle of Dread is fairly synonymous with Tar-Babhon, since its treated as "scary dungeon island" rather than country. I think with Tar-Babhon there is bit of mixed up thing with him in lore: pre being released he was treated in lore as this "Super badass villain who is scary" but when you actually look at him between the lines, he is "All mighty idiot". He is basically skeletor with too much powers. A megalomaniac who will waste wish spell to create explosive entrance or perform mortal kombat fatality and spam disintegrate because he can and not because its tactically good. He players like highly powered PC wizard vs lower level mooks just reveling in the carnage.

I personally prefer the slightly comedic sociopath version of him to the "ultimate evil bad guy" version of him, but I think lore should commit on portraying him in the one way and have other characters in setting treat him appropriately.

Lastwall -> Gravelands is fairly interesting topic. Like Lastwall wasn't particularly lacking in potential, its main problem interest wise (besides lack of focus) was that its entire purpose is to guard the seal, so that did restrict it thematic wise a lot. And it really made sense for nation to be destroyed when lich got out and 2e has been doing really good job with turning Knights of Lastwall into interesting faction that is now being more active and offensive rather than passive and defensive. Gravelands is also good post apocalyptic undead zone which we really never had in this massive scale in setting before, so its good as showing threat of Tar-Babhon. I just hope that once paizo isn't afraid of 1e ap spoilers we see more of the radiant fire explosion created mutant jungles ;D

But yeah besides Lastwall all of 1e countries in region actually had a campaign setting book huh.(also means I'll avoid going to super long detail on any of them because uh not gonna summarize multiple books worth of "each country's regions" content) So let's move to easiest one to describe, Ustalav! To nobody surprise the gothic horror land has several APs, Modules and scenarios even books set there so its one of the more used Avistani countries and for good reason. Its good for providing all classic horror flavor and now in 2e we have tesla coil shenanigans too. Plus its not just classic universal movie monsters, there is also lovecraftian horror here(complete with local occult university). Atmosphere of Ustalav is pretty nice ya. Also citizens are mostly varisians so thats alternate to nomadic roma inspired varisians from varisia and elsewhere.

Hold of Belkzen is already in fairly good place from 1e tbh. Sure its bit stereotyped as "wasteland nation" but there is a lot of interesting locales, orc tribes detailed were distinguished from each other and there were interesting characters (still sad the visionary orc leader got killed off in 2e though at least his right hand is continuing his vision of "Orcs really should get into economics and country building") There were at least two different portals to two different evil planes(qlippoth lord's and velstract demagogue's domains) among my personal favorite locales. Also orc pantheon in itself is fun. 2e avoiding the "orcs get united by strong bad guy into army" thing with "orcs kinda getting sick of being treated as disposable mooks so now they take fight to bad guy" thing was fun surprising direction too :D Especially since it complicates their foreign relations to countries previously hostile to them.

Molthune and Nirmathas got both detailed in same campaign setting book, which makes sense since they are really really interconnected. Truth about Molthune and Nirtmathas conflict is this: Its Lawful vs Chaos conflict of the setting really. I think main problem here though is that it kinda shows up Paizo's chaotic bias again since more accurately its "LN imperialistic jerks vs CG plucky guerilla fighters", even if lands of conflict tries to portray it as "below nationalistic pride, its that Molthune care about law and order even if it leads to imperialism while Nirmathas values personal freedom to extreme even if it leads to rabble rousing".

Ancient history wise Molthune was populated by elves and fey(still lot of fey in region) then orcs conquered area, then after whispering tyrant and orcs were repelled pre devil worshipping cheliax settled the land with Molthune as a province. So that is why lot of Molthune shares similarities with Cheliax(including color red!), its pretty much descended from pre devil worshipping version of them and declared independence when Aroden died and cheliax civil war started.

(yeah both Molthune and Nirmathas are fairly new countries)

Molthune does good job at being LN antagonistic human faction with strict order that doesn't go to Hellknight over the top lengths. Nirmathas I honestly think would benefit more form being more CN since while plucky rebels vs jerks is good and all, it makes conflict less ideological and more ethical if one side is also morally righteous ones :p

Anyway, there are some interesting locales on both sides (like Molthune side Palace of Virtue is monastery where several of elder monks are secret dragons, on nirmathas side I'm feeling soft on Kraggodan just because I played dorf in ironfang invasion and campaign went on perma hiatus on book 2 so I never got to see it :p ), but as lands of conflict book name implies, 1e Nirmathas and Molthune's dealio and why they are duo is essentially being the setting for war themed games. Kind of ironic that Ironfang Invasion ignores Molthune for most part and interrupts the war :'D But yeah, with 2e new status quo, Molthune and Nirmathas has truce going on so its now shifted to more of cold war dynamic and they need more development to develop them to new direction.

Oprak is fairly interesting just by its premise: evil military conquest faction settling down and trying to start economy and diplomacy to establish itself as country while also providing new ways for "monstrous people" to show their talents besides just war.


I’d appreciate if Molthune felt at all sympathetic enough to play a character from, as I lone LN characters, especially spies. Are there any nonhumans other than those dwarves in either country?

What other nonhumans are in the region, other than orcs and hobgoblins? Are there any potential Ancestries that would be new to 2e?

Dark Archive

I mean pretty much every human nation in entire setting has all core ancestries featured more or less. But yeah, I do think Molthune would be more interesting if it had extra things to it, like I kinda feel like maybe it should have leaned on monster regiments more or such?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

From the top of my head I know that there is a notable population of fetchlings living in Molthune, next to the border to Nidal. At least notable enough that I picked it up somewhere.

Radiant Oath

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Grimspawn tieflings hang out in both nations too, their daemonic blood resonating with the constant conflict and making them feel right at home.

Liberty's Edge

7 people marked this as a favorite.
keftiu wrote:

I’d appreciate if Molthune felt at all sympathetic enough to play a character from, as I lone LN characters, especially spies. Are there any nonhumans other than those dwarves in either country?

What other nonhumans are in the region, other than orcs and hobgoblins? Are there any potential Ancestries that would be new to 2e?

As you mentioned, dwarves are commonly found in the region. There are a few other groups that are textually referenced in Lands of Conflict in a way that's more than just a one-off NPC with that ancestry:

Molthune:
- Bronze Dragons (the only community of sorts mentioned - a monastery they live in and try to help, but avoid taking leadership positions)
- Ogres (also a community, frustrated with the mistreatment from humans after attempts to join Molthuni (military) society, they're planning to attack Molthune. They're also pretty common across parts of Nirmathas)
- Fetchlings (they have a town called Doommark close to the Nidalese border, and the general's second in command in the region is a fetchling herself)
Nirmathas:
- Half-elves seem particularly common here compared to other ancestries, though there's not much in the way of elven communities detailed
- The settlement of Crystalhurst, a druidic settlement that is one of the more diverse places in the region, with centaurs, gathlains, and ghorans listed as examples of the more unexpected groups found commonly in the settlement. The art depicts an orc/half-orc druid here too.
- Treant populations deep in the forest from the days when elves were more common
- Natural werebears are explicit allies of Crystalhurst and sound fairly organized
- A wide array of fey are mentioned throughout the book, and the Fangwood is very much filled with fey.

From my experience running Ironfang Invasion, I'd say there are a few other groups that could be interesting here in Nirmathas (Molthune isn't touched in the AP):
- Harpies, particularly the Carrion Brides, who formed an agreement with the local cities ~20 years ago to interact peacefully.
- Minotaurs - they were quite common in parts of the Ironfang Invasion's forces, and presumably came from the local area
- Ratfolk don't seem to be native to the area, but there's a community of them near the mining towns that have settled in with great success

In general, I find Molthune to be the weaker of the two. Nirmathas is an interesting attempt by Paizo to explore a minimally hierarchical society that is Good aligned, even if I don't necessarily agree with everything in there. It's also got the fey + druid interactions that give you something other than an exclusive focus on the Nirmathi-Molthuni conflict. I find Molthune suffers in that exclusive focus - it has some stuff about its interactions with Cheliax/Isger/Druma, but not very much. The parts of Molthune that interests me are that it is technically a LN society, and their interactions with "monsters". They have these "monstrous regiments" in their army that include just about anyone in their armed forces - ogres, goblins, hobgoblins, minotaurs, and the like. In a way it's more accepting of groups that otherwise are just excluded from most societies, but they also keep them seperate from the rest of their society and don't treat them well. It also really doesn't feel particularly LN from its interactions so far, but theoretically an ex-Chelish state that rebelled against Cheliax but stayed relayed close to Chelish ways is interesting to me, and I find Paizo has a pretty bad track record with making LN states into ones that are borderline LE, so grounds to revisit Molthune and look at it with a new light is interesting to me. Combining that with the monstrous regiments would be an interesting direction for the nation to go for me - a fairly radical acceptance of groups that are otherwise considered monsters in an LN state would definitely be one I'd like to see!

Other things that may be of interest is Nirmathi raids into Nidal to liberate slaves - I find Nidal an interesting place, but it tends to be extremely isolated and doesn't interact much with the surrounding world. If Nirmathas' Molthune problems came to an end, Nidal has been stated as the area that Nirmathas would most oppose.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Arcaian wrote:
a bunch of lovely stuff

I appreciate such an insightful reply! If Molthune is my best angle on getting Minotaurs playable in the Inner Sea, then that sees them climb my list pretty significantly. Them trying to treat their “monsters” better to try and avoid a repeat of Azaersi’s trick would give them some much-needed depth. Citizenship for anyone and anything that serves feels very LN, and letting them be so pragmatically egalitarian helps them be more than "the militant jerks."

My opinion of Molthune and Nirmathas at present is "the fash kingdom against the Robin Hood rebel state," and that's understandably unappetizing. If they lean harder into 'monster' citizens being accepted in the former and fey likewise defining the latter, that's a pair I'm much more excited about, and that feels much more distinctly Golarion. Scouts drawing on the power of the Eldest clashing with disciplined minotaur ranks - or better yet, uncomfortably working together? Yes, please.


7 people marked this as a favorite.

I'm greatly interested in the diplomatic relations between Nirmathas, Molthune, and Oprak and how in every interaction between any two they play the third against the other.

I think the Nirmathas/Molthune thing gets a lot interesting when you add Oprak to the mix. Since Molthune can remind her about how they gave her a chance as a soldier (never mind the other stuff) and Nirmathas can remind her of the Nirmathi heroes that saved her from disaster and helped her secure her own kingdom for her people. Mothune can remind Nirmathas that "it was Oprak that invaded and burned your cities not us." Finally Nirmathas can remind Azersi about what happened after she got her start in Molthune's legion of monsters.

This is a much more fun dynamic than "Molthune wants to conquer Nirmathas and Nirmathas doesn't want that." Particularly since Oprak has the potential to be an economic powerhouse particularly given how everybody south of Lake Encarthan needs to consider their military readiness seriously.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
keftiu wrote:
Arcaian wrote:
a bunch of lovely stuff

I appreciate such an insightful reply! If Molthune is my best angle on getting Minotaurs playable in the Inner Sea, then that sees them climb my list pretty significantly. Them trying to treat their “monsters” better to try and avoid a repeat of Azaersi’s trick would give them some much-needed depth. Citizenship for anyone and anything that serves feels very LN, and letting them be so pragmatically egalitarian helps them be more than "the militant jerks."

My opinion of Molthune and Nirmathas at present is "the fash kingdom against the Robin Hood rebel state," and that's understandably unappetizing. If they lean harder into 'monster' citizens being accepted in the former and fey likewise defining the latter, that's a pair I'm much more excited about, and that feels much more distinctly Golarion. Scouts drawing on the power of the Eldest clashing with disciplined minotaur ranks - or better yet, uncomfortably working together? Yes, please.

Exactly what I was thinking! Them responding to Azaersi's actions by instituting a rule that citizenship for anyone who serves, no matter what both makes sense to emphasise that it is an LN state, and given the new existence of Oprak, it does seem like an effective way to try to keep those regiments they'd previously relied on and otherwise may be heading to Oprak. Some of the art of Molthune does seem inspired by Rome (though much of it more classically medieval fantasy), which this would tie into well. Some degree of egalitarianism like this definitely does have textual support as well - from one of the more influential minotaurs in the Ironfang Invasion AP:

Ironfang Invasion wrote:
In Molthune, her physical power and strategic mind were not only respected, but feared. As one of the army’s terrifying mercenary legions—the War Maze— [redacted] and her followers grew powerful and wealthy by crushing humans distracted by petty squabbles.

And as both you and PossibleCabbage mention, an uneasy alliance between Oprak, Molthune, and Nirmathas with the emergence of Tar-Baphon (and the intrigue that is surely happening alongside that) seems like an interesting perspective for the region, opening it up to more than just the relatively one-note conflict that was previously there between Molthune and Nirmathas.

Dark Archive

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Arcaian wrote:
and I find Paizo has a pretty bad track record with making LN states into ones that are borderline LE

Ye this is definitely issue. I don't mind occasional LN or CN bad guys, but Paizo is definitely biased as treating Chaotic as automatically "more good than Lawful" and even LG sometimes get treated as "lesser good"

It's also why I think Molthune leaning more into "monsters can earn citizenship through service" and such would make it more 3d dimensional while not completely leaving their jerk status behind. Like, Molthune needs extra gimmick to it than "relatively mundane and less over the top malicious pompous military state" to it which just makes it seem like lesser Cheliax.

keftiu wrote:
Arcaian wrote:
a bunch of lovely stuff

I appreciate such an insightful reply! If Molthune is my best angle on getting Minotaurs playable in the Inner Sea, then that sees them climb my list pretty significantly. Them trying to treat their “monsters” better to try and avoid a repeat of Azaersi’s trick would give them some much-needed depth. Citizenship for anyone and anything that serves feels very LN, and letting them be so pragmatically egalitarian helps them be more than "the militant jerks."

My opinion of Molthune and Nirmathas at present is "the fash kingdom against the Robin Hood rebel state," and that's understandably unappetizing. If they lean harder into 'monster' citizens being accepted in the former and fey likewise defining the latter, that's a pair I'm much more excited about, and that feels much more distinctly Golarion. Scouts drawing on the power of the Eldest clashing with disciplined minotaur ranks - or better yet, uncomfortably working together? Yes, please.

This idea for Nirmathas is also really good because it both makes nation feel moer fantasy and makes sense as already established.


I seem to remember a mentioning of Molthune having quite strict laws of war. Just adding some balance to the 'are they evil or neutral' discussion. I think Molthune could be characterised as amoral rather than immoral. Maybe it could be written as a rather nice place to live just without freedom, whereas Nirmathas can be seen as the opposite with total freedom but impoverished and dangerous.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Molthune could be reeling from the Ironfang events and assessing the worth of the monsters as soldiers (then citizens) system. Monstrous citizens and high-ranking military officials who backed the system might sponsor like-minded soldiers, both humans and monsters, to prove the worth of this system in front of the far greater threat of Tar-Baphon.

While those with entrenched prejudices might try and sabotage these efforts to make sure the promotion system ends for good.

In a way, it is a font of military tropes, plots and dilemna.

Acquisitives

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

ISLE. OF. TERROR.

that is all.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The thing about both Molthune and Nirmathas is that the cultures are very set in their ways to the extent of being somewhat self-defeating. The Imperial Governor and the Forest Marshal hate each other, but they could have multiple in-depth conversations about the uphill battles they fight trying to save their peoples from themselves.

(Speaking of which: how is the "no slavery" rule going to work with Molthune? Their underclass was specifically called out as being slaves in all but name)

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I have an adventure I'm working on whose background is basically: a powerful undead lieutenant of Tar-Baphon has gathered up an army in the Gravelands and laid siege to Vellumis, the last stronghold of the Knights of Lastwall. In response, an emergency coalition of troops from Molthune, Kraggodan, Nirmathas, and Oprak marched out to relieve the siege, but were intercepted by the undead rearguard and lost that big battle.

That's where the adventure begins, with the PCs trying to escape the battlefield alongside whatever allied units than can save/persuade and desperately trying to hold this fractious & mistrustful alliance together to keep them all alive. So it would be a running battle back toward Nirthmathi/Oprak territory, seeking a place to turn and make a stand so undead hordes don't just roll down the western Lake Encarthan nations.

I have the Molthuni as basically being a "citizen-service" type of polity, prizing their national identity and willing to welcome anyone who will assimilate--but they have to assimilate, if Molthune tolerated dissent and melting pots they wouldn't have been fighting Nirmathas for sixty year.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

It's not too hard to imagine the Ironfang Invasion prompting some pragmatic reforms, up to and including the abolition of slavery. All who serve the state are equal... in theory, anyway, and LOWG shows some tension there between those who recently earned their citizenship (including a number of 'monsters') and the old elite.

While I wait for Minotaurs, it might be fun to roll up a Molthuni Gnoll of some sort.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I wouldn't mind seeing Molthune as the meritocratic country. The militarization makes them (theoretically) partially there already.

Acquisitives

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
SOLDIER-1st wrote:
I wouldn't mind seeing Molthune as the meritocratic country. The militarization makes them (theoretically) partially there already.

Molthune is clearly an aristocracy.

Which is why they hate Nirmathas.

(and if you think militarism can equate with meritocracy, I got a bridge to sell you)


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Yakman wrote:
SOLDIER-1st wrote:
I wouldn't mind seeing Molthune as the meritocratic country. The militarization makes them (theoretically) partially there already.

Molthune is clearly an aristocracy.

Which is why they hate Nirmathas.

(and if you think militarism can equate with meritocracy, I got a bridge to sell you)

It's a military oligarchy, which while similar is not an aristocracy.

I recognize the inherent difficulties in establishing a meritocracy, and acknowledge that militarization does not equate to such. Saying that I would like to see it as one does not mean I am in any way confused by the actual state of things. I was merely expressing my desire to explore that concept in this particular fiction, as it is thematically an easy (and to me at least, satisfying) jump.

Wayfinders

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Here's an angle that's not yet been discussed - what's the religious makeup of the area? What gods and other faiths are common around here, that could theoretically show up in an EoD book? We're in the middle of Avistan, so presumably every core god has at least a modicum of presence, but which faiths might stand out here?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Pharasma is the top lady in Ustalav (which is also my favorite country in Golarion, so I am ALWAYS delighted t to see it get any screentime at all.) There's demon lords out and about too, of course...


RiverMesa wrote:

Here's an angle that's not yet been discussed - what's the religious makeup of the area? What gods and other faiths are common around here, that could theoretically show up in an EoD book? We're in the middle of Avistan, so presumably every core god has at least a modicum of presence, but which faiths might stand out here?

PFS has specific groups of both Sarenite orcs out of Belkzen and Iomedean hobgoblins from Belkzen.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

There's a part of me that just will not let go of a haggard Molthuni veteran... who just happens to be a Shoony. This little greying pug-person, barking orders and rallying defenses for the country that gave her citizenship.

Liberty's Edge

3 people marked this as a favorite.
RiverMesa wrote:

Here's an angle that's not yet been discussed - what's the religious makeup of the area? What gods and other faiths are common around here, that could theoretically show up in an EoD book? We're in the middle of Avistan, so presumably every core god has at least a modicum of presence, but which faiths might stand out here?

Religion does seem to be something that large parts of the region treat differently to the standard model in Pathfinder of picking a single deity to worship. Molthune seems more traditional in that manner - a Prince-Archbanker (cleric of Abadar) de-facto runs the city of Braganza, and clerics are mentioned as common in more mundane positions like prison guards. Although Nirmathas does have some clerics present in it (Cayden Cailean and Erastil seem the most common from the textual evidence), but nature-based faiths that don't necessarily involve traditional deities are particularly common across the nation - with the Fangwood basically regarded as Nirmathas' national guardian, the forest itself is almost worshiped. There's also an interesting tidbit that the worship of Iomedae is common in Nirmathas - originally coming down from Lastwall with retired knights, but nowadays worshiped as a deity of just self-rule, which is a very interesting interaction between an LG deity and a CG society. Gorum and Milani are mentioned as semi-popular deities, in the places you'd expect, and Calistria among the more vengeful of Nirmathas' populace. In recent releases, they fey queen of the Fangwood Gendowyn has been released as a deity, presumably worshiped in Nirmathas more than most locations. We haven't got much information on Oprak, but I'd imagine Hadregash is a particularly common deity in the region - he certainly was among the Ironfangs before they settled.

In addition to the (very cool) Burning Sun mentioned by keftiu in the Holds of Belkzen, there are also the expected candidates: Rovagug, Lamashtu, Gorum, Urgathoa (though Urgathoa and Gorum are considered human/elf gods, and some deride them), and the orcish pantheon of deities (all CE). There is an interesting note in Belkzen, Hold of the Orc Hordes that orcs avoid explicitly saying the name of a deity, including their own - speaking the name of a god draws their attention, and that rarely is considered a good thing. There might be additional details outside of the Hold of Belkzen campaign setting book, but the Burning Sun are the only group I know that are pushing back against the stereotypical orc deities in Belkzen - but it definitely feels like Paizo has been making an effort in that direction in recent years, so hopefully we'll get to see some interesting and more nuanced takes on Orcish religion in a book like this.

Ustalav definitely has two key deities above all others - Pharasma and Urgathoa. It features a lot of secret cults, underground religious societies, and complex intrigues relating to religion - but surprisingly few of them have actually been detailed so far. The one I find most interesting that has been detailed is The Harlequin Society in the city of Karcau - they're secretly a cult of Alichino, the malebranche responsible for leading the attempt by Hell to conquer Golarion. It's an interesting plot point that hasn't really been focused on so far, and that could be fun to flesh out.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Don't forget the smattering of Old Cults throughout Ustalav as well. They aren't exceedingly common, but they did get a book to themselves in Carrion Crown.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I'd appreciate a 2e look at the Orc Pantheon. The Mwangi Expanse dodged it pretty cleverly with them revering Majagua/Kazutal (which I loved!), but at some point there needs to be a reckoning of some sort with the gods of this people all being CE and monstrous. As a gal whose formative fantasy years featured the orc nation of Many-Arrows being founded despite all expectations, I'd really love to similarly fall for Belkzen and its people, and their faith is part of that.

As for Ustalav's cults, the Night Heralds are my preference; the Dominion of the Black are my single favorite antagonists in Pathfinder, and I find the explicit Lovecraft elements a little hokey when they pop up. Bring on the fleshfarms!

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Honestly kinda wondering what is up with Orc pantheon because in 1e they each had four domains which was usually sign of them being demigods. Like is orc pantheon just bunch of ascended orcs who became god-like in Volkorgoth?

Acquisitives

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
CorvusMask wrote:
Honestly kinda wondering what is up with Orc pantheon because in 1e they each had four domains which was usually sign of them being demigods. Like is orc pantheon just bunch of ascended orcs who became god-like in Volkorgoth?

yeah, i thought they were sorta like hero-gods...


Yakman wrote:
CorvusMask wrote:
Honestly kinda wondering what is up with Orc pantheon because in 1e they each had four domains which was usually sign of them being demigods. Like is orc pantheon just bunch of ascended orcs who became god-like in Volkorgoth?
yeah, i thought they were sorta like hero-gods...

The wiki seems to explicitly call them this, but I’m not in a place to double-check its sources at the moment.


This doesn't exactly relate to the thread's topic, but I'm glad that PF2E disconnected a deity's divine power from the number of domains that deity can grant and now gives all deities four, along with any others worshipers might associate with them. It's less gamified, which feels appropriate for gods considering they're meant to be pure plot device.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Lost Omens Campaign Setting / General Discussion / What do you want from a Lost Omens: The Eye of Dread? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.