The Inheiritance of the Crimson Sun (Legacy of Fire AP in Dark Sun)

Game Master Sebecloki

Maps and Images:

Battlemaps:

Current Encounter Maps:

Myceloid Cavern
Earth Drake Layer: Overview
Earth Drake Layer w/our Grid
Earth Drake Layer w/ Grid

Battlemaps
Hex Grid

The Ruins of Kalidnay
The Ruins of Kalidnay I: The Ceramic Desert and Outskirts of New Kalid
The Ruins of Kalidnay II: Elder Kalidnay and the Diamond Mines of Khnum-Khamunkhephres
The Ruins of Kalidnay III: The Iridescent Desert and Magma Lake

Setting Maps

The Free City of Tyr
The Ruins of Yaramuke
The City State of Raam

The World of Athas

World Map I
World Map II
World Map III

Some additional ideas from the 'Arena' discussion forums of Athas.org that I will be using for this fan-created expansion of the Dark Sun world map include ideas from the following threads:

East side of the Sea of Silt

Beyond the Tablelands

And here are some ideas I will be incorporating in some fashion if Spelljamming ever comes up:

Dark Sun Sphere

The Tablelands and Beyond

The Tablelands I
The Tablelands II
The Tablelands and Beyond I
The Tablelands and Beyond II

Giuestenal

The Ruins of Giustenal
New Giuestenal

Chapter One: The Howl of the Carrion King

Tyr Region

The Ruins of Kalidnay Overview

The Riese: Levels 1-2
The Riese -- Side Perspective

The Scarab Hold: The Fortress of the High Templar Ahmun-Ahnpur -- Overview
The Scarab Hold: The Fortress of the High Templar Ahmun-Ahnpur -- The Spires of Apep: The Central Keep

Destiny's Chariot -- Overview
Destiny's Chariot -- Detail

Trading Post of Kelmarane I
Trading Post of Kelmarane II

Battle Market of Kelmarane -- Ground Level
Battle Market of Kelmarane -- Second Level

Temple of Elemental Earth of Kelmarane

Guard Post I
Guard Post II

Sulfuric Baths of Kelmarane -- Overview
Sulfuric Baths of Kelmarane -- Detail

Guild Hall of Kelmarane

Mills


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I also want to invite people to consider outside the box thinking for this combat -- you might be able to retreat into a closed space, or collapse the ceiling or teleport the monster away or something. You may not be able to bash this thing into submission.


Male Yaksha Shadow Lord Stalker 6/Harbinger 6(gestalt) Trickster 2(mythic), Mage Hunter 2

Already thinking that way as of last night. Just don't know how to get the thing to move how I want it to.


Hamza Mīnakshi wrote:
Already thinking that way as of last night. Just don't know how to get the thing to move how I want it to.

Also I should note this generally so everyone understands my adventure design philosophy -- these areas are more like Frog God Games modules such as Rappan Athuk than some Paizo APs. In other words, there aren't CR 1, 2, 3 etc. areas with monsters that are only appropriate for that level. Instead, it's more of an ecosystem with stuff from between CR 1-16 or so -- which is more realistic. You'll encounter stuff you can mow over, and stuff you can't. It's not slotted into specific spaces, and the monsters wander around. That's also how Rappan Athuk is.


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Under "Skills" in the build rules, you might want to note that we are using background skills also.


Male Yaksha Shadow Lord Stalker 6/Harbinger 6(gestalt) Trickster 2(mythic), Mage Hunter 2

Couple of questions,

1) For vitality, I assume we use the PF updated hit die? Ie, Wiz/Sorc(etc) are now d6 as opposed to d4 and Rogues are bumped up to d8s.

2) You had said that two players were coming over from your GitP game, yet I only see Genth so far, right?

Is the other play still planning on joining?

I ask cuz I have a buddy here on Paizo who I was considering asking if he wanted to join.


Is the golem on the map? I can't see it. Also can I post Devapala into th3 fight now?


Male Yaksha Shadow Lord Stalker 6/Harbinger 6(gestalt) Trickster 2(mythic), Mage Hunter 2

Some more questions,

1) I'm thinking of taking Nightblade via the HOP Gestalt feat. Is this okay?

2) Assuming it is okay, the path I want to take is Darkened Fortress

Would I be able to apply my attunement benefits from ABP to the weapon I create via Shadow Armament? It functions similar to a Soulknife's mindblade, so I assume so.

3) I kinda wanna chose familiar for Shadow Bond. Is there anyway I could enhance it via like templates or something, to keep it alive/useful?


Hamza Mīnakshi wrote:

Couple of questions,

1) For vitality, I assume we use the PF updated hit die? Ie, Wiz/Sorc(etc) are now d6 as opposed to d4 and Rogues are bumped up to d8s.

2) You had said that two players were coming over from your GitP game, yet I only see Genth so far, right?

Is the other play still planning on joining?

I ask cuz I have a buddy here on Paizo who I was considering asking if he wanted to join.

(1) The updated values.

(2) Still waiting, I'll let you know by the weekend if you can ask your other friend. We have openings in the Runelords game if he just wants to join another.


Genth wrote:
Is the golem on the map? I can't see it. Also can I post Devapala into th3 fight now?

slides 1-2 are a connected map section. The golem is the mantis thing on 1 next to jiumbli


Hamza Mīnakshi wrote:

Some more questions,

1) I'm thinking of taking Nightblade via the HOP Gestalt feat. Is this okay?

2) Assuming it is okay, the path I want to take is Darkened Fortress

Would I be able to apply my attunement benefits from ABP to the weapon I create via Shadow Armament? It functions similar to a Soulknife's mindblade, so I assume so.

3) I kinda wanna chose familiar for Shadow Bond. Is there anyway I could enhance it via like templates or something, to keep it alive/useful?

1-fine

2-fine
3-just use the same build rules as characters for familiars or whatever


I'm assuming everyone needs a bit of time to finish updating, so I'm just posting 'interludes' and similar non-rules posts to keep the thread active.

Let's try to finish updates by this weekend maybe? Then I'll post the ROUND two actions for the Crimson Sentry golem.


Cae Leonidas wrote:
Under "Skills" in the build rules, you might want to note that we are using background skills also.

Thanks, updated


I realized I linked to 3.5 wounds and vitality, not PF wounds and vigor. I actually want to combine elements of both, and call it wounds and vitality (I think vitality sounds better than vigor). I just tired to combine the two -- here's my effort, any comments would be welcome:

Wounds and Vitality

Just as armor class is an abstraction, so are hit points —after all, just because a dagger does 1d4 points of damage doesn’t mean a high-level fighter is somehow immune to having his throat slit. This alternate system attempts to better represent the differences between injuries and impeded performance.

Hit points are an abstraction. When a fighter gains a level, his body does not suddenly become more resistant to damage. A sword’s strike does not suddenly do proportionately less damage. Rather, hit points suggest that the fighter has undergone more training, and while he may have improved his ability to deal with wounds to a small degree, the hit points gained at higher levels reflect less his capacity for physical punishment and more his skill at avoiding hits, his ability to dodge and twist and turn. Each loss of hit points, in this case, suggests that he is becoming progressively less nimble over the course of combat—in other words, that the decreasing hit points are a marker for his overall endurance and condition. It’s not quite as satisfying, however, to roll a critical hit and then tell a player that his opponent ducked out of the way, but that the sword’s slash made the enemy a little less lucky.

This variant system for tracking wounds and vitality should help to remedy that.

The vitality and wound points system was originally developed as a more cinematic method of handling damage than the traditional hit point system. The system allows for characters to improve the amount of punishment they can withstand as they go up in level, while still allowing for a single lucky attack to take down a character.

Metagame Analysis: Vitality And Wounds

Characters using this system should be more wary in combat, which can turn deadly in the space of a few lucky rolls. But they can also bounce back from a fight much more quickly. For that reason, this variant is an ideal system for low-magic campaigns or games where healing is otherwise rare.

A very weak creature in this system tends to be tougher to kill than in a standard d20 game, since its Constitution score is often higher than the number of hit points it might have had. Very big creatures are also more durable, due to their size modifier. This is reflected in the CR adjustments given in the variant rules.

Creatures capable of dealing a large amount of damage on a single hit become significantly more deadly in this system, since a lucky attack roll can give a deadly blow to almost any character. For critical hits, consider reducing the additional damage from bonus damage dice (such as a flaming sword or a rogue’s sneak attack) to only 1 point per die. (Such attacks deal normal damage on noncritical hits.) That’s still pretty scary when fighting a high-level rogue, but not quite as terrifying as facing the possibility of an extra 5 or 10 dice of wound point damage with a successful sneak attack critical hit. You may find other places where damage needs adjustment in this system as well; don’t be afraid to tinker when needed to keep your game fun and exciting.
Constitution damage is especially deadly under this variant, since every point of Constitution damage reduces wound points by 1 and every 2 points of damage reduces vitality by a number of points equal to the character’s HD. If a character’s Constitution is reduced to 0, he dies even if he has wound points remaining.

Determining Wound Points and Vitality Points

Instead of hit points, creatures using this system have a number of wound points and vitality points. These two replacement scores are kept track of separately, and represent different ways a character handles the damage inflicted on him. The following are descriptions of these scores and how they work within the variant system of damage tracking.
Wound points measure how much true physical damage a character can withstand. Damage reduces wound points only after all vitality points are gone, or when a character is struck by a critical hit. A character has a number of wound points equal to double her current Constitution score.

Wound Points

Typically a creature has a number of wound points equal to twice its Constitution score. It also has a wound threshold equal to its Constitution score. Wound points represent the amount of physical punishment a creature can take before it dies. When a creature’s wound points drop to or below its wound threshold, that creature becomes wounded. When a creature is wounded, it gains the staggered condition until it is no longer wounded. Furthermore, when a creature is wounded, if that creature takes any standard or move action on its turn, its remaining wound points are reduced by 1 and it must make a DC 10 Constitution check. If the creature fails that check, it falls unconscious.

When a creature reaches 0 or fewer wound points, it is dead.
Wound Points and Constitution Damage, Drain, and Penalties: A creature’s wound points and Constitution score are intrinsically linked. For each point of Constitution damage a creature takes, it loses 2 wound points, but this damage does not affect the creature’s wound threshold. When a creature takes a penalty to its Constitution score or its Constitution is drained, it loses 1 wound point per point of drain or per penalty for the duration of the penalty or drain. A penalty to Constitution or Constitution drain has no effect on the creature’s wound threshold.

Vitality Points

Vitality represents a creature’s ability to avoid the majority of actual physical damage it might take from an attack. When a creature takes damage, the damage typically reduces its vitality points first. Some special attacks either deal wound point damage directly or deal both vitality and wound point damage (see Critical Hits).

Creatures with one or more full Hit Dice or levels gain vitality points. With each level gained or each Hit Die a creature has, it gains a number of vitality points based on its Hit Die type. Use the creature’s Hit Dice to generate its vitality points, just like you would hit points, but without adding the creature’s Constitution modifier. A creature gains maximum Vitality points on its first Hit Die if it comes from a character class level. Creatures whose first full Hit Die comes from an NPC class or from their race roll their Hit Dice to determine their starting Vitality points. A creature with less than one Hit Die has no vitality points; it only has wound points.

When a creature no longer has any vitality points, any additional damage it takes reduces its wound point total.

Vitality Points

Table: Vitality Points

Class Vitality Points at 1st level Vitality Die

Barbarian 12 + Con mod d12
Bard 8 + Con mod d8
Cleric 8 + Con mod d8
Druid 8 + Con mod d8
Fighter 10 + Con mod d10
Monk 8 + Con mod d8
Paladin 10 + Con mod d10
Ranger 8 + Con mod d8
Rogue 8 + Con mod d8
Sorcerer 6 + Con mod d4
Wizard 6 + Con mod d6

Vitality points are a measure of a character’s ability to turn a direct hit into a graze or a glancing blow with no serious consequences. Like hit points in the standard d20 rules, vitality points go up with level, giving high-level characters more ability to shrug off attacks. Most types of damage reduce vitality points.

Characters gain vitality points as they gain levels. Just as with hit points in the standard d20 rules, at each level a character rolls a vitality die and adds his Constitution modifier, adding the total to his vitality point total. (And, just as with hit points, a character always gains at least 1 vitality point per level, regardless of his roll or Constitution modifier.) A 1st-level character gets the maximum vitality die result rather than rolling, as shown on Table 4-6 below.

Regaining Wound Points and Vitality Points

A creature can regain wound and vitality points in a number of ways, but in general it is easier to regain vitality points.

Healing Spells and Effects: When casting healing spells or using an ability with a healing effect (such as channeling holy energy on living creatures or the paladin’s lay on hands ability), the creature casting the spell or using the effect must choose whether it wants to heal wound points or vitality points. The creature decides this before casting the spell or using the ability. When that creature decides to heal vitality points, the healing spell or effect acts normally, replenishing a number of vitality points equal to the number of hit points the spell or effect would normally heal. If the creature decides to heal wound points, it heals a number of wound points equal to the number of dice it would normally roll for the healing spell or effect. In the case of effects like the heal spell, where a spell or effect heals 10 hit points per caster level, the creature heals its caster level in wound points. For instance, if a 12th-level cleric uses her channel positive energy power to replenish wound points to living creatures, she would typically heal 6 wound points for all living creatures with her channel energy burst. If she casts the heal spell, she would restore 12 wound points to the creature touched.

Rest:

When a creature has a full night’s rest (8 hours of sleep or more), that creature regains all its vitality points and 1 wound point. If there is a significant interruption during a rest, the creature regains neither wound points nor vitality points. If a creature undergoes complete bed rest for an entire day, it regains half its level in wound points and all its vitality points.

Restoration and Similar Effects:

When a creature regains Constitution points by way of the restoration spell or a similar effect, that creature regains 2 wound points for every Constitution point regained. Relieving a Constitution penalty or Constitution drain regains any wound points that were lost from that penalty or drain.

Attacks That Deal Wound Point Damage

Some attacks can be used to deal wound points damage directly.

Negative Energy Damage:

When a creature deals negative energy damage to a creature with a spell or effect, it can choose to deal wound point or vitality point damage (but not both) with the spell or effect. If that creature chooses to deal vitality point damage, the spell or effect deals negative energy damage normally, and that damage reduces vitality points only, even if it deals more damage than the target has vitality points. If the spell or effect deals negative energy damage to wound points directly, it deals an amount of wound point damage equal to the number of dice the creature would roll for that effect; if the effect deals a number of points per caster level (such as the harm spell), it deals a number of wound points equal to the caster level of the spell.

Critical Hits

A critical hit deals the same amount of damage as a normal hit, but that damage is deducted from wound points rather than from vitality points. Critical hits do not deal extra damage; for that reason, no weapon in this system has a damage multiplier for its critical hits.

Any critical hit automatically overcomes a creature’s damage reduction, regardless of whether or not the attack could normally do so.

Most weapons retain their normal critical threat range. If a weapon normally has a critical multiplier greater than ×2, the weapon’s threat range expands by 1 point per additional multiplier, as indicated on the table below.

Multiplier New Threat Range

×3 19-20
×4 18-20
×5 17-20

Injury And Death

Vitality and wound points together measure how hard a character is to hurt and kill. The damage from each successful attack and each fight accumulates, dropping a character’s vitality point or wound point total until he runs out of points.

Nonlethal Damage

This system doesn’t differentiate between lethal and nonlethal damage. Attacks and effects that normally deal nonlethal damage reduce vitality points, except on a critical hit, in which case they reduce wound points.

0 Vitality Points

At 0 vitality points, a character can no longer avoid taking real physical damage. Any additional damage he receives reduces his wound points.

Taking Wound Damage

The first time a character takes wound damage—even a single point—he becomes fatigued. A fatigued character can’t run or charge and takes a -2 penalty to Strength and Dexterity until he has rested for 8 hours (or until the wound damage is healed, if that occurs first). Additional wound damage doesn’t make the character exhausted.

In addition, any time an attack deals wound damage to a character, he must succeed on a Fortitude saving thow (DC 5 + number of wound points lost from the attack) or be stunned for 1d4 rounds. (During that time, any other character can take a standard action to help the stunned character recover; doing so ends the stunned condition.)

0 Wound Points

Wound points cannot drop below 0; any damage that would cause a character’s wound point total to drop below 0 simply causes the character to have 0 wound points.

At 0 wound points, a character is disabled and must attempt a DC 15 Fortitude save. If he succeeds on the save, he is merely disabled. If he fails, he falls unconscious and begins dying.

Disabled

A disabled character is conscious, but can only take a single move or standard action each turn (but not both, nor can she take full-round actions). She moves at half speed. Taking move actions doesn’t risk further injury, but performing any standard action (or any other action the GM deems strenuous, including some free actions such as casting a quickened spell) worsen the character’s condition to dying (unless it involved healing; see below).

Dying

A dying character is unconscious and near death. Each round on his turn, a dying character must make a Fortitude save (DC 10, +1 per turn after the first) to become stable.

If the character fails the save, he dies.

If the character succeeds on the save by less than 5, he does not die but does not improve. He is still dying and must continue to make Fortitude saves every round.

If the character succeeds on the save by 5 or more but by less than 10, he becomes stable but remains unconscious.

If the character succeeds on the save by 10 or more, he becomes conscious and disabled.

Another character can make a dying character stable by succeeding on a DC 15 Heal check as a standard action (which provokes attacks of opportunity).

Stable Characters and Recovery

A stable character is unconscious. Every hour, a stable character must succeed on a Fortitude save (DC 10, +1 per hour after the first) to remain stable.

If the character fails the save, he becomes dying.

If the character succeeds on the save by less than 5, he does not get any worse, but does not improve. He is still stable and unconscious, and must continue to make Fortitude saves every hour.

If the character succeeds on the save by 5 or more, he becomes conscious and disabled.

An unaided stable, conscious character at 0 wound points has a 10% chance to start recovering wound points naturally that day.
Once an unaided character starts recovering wound points naturally, he is no longer in danger of dying.

Recovering with Help

A dying character can be made stable with a DC 15 Heal check (a standard action that provokes attacks of opportunity). One hour after a tended, dying character becomes stable, roll d%. He has a 10% chance of regaining consciousness, at which point he becomes disabled. If he remains unconscious, he has the same chance to regain consciousness every hour. Even while unconscious, he recovered wound points naturally, becoming conscious and able to resume normal activity when his wound points rise to 1 or higher.

Special Damage Situations

The vitality point system changes the way some special damage effects work.

Coup de Grace

A coup de grace functions normally in that it automatically hits and scores a critical hit (and thus the damage dealt is applied to the target’s wound points). If the defender survives the damage, he must make a Fortitude save (DC 10 + the amount of damage dealt) or die.

Massive Damage

The massive damage rule does not apply under this system.

Healing

After taking damage, a character can recover vitality and wound points through natural healing (over the course of hours or days), or by magic. In any case, a character can’t regain vitality points or wound points above his full normal totals.

Natural Healing

Characters recover vitality points at a rate of one vitality point per hour per character level.

With a full night’s rest, a character recovers 1 wound point per character level (minimum 1 per night), or twice that amount with complete bed rest for 24 hours. Any significant interruption during the rest period prevents the character from healing that night.

Assisted Healing

A character who provides long-term care doubles the rate at which a wounded character recovers lost vitality and wound points.

Magical Healing

Spells that heal hit point damage work somewhat differently in this system. For spells that heal a variable amount of hit point damage based on a die roll (such as cure light wounds), apply the actual die roll as restored vitality points, and any modifier to the die roll (such as caster level, for cure spells) as restored wound points.

For example, cure moderate wounds heals 2d8 points of damage, +1 point per caster level (maximum +10). Under this system, a 10th-level cleric could cast it to heal 2d8 vitality points and 10 wound points.

Spells or effects that return a number of hit points not based on a die roll, such as heal, apply the healing to lost wound points first, then to lost vitality. For example, an 11th-level cleric casting heal has 110 points of healing to apply. If the target has taken 12 points of wound damage and 104 points of vitality damage, the spell heals all the wound damage and 98 points of the vitality damage, leaving the target with only 6 points of vitality damage remaining.

NPCs And Monsters

Size Wound Point Multiplier

Fine ×1/8
Diminutive ×¼
Tiny ×½
Small ×1
Medium ×1
Large ×1
Huge ×2
Gargantuan ×4
Colossal ×8

Vitality points are only granted by the “heroic” classes, such as the standard character classes and various prestige classes. The NPC classes—adept, aristocrat, commoner, expert and warrior—grant no vitality points (either at 1st level or thereafter). Such characters have wound points equal to their Constitution score. Thus, a typical 1st-level orc warrior has no vitality points and 12 wound points. All damage dealt to such creatures is applied to their wound points.

Most monsters, on the other hand, have both wound points and vitality points. For Small, Medium and Large creatures, a monster’s wound point total is equal to its current Constitution score. Creatures smaller or larger than that have their wound point total multiplied by a factor based on their size, as indicated on the table.

A monster’s vitality point total is equal to the number of hit points it would normally have, based on its type and Constitution score. The GM may choose not to assign vitality points to creatures that pose little or no threat to PCs, such as domesticated herd animals.

Creatures without Constitution Scores

Some creatures, such as undead and constructs, do not have Constitution scores. If a creature has no Constitution score, it has no vitality points. Instead, it has wound points equal to the number of vitality points it would have based on its HD and type. Such creatures are never fatigued or stunned by wound damage.

Bonus Hit Points

If a creature would have bonus hit points based on its type, these are treated as bonus wound points. (For example, a Medium construct gets 20 bonus wound points.) The same holds true for any permanent effect that increases a character’s hit point total (such as the Toughness feat, which adds 3 to the character’s wound point total).

Damage Reduction

Damage reduction functions normally, reducing damage dealt by attacks. However, any critical hit automatically overcomes a creature’s damage reduction, regardless of whether the attack could normally do so. For example, a critical hit against a skeleton (DR 5/bludgeoning) overcomes the creature’s damage reduction even if it was hit with a weapon that does not deal bludgeoning damage.

Fast Healing

Creatures with fast healing regain vitality points at an exceptionally fast rate, usually 1 or more vitality points per round, as given in the creature’s description (for example, a vampire has fast healing 5).
If a creature with fast healing has no Constitution score, fast healing restores lost wound points instead. The same doesn’t apply to creatures that have no vitality points but do have a Constitution score (such as a human warrior or domestic animal). Such creatures gain no benefit from fast healing.

Regeneration

All damage dealt to creatures with regeneration is vitality point damage, even in the case of critical hits. The creature automatically heals vitality point damage at a fixed rate per round, as given in the entry (for example, a troll has regeneration 5). A regenerating creature that runs out of vitality points becomes fatigued just as if it had taken wound point damage. Excess damage, however, does not reduce its wound points. Certain attack forms, typically fire and acid, automatically deal wound damage to a regenerating creature, though it may attempt a Fortitude save (DC 10 + damage dealt) to convert this to vitality damage, which it can regenerate normally. Otherwise, regeneration functions as described in the standard rules and in individual monster descriptions.

Monster Challenge Ratings

Increase the CR of any Gargantuan or Colossal creature by +1, unless the creature does not have a Constitution score.

Monsters with fractional CRs move up to the next highest fraction. The kobold (ordinarily CR 1/4) becomes CR 1/3, for example, while the goblin (normally CR 1/2) becomes CR 1.

Other Considerations

The following are a few other considerations to take into account when using the wounds and Vitality system.

Temporary Hit Points:

When a creature would normally gain temporary hit points, it gains temporary Vitality points instead. When that creature takes damage, it loses these temporary Vitality points first. If an attack deals damage to wound points only, these temporary Vitality points are not lost.

Nonlethal Damage:

When a creature takes nonlethal damage, it takes that damage in Vitality points only, even if the attack deals more damage than the creature has Vitality points. If the creature has no Vitality points (and no temporary Vitality points), each time that creature takes damage from an attack that deals nonlethal damage, it takes either 1 wound point of damage, or a number of wound points in damage equal to the attack’s critical hit modifier if the attack is a critical hit.

Spells or Effects with Hit Point Triggers:

When using this system, if a spell or an ability has an effect that occurs when you reduce a creature to 0 or fewer hit points (such as the disintegrate spell), that effect is instead triggered when a creature is wounded. In the case of the harm spell or a similar effect where a creature cannot be reduced below 1 hit point by the spell or effect, a creature’s wound points cannot be reduced to or below that creature’s wound threshold.

Wounds and Vitality Variant Feats

The following feats are either new for the wounds and Vitality system or work differently in that system.

Deathless Initiate (Combat)

For you, impending death is a call to wrath.
Prerequisites: Str 13, Con 13, Diehard, Endurance, base attack bonus +6, orc or half-orc.
Benefit: You are not staggered when your wound points reach your wound threshold, but you lose 1 wound point if you take any action during your turn. You only take 1 wound point each round when you take actions. Furthermore, you gain a +2 bonus on melee attacks and damage rolls when your wound points are at or below your wound threshold.

Deathless Master (Combat)

Even if you suffer a grievous wound, you can shrug off the damage and continue your relentless assault.
Prerequisites: Str 13, Con 15, Deathless Initiate (above), Diehard, Endurance, Ironhide, base attack bonus +9, orc or half-orc.
Benefit: When your wound points reach your wound threshold, you do not take 1 wound point when you take an action.

Diehard

You keep on going, even when your wound points are lower than your wound threshold.
Benefit: When your current wound point total is below your wound threshold, you do not need to succeed at the DC 10 Constitution check to stay conscious.

Toughness

You have enhanced physical stamina.
Benefit: You gain 1 wound point for every level or Hit Die your character has.


AC 39/36/36 | CMB/D 27/45 | Vig 151/151 Wnd 68/68 (20) | F+20 R +19, W +18; +2 vs. enchantments, +2 charm Init +24; Senses darkvision 120 ft., low-light vision*4; Perception +42 | Speed: 90 (Spider Climb + Dandelion Treat) | Defensive Abilities danger sense +2, evasion, uncanny dodge, vigor; DR 5/silver; Immune sleep, disease, enchan; Resist cold 10, electricity 10, fire 12; Fast Healing 2

Wow Wall of Text. Need to read that on a big screen.


Amunet-Ra wrote:

Wow Wall of Text. Need to read that on a big screen.

I'll turn it into a word file and link it later -- I was just trying to open it up to discussion first


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |
Sebecloki wrote:
Under this system, a 10th-level cleric could cast it to heal 2d8 vitality points and 10 wound points.

Under Magical Healing, "and" should be "or".


I'm uploading some of this stuff in spoilers on the campaign info page to try to make it more reader friendly so you can open individual tabs for information.


Cae Leonidas wrote:
Sebecloki wrote:
Under this system, a 10th-level cleric could cast it to heal 2d8 vitality points and 10 wound points.
Under Magical Healing, "and" should be "or".

Maybe I'm misunderstanding you?

"For spells that heal a variable amount of hit point damage based on a die roll (such as cure light wounds), apply (1) the actual die roll as restored vitality points, and (2) any modifier to the die roll (such as caster level, for cure spells) as restored wound points."


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Oh my, my bad, that's different than what I understood. Very nice. I think in PF Vigor, it's one or the other.


I'm still working on stuff -- I tried to move things to spoilers that are long digressions and edit stuff that doesn't make sense (like changing lethal/nonlethal everywhere to wounds/vitality, standardizing language, and moving stuff that goes together into contiguous sections (like all combat rules together). I'll keep working on it, lot to synthesize.


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

It's good work, and it makes clear what stuff like Fast Healing does, which is muy bueno.


It's starting to cut stuff off because I have too much stuff, I'm going to have to rework this so that there's an attached google docs for setting and rules info.


Give me a little time, I'm going to organize all the setting notes in one linked google doc word file, and all the rules in another. There's not nearly enough space in the box for campaign info to get everything in I need to include


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Aye, I had to change my character formatting for the same reason.

Is the Feywild linked to Athas at all?


Cae Leonidas wrote:

Aye, I had to change my character formatting for the same reason.

Is the Feywild linked to Athas at all?

It used to exist but doesn't anymore.


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

The Feywild, or the link? Either way, that's so sad for Athas.


Male Human Bard 20

Hey, guys...First time on Paizo! :D
Anyway, here's my character and his soul-inhabited suit of ancient-tech armor that he studied for his technological secrets!
Tyren Lorofesh, the Mad Scientist who combines the eldritch knowledge of Xxyth cults with ancient technology:
https://www.myth-weavers.com/sheet.html#id=1871544
Shines Against the Dark, the ancient-tech suit of armor who's inhabited by the soul of a victim of the Sorcerer Kings:
https://www.myth-weavers.com/sheet.html#id=1876737


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Howdy,

This cracked me up:

Other possessions: 2x Undead humans


Male Human Bard 20

See, I had a hard time trying to figure out where to put 'em, and ya know, in Athas the undead don't really have *rights*, per say, so ya know...


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Haha, awesome. Is your character converted already?

And if I had an optimization suggestion, is that helpful, or do you prefer to manage it on your own?


Male Human Bard 20

So far as I can tell, yes.
Also, I'm totally up to suggestions. Would it perhaps be grabbing the skill-trick for hiding spellcasting using sleight of hand, then grabbing sleight of hand? Because I was considering that, in case calling the summoning of a fragment of a Xxyth Psyche chained into an orb of telepathic energy a 'psychic magic' was a bit of a stretch.

As a secondary aside, do you think using my zombies to grab more conjuration companions to use as time-slaved action batteries would be a bit too cheesy? Because I'm leaning on calling that too cheesy.


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

No idea on the cheese factor, I'm not from Wisconsin. I have the impression that Seb doesn't mind some cheese as long as it doesn't involve looking up rules on his part.

I noticed that you have a couple of "Extra Combat Talent" feats and I think there is a better way to obtain extra talents.

One of the Horrifically Overpowered Feats is Gestalt which also has a Mythic version.

Gestalt(Horrifically Overpowered):

You are practically a member of two character classes, rather than just one.
Benefit: Select one character class. You gain all the class features (proficiencies and abilities listed in the “special” column of the class writeup) of that class other than spellcasting, as if half your total character level was your class level. (If you are 1st level, gain only the armor and weapon proficiencies of your selected class until you reach 2nd level.) If you actually have levels in the selected class, you gain class features as if your class level was equal to your actual class level plus one-half of all your other levels.

Gestalt (Horrifically Overpowered, Mythic):

You have prestige, in addition to class and horrifically overpowered mythic abilities.
Prerequisite: Gestalt (Horrifically Overpowered)
Benefit: When calculating what class features you gain from your gestalt class, add your mythic tier to half your character level (to a maximum of your hit dice). If you expend a point of mythic power, you may also gain the class features from the first level of any one prestige class you meet the prerequisites for, for one minute.

If you combine the two, you'll have 6 levels of a class. I suggest taking Technician as your Gestalt class as you will still gain all the class features including combat talents. Then you take Striker as your main class with the Black Powder Brawler archetype. You'll gain full BAB, good Fort saves, 6 combat talents from Striker, and the Striker class abilities. The only thing you lose is Disable Device as a class skill and you can obtain that with the Vagabond Child or Trap Finder traits. Since we have 5 traits, that seems reasonable.

With the newly freed feats, you might want Mental Paragon. As long as you don't take it at Level 1, you can spend your entire point buy on only physical stats.

Mental Paragon (Horrifically Overpowered):

You are the peak of mental perfection for your race.
Benefit: Your Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma are a base of 18 (before racial and level-based adjustments). If you take this feat at first level and roll for ability scores, you may only roll for your physical statistics. For example, if your campaign normally has new characters roll six times for ability scores, rolling 4d6 and take the best 3 each time, you are only allowed to do this three times (using the values for your Str, Dex, and Con). If you take this feat at 1st level and use a point-buy for ability scores, you get only half as many points (round up) to buy your physical ability scores.


Male Human Bard 20

Ha...Ha ha...Holy s+!&.
Where has this been all this time?


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Haha, yeah, fully utilizing the build rules makes for some serious craziness.


Male Human Bard 20

I'm going to be honest, I've spent so long being banned from anything more powerful than Base Wizard that I'm just fearful I'll hold the group back.


Lion Heart: Witch/Godling(6) | Vitality: 119 | Wounds: 62 | AC: 50 | T: 44 | FF: 37 | DR: 10/silver | Fort: +30 | Ref: +36 | Will: +29 | CMD: 39 | Init: 20 | Per: 22 | Speed: 150' | Low-light Vision | Darkvision: 60' | See in darkness | Immunity: Electricity / Inhaled poisons, gas, fog, or cloud-based attacks and spells | Resistance: Cold:10 |

Well, we will make sure that doesn't happen.


AC 39/36/36 | CMB/D 27/45 | Vig 151/151 Wnd 68/68 (20) | F+20 R +19, W +18; +2 vs. enchantments, +2 charm Init +24; Senses darkvision 120 ft., low-light vision*4; Perception +42 | Speed: 90 (Spider Climb + Dandelion Treat) | Defensive Abilities danger sense +2, evasion, uncanny dodge, vigor; DR 5/silver; Immune sleep, disease, enchan; Resist cold 10, electricity 10, fire 12; Fast Healing 2

Welcome!
That looks quite cheezy overall, but that's kind of the theme here.

The only concerns i have are guns on Athas? That's...blasphemy somehow.
A horde of zombies would also be weird and brand you as a necromancer, who has to be a magic user, who has to be impaled and be left baking in the sun. Of course after the removal of his tongue and hands, so no more magics. :D

But just to get that straight, you're traveling with 2 zombies, 2 siege robots and a weird magical suit of armor? And also guns? In Dark Sun?


Male Human Bard 20

The way I've been explained it is that basically there's a metric ton of technology buried within the ruins of Tyr*. This particular character is a part of what is publicly believed to be a gravekeeper organization, that actually specializes in the excavation of ruins deep below their cemetery. This character is meant to specialize in taking those items and modifying them to be workable with the technology of the time.

As for the zombies, well...They're going to be kept in suits at all times, and he has a disguise check of around 24.

The suit itself is magical in the sense that there's a soul inhabiting it, but the actual mechanisms that move it aren't magical, per say. It's probably Tyren's most powerful argument for his technology, too, since it can actually use Psionic powers--It can manifest it's psionic powers, and he can try and bluff and go 'see? I'm manipulating it with psionics, not magic!'


Yeah, there's a cache of high tech items in Under-Tyr, just like there's literally a crashed space ship in Kalidnay. It's not common, but it's there if you know where to look.


TheDez wrote:

The way I've been explained it is that basically there's a metric ton of technology buried within the ruins of Tyr*. This particular character is a part of what is publicly believed to be a gravekeeper organization, that actually specializes in the excavation of ruins deep below their cemetery. This character is meant to specialize in taking those items and modifying them to be workable with the technology of the time.

As for the zombies, well...They're going to be kept in suits at all times, and he has a disguise check of around 24.

The suit itself is magical in the sense that there's a soul inhabiting it, but the actual mechanisms that move it aren't magical, per say. It's probably Tyren's most powerful argument for his technology, too, since it can actually use Psionic powers--It can manifest it's psionic powers, and he can try and bluff and go 'see? I'm manipulating it with psionics, not magic!'

Also, if you could finish making an Alias with a picture, then I can write you an introductory post.


Cae Leonidas wrote:

No idea on the cheese factor, I'm not from Wisconsin. I have the impression that Seb doesn't mind some cheese as long as it doesn't involve looking up rules on his part.

I noticed that you have a couple of "Extra Combat Talent" feats and I think there is a better way to obtain extra talents.

One of the Horrifically Overpowered Feats is Gestalt which also has a Mythic version.

** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

If you combine the two, you'll have 6 levels of a class. I suggest taking Technician as your Gestalt class as you will still gain all the class features including combat talents. Then you take Striker as your main class with the...

Slyness/Cae is right -- as long as you don't expect me to learn your Spheres system or Path of War stuff, etc., I don't care. You just have to be responsible for your own rules on the character side and tell me what to roll for the opponents.


Male Human Bard 20

Alright, I've got it all set up(I believe)
And fortunately, we also seem to have some fellow players that're likely more proficient with the spheres system, so if I'm misinterpreting, I do hope they could chip in.


Male Clockspeaker Bard 6/Clockstopper Gunislinger 6/Genius 3 (Gestalt Necrotech Necros 6)(Spellcaster Incanter 3)(Prestigious Necromant 1) | Vitality: 84/84 | Wounds: 36/36 | AC: 35 | TAC: 31 | FFAC: 28 | Fort: 16 | Refex: 19 | Will: 17 | CMD: 33
Resources:
24 Spell Points|2/3 Dancing Lights|1/1 Faerie Fire|1/1 Entangle|1/1 Glitterdust|1/1 Deep Slumber|1/1 Missive|26/27 Rounds Bardic Perform|4/10 Hypertoxins|9/9 Mythic Power|

Er, here we go!


Tyren Lourofesh wrote:
Er, here we go!

Could you link your mythweavers sheet to your profile? Also, I think you still need to add automatic bonus progression, I think I forgot about that for you.


I posted a link to a long document in pdf form -- I collected conversion for Aarakocra and Pterran which I buffed up to the level of the conversion document we're using; I also included some other class options for some Dark Sun 2e classes that aren't represented in the conversion -- like not just using Inquisitor for Templar, I found a separate class that could work too.

Anyone have a suggestion for an Elemental Cleric class?

I included the rules for Wounds and Vitality, Reserve Points, Healing Surges, Action Points, and Defense Bonus that I think I've ironed out and rearranged between 3.5, Pathfinder, and 4e sources.


Okay, I think I've collected all my campaign fluff stuff into about 20 pages, but it's mostly unordered notes right now -- I'll reply to questions but it will take some more time to edit it into anything use-able that I'll want to post.


Cae Leonidas wrote:
The Feywild, or the link? Either way, that's so sad for Athas.

Cae Leonidas: Feywild Fluff:

I'm going to leave the details hazy who came up with this fluff for this iteration of Dark Sun -- but when the gnomes of Athas were attacked during the Cleansing Wars they tried to fight back by waking up a sleeping xxyth lord. This creature ended up getting out of control and ATE the Feywild, thus turning it into the Black. This created 2 new subspecies of gnomes from the old Athasian gnomes. One are black gnomes, who embraced the darkness of the void (and the minority group), and the majority became white gnomes, who are like twisted, evil svirneblin mixed with the Locust Horde from Gears of War. They worship immense deep earth worms and have infected with a parasitic mutagenic virus called wormgroating.


Male Yaksha Shadow Lord Stalker 6/Harbinger 6(gestalt) Trickster 2(mythic), Mage Hunter 2

Hey Seb,

Could I give my familiar the Imperial Foo Creautre template, but ignore the alignment aspect and change Sorcerer casting to Psion manifesting?

Also, I found a HOP that lets me make my familiar into an animal companion as well, so I think I'll take that.


Is the idea that it's like a evil foo creature for yaksha nobles?

EDIT: I like the idea, but we need some fluff, like it's a specific, known category of creatures that inhabit 'Alaka. Come up with an appropriate Sanskrit analog of some sort.


AC 39/36/36 | CMB/D 27/45 | Vig 151/151 Wnd 68/68 (20) | F+20 R +19, W +18; +2 vs. enchantments, +2 charm Init +24; Senses darkvision 120 ft., low-light vision*4; Perception +42 | Speed: 90 (Spider Climb + Dandelion Treat) | Defensive Abilities danger sense +2, evasion, uncanny dodge, vigor; DR 5/silver; Immune sleep, disease, enchan; Resist cold 10, electricity 10, fire 12; Fast Healing 2

Take your time. I updated Amunet-Ra. The new rules are different and there are less feats now, but it turned out a lot of them are bonus feats actually and from the feat tax rules.

She's actually stronger now. We'll see how this works out, i think it's a bit crazy.

I also know my next mythic and hop feats :D
+20 on deft and powerful maneuvers for awesome bull rush and trip, oh yeah!

Do we now get some magical items or something we can fluff as grafts or whatever?
I also have 3 languages left to take, looking for advice.

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