Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Magic (PFRPG)

4.30/5 (based on 8 ratings)
Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Magic (PFRPG)
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A World of Magic!

From the tortured sands of the Mana Wastes, where magic is as likely to tear you apart as it is to not work at all, to the perpetually frozen northern nation of Irrisen where the winter witches rule, magic is a part of life in the Inner Sea region. Whether it is wielded by benevolent clerics to keep their allies fighting the good fight or unleashed by wizards in the form of scorching blasts of fire, magic can be the difference between life or death. Or, as in so many cases, the cause of life or death.

    Inner Sea Magic explores the role of magic within this vast and varied region. Within this 64-page book, you will find:
  • A who’s-who of powerful and famous spellcasters from throughout the Inner Sea region
  • Details on four types of magical schools—arcane academies, spellcaster’s guilds, monasteries, and secret societies—along with rules for joining and studying with such organizations
  • Rules for several types of specialized or variant magic, including the chaotic power of primal magic, the secrets of shadowcasting, the traditions of Thassilonian sin magic, and the wonders of Varisian tattoo magic
  • Two new oracle mysteries (the primal-magic wielding spellscar mystery and the sinister Outer Rifts mystery)
  • More than a dozen new archetypes for all sorts of spellcasters, including the black-blooded oracle, the Razmiran priest, the shadowcaster wizard, the tattooed sorcerer, and the winter witch
  • Two new prestige classes—the cyphermage and the divine scion
  • Dozens of new spells, from Aroden’s spellward to zone of foul flames!

Inner Sea Magic is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game setting.

by Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-360-6

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Interesting Variant Rules, and Packed Full of Player Options

4/5

Inner Sea Magic is a 64-page entry in the Pathfinder Campaign Setting line that contains an impressive amount of information about everything from magical schools to variant types of spellcasting and more. It's full of new spells, archetypes, and even a couple of prestige classes, and I found myself impressed and intrigued by most of the options presented. I will say this is another product that seems to blur the division between the Campaign Setting line (intended for GMs) and the Player's Companion line (intended for players), as players will get as much or more use out of this book as GMs. But in the end that doesn't keep this from being a quality book that is definitely worth getting.

The inside front cover is a map of the Inner Sea region with the location of important magic schools listed. The inside back cover is a reproduction of the cover without any logos or title. The contents are divided into five sections: Magic of the Inner Sea, Variant Magic, Magic Schools, Spellcasters of the Inner Sea, and Spells.

Section 1, Magic of the Inner Sea, is six pages long. It begins with a brief overview (1 paragraph each) of regions in the Inner Sea that are particularly noteworthy in regards to magic: Geb, Irrisen, Jalmeray, the Mana Wastes, Nex, Nidal, Thuvia, Varisia, and the Worldwound. The rest of the section is a list of fifty(!) noted spellcasters in the Inner Sea, each with a one-line description, class and level, and a head-shot. I don't recall seeing anything like this before, but I actually really liked it. It's basically a "Who's Who" of magical power in known Golarion. My only suggestion is that it would have been better to use the inside front and inside back covers for this sort of reference information, thus freeing up a couple of pages in the interior for exposition.

Section 2, Variant Magic, is ten pages long and definitely something I'll make use of. It presents seven variant systems of spellcasting that are tied to a particular region or theme, and are perfect for NPCs or (with GM permission) PCs that hail from that area. Included in this section is False Divine Magic (Razmiran spellcasters who disguise arcane magic as divine), Fleshwarping (not really a different way of casting spells, but a way to transform creatures), Primal Magic (otherwise known as "wild magic", this section includes rules on primal magic areas, how primal magic events are triggered, and a great table on sample effects that could result); Riffle Scrolls (a slightly different method of scroll-casting that I didn't really get the purpose of, either in the novel Prince of Wolves or here); Shadowcasting (drawing from the plane of shadow; this section includes four new feats); Tattoo Magic (favoured by Varisians), and Thassilonian Magic (basically super-specializing in a school of magic; includes a great picture of the Runelord Sorshen). The options presented here were quite flavourful but also seemed (without play-testing) mechanically viable.

Section 3, Magic Schools, is ten pages long and presents a full rules sub-system for handling PCs who enroll at a magical school, including the cost, the benefits (socially and mechanically) they gain from their education, what it takes to avoid flunking out, and so forth. The sub-system is designed to track the students' Fame (which they earn by making Education checks a certain number of times per semester) and Prestige Points (which they earn by completing specific tasks). Fame is used to track a students' progress and privileges (everything from library access at one end to becoming a full professor and receiving a salary at the other) while Prestige Points can be spent to receive specific favors which vary based on the school, such as gaining an Imp Minion or a discount on the purchase of poisons. Formally, the system distinguishes between Academies (arcane education), Guilds (item creation), Monasteries (divine instruction), and Secret Societies (hidden goals). The following schools are detailed, each customized to reflect different entrance fees, tuition costs, exams, extracurricular tasks, and awards: the Acadamae (Korvosa's school of demonic conjuration), the Arcanamirium (Absalom's school of "practical magic"), the Magaambya (a long-standing school in Nantambu in the Mwangi Expanse), the Kintargo Opera House (bardic college in Cheliax), the Oenopion Fleshforges (fleshwarping laboratory in Nex), the Poisoner's Guild (in the River Kingdoms), the White Grotto (a bardic college in Absalom), Citadel Enferac (Hellknight stronghold in Cheliax), the Harrowed Society (Varisian fortune-tellers in Galduria), and the Crimson Citadel (Red Mantis assassins!). Monasteries receive a two-page spread that are not geographically specific, but instead lists a faith-specific award that students can spend prestige points on. Each of the core deities receive one entry. I think the concept of magic schools, and the system presented, would be fantastic fun to use. However, I think it probably would require the entire campaign to be centered around the premise, as otherwise most campaigns don't last long enough (in terms of in-game months) to make a semester structure viable. There is a brief sidebar that suggests a method to cope with this, but I think it could lead to PCs rising from students to Full Professors in the space of what could be only a few months of in-game time, which seems unrealistic. But then, Pathfinder is full of unrealistic things, so that might not be a problem for most. Where I see the Magic Schools sub-system receiving the most value is in a "Harry Potter" style campaign where all the PCs attend the same magic school and compete for fame and prestige while handling missions presented by the school (or foiling threats to the school).

Section 4, Spellcasters of the Inner Sea, is a twenty-page section that tries to offer something for everyone. It's basically a miscellany of everything from new oracle mysteries to new archetypes to new prestige classes. The two new oracle mysteries are Spellscar (centered around primal magic) and Outer Rifts (related to the incursion of the chaotic evil Abyss into the Material Plane). Next, the section lists 19(!) new archetypes. This is already a long review, so I won't list them all here. The ones I've heard a lot about include Crypt Breaker archetype for alchemists (another attack on poor rogues), the Dawnflower Dervish archetype for bards (doubling the benefits of bardic performance, but limiting their application to the bard), and the Winter Witch archetype for witches (pretty much every spellcaster in Irrisen!). Most of the archetypes look pretty good, but there are a couple like Mendevian Priest and Oenopion Researcher that I think could have been fleshed out more. Last, there are two new prestige classes, each with a full two-page spread. The Cyphermage is an expert in written and runic magic from long study of the famous Cyphergate in Riddleport. I really like the flavour of this prestige class, but most of the special abilities apply only to scrolls or other magical writing (like runes or symbols), and, at least in the games I'm involved in, I don't know how useful they would really be. The other prestige class, the Divine Scion, didn't do much for me (apart from a cool picture of Nualia). This divine-focussed prestige class is pretty bland thematically, as it's basically just a super-worshipper of any faith, and the special abilities consist of getting a low-level spell as a spell-like ability and another miscellaneous bonus (tied to the PCs domains), and some other moderate bonuses based on alignment. I think it tries too hard to be available to any faith and just comes across as pretty generic.

Last but not least, is Section 5: Spells. This section starts with a cool picture of the Iconic witch fighting a woolly mammoth with Ice Spears, one of the new spells introduced here. Spellcasters shouldn't be disappointed, as 39 new spells appear here, with at least a couple of options for every spellcasting class (even Alchemist and Summoner). The rich get richer, of course, as Clerics and Wizards/Sorcerors get by far the most new options.

Overall, I quite liked Inner Sea Magic. The sections on Variant Magic and Magic Schools were real highlights, and I could see them adding a lot to the right campaign. The player-focussed options presented (archetypes, spells, etc.) are more the sort of thing that could be found in any book, and I wish that as a Campaign Setting book this one would have spent more time on material that would be unlikely to appear elsewhere. Still, all in all this is a solid buy.


5/5

I've reviewed this on RPGGeek.com.

You can read it here.


Not what I was hoping for

2/5

I'm a big fan of the Pathfinder game rules (core rule book, advanced player's guide, gamemaster guide, and the monster manuals) and adventure paths for their atmosphere and creativity. However a few products I bought, among others this one, don't bring this particular atmosphere that I came to expect. If you're thinking of buying this one, check first if it's really what you're after.


Magic, customized and so very, very cool.

5/5

Another great suppliment with tons of great ideas to spark memorible characters. See my full review: Inner Sea Magic


An Indispensible Guide to Golarion Magic

4/5

See my full review here.

Inner Sea Magic takes an in-depth look at how magic is used in the Inner Sea Region of Golarion and, in turn, a bit of how that magic affects the setting. Unlike many other Campaign Setting products, Inner Sea Magic has a quite large amount of “crunch”, i.e. game mechanics information such as new rules systems, archetypes, spells, etc., instead of “fluff”, which is story and descriptive material. This makes it a product more in the style of a book like Ultimate Magic than most books in this line. However, whereas Ultimate Magic is a generic look at magic in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Inner Sea Magic looks at magic with a very Golarion-specific spin.

In general, I really like that most Campaign Setting books are fluff-heavy, as that’s the kind of thing I most enjoy reading when learning about a game world. There’s enough crunch in the generic books that, unless it’s very specific to the setting, more is not really needed in a world book. As such, I had a few reservations going into this book. Most of those reservations, however, quickly subsided. This is not just a book with a gazillion new feats and spells that the game doesn’t really need. There are full details on variant magic styles that other Campaign Setting books have only hinted at, new class archetypes that explore these styles, an overview of prominent spellcasters across the Inner Sea, and details on the most prominent magical schools and academies. They are all things that can enrich any game set in Golarion.

There are quite a few new archetypes in the book. Many of these archetypes will be far more useful than those in books like the Advanced Player’s Guide or Ultimate Magic as these ones fit seamlessly into the setting and bring with them the flavour of the setting. To use archetypes from generic sources, you either need to use very generic archetypes (which are less flavourful) or shoehorn them into a setting they don’t quite fit in. I love the tattooed sorcerer, in particular. We’ve heard about Varisian tattoo magic in previous books, but until now, it’s been represented by nothing more than a single feat that only grants a bonus spell and a boosted caster level to a specific school. Now, tattooed sorcerers gain a familiar that can transform itself into a tattoo and hide out on their bodies. They can create tattoos that are magical items or can store spells in their tattoos. There is actually a point to Varisian tattoos now.

Overall, Inner Sea Magic is a very good book that finally fleshes out a lot of things that have only been hinted at in previous products. People expecting the usual amount of “fluff” in a Pathfinder Campaign Setting book, however, may be a bit surprised by the very high amount of “crunch”. However, it’s mostly useful and flavourful crunch that enhances and expands the setting. It will be an indispensable book for most games set in Golarion.


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Justin Franklin wrote:
The Thassilonian Magic has a specialist Wizard and the 7 schools of sin magic.

???.....I thought Sin magic was already associated with existing arcane schools.....

Are these alternate school abilities for Sin mages ?


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
nighttree wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:
The Thassilonian Magic has a specialist Wizard and the 7 schools of sin magic.

???.....I thought Sin magic was already associated with existing arcane schools.....

Are these alternate school abilities for Sin mages ?

Nope each one is associated with a specific school and has 2 opposition schools.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Dragon78 wrote:
Wait let me get this strait the "Razmirian priest" is a sorcerer archtype?

Spoiler:
And it should be since Razmir isn't really a god so all of his priests are really sorcerers.
Dragon78 wrote:


What do you mean for the tattooed sorcerer that every bloodline spell is to be of the chosen school?

If you look at the Varisian Tatoo feat it is tied to a specific school of magic. However not ever bloodline spell is from the same school so all of the sorcerers bloodline spells count as being from the chosen school.

Liberty's Edge

Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Dragon78 wrote:

Wait let me get this strait the "Razmirian priest" is a sorcerer archtype?

What do you mean for the tattooed sorcerer that every bloodline spell is to be of the chosen school?

Razmiran does not have clerics, but they have Wizards/Sorcerers that pretend to be clerics, this Archetype helps with that.


Oh yeah, "Razmirian", I remember now nevermind.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Kalraan wrote:

I've downloaded this this morning and can say that I am impressed. However, can we hold off on the Spoilers in these books??? These books are made for both players and GMs, but there is a huge spoiler in this book for Carrion Crown and other APs.

I love the products that you guys bring out, but if you can cut back on those sorts of things it would be appreciated.

I also think that the Shdowdancer is quite nice, but I also love the Vampire Hunter Inquisitor Archetype. I can see one of my players "adjusting" their Inquisitor character in the near future.

** spoiler omitted **

Actually, the primary audience for most of these 64 page books is GMs, and as such, they do sometimes have spoilers in them.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Justin Franklin wrote:
nighttree wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:
The Thassilonian Magic has a specialist Wizard and the 7 schools of sin magic.

???.....I thought Sin magic was already associated with existing arcane schools.....

Are these alternate school abilities for Sin mages ?

Nope each one is associated with a specific school and has 2 opposition schools.

Correct. Also, Sin Magic does not include Divination as its own separate school. And you don't have a choice as to what your opposition schools are.


Can you tell us what the spells do? Such as a one line summary maybe?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Razz wrote:
Can you tell us what the spells do? Such as a one line summary maybe?

Nope. Don't have time to do that, nor the inclination. Maybe later, once the book's been out for a while.


James Jacobs wrote:
Razz wrote:
Can you tell us what the spells do? Such as a one line summary maybe?
Nope. Don't have time to do that, nor the inclination. Maybe later, once the book's been out for a while.

Oh apologies, that was meant for the people who have the PDF already.


James Jacobs wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:


Nope each one is associated with a specific school and has 2 opposition schools.
Correct. Also, Sin Magic does not include Divination as its own separate school. And you don't have a choice as to what your opposition schools are.

I will be interested to see how this lines up with the ROTRL info, I was kind of hoping for a combining of two schools along the lines of the Runeforged weapons abilities, where it blended two schools to counter another school.


Huh, I didn't know Paizo was in the habit of doing more special materials for weapons and armor outside of core; I'd love to see some mechanics for the six unexplained "skymetals".


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ashram wrote:
Huh, I didn't know Paizo was in the habit of doing more special materials for weapons and armor outside of core; I'd love to see some mechanics for the six unexplained "skymetals".

One is detailed in second darkness and another was written up in Dungeons of Golarion

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

Speaking of spoilers

Spoiler:
is that new or re-used art for Nualia on page 47. It's like Nualia with No-Dachi

Edit: Holy crap, bladed dash? Yes please. Greater bladed dash? Hell yes please.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Matthew Morris wrote:

Speaking of spoilers

** spoiler omitted **

It's new and I have a theory of where it might be used again.


James Jacobs wrote:
Actually, the primary audience for most of these 64 page books is GMs, and as such, they do sometimes have spoilers in them.

Is there any way for prospective players to know that based on the books' cover?


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Dungeon Grrrl wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Actually, the primary audience for most of these 64 page books is GMs, and as such, they do sometimes have spoilers in them.
Is there any way for prospective players to know that based on the books' cover?

The Campaign Setting header?

Dark Archive

Personally I would like to see about 10 more pages of primal magic events myself I like stuff like that. My group likes to use stuff like that for normal magic.

Maybe that's something a 3pp could tackle if enough others like me would like to see more of them.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Dungeon Grrrl wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Actually, the primary audience for most of these 64 page books is GMs, and as such, they do sometimes have spoilers in them.
Is there any way for prospective players to know that based on the books' cover?

Just the fact that it doesn't say "Player's Companion" or something like that on the cover.

There are bigger spoilers than famous NPC levels in all of the books in this line, and if a GM's worried about that, he should let his players know.

But frankly, as a GM, I LOVE it when a player's so interested in the game that he goes out of his way to learn more about the setting. I'm willing to deal with that player having spoilers, personally... especially since most players I game with are able to separate player knowledge from character knowledge.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Matthew Morris wrote:

Speaking of spoilers

** spoiler omitted **

It's new art.


Anyone care to share any tidbits on the Cypher mage PrC ???

Dark Archive

All I've got to say (and this is after taking my wife out for her 40th birthday to a place with wicked margaritas) man it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy to see Caldwell-esque wizardesses on the front cover. Nothing goes better than flames and thongs!

Tequila makes me goofy,

Greg Volz
Natural Twenty Games


nighttree wrote:
Anyone care to share any tidbits on the Cypher mage PrC ???

Must not be a lot of people that have this PDF, it seems, as I have requested someone share what the spells do.


Razz wrote:
nighttree wrote:
Anyone care to share any tidbits on the Cypher mage PrC ???
Must not be a lot of people that have this PDF, it seems, as I have requested someone share what the spells do.

Well, right now only subscribers have it. It does not go on sale to those of us in the general public til Thursday. Wait til after GenCon and I am sure a lot more people will be able to tell you something.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Razz wrote:
nighttree wrote:
Anyone care to share any tidbits on the Cypher mage PrC ???
Must not be a lot of people that have this PDF, it seems, as I have requested someone share what the spells do.

Well there are 40 spells in the book.

Dark Archive

Justin Franklin wrote:
Razz wrote:
Must not be a lot of people that have this PDF, it seems, as I have requested someone share what the spells do.

Well there are 40 spells in the book.

Come on people, its only 3 pages of the PDF that Razz needs to know. I'm sure if we all chip in we can get it done in no time.

Alchemists spells :-

level 2 - tattoo potion; drink a potion and have it turn into a spell tattoo

Level 3 - Orchid's drop; heal 2d10 points of damage whenever you drink a mutagen; and gain a +2 alchemical bonus on saves, lasts 1 hour per level

Both of those spells cost 500 gp a time to cast. The latter is alchemist only, so you won't be able to find it in a wizard's spellbook.


I'm not a subscriber to the campaign setting line yet ordered this book since I'm running RotRL currently, but I'm really curious what sort of treatment sin magic received: is it just a clarification and re-hashing of previous 3.5 materials, is their more flavor text describing the differences in the mystic paradigms and philosophies of drawing upon sin to fuel your magic, or are there any new mechanical differences?

I'm also curious about Varisian tattoo magic and any correlation between it and the rune magic that it (initially) appears to have been birthed by; what are the key differences between this new magic system and say, the Inscribe Rune feat? Anything alike?


Regarding Thassilonian magic, I'd be more curious to see new information about sin magic's predecessor; the "virtue" magic pioneered by emperor Xin and from which later Runelords' better known sin magic originally devolved. It'd make an interesting counterpoint to sin magic and recall the empire's utopian beginnings. It would likely also be a more player-friendly alternative to the NPC-centric sin magic.


amethal wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:
Razz wrote:
Must not be a lot of people that have this PDF, it seems, as I have requested someone share what the spells do.

Well there are 40 spells in the book.

Come on people, its only 3 pages of the PDF that Razz needs to know. I'm sure if we all chip in we can get it done in no time.

Alchemists spells :-

level 2 - tattoo potion; drink a potion and have it turn into a spell tattoo

Level 3 - Orchid's drop; heal 2d10 points of damage whenever you drink a mutagen; and gain a +2 alchemical bonus on saves, lasts 1 hour per level

Both of those spells cost 500 gp a time to cast. The latter is alchemist only, so you won't be able to find it in a wizard's spellbook.

Thank you, that's all I meant was just some ideas on what kind of spells I will be looking forward to in here. These help :D


Vampire hunter archetype?

Just good against vampires or undead in general? One of my players is playing an inquisitor in my upcoming Carrion Crown game.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Some Runelord spoilers...

spoiler:

It has been mentioned by Paizo folks that Karzoug, Runelord of Greed, was the middle Runelord power-wise. Karzoug was 20th level. Thus, there were three Runelords stronger than him and three weaker.

We now know that Alaznist (wrath), Sorshen (lust), and Xandergul (pride) were above 20th level, and thus were the Runelords that were stronger than Karzoug. This means that envy, sloth, and gluttony (whose names escape me) were below 20th level, and thus the weaker ones. It was also stated in one of the earliest PF articles that Xandergul was perhaps the greatest Runelord of his day.

Thus, here's the Runelord power scale as it currently stands, starting with the strongest and working down to the weakest.

1: Xandergul
2: Alaznist or Sorshen
3: Alaznist or Sorshen
4: Karzoug
5: Envy, Sloth, or Gluttony
6: Envy, Sloth, or Gluttony
7: Envy, Sloth, or Gluttony

Not yet complete, but it's getting closer.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Generic Villain wrote:

Some Runelord spoilers...

** spoiler omitted **

I'm pretty sure I've posted this list before... but the for-real list is:

Spoiler:

1: Xandergul (Pride)
2: Sorshen (Lust)
3: Alaznist (Wrath)
4: Karzoug (Greed)
5: Zutha (Gluttony)
6: Belimarius (Envy)
7: Krune (Sloth)


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:


I'm pretty sure I've posted this list before... but the for-real list is:

** spoiler omitted **

Ah cool, thanks! I must have missed the list the first time you posted it.

ThatEvilGuy wrote:

Vampire hunter archetype?

Just good against vampires or undead in general? One of my players is playing an inquisitor in my upcoming Carrion Crown game.

The vampire hunter would be excellent for Carrion Crown. It's more of an undead-hunter really, with a few abilities that aid against creatures vulnerable to silver and sunlight. And while vampires certainly don't like silver/sunlight, other undead are also vulnerable to them.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Ambrus wrote:
Regarding Thassilonian magic, I'd be more curious to see new information about sin magic's predecessor; the "virtue" magic pioneered by emperor Xin and from which later Runelords' better known sin magic originally devolved. It'd make an interesting counterpoint to sin magic and recall the empire's utopian beginnings. It would likely also be a more player-friendly alternative to the NPC-centric sin magic.

There's nothing like that. However, Thasillonian Sin Magic does get a full writeup. Basically, it gives you another spell-per-day from your specialized school, but is even more restrictive regarding opposition schools.

Spawn of Rovagug wrote:


I'm also curious about Varisian tattoo magic and any correlation between it and the rune magic that it (initially) appears to have been birthed by; what are the key differences between this new magic system and say, the Inscribe Rune feat? Anything alike?

Tattoo magic might have some thematic similarities to sin magic, but it's really treated as its own thing. You'll find an article on it here, along with a new item creation feat for tattoos. This part is completely new to the system as far as I can tell. Also, the tatooed sorcerer is about as tattoo-y as you can get.


Generic Villain wrote:


There's nothing like that. However, Thasillonian Sin Magic does get a full writeup.

Oh I was sure there wouldn't be; I was just saying what it was that I'd rather see. I find it odd that the first half of Thassilon's magical tradition has been completely ignored in favor of it's second half.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Ambrus wrote:
Generic Villain wrote:


There's nothing like that. However, Thasillonian Sin Magic does get a full writeup.
Oh I was sure there wouldn't be; I was just saying what it was that I'd rather see. I find it odd that the first half of Thassilon's magical tradition has been completely ignored in favor of it's second half.

The rune side of Thassilon's magic hasn't been ignored. We did a big article about it back in Pathfinder #5, actually. It's a big enough subject that it would have been TOO much to put into Inner Sea Magic. The sin magic stuff is simple and one page long, so that was easy to get in there.

Maybe someday if we do something more with Thassilon, though, we'll do more about their runes.


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James Jacobs wrote:


The rune side of Thassilon's magic hasn't been ignored. We did a big article about it back in Pathfinder #5, actually. It's a big enough subject that it would have been TOO much to put into Inner Sea Magic. The sin magic stuff is simple and one page long, so that was easy to get in there.

Maybe someday if we do something more with Thassilon, though, we'll do more about their runes.

Yes Please! More on Thassilon and their magic, please! I've been looking for something to really make the magic of Thassilon something special for my RotRL campaign and while the article in Pathfinder #5 is great as a jumping off point, I was hoping for a bit more on the history of the tri-partite rune language, the goddess Lissala (and the Peacock Spirit), the Rune Law, Old Xin, and how rune magic was corrupted and/or perverted into being associated with sin.

Dark Archive

James Jacobs wrote:
Ambrus wrote:
Generic Villain wrote:


There's nothing like that. However, Thasillonian Sin Magic does get a full writeup.
Oh I was sure there wouldn't be; I was just saying what it was that I'd rather see. I find it odd that the first half of Thassilon's magical tradition has been completely ignored in favor of it's second half.

The rune side of Thassilon's magic hasn't been ignored. We did a big article about it back in Pathfinder #5, actually. It's a big enough subject that it would have been TOO much to put into Inner Sea Magic. The sin magic stuff is simple and one page long, so that was easy to get in there.

Maybe someday if we do something more with Thassilon, though, we'll do more about their runes.

I've been asking for it before, but the occasion demands I do that again ([/]repetita iuvant, atque scocciant[/i]): a sourcebook on lost empires. Thassilon, azlant, Shory, sarkoris, etc.

Some of us like historical campaigns. Please.

Dark Archive

golem101 wrote:

I've been asking for it before, but the occasion demands I do that again (repetita iuvant, atque scocciant): a sourcebook on lost empires. Thassilon, azlant, Shory, sarkoris, etc.

Some of us like historical campaigns. Please.

I'd like that as well, particularly if it also covered Old-Mage Jatembe and the Ten Magic Warriors. I'm not sure it would be popular enough with everybody else to justify writing it, however.

In fact, that has got me wanting to run a campaign set in the Mwangi Expanse around the year -3500 AR.


Spawn of Rovagug wrote:


Yes Please! More on Thassilon and their magic, please! I've been looking for something to really make the magic of Thassilon something special for my RotRL campaign and while the article in Pathfinder #5 is great as a jumping off point, I was hoping for a bit more on the history of the tri-partite rune language, the goddess Lissala (and the Peacock Spirit), the Rune Law, Old Xin, and how rune magic was corrupted and/or perverted into being associated with sin.

+1

This was kind of what I was hoping for in Inner sea magic.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
golem101 wrote:


I've been asking for it before, but the occasion demands I do that again ([/]repetita iuvant, atque scocciant[/i]): a sourcebook on lost empires. Thassilon, azlant, Shory, sarkoris, etc.
Some of us like historical campaigns. Please.

I would highly recommend Lost Cities of Golarion and Dungeons of Golarion to you. Between them, every nation you mentioned receives coverage. I also think it's fair to say that Thassilon has had more pages devoted to it than many of Golarion's modern nations - Numeria, Thuvia, Isger, Galt, Nex, Geb, and the Realm of the Mammoth Lords off the top of my head.

I personally would much rather see these living countries thourougly detailed before, let's say, Shory. The historical stuff is great of course - I just think it's best in small doses.


golem101 wrote:

I've been asking for it before, but the occasion demands I do that again ([/]repetita iuvant, atque scocciant[/i]): a sourcebook on lost empires. Thassilon, azlant, Shory, sarkoris, etc.

Some of us like historical campaigns. Please.

A Lost Empires sourcebook would be pretty cool, could combine not just magic, but background, combat, and "lost" archtypes or prestige classes etc.

I'd buy it for one!

Dark Archive

Well, I've read this one cover to cover now and I can definately recommend this for anyone with an interest in the mystical elements of Golarion.

Magic is by far my favorite element of RPG's, right up there with high-level play and terrific Paizo-brand storytelling, and the list of significant spellcasters in the Inner Sea region seriously increased my demand for an Epic Level Handbook for Pathfinder.

The short bits about the various spellcasters certainly piqued my interest, but I did notice that three of the Runelords (the three least powerful ones) were absent. Any official word on their relative power levels? I find it hard to picture them being lower than level 15 wizards.

Does anyone else find the illustration of Runelord Sorshen (page 17) to be kind of bland? I guess I always pictured her as a younger woman with red hair and very light skin, ala Lucy Westerna from Dracula.

Anyway, get cracking on that Epic Level Handbook Paizo!


I just want the spells :D


So Nualia is now the Iconic Divine Scion...RotRL reprint announcement today or tomorrow then?


Ah this book is great. I was really pleased with a number of things that haven't been mentioned (unless I missed them). I know a lot of 3.5 stuff has really neglected organizations, and Paizo has been doing a great job of fixing that, and the fame and mage guild stuff here is nice and solid. I was bowled over by the Oracle mystery and archetype, came out of left field (I was pessimistically thinking that there would be no mysteries added, when I heard they weren't getting anything in ultimate combat, which I know is about combat but wizards got some stuff). Anyways, it's a great book. I'm liking all the archetypes in here, actually, and even the jerks of Razmir bring some cool stuff to the table.


DM Wellard wrote:
So Nualia is now the Iconic Divine Scion...RotRL reprint announcement today or tomorrow then?

Today


Spawn of Rovagug wrote:
Yes Please! More on Thassilon and their magic, please!...
nighttree wrote:

+1

This was kind of what I was hoping for in Inner sea magic.
golem101 wrote:

I've been asking for it before, but the occasion demands I do that again (repetita iuvant, atque scocciant): a sourcebook on lost empires. Thassilon, azlant, Shory, sarkoris, etc.

Some of us like historical campaigns. Please.
Black Dow wrote:

A Lost Empires sourcebook would be pretty cool, could combine not just magic, but background, combat, and "lost" archtypes or prestige classes etc.

I'd buy it for one!

Can you wait until May 2012?


Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Spawn of Rovagug wrote:
Yes Please! More on Thassilon and their magic, please!...
nighttree wrote:

+1

This was kind of what I was hoping for in Inner sea magic.
golem101 wrote:

I've been asking for it before, but the occasion demands I do that again (repetita iuvant, atque scocciant): a sourcebook on lost empires. Thassilon, azlant, Shory, sarkoris, etc.

Some of us like historical campaigns. Please.
Black Dow wrote:

A Lost Empires sourcebook would be pretty cool, could combine not just magic, but background, combat, and "lost" archtypes or prestige classes etc.

I'd buy it for one!

Can you wait until May 2012?

OK.....I just had the most disturbing sensation in my groin when I looked at that......

THANK YOU ;)


So, uh.

Can anyone explain what on earth Enhanced Varisian Tattoo (from the Tattooed Sorcerer archetype) actually does? The writing on that ability is a mess.

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