Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Magic (PFRPG)

4.30/5 (based on 8 ratings)
Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Magic (PFRPG)
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A World of Magic!

From the tortured sands of the Mana Wastes, where magic is as likely to tear you apart as it is to not work at all, to the perpetually frozen northern nation of Irrisen where the winter witches rule, magic is a part of life in the Inner Sea region. Whether it is wielded by benevolent clerics to keep their allies fighting the good fight or unleashed by wizards in the form of scorching blasts of fire, magic can be the difference between life or death. Or, as in so many cases, the cause of life or death.

    Inner Sea Magic explores the role of magic within this vast and varied region. Within this 64-page book, you will find:
  • A who’s-who of powerful and famous spellcasters from throughout the Inner Sea region
  • Details on four types of magical schools—arcane academies, spellcaster’s guilds, monasteries, and secret societies—along with rules for joining and studying with such organizations
  • Rules for several types of specialized or variant magic, including the chaotic power of primal magic, the secrets of shadowcasting, the traditions of Thassilonian sin magic, and the wonders of Varisian tattoo magic
  • Two new oracle mysteries (the primal-magic wielding spellscar mystery and the sinister Outer Rifts mystery)
  • More than a dozen new archetypes for all sorts of spellcasters, including the black-blooded oracle, the Razmiran priest, the shadowcaster wizard, the tattooed sorcerer, and the winter witch
  • Two new prestige classes—the cyphermage and the divine scion
  • Dozens of new spells, from Aroden’s spellward to zone of foul flames!

Inner Sea Magic is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game setting.

by Jesse Benner, Jason Nelson, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Russ Taylor

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-360-6

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Interesting Variant Rules, and Packed Full of Player Options

4/5

Inner Sea Magic is a 64-page entry in the Pathfinder Campaign Setting line that contains an impressive amount of information about everything from magical schools to variant types of spellcasting and more. It's full of new spells, archetypes, and even a couple of prestige classes, and I found myself impressed and intrigued by most of the options presented. I will say this is another product that seems to blur the division between the Campaign Setting line (intended for GMs) and the Player's Companion line (intended for players), as players will get as much or more use out of this book as GMs. But in the end that doesn't keep this from being a quality book that is definitely worth getting.

The inside front cover is a map of the Inner Sea region with the location of important magic schools listed. The inside back cover is a reproduction of the cover without any logos or title. The contents are divided into five sections: Magic of the Inner Sea, Variant Magic, Magic Schools, Spellcasters of the Inner Sea, and Spells.

Section 1, Magic of the Inner Sea, is six pages long. It begins with a brief overview (1 paragraph each) of regions in the Inner Sea that are particularly noteworthy in regards to magic: Geb, Irrisen, Jalmeray, the Mana Wastes, Nex, Nidal, Thuvia, Varisia, and the Worldwound. The rest of the section is a list of fifty(!) noted spellcasters in the Inner Sea, each with a one-line description, class and level, and a head-shot. I don't recall seeing anything like this before, but I actually really liked it. It's basically a "Who's Who" of magical power in known Golarion. My only suggestion is that it would have been better to use the inside front and inside back covers for this sort of reference information, thus freeing up a couple of pages in the interior for exposition.

Section 2, Variant Magic, is ten pages long and definitely something I'll make use of. It presents seven variant systems of spellcasting that are tied to a particular region or theme, and are perfect for NPCs or (with GM permission) PCs that hail from that area. Included in this section is False Divine Magic (Razmiran spellcasters who disguise arcane magic as divine), Fleshwarping (not really a different way of casting spells, but a way to transform creatures), Primal Magic (otherwise known as "wild magic", this section includes rules on primal magic areas, how primal magic events are triggered, and a great table on sample effects that could result); Riffle Scrolls (a slightly different method of scroll-casting that I didn't really get the purpose of, either in the novel Prince of Wolves or here); Shadowcasting (drawing from the plane of shadow; this section includes four new feats); Tattoo Magic (favoured by Varisians), and Thassilonian Magic (basically super-specializing in a school of magic; includes a great picture of the Runelord Sorshen). The options presented here were quite flavourful but also seemed (without play-testing) mechanically viable.

Section 3, Magic Schools, is ten pages long and presents a full rules sub-system for handling PCs who enroll at a magical school, including the cost, the benefits (socially and mechanically) they gain from their education, what it takes to avoid flunking out, and so forth. The sub-system is designed to track the students' Fame (which they earn by making Education checks a certain number of times per semester) and Prestige Points (which they earn by completing specific tasks). Fame is used to track a students' progress and privileges (everything from library access at one end to becoming a full professor and receiving a salary at the other) while Prestige Points can be spent to receive specific favors which vary based on the school, such as gaining an Imp Minion or a discount on the purchase of poisons. Formally, the system distinguishes between Academies (arcane education), Guilds (item creation), Monasteries (divine instruction), and Secret Societies (hidden goals). The following schools are detailed, each customized to reflect different entrance fees, tuition costs, exams, extracurricular tasks, and awards: the Acadamae (Korvosa's school of demonic conjuration), the Arcanamirium (Absalom's school of "practical magic"), the Magaambya (a long-standing school in Nantambu in the Mwangi Expanse), the Kintargo Opera House (bardic college in Cheliax), the Oenopion Fleshforges (fleshwarping laboratory in Nex), the Poisoner's Guild (in the River Kingdoms), the White Grotto (a bardic college in Absalom), Citadel Enferac (Hellknight stronghold in Cheliax), the Harrowed Society (Varisian fortune-tellers in Galduria), and the Crimson Citadel (Red Mantis assassins!). Monasteries receive a two-page spread that are not geographically specific, but instead lists a faith-specific award that students can spend prestige points on. Each of the core deities receive one entry. I think the concept of magic schools, and the system presented, would be fantastic fun to use. However, I think it probably would require the entire campaign to be centered around the premise, as otherwise most campaigns don't last long enough (in terms of in-game months) to make a semester structure viable. There is a brief sidebar that suggests a method to cope with this, but I think it could lead to PCs rising from students to Full Professors in the space of what could be only a few months of in-game time, which seems unrealistic. But then, Pathfinder is full of unrealistic things, so that might not be a problem for most. Where I see the Magic Schools sub-system receiving the most value is in a "Harry Potter" style campaign where all the PCs attend the same magic school and compete for fame and prestige while handling missions presented by the school (or foiling threats to the school).

Section 4, Spellcasters of the Inner Sea, is a twenty-page section that tries to offer something for everyone. It's basically a miscellany of everything from new oracle mysteries to new archetypes to new prestige classes. The two new oracle mysteries are Spellscar (centered around primal magic) and Outer Rifts (related to the incursion of the chaotic evil Abyss into the Material Plane). Next, the section lists 19(!) new archetypes. This is already a long review, so I won't list them all here. The ones I've heard a lot about include Crypt Breaker archetype for alchemists (another attack on poor rogues), the Dawnflower Dervish archetype for bards (doubling the benefits of bardic performance, but limiting their application to the bard), and the Winter Witch archetype for witches (pretty much every spellcaster in Irrisen!). Most of the archetypes look pretty good, but there are a couple like Mendevian Priest and Oenopion Researcher that I think could have been fleshed out more. Last, there are two new prestige classes, each with a full two-page spread. The Cyphermage is an expert in written and runic magic from long study of the famous Cyphergate in Riddleport. I really like the flavour of this prestige class, but most of the special abilities apply only to scrolls or other magical writing (like runes or symbols), and, at least in the games I'm involved in, I don't know how useful they would really be. The other prestige class, the Divine Scion, didn't do much for me (apart from a cool picture of Nualia). This divine-focussed prestige class is pretty bland thematically, as it's basically just a super-worshipper of any faith, and the special abilities consist of getting a low-level spell as a spell-like ability and another miscellaneous bonus (tied to the PCs domains), and some other moderate bonuses based on alignment. I think it tries too hard to be available to any faith and just comes across as pretty generic.

Last but not least, is Section 5: Spells. This section starts with a cool picture of the Iconic witch fighting a woolly mammoth with Ice Spears, one of the new spells introduced here. Spellcasters shouldn't be disappointed, as 39 new spells appear here, with at least a couple of options for every spellcasting class (even Alchemist and Summoner). The rich get richer, of course, as Clerics and Wizards/Sorcerors get by far the most new options.

Overall, I quite liked Inner Sea Magic. The sections on Variant Magic and Magic Schools were real highlights, and I could see them adding a lot to the right campaign. The player-focussed options presented (archetypes, spells, etc.) are more the sort of thing that could be found in any book, and I wish that as a Campaign Setting book this one would have spent more time on material that would be unlikely to appear elsewhere. Still, all in all this is a solid buy.


5/5

I've reviewed this on RPGGeek.com.

You can read it here.


Not what I was hoping for

2/5

I'm a big fan of the Pathfinder game rules (core rule book, advanced player's guide, gamemaster guide, and the monster manuals) and adventure paths for their atmosphere and creativity. However a few products I bought, among others this one, don't bring this particular atmosphere that I came to expect. If you're thinking of buying this one, check first if it's really what you're after.


Magic, customized and so very, very cool.

5/5

Another great suppliment with tons of great ideas to spark memorible characters. See my full review: Inner Sea Magic


An Indispensible Guide to Golarion Magic

4/5

See my full review here.

Inner Sea Magic takes an in-depth look at how magic is used in the Inner Sea Region of Golarion and, in turn, a bit of how that magic affects the setting. Unlike many other Campaign Setting products, Inner Sea Magic has a quite large amount of “crunch”, i.e. game mechanics information such as new rules systems, archetypes, spells, etc., instead of “fluff”, which is story and descriptive material. This makes it a product more in the style of a book like Ultimate Magic than most books in this line. However, whereas Ultimate Magic is a generic look at magic in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Inner Sea Magic looks at magic with a very Golarion-specific spin.

In general, I really like that most Campaign Setting books are fluff-heavy, as that’s the kind of thing I most enjoy reading when learning about a game world. There’s enough crunch in the generic books that, unless it’s very specific to the setting, more is not really needed in a world book. As such, I had a few reservations going into this book. Most of those reservations, however, quickly subsided. This is not just a book with a gazillion new feats and spells that the game doesn’t really need. There are full details on variant magic styles that other Campaign Setting books have only hinted at, new class archetypes that explore these styles, an overview of prominent spellcasters across the Inner Sea, and details on the most prominent magical schools and academies. They are all things that can enrich any game set in Golarion.

There are quite a few new archetypes in the book. Many of these archetypes will be far more useful than those in books like the Advanced Player’s Guide or Ultimate Magic as these ones fit seamlessly into the setting and bring with them the flavour of the setting. To use archetypes from generic sources, you either need to use very generic archetypes (which are less flavourful) or shoehorn them into a setting they don’t quite fit in. I love the tattooed sorcerer, in particular. We’ve heard about Varisian tattoo magic in previous books, but until now, it’s been represented by nothing more than a single feat that only grants a bonus spell and a boosted caster level to a specific school. Now, tattooed sorcerers gain a familiar that can transform itself into a tattoo and hide out on their bodies. They can create tattoos that are magical items or can store spells in their tattoos. There is actually a point to Varisian tattoos now.

Overall, Inner Sea Magic is a very good book that finally fleshes out a lot of things that have only been hinted at in previous products. People expecting the usual amount of “fluff” in a Pathfinder Campaign Setting book, however, may be a bit surprised by the very high amount of “crunch”. However, it’s mostly useful and flavourful crunch that enhances and expands the setting. It will be an indispensable book for most games set in Golarion.


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Dark Archive

Generic Villain wrote:
I would highly recommend Lost Cities of Golarion and Dungeons of Golarion to you.

I have both. ;D

Sovereign Court

Rokku wrote:

So, uh.

Can anyone explain what on earth Enhanced Varisian Tattoo (from the Tattooed Sorcerer archetype) actually does? The writing on that ability is a mess.

Let's break it down.

ISM wrote:
Enhanced Varisian Tattoo (Su):

Titles are easy: it's a called Enhanced Varisian Tattoo and it is a supernatural ability

ISM wrote:
At 9th level, the tattooed sorcerer can pick any one spell she knows for which she has a Varisian Tattoo feat. This spell must be one that lacks focus components and costly material components.

Pick a spell with a few stipulations.

1. Sorcerer must know it.
2. Must have Varisian Tattoo feat applied.
3. Cannot be a spell that requires a focus.
4. Cannot have costly material components.

ISM wrote:
She can now use that spell as a spell-like ability once per day.

Simples: One use of that spell each day as a spell-like ability.

ISM wrote:
This spell-like ability is not enhanced by her Varisian Tattoo,

The spell is not modified by Varisian Tattoo. Whatever bonuses it might get are different.

ISM wrote:
but it functions at +2 caster levels above her sorcerer caster level.

The spell-like ability casts the spell at +2 caster level. So potentially more damage, or more difficult to resist, longer duration etc. etc.

ISM wrote:
Whenever she gains a bloodline power at a later date, she may change this spell-like ability to another qualifying spell. This ability replaces the 9th-level bloodline power.

Rather than having to stick with a certain spell of 5th level or lower you get to change the spell which you can cast as a spell-like ability at +2 caster level once a day.

You cannot change this spell from day to day, you can only change it when you gain a new bloodline power (after level 9 that is level 15 and level 20)

I hope that helps.


Extensive breakdown cut for space!

GeraintElberion wrote:
I hope that helps.

It does! That's a pretty good breakdown of a rather messily written feature, thanks.


Where from are the pictures used in the list of spellcasting NPCs? Specifically, Aroden and Count Arudora.


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

Aroden, at least, appears on the back cover of the book.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Toadkiller Dog wrote:
Where from are the pictures used in the list of spellcasting NPCs? Specifically, Aroden and Count Arudora.

As far as I can tell, several portraits are brand new works of art. Arudora is one of them - Nex, Kortash Khain, Jatembe, and Xanderghul are just a few of the others.

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 16

James Jacobs wrote:
Kalraan wrote:

I've downloaded this this morning and can say that I am impressed. However, can we hold off on the Spoilers in these books??? These books are made for both players and GMs, but there is a huge spoiler in this book for Carrion Crown and other APs.

I love the products that you guys bring out, but if you can cut back on those sorts of things it would be appreciated.

I also think that the Shdowdancer is quite nice, but I also love the Vampire Hunter Inquisitor Archetype. I can see one of my players "adjusting" their Inquisitor character in the near future.

** spoiler omitted **

Actually, the primary audience for most of these 64 page books is GMs, and as such, they do sometimes have spoilers in them.

I just want to voice my unhappiness with this descision. Groups are fluid, someone might be GMing one AP, but then PCing in another. Also, I diagree that this book is for GMs: I assumed it was for PCs and would expect a PC to get anthing that has archetypes in it.

Please reconsider? As an AP-advocate, I am saddened.


Generic Villain wrote:
Toadkiller Dog wrote:
Where from are the pictures used in the list of spellcasting NPCs? Specifically, Aroden and Count Arudora.
As far as I can tell, several portraits are brand new works of art. Arudora is one of them - Nex, Kortash Khain, Jatembe, and Xanderghul are just a few of the others.

Too bad. I'd so so so like to see a picture of Nex...

Quote:
Please reconsider? As an AP-advocate, I am saddened.

Yeah, I support this. I'm DMing Carrion Crown and I have a player who wanted to check out the Varisian Tattoos rules and surprise, surprise now he knows who created The Beast. So much for that mystery.

At least a warning somewhere would be helpful... I mean if ADVENTURE PATH has a spoiler warning (the first chapter always has that summary of other chapters with a warning sign), a book so clearly for DMs that such warning is unneccesary, why can't a book such as this, where it isn't so clear?

The Exchange

But....but....T_T i start to read this handbook but suddenly i stopped: Dawnflower Dervish a baaaaaaaaaaaaaards?!? Why?!?

Dark Archive

Why not?

Bards have an often overlooked martial aspect, and the archetype concept seems to fit quite well.


Iomedae is listed as a LN goddess of honor and rulership. Isn't she a LG goddess? or am I missing something?

The Exchange

golem101 wrote:

Why not?

Bards have an often overlooked martial aspect, and the archetype concept seems to fit quite well.

yes right only two little detail in the Campaign Setting is said they are the elite of Sarenrae clergy.

Inner Sea World Guide says "At such times, Sarenrae’s clerics become dervishes,dancing among foes while allowing their scimitars to give their opponents final redemption"
So i start as i divine caster and finish as ad arcane caster?!? it's doesn't look so logic


yukarjama wrote:
Iomedae is listed as a LN goddess of honor and rulership. Isn't she a LG goddess? or am I missing something?

Hmm. Sounds to me like a typing error on the Alignment. The last time I looked in the Core Rulebook she was listed as LG.

Official confirmation may have to wait until GenCon is over though... I'm not sure if there's anyone apart from the warehouse staff back at the office to judge by the blog posts and other reports. :D

The Exchange

Charles Evans 25 wrote:
yukarjama wrote:
Iomedae is listed as a LN goddess of honor and rulership. Isn't she a LG goddess? or am I missing something?

Hmm. Sounds to me like a typing error on the Alignment. The last time I looked in the Core Rulebook she was listed as LG.

Official confirmation may have to wait until GenCon is over though... I'm not sure if there's anyone apart from the warehouse staff back at the office to judge by the blog posts and other reports. :D

All other fonts says LG:

Core Rolebook
Inner Sea World Guide
Faith of Purity
Inner Sea Primer
so...i suppose that LG is the right allignment


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Benkalas wrote:

But....but....T_T i start to read this handbook but suddenly i stopped: Dawnflower Dervish a baaaaaaaaaaaaaards?!? Why?!?

Though this may not help your cleric, the Inner Sea Primer has a fighter archetype for Sarenae worshipers that's also called Dawnflower Dervish.

And of course, you can still play a dervish-like cleric - take the Dervish Dance feat from Inner Sea World Guide and play a lightly-armored cleric with a high dexterity score. If you want to really emphasise the warrior aspect of your dervish, there's the crusader archetype from Ulitmate Combat as well.


I was a bit confused by some aspects of the new Devine Scion prestige class. Since part of its features domain specialization and true scion are meant to heal you when you use domain spells does that mean you continue to advance in your base class domain(s) or your scion specialized domain or your domains dont advance at all in learning new domain spells.


Who is the patron god(ess) of the pictured Divine Scion?


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber
Toadkiller Dog wrote:
Who is the patron god(ess) of the pictured Divine Scion?

Rise of the Runelords Spoiler:

Spoiler:
Lamashtu


Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

I am really digging this book.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Benkalas wrote:
golem101 wrote:

Why not?

Bards have an often overlooked martial aspect, and the archetype concept seems to fit quite well.

yes right only two little detail in the Campaign Setting is said they are the elite of Sarenrae clergy.

Inner Sea World Guide says "At such times, Sarenrae’s clerics become dervishes,dancing among foes while allowing their scimitars to give their opponents final redemption"
So i start as i divine caster and finish as ad arcane caster?!? it's doesn't look so logic

There are multiple ways for a worshiper of Sarenrae to become "dervishes." The "Dawnflower Dervish" is a bard route. Inner Sea Primer presents the same option as an archetype for a fighter. There's no reason that your GM can't build a similar option for a cleric. In fact, we'll probably do that eventually.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

yukarjama wrote:
Iomedae is listed as a LN goddess of honor and rulership. Isn't she a LG goddess? or am I missing something?

That's an error. Iomedae is lawful good.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Deadlogic wrote:
I was a bit confused by some aspects of the new Devine Scion prestige class. Since part of its features domain specialization and true scion are meant to heal you when you use domain spells does that mean you continue to advance in your base class domain(s) or your scion specialized domain or your domains dont advance at all in learning new domain spells.

A single-classed cleric can't even qualify for the divine scion prestige class until 5th level, at which point the class will already have its domain bonus spells (which continue to be available at all levels) and lower level domain abilities. Even if you go into the class before you get your second domain ability, when you hit 20th level, chances are good you'll have picked up that 2nd domain ability since you'll be, in theory, a cleric 10/divine scion 10.

But again, for domain spells... earning new domain spells is part of the "+1 level of divine spellcasting class", so taking levels of any prestige class that offers continued spellcasting allows you to pick domain spells if you have domains for any levels you'll eventually be able to cast.


I can find no advantage to the Riffle scroll variant. Is there any beneficial point to this other than fluff, which I am Ok with.

It seems:

More Expensive
More Encumberance
No 9th level spells.

From a rules point and not a flavor point, Why would I want to use this riffle magic?


They all have Silent Spell applied to them.


Toadkiller Dog wrote:
They all have Silent Spell applied to them.

AH Right!

Many thanks!


Doesn't Varian Jeggare have levels in Aristocrat as well? He is a master swordsman.

Also there are other characters with levels in classes not listed in their stats in this book.


On p. 4, Varisia wrote:
Powerful magic and strange guardians still dwell in regions where Thassilon's might one held sway...

More likely where Thassilon's might "once" held sway. Can't promise it's the only error, since I tend to read these books slowly.

On p. 3-4, Mana Wastes wrote:
Here, magic is dead at best. At worst, magic itself becomes a wild and untamed entity, twisting spellcasting and lashing the land with unpredictable warps and waves of ruin.

"Warp and woof" (or warp and weft) is weaving shorthand for the underlying structure of the whole. To have "warps and waves" of ruin in the Mana Wastes is to have twistings of the underlying structure of reality in that place, so yeah. I see what you did there. ;)

Dark Archive

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

Is the check to focus spellcasting, etc. supposed to be concentration or Spellcraft? In one spot it says concentration, in another it says Spellcraft.


My biggest disapointment was that the Winter Witch can't learn spells with the (Fire) descriptor.

Note that I said learn, not cast.

I was really hoping to be able to cast cold versions of spells like fireball, flaming sphere, and scorching ray while using the elemental metamagic feat with this archetype.

I know most GM's would probably allow you to do it, since you apply the feat as part of your preparations, but I wanted to make one of these for Pathfinder Society.

And that kind of homebrewing just doesn't work there.

James: I don't suppose you could fix that in an errata, could you?


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Wraithcannon wrote:

My biggest disapointment was that the Winter Witch can't learn spells with the (Fire) descriptor.

Note that I said learn, not cast.

I was really hoping to be able to cast cold versions of spells like fireball, flaming sphere, and scorching ray while using the elemental metamagic feat with this archetype.

I know most GM's would probably allow you to do it, since you apply the feat as part of your preparations, but I wanted to make one of these for Pathfinder Society.

And that kind of homebrewing just doesn't work there.

James: I don't suppose you could fix that in an errata, could you?

You know that only witches with the elements patron get flaming sphere and fireball at all, right? And that winter witches do not have that as a choice?

There is nothing to fix in errata. You are already going to have to be house-ruling this concept.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I'm wondering about the Shadowcaster's Shadow Spells ability. It doesn't specifically mention 0-level spells. If the wizard is able to spend one's entire spell preparation time in dim light, does that mean the individual is able to prepare all 0-level spells in the spellbook, as they would count as a total of 0 levels' worth of spells?


Any chance that the text for "Esoteric Training" is in error? It's seems way too powerful.


Toadkiller Dog wrote:


Too bad. I'd so so so like to see a picture of Nex...

So, three and a half years later, is there any way to find a full-sized version of that picture of Nex from page 7 of Inner Sea Magic? Has it been used in any subsequent releases?

Silver Crusade

Help me understand how this is supposed to work. Primal Magic Event pg12 of the Inner sea Magic says
“When a creature activates a magic item, casts a spell, or uses a spell-like ability in an area infused with primal magic, there’s a 50% chance that the spell effect is replaced by a primal magic effect. A spellcaster casting a spell, using a spell-like ability, or activating a spell completion or spell trigger magic item can make a concentration check (DC = 15 + twice the spell’s level) to focus the magic and avoid triggering a primal magic effect.”

Does this mean that If one where to make a Concentration check and fail that:
1. A primal magic event occurs automatically without rolling the 50% chance.
Or
2. You still have to roll 50% chance to see if your failed Concentration check results in a Primal Magic Event?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Neither. You start with checking the 50% chance, and if it comes up, you can try to avert the effects by a concentration check.

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