Questions about Iconic Character Art?


Lost Omens Campaign Setting General Discussion

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Do you have any commentary you may share at this time about the new Curse of the Crimson Throne cover?

Thank you.


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Looking forward to any commentary on the Nyctessa reveal - she's my favorite villain!

Contributor

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Zhangar wrote:

Do you have any commentary you may share at this time about the new Curse of the Crimson Throne cover?

Thank you.

Apologies that there isn't really a design commentary to go with that particular image at the moment.

Although you are welcome to ask questions.

Silver Crusade

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Fooie, what about the lovely Nyctessa then?


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What race did you pictured most?

What race you *enjoyed* drawing?

Contributor

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Rysky wrote:
Fooie, what about the lovely Nyctessa then?

I’ve mentioned previously that some of the characters I design have more going on than others from a visual point of view. Nyctessa is one of those designs that’s fairly straight-forward. There’s not a whole lot I can actually say that isn’t already apparent.

The art description specified white robes with red trim which I thought was a welcome departure from the conventional depiction of a necromancer.

The costume design was inspired by a fusion of the Mori fashion movement and a post-modern gothic style. (if that makes any sense? Inspiration is sometimes hard to define) I liked the tattered fabrics, frayed edges and spiralling folds of fabric. Introducing red trims at random points helped to define the folds in the fabric.
Nyctessa only wears three pieces of metal; Two rings on her wand and a nail on her staff. The rest of her jewellery and costume adornments are made from bone – Which seemed completely appropriate for this character. Lots of vertebrae from different creatures such as snake, cat, dog – even human.
I thought it appropriate for her to have the jawbone from a vampire around her neck which might aid her in communicating with the dead.
She has an eyeball to maybe help detect the dead.
Even her buttons are made of bone. Her strap ties are made from animal horns or tusks.

Her leather flask bears the insect emblem of Urgathoa – The Goddess of Death, Disease and Undead.
Another reference to necro – culture is the flowing designs on the vampire skull, reminiscent of the Mexican Day of the Dead patterns.

And that’s about it…..

Contributor

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Nekomimi^w^ wrote:

What race did you pictured most?

What race you *enjoyed* drawing?

For Pathfinder single character illustrations, I have depicted;

39 humans
3 elves
4 Half-Elves
3 Dwarves
2 Gnomes
3 Halflings
3 Half Orcs
and 17 "Other species".

I don't really have a particular race that I enjoy illustrating most. However, I do enjoy creating costumes and design themes for new cultures.
I quite like depicting demi - human races because I get to play around with facial features and body shape a little bit more.


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James Jacobs wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
ulgulanoth wrote:
Having that we've seen the iconics already depicted in different costumes, is there any costumes for any of the iconics you'd like to paint them in? And if so who and what would they wear?
I'd love to create sci-fi variants of the first 11 Iconics. That would be fun. :)

GASP! SCI-FI MERISIEL!!!!

Hmmm.

HMMMM...

Well, now we can hopefully see some STARFINDER W.A.R. iconics.


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Oceanshieldwolf wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
ulgulanoth wrote:
Having that we've seen the iconics already depicted in different costumes, is there any costumes for any of the iconics you'd like to paint them in? And if so who and what would they wear?
I'd love to create sci-fi variants of the first 11 Iconics. That would be fun. :)

GASP! SCI-FI MERISIEL!!!!

Hmmm.

HMMMM...

Well, now we can hopefully see some STARFINDER W.A.R. iconics.

I was about to post the very same thing.


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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

Other artists have made interior pieces with iconics you designed. Do you have a favorite piece or artist that have used these characters?

Contributor

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BobTheCoward wrote:
Other artists have made interior pieces with iconics you designed. Do you have a favorite piece or artist that have used these characters?

I have lots of favourite artists that have worked on Pathfinder, rather than any particular one.

Among them are; Steve Prescott, Eric Belisle, Jesper Elsing, Eva Widderman, Lucio Parillo, Lucas Graciano and Mike Sass are ones that immediately spring to mind.

Generally speaking the standard of art is very high in Pathfinder. There's been more than a few occaisions where I've seen a fantastic piece of artwork but have been unable to identify the name of the artist.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Missed you at Expo this year. Still got your dodgy Scottish fiver. :)


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Hey Wayne, it has been awhile since Zelhara popped up, but I just wanted to let you know that she is one of my favorite iconics. Awesome job with all the torture implements showing up.

Contributor

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Wraithguard wrote:
Hey Wayne, it has been awhile since Zelhara popped up, but I just wanted to let you know that she is one of my favorite iconics. Awesome job with all the torture implements showing up.

Thanks Wraithguard. I'm really pleased that you like Zelhara.

The Hell's Vengeance Iconics were a lot of fun to work on. The Paizo design team devise some fantastic concepts that I feel really break away from stereotypes. These concepts provide a rich basis on which to create an interesting an unique character design.


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Wayne, I have two completely different questions for you:

Have you ever refused to do a drawing for personal reasons, be them religious, political or moral? if not, have you regretted any?

If your acronym wasnt WAR, but GWAR, what would the G stand for?

Dark Archive

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Talking about the iconics in general, when you are asked to change them up, say for mythic version of the iconics, where do you get the inspiration for the changes?

Contributing Artist

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the xiao wrote:

Wayne, I have two completely different questions for you:

Have you ever refused to do a drawing for personal reasons, be them religious, political or moral? if not, have you regretted any?

If your acronym wasnt WAR, but GWAR, what would the G stand for?

The G would probably stand for ‘Goat’.

I’ve been asked to do some very odd sketches in the past.
However, I recall two occasions where I‘ve declined fan requests /private commissions/convention sketches on moral grounds. In both cases the requests involved graphic nudity or a sexual situation.
Whilst some of the oddest sketch requests I’ve received in the past have sometimes been slightly gross. I like to keep my illustrations PG rated.

Contributing Artist

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ulgulanoth wrote:
Talking about the iconics in general, when you are asked to change them up, say for mythic version of the iconics, where do you get the inspiration for the changes?

Damiel and Amiri briefly got new weapons in the Iron Gods Adventure Path. But I'd already designed those weapons for different NPC characters featured in the encounters.

Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent. This was for the cover art to Mythic Adventures and Wrath of the Righteous Adventure Card Game.
Their costume design didn't change that much as it was a continuation of the themes I'd established in the original renditions. The modifications involved subtly accentuating the current designs to reflect their Mythic progression.


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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

Mr. Reynolds,

When designing elements in golarion before the age of lost omens, do you use any historical periods as a guide? How strongly do you adhere to these rules? For example, would a Taldan character from that peak of the empire resemble an iron age fighter rather than middle ages knight?


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Wayne Reynolds wrote:
ulgulanoth wrote:
Talking about the iconics in general, when you are asked to change them up, say for mythic version of the iconics, where do you get the inspiration for the changes?

Damiel and Amiri briefly got new weapons in the Iron Gods Adventure Path. But I'd already designed those weapons for different NPC characters featured in the encounters.

Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent. This was for the cover art to Mythic Adventures and Wrath of the Righteous Adventure Card Game.
Their costume design didn't change that much as it was a continuation of the themes I'd established in the original renditions. The modifications involved subtly accentuating the current designs to reflect their Mythic progression.

You didn't do the degenerate versions for the Horror volumne?

Contributing Artist

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Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
ulgulanoth wrote:
Talking about the iconics in general, when you are asked to change them up, say for mythic version of the iconics, where do you get the inspiration for the changes?

Damiel and Amiri briefly got new weapons in the Iron Gods Adventure Path. But I'd already designed those weapons for different NPC characters featured in the encounters.

Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent. This was for the cover art to Mythic Adventures and Wrath of the Righteous Adventure Card Game.
Their costume design didn't change that much as it was a continuation of the themes I'd established in the original renditions. The modifications involved subtly accentuating the current designs to reflect their Mythic progression.

You didn't do the degenerate versions for the Horror volumne?

No, they were illustrated by a number of talented artists. :)


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There may be a better board for this, but here goes:

I want to grab a copy of PF iconic art to put on a character sheet -- NOT to publish in any way. Is this permitted? Where do I look for the images?

And thank you to all of Paizo's talented artists for beautiful and lush images!


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Paizo's got your back with the Community Use Package - also check out the check out the community use policy to see what exactly you can and can't do with it.


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Kajehase wrote:
Paizo's got your back with the Community Use Package - also check out the check out the community use policy to see what exactly you can and can't do with it.

Ooooh, thank you! Registered & in my downloads!

Contributing Artist

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BobTheCoward wrote:

Mr. Reynolds,

When designing elements in golarion before the age of lost omens, do you use any historical periods as a guide? How strongly do you adhere to these rules? For example, would a Taldan character from that peak of the empire resemble an iron age fighter rather than middle ages knight?

Golarion doesn't adhere to the real - life rules of historical progression. Visual influences of different periods and cultures from real - life history manifest simultaneously within the imaginary setting of Golorian.

Consequently, that linear progression of culture and technology that we experienced in the real world history doesn't really apply to the Golorion setting. This implies that an older incarnation of a Golarion culture may not necessarily infer a lower level of technology.
Though earlier incarnations would probably include design aesthetics from it's later counterpart. The extent that these design aspects would manifest would be up to the design team or the individual artist.

I've not yet been asked to specifically illustrate historic variations of in-game cultures or kingdoms. However, I've occasionally illustrated ruins or ancient items where I've included design aspects from a specific culture to better enable the viewer to make the visual connection that what they're seeing is from the geographical setting's history.


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Mr Reynolds, have you seen the art produced by the creator of this thread?.

If not, you owe it to yourself to check it out. They sculpted the scene from the cover of the Core Rulebook in a 3-D digital format. It's absolutely incredible, especially given that it's seeing your artwork really come to life.


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Dear Mr. Reynolds,

how did you come up with the design for Feiya, the Iconic Witch, and what were the directions given?

Contributing Artist

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Platinius Nemoralis wrote:

Dear Mr. Reynolds,

how did you come up with the design for Feiya, the Iconic Witch, and what were the directions given?

I seem to recall the art description for Feiya was fairly short.

"Female, Asian ethnicity, white hair, Fox companion".

Her costume has a lot in common with renaissance Europe. Though I wanted to retain aspects that would immediately associate the character with the concept of a "Witch". Consequently, I elected to stick to a lot of black - highlighted with white and red.
Her equipment is organic with a handmade aspect to it that I felt very in-keeping with the concept that a witch would make all of her own items.
I initially named the fox "Mr Chessington World of Adventure". Unfortunately, the name didn't stick. ;)
Hope you like the character.


Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Platinius Nemoralis wrote:

Dear Mr. Reynolds,

how did you come up with the design for Feiya, the Iconic Witch, and what were the directions given?

I seem to recall the art description for Feiya was fairly short.

"Female, Asian ethnicity, white hair, Fox companion".

Her costume has a lot in common with renaissance Europe. Though I wanted to retain aspects that would immediately associate the character with the concept of a "Witch". Consequently, I elected to stick to a lot of black - highlighted with white and red.
Her equipment is organic with a handmade aspect to it that I felt very in-keeping with the concept that a witch would make all of her own items.
Hope you like the character.

I will admit that I see nothing particularly asian about Feiya (except perhaps the very long nails and even that is a stretch). I really like her clothes though. Very vagabond in a 19th century sort of way (at least to my eye). I find that such a vagabondish style fits a witch conceptually very well as witches are outsiders/outcasts of general society. Very well done. :)


I also have never thought of Feiya as Asian.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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She does remain Tien, in any event—one of the primary reasons we gave Wayne that direction was from the tradition of white haired witches in asian movies and fiction.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

Much earlier in this thread, there was discussion about your interests in historical armor and clothing. Is there any details lost to history that you always wanted to know?

Contributing Artist

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BobTheCoward wrote:
Much earlier in this thread, there was discussion about your interests in historical armor and clothing. Is there any details lost to history that you always wanted to know?

Slightly off - topic on the title of the thread but I think it's pretty much become an "Ask Wayne Reynolds" thread now. :)

It'd be nice to see more artefacts from anything before 700 - 900 AD. That seems to be the cut - off point where items seem to perish or just weren't documented in any great detail (There are some notable exceptions, such as the Roman Empire at it's height. And even then, there are gaps in our knowledge from that time)
Ancient Asia Minor cultures - Assyrians, Babylonians, Minoan, etc. A lot of that stuff has been lost in antiquity or not survived the passage of time.
Also, artefacts that are made from cloth or wood from before that are generally considered to be perishable. Particularly; gambesons or subarmalis (padded armour)Most of the information we have seems to have been gathered from the artwork of the time.

Contributor

Mr. Reynolds, I have a question in regards to the cover of the NPC Codex. My wife is an art major and says that the artwork reminds of her a notable piece of art. She can't quite put her finger on it, though and she wanted me to ask you about it. Is the NPC Codex cover an intentional reference or allusion to an existing work?

Contributing Artist

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donato wrote:
Mr. Reynolds, I have a question in regards to the cover of the NPC Codex. My wife is an art major and says that the artwork reminds of her a notable piece of art. She can't quite put her finger on it, though and she wanted me to ask you about it. Is the NPC Codex cover an intentional reference or allusion to an existing work?

The composition to the NPC Codex is an original piece of work. Any resemblance to existing images is purely coincidental and in the eye of the beholder only.

As an artist, it's often difficult to relate to personal interpretations of one's own creation. Personal interpretations can be as unique as the person viewing the image.
"Something always looks like something else to someone else"

Check out my Facebook page to see the post (June 2012) containing original sketch, explanation of the characters involved, their creation and positioning within the scene.


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I am not surprised by that all. Group images like that cover (love it, btw) are not unusual. The popular cartoonist Sergio Aragonés for example is rather famous for them.

You (along with all the other artists too) probably have been told this before, but I would not find Pathfinder as appealing as I do were it not for the artwork.
Technically speaking, the collection of rules that form the game could function without illustrations beyond the barest necessary to explain certain objects and tactics in need of representation for the younger/less experienced/less knowledgeable players. However, the truth is that without the art, the reading of said rules can easily get very tedious. No-one likes tedious busywork and if playing becomes work, most won't play.
I also find it quite inspiring in a very direct sense, it gives ideas on what one could play. For example, as a GM, I often pick enemies/creatures simply for looking cool or interesting and then thinking up a secenario around them even if some of them are not the simplest to use creatures.

To sum up, it is ultimately the (in my opinon) dynamic and often quite hilarious artwork that makes the game stand out from the competition (at least to me).
Keep up the good work and may you cash many big paychecks for it.^^

Contributing Artist

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Platinius Nemoralis wrote:

I am not surprised by that all. Group images like that cover (love it, btw) are not unusual. The popular cartoonist Sergio Aragonés for example is rather famous for them.

You (along with all the other artists too) probably have been told this before, but I would not find Pathfinder as appealing as I do were it not for the artwork.
Technically speaking, the collection of rules that form the game could function without illustrations beyond the barest necessary to explain certain objects and tactics in need of representation for the younger/less experienced/less knowledgeable players. However, the truth is that without the art, the reading of said rules can easily get very tedious. No-one likes tedious busywork and if playing becomes work, most won't play.
I also find it quite inspiring in a very direct sense, it gives ideas on what one could play. For example, as a GM, I often pick enemies/creatures simply for looking cool or interesting and then thinking up a secenario around them even if some of them are not the simplest to use creatures.

To sum up, it is ultimately the (in my opinon) dynamic and often quite hilarious artwork that makes the game stand out from the competition (at least to me).
Keep up the good work and may you cash many big paychecks for it.^^

Thanks for the kind words. I'm really pleased that the artwork images of Pathfinder greatly enhances your enjoyment of the game.

Shadow Lodge

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Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Lost Omens, Maps, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber
Wayne Reynolds wrote:


Thanks for the kind words. I'm really pleased that the artwork images of Pathfinder greatly enhances your enjoyment of the game.

The fact that the deluxe edition of Rise of the Runelords included prints of the iconic characters was a significant factor in my purchase decision.

I really need to get frames for them and hang them up in our game room...


Is there any kind of thought or story behind the "Tooth Gang", the thugs from the cover of Pathfinder RPG - Guide to Absalom? They all have this strange look...

Contributing Artist

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MGX wrote:
Is there any kind of thought or story behind the "Tooth Gang", the thugs from the cover of Pathfinder RPG - Guide to Absalom? They all have this strange look...

I seem to recall that there wasn't much information provided for the thugs in the art description for cover of Guide to Absalom.

Visual identifiers such as Studded leather armour and leather hoods seemed to be pretty good "Thug clothing". However, I felt that something additional was required to differentiate them from other street gangs. Hence the inclusion of the large tooth or tusk.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

I have been mulling over a question about strange aeons art in general then I saw your 1930s iconics in the blog post.

How do you approach art for a project like that? Flipping through them, the art is the the most "modern" looking dress and design of the golarian setting. How do you push the fantasy tradition while still maintaining the feel?

Contributing Artist

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BobTheCoward wrote:

I have been mulling over a question about strange aeons art in general then I saw your 1930s iconics in the blog post.

How do you approach art for a project like that? Flipping through them, the art is the the most "modern" looking dress and design of the golarian setting. How do you push the fantasy tradition while still maintaining the feel?

Hi Bob, I didn't work on any of the imagery for Strange Aeons. The "1930s" versions of the Iconics were beautifully rendered by a different artist. (Miguel Regodón Harkness)


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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
BobTheCoward wrote:

I have been mulling over a question about strange aeons art in general then I saw your 1930s iconics in the blog post.

How do you approach art for a project like that? Flipping through them, the art is the the most "modern" looking dress and design of the golarian setting. How do you push the fantasy tradition while still maintaining the feel?

Hi Bob, I didn't work on any of the imagery for Strange Aeons. The "1930s" versions of the Iconics were beautifully rendered by a different artist. (Miguel Regodón Harkness)

Ugh. I can never read artist signatures.


BobTheCoward wrote:
Wayne Reynolds wrote:
BobTheCoward wrote:

I have been mulling over a question about strange aeons art in general then I saw your 1930s iconics in the blog post.

How do you approach art for a project like that? Flipping through them, the art is the the most "modern" looking dress and design of the golarian setting. How do you push the fantasy tradition while still maintaining the feel?

Hi Bob, I didn't work on any of the imagery for Strange Aeons. The "1930s" versions of the Iconics were beautifully rendered by a different artist. (Miguel Regodón Harkness)

Ugh. I can never read artist signatures.

To be fair, Mr. Reynolds did renditions of the Iconics in different settings/types of outfits, so the mistake was easy to make.

And don't try to read the signatures, difference them as if they were Hieroglyphs/Runes or something.

Contributing Artist

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To be fair, Mr. Reynolds did renditions of the Iconics in different settings/types of outfits, so the mistake was easy to make.

And don't try to read the signatures, difference them as if they were Hieroglyphs/Runes or something.

As mentioned earlier in this thread -

"Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent."

Most of the variations of the Iconic characters have been expertly rendered by different artists.


Wayne Reynolds wrote:
Guy St-Amant wrote:

To be fair, Mr. Reynolds did renditions of the Iconics in different settings/types of outfits, so the mistake was easy to make.

And don't try to read the signatures, difference them as if they were Hieroglyphs/Runes or something.

As mentioned earlier in this thread -

"Valeros, Seoni, Kyra, Merisiel, Seelah, Alain and Balazar have been the only Iconic characters that I've been asked to modify to any great extent."

Most of the variations of the Iconic characters have been expertly rendered by different artists.

+ a few rendering you did just for fun, + a few "first drafts".


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Hey, I just saw you at the Just Ridiculous thread and it occurred to me that I could actually come tell you how much I enjoy your art. Thank you for creating such wonderful art. Many years ago I picked up the Core Rulebook, looked at the cover, and thought to myself: Yes, this looks like the kind of RPG that I want to play...

Contributing Artist

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DM Livgin wrote:
Hey, I just saw you at the Just Ridiculous thread and it occurred to me that I could actually come tell you how much I enjoy your art. Thank you for creating such wonderful art. Many years ago I picked up the Core Rulebook, looked at the cover, and thought to myself: Yes, this looks like the kind of RPG that I want to play...

Thanks very much for the kind words. I sincerely appreciate it. I'm really pleased that you enjoy playing Pathfinder and the artwork contained within. It's a fun game to illustrate. :)


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I switched to pathfinder because of the iconic artwork. :-)

And for a blast to the past question.

What was your favorite Eberron cover to do, or which one turned out better than you expected. :-)


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Also, what's your favorite adventure path cover that you didn't do. :-)

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