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Contrary to popular belief, absinthe is not hallucinogenic. It doesn't even get you drunk very fast. Total bummer.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Contrary to popular belief, absinthe is not hallucinogenic. It doesn't even get you drunk very fast. Total bummer.

you sir, are inhuman.


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adderall is just the brand name for amphetamine, which is the generic name for the drug.

it has a very similar structure to methamphetamine, where meth has a methyl group attached to the amino group, while amphetamine doesn't. The names reflect this difference and similarity in structure which is why they sound similar. Both are CNS stimulants.

Methamphetamine hydrochloride is actually approved by the FDA for treating adhd, but amphetamine is worlds safer.


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Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Contrary to popular belief, absinthe is not hallucinogenic. It doesn't even get you drunk very fast. Total bummer.
you sir, are inhuman.

My Irish, German, and Scots-Irish ancestry serves me well once in a while.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Contrary to popular belief, absinthe is not hallucinogenic. It doesn't even get you drunk very fast. Total bummer.
you sir, are inhuman.
My Irish, German, and Scots-Irish ancestry serves me well once in a while.

I'm a very large irishman. Bring enough anesthetic for the entire class. Then more if you want to share

Pakistani anesthesiologist : Why does that matter?

Flashforward to the operation, they're taking a bone out of my foot and I'm doing hand signs telling the bar keep to pour another round FAST.


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Yogurt is a food produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. The bacteria used to make yogurt are known as "yogurt cultures". Fermentation of lactose by these bacteria produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yogurt its texture and characteristic tang. Worldwide, cow's milk, the protein of which is mainly casein, is most commonly used to make yogurt. Milk from water buffalo, goats, ewes, mares, camels, and yaks is also used to produce yogurt in various parts of the world.


...that I absolutely stink at PbP. I gave it a shot with Jiggy GMing (who's a great GM, by the way). I sucked dirt at it.


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Bugs Bunny's most famous catchphrase, "What's up, Doc?" was first used in the Bugs Bunny short A Wild Hare in 1940. According to writer Fred "Tex" Avery, "What's up, Doc?" was a common expression where he was from in central Texas, and he didn't think much of adding the phrase to the script. Only after an extremely positive audience reaction at an early showing was it realized how popular the catchphrase would become.

To quote animator Chuck Jones:

"'What's up Doc?' is a very simple thing. It's only funny because it's in a situation. It was an all Bugs Bunny line. It wasn't funny. If you put it in human terms; you come home late one night from work, you walk up to the gate in the yard, you walk through the gate and up into the front room, the door is partly open and there's some guy shooting under your living room. So what do you do? You run if you have any sense, the least you can do is call the cops. But what if you come up and tap him on the shoulder and look over and say 'What's up Doc?' You're interested in what he's doing. That's ridiculous. That's not what you say at a time like that. So that's why it's funny, I think. In other words it's asking a perfectly legitimate question in a perfectly illogical situation."

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
David M Mallon wrote:

Bugs Bunny's most famous catchphrase, "What's up, Doc?" was first used in the Bugs Bunny short A Wild Hare in 1940. According to writer Fred "Tex" Avery, "What's up, Doc?" was a common expression where he was from in central Texas, and he didn't think much of adding the phrase to the script. Only after an extremely positive audience reaction at an early showing was it realized how popular the catchphrase would become.

To quote animator Chuck Jones:

"'What's up Doc?' is a very simple thing. It's only funny because it's in a situation. It was an all Bugs Bunny line. It wasn't funny. If you put it in human terms; you come home late one night from work, you walk up to the gate in the yard, you walk through the gate and up into the front room, the door is partly open and there's some guy shooting under your living room. So what do you do? You run if you have any sense, the least you can do is call the cops. But what if you come up and tap him on the shoulder and look over and say 'What's up Doc?' You're interested in what he's doing. That's ridiculous. That's not what you say at a time like that. So that's why it's funny, I think. In other words it's asking a perfectly legitimate question in a perfectly illogical situation."

I'm still waiting for the Doctor Who crossover.


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Ten years ago today, Joss Whedon's film Serenity premiered in theaters.


David M Mallon wrote:
Ten years ago today, Joss Whedon's film Serenity premiered in theaters.

that explains much.


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Not only did Viz used to flip their manga and add english FX, they also went to the trouble of editing the shape of speech bubbles to look less vertical.

That was something I wondered for maybe seven years, which I finally confirmed today when I finally got to see the original Japanese tankoubon of Inuyasha and compare it to the Viz edit.

I'm glad western manga publishers figured out that people don't actually mind reading manga right-to-left.


Chobits is a seinen manga. I always thought it was Shoujo cus it's Clamp, guess I was wrong about that.

In retrospect, this is not surprising.

Silver Crusade

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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
I'm glad western manga publishers figured out that people don't actually mind reading manga right-to-left.

Or the mind shattering complexity of a rice ball compared to a hotdog or doughnut -_-


Rysky wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
I'm glad western manga publishers figured out that people don't actually mind reading manga right-to-left.
Or the mind shattering complexity of a rice ball compared to a hotdog or doughnut -_-

That always drived me nuts! Thankfully Viz didn't do that sort of thing (and if they did then they would be entirely unable to translate Inuyasha)

Related vine

Silver Crusade

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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
I'm glad western manga publishers figured out that people don't actually mind reading manga right-to-left.
Or the mind shattering complexity of a rice ball compared to a hotdog or doughnut -_-

That always drived me nuts! Thankfully Viz didn't do that sort of thing (and if they did then they would be entirely unable to translate Inuyasha)

Related vine

*nods sagely*

Stupid 4Kids really ruined a lot of stuff for me :(

Poor 8 year old me watching and thinking "I've seen doughnuts. I've eaten doughnuts. That ain't a doughnut."

... among many, many other horrible travesties.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

Chobits is a seinen manga. I always thought it was Shoujo cus it's Clamp, guess I was wrong about that.

In retrospect, this is not surprising.

oh hells no.

It's seinen all the way.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

Not only did Viz used to flip their manga and add english FX, they also went to the trouble of editing the shape of speech bubbles to look less vertical.

That was something I wondered for maybe seven years, which I finally confirmed today when I finally got to see the original Japanese tankoubon of Inuyasha and compare it to the Viz edit.

I'm glad western manga publishers figured out that people don't actually mind reading manga right-to-left.

cannot favorite this enough.


Freehold DM wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

Chobits is a seinen manga. I always thought it was Shoujo cus it's Clamp, guess I was wrong about that.

In retrospect, this is not surprising.

oh hells no.

It's seinen all the way.

Then again I haven't actually read the manga since I was like 13

I vaguely remember the perverted bits but not in detail


The oldest printed recipes for iced tea date back to the 1870s. Two of the earliest cookbooks with iced tea recipes are the Buckeye Cookbook by Estelle Woods Wilcox, first published in 1876, and Housekeeping in Old Virginia by Marion Cabell Tyree, first published in 1877. Iced tea had started to appear in the USA during the 1860s. Seen as a novelty at first, during the 1870s it became quite widespread. Not only did recipes appear in print, but iced tea was offered on hotel menus, and was on sale at railroad stations. Its popularity rapidly increased after Richard Blechynden introduced it at the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis.


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Odin, yes, the Odin, the Allfather, practices seiðr, an effeminate threadspinning magic. He studies seiðr from Freyja. When practicing seiðr, he wears women's clothes.

If this isn't common knowledge about Norse mythology, it should be.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
Odin, yes, the Odin, the Allfather, practices seiðr, an effeminate threadspinning magic. He studies seiðr from Freyja. When practicing seiðr, he wears women's clothes. If this isn't common knowledge about Norse mythology, it should be.

Yeah, Loki rags on him for it, until Odin reminds him that Loki himself got knocked up by a horse and have birth to Sleipnir.

We won't talk about frost giants, whose race was born when one of a bigger giant's legs had sex with the other leg while he was asleep.


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Kirth Gersen wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
Odin, yes, the Odin, the Allfather, practices seiðr, an effeminate threadspinning magic. He studies seiðr from Freyja. When practicing seiðr, he wears women's clothes. If this isn't common knowledge about Norse mythology, it should be.
Yeah, Loki rags on him for it, until Odin reminds him that Loki himself got knocked up by a horse and have birth to Sleipnir.

Another fun fact! There is a theory that I am very divided on, that Loki originated as an aspect of Odin. It sounds plausible to me but I don't know what to make of it since I have no solid information that would support or refute it.

Quote:
We won't talk about frost giants, whose race was born when one of a bigger giant's legs had sex with the other leg while he was asleep.

Until I find the source for this and its exact wording, I choose to interpret as Ymir Had A Vagina And He Knocked Himself Up, especially given the etymological hints towards ymir *tuisto having a monoecious anatomy.

I've also seen said that he had twins, a boy and girl, under his armpits, but I don't know the source and wording for that either.

Also, rituals for Freyr at Uppsala were super gay. They involved the jingling of bells (i think was in the hair) and 'effeminate hand gestures'. Saxo Grammaticus reported some dude complaining about it. Also Freyr's depicted with an enormous penis in idols.

Freyr's name is Ingwi. the word 'freyr' actully being an old fashioned term 'lord', used that way in Anglo-Saxon 'frēa'. There was a migration period/Vendel Era confederation called the Ingvæones (Ingwinas Friends of ing), and this is also the name for a linguistic group that encompasses English, Saxon and Frisian.


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Freyr is totally my favorite god. If I had a patron deity, he'd be it.
Sits on Odin's throne without permission, then trades his sword for a chick he sees there, who doesn't even particularly like him -- knowing full well he'll get cut down at Ragnarok without it. In the meantime, kills the giant Beli with an antler.

Psychologically, I also find it amusing that the swordless god has the ridiculously giant penis -- what with swords being such phallic symbols and all.

We should probably start a separate thread for Norse mythology...


wæpnedwyf was and is a word in Anglo-Saxon for a woman with a penis.

I have such a character in my story! c:


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

Odin, yes, the Odin, the Allfather, practices seiðr, an effeminate threadspinning magic. He studies seiðr from Freyja. When practicing seiðr, he wears women's clothes.

If this isn't common knowledge about Norse mythology, it should be.

indeed I knew this. It is an important part of sorcery as well as femininity.


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During the development of the game Mass Effect (originally to be titled Science Fiction X-- we really dodged a bullet with that one), Bioware hired theater actor and comedian Mark Meer to do demos and scratch tracks that would later be overdubbed by other actors. After Meer finished recording the scratch tracks, the project leads at Bioware liked him enough to hire him on full-time to be the voice of Commander Shepard (the male version, anyway).


Ninja Baseball Bat Man, known in Japan as Yakyū Kakutō League Man ("Baseball Hand-to-Hand Fighting League Man"), was a 1993 beat 'em up developed and published by Irem Corporation in association with its North American division Irem America exclusively as an arcade game. Though having absolutely nothing to do with Batman, the game was a hit in Japan, receiving good reviews from critics. However, when compared to the sales of other kits sold at the time, it sold poorly overseas. Of the 1042 units sold, only 43 units were sold in North America.


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The character of Wally (Waldo in the United States and Canada) is localized for every language the Where's Wally? books have been printed in. Usually, the name of the eponymous world traveler is a variation on the original UK name-- Willie, Wali, Ali, Waldo, Wei Li, Walter, etc. However, there are some exceptions. In Sweden, his name is "Hugo;" in Lithauania, "Jonas;" Croatia, "Jura;" India, "Hetti;" France, "Charlie;" and Denmark, "Holger."


I just learned that Death Note and Hikaru no Go are illustrated by Obata Takeshi, and I'm reading both these series at the same time.

The styles are just so different!


The Book of Torak is the Angarak holy book in the five book fantasy epic The Belgariad. It was apparently written by Torak himself, in first person narrative. Like the Book of Alorn, the book of Torak narrates the major world events, but tells it from a different perspective. According to the book, it was Torak who led the gods to create the world, protagonists (such as Belgarath the Sorcerer) are recast as villains, and the reason for Riva Iron-Grip being able to touch the Orb of Aldur is different.

The first several pages of the Book of Torak are printed in The Rivan Codex, David and Leigh Eddings' collection of unpublished background material and commentary on the Belgariad and Malloreon.


Ume Aoki provided the original character designs for Puella Magi Madoka Magica, but she doesn't appear to be involved in art direction.

When Gen Urobuchi (writer) approached her for character design, he presented the story as a cute bubbly magical girl series, and didn't tell her about the dark and violent nature of the story until after the character designs were finished.

Meguca spoilers:
Aoki's favorite character was Mami and she put her heart and soul into the design. Needlessly to say she was shocked to learn that Mami would have her head chomped off in the third episode.

While the anime was still in development, it was nicknamed Chidamari (blood puddle) Sketch by fans. Hidamari Sketch is the name of Ume Aoki's cute and happy manga series.

Silver Crusade

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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

Ume Aoki provided the original character designs for Puella Magi Madoka Magica, but she doesn't appear to be involved in art direction.

When Gen Urobuchi (writer) approached her for character design, he presented the story as a cute bubbly magical girl series, and didn't tell her about the dark and violent nature of the story until after the character designs were finished.

** spoiler omitted **

While the anime was still in development, it was nicknamed Chidamari (blood puddle) Sketch by fans. Hidamari Sketch is the name of Ume Aoki's cute and happy manga series.

-_-

Not cool.


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Madoka is cool, though. Very much so.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
While the anime was still in development, it was nicknamed Chidamari (blood puddle) Sketch by fans. Hidamari Sketch is the name of Ume Aoki's cute and happy manga series.

This is one of the best things I've ever heard.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
Puella Magi Madoka Magica

Also, "puella" (f)(1) means girl/maiden in Latin, rendering this title something like "Girl (singular noun) | Magicians (plural noun) | Madoka | Magic (singular noun)."

"Romanes eunt domus?" "People called 'Romanes' they go the house?"

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
Odin, yes, the Odin, the Allfather, practices seiðr, an effeminate threadspinning magic. He studies seiðr from Freyja. When practicing seiðr, he wears women's clothes. If this isn't common knowledge about Norse mythology, it should be.

Yeah, Loki rags on him for it, until Odin reminds him that Loki himself got knocked up by a horse and have birth to Sleipnir.

And with a sneer Loki reminds him that it happened while Loki was bailing out of yet another of the jams his dishonest bargaining got him into.

Seriously, Loki bails Odin and the Asgardians out of a lot of Odin-caused problems, and they'r e pretty ungrateful about it. Small wonder he's fighting with the Giants at Ragnarok.

Silver Crusade

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LazarX wrote:
Kirth Gersen wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
Odin, yes, the Odin, the Allfather, practices seiðr, an effeminate threadspinning magic. He studies seiðr from Freyja. When practicing seiðr, he wears women's clothes. If this isn't common knowledge about Norse mythology, it should be.

Yeah, Loki rags on him for it, until Odin reminds him that Loki himself got knocked up by a horse and have birth to Sleipnir.

And with a sneer Loki reminds him that it happened while Loki was bailing out of yet another of the jams his dishonest bargaining got him into.

Seriously, Loki bails Odin and the Asgardians out of a lot of Odin-caused problems, and they'r e pretty ungrateful about it. Small wonder he's fighting with the Giants at Ragnarok.

Which he also gave them the tools to overcome.


Velveeta is the brand name of a processed cheese product having a taste that is identified as a type of American cheese, but with a softer and smoother texture than cheese. As a result, when melted/heated, Velveeta maintains a fully integrated, and evenly clump-free liquid texture—the opposite of what results when cheese is melted or cooked at high heat. It was invented in 1918 by Emil Frey of the Monroe Cheese Company in Monroe, New York. In 1923, The Velveeta Cheese Company was incorporated as a separate company, and was sold to Kraft Foods in 1927. The product was advertised at the time as a nutritious health food. According to Kraft's website, in the 1930s, Velveeta became the first cheese product to gain the American Medical Association's seal of approval. It was reformulated in 1953 as a cheese spread. Velveeta is labeled in the United States as a "Pasteurized Recipe Cheese Product". The name "Velveeta" is intended to connote a velvety smooth edible product. Smoothness and melting ability are promoted as its properties that result by reincorporating the whey with the curd. The brand has also been successfully spun off into a varied, Velveeta-based product line.


Randarak wrote:
The brand has also been successfully spun off into a varied, Velveeta-based product line.

Surprisingly (?), they've never made a Velveetaeen Rabbit. Just imagine: A cuddly, processed-cheese friend who's eventually discarded but "comes alive" in the garbage. Eww...


A transformer is an electrical device that transfers electrical energy between two or more circuits through electromagnetic induction. Commonly, transformers are used to increase or decrease the voltages of alternating current in electric power applications.

A varying current in the transformer's primary winding creates a varying magnetic flux in the transformer core and a varying magnetic field impinging on the transformer's secondary winding. This varying magnetic field at the secondary winding induces a varying electromotive force (EMF) or voltage in the secondary winding. Making use of Faraday's Law in conjunction with high magnetic permeability core properties, transformers can thus be designed to efficiently change AC voltages from one voltage level to another within power networks.

Since the invention of the first constant potential transformer in 1885, transformers have become essential for the transmission, distribution, and utilization of alternating current electrical energy. A wide range of transformer designs are encountered in electronic and electric power applications. Transformers range in size from RF transformers less than a cubic centimeter in volume to units interconnecting the power grid weighing hundreds of tons.


Randarak wrote:
Transformers range in size from RF transformers less than a cubic centimeter in volume to units interconnecting the power grid weighing hundreds of tons.

Your typical pad-mounted 3-phase step-down transformer weighs between 1 and 2 tons. As a consequence, they're a b+!%* and a half to install.

RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 8

The capital of Azerbaijan—Baku—is:
* the largest city in Azerbaijan,
* the largest city on the Caspian Sea,
* the largest city in the Caucasus Region,
* the largest city in the world located below sea level.
It is also the lowest lying national capital in the world (at -28 meters/-92 feet below sea level).
Finally, it shares the name of a dream-eating elephantine creature, though the etymologies are unconnected.


David M Mallon wrote:
Randarak wrote:
Transformers range in size from RF transformers less than a cubic centimeter in volume to units interconnecting the power grid weighing hundreds of tons.
Your typical pad-mounted 3-phase step-down transformer weighs between 1 and 2 tons. As a consequence, they're a b~&#~ and a half to install.

I'm sure. Very easy to design into an engineering drawing though, assuming that the architect doesn't steal all of your electrical room space for something else less vital. :-)


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Marvin, the Paranoid Android, is a fictional character in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams. Marvin is the ship's robot aboard the starship Heart of Gold. Originally built as a failed prototype of Sirius Cybernetics Corporation's GPP (Genuine People Personalities) technology, Marvin is afflicted with severe depression and boredom, in part because he has a "brain the size of a planet" which he is seldom, if ever, given the chance to use. Indeed, the true horror of Marvin's existence is that no task he could be given would occupy even the tiniest fraction of his vast intellect. Marvin claims he is 50,000 times more intelligent than a human, (or 30 billion times more intelligent than a live mattress) though this is, if anything, a vast underestimation. When kidnapped by the bellicose Krikkit robots and tied to the interfaces of their intelligent war computer, Marvin simultaneously manages to plan the entire planet's military strategy, solve "all of the major mathematical, physical, chemical, biological, sociological, philosophical, etymological, meteorological and psychological problems of the Universe except his own, three times over," and compose a number of lullabies.


Randarak wrote:
Very easy to design into an engineering drawing though, assuming that the architect doesn't steal all of your electrical room space for something else less vital. :-)

Ha. Funny story.

The last apartment job I was on, the architect didn't reference the electrical print while drawing up the plumbing print. If everything had been built to spec, the water main and the washing machine hoses would have been coming up through the main breaker panel in every single unit in the building.


David M Mallon wrote:
Randarak wrote:
Very easy to design into an engineering drawing though, assuming that the architect doesn't steal all of your electrical room space for something else less vital. :-)

Ha. Funny story.

The last apartment job I was on, the architect didn't reference the electrical print while drawing up the plumbing print. If everything had been built to spec, the water main and the washing machine hoses would have been coming up through the main breaker panel in every single unit in the building.

HA! :-D I've seen builds like that: Like running cold water piping through electrical rooms with lots of high voltage equipment underneath it.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Randarak wrote:
Marvin, the Paranoid Android, is a fictional character in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams. Marvin is the ship's robot aboard the starship Heart of Gold. Originally built as a failed prototype of Sirius Cybernetics Corporation's GPP (Genuine People Personalities) technology, Marvin is afflicted with severe depression and boredom, in part because he has a "brain the size of a planet" which he is seldom, if ever, given the chance to use. Indeed, the true horror of Marvin's existence is that no task he could be given would occupy even the tiniest fraction of his vast intellect. Marvin claims he is 50,000 times more intelligent than a human, (or 30 billion times more intelligent than a live mattress) though this is, if anything, a vast underestimation. When kidnapped by the bellicose Krikkit robots and tied to the interfaces of their intelligent war computer, Marvin simultaneously manages to plan the entire planet's military strategy, solve "all of the major mathematical, physical, chemical, biological, sociological, philosophical, etymological, meteorological and psychological problems of the Universe except his own, three times over," and compose a number of lullabies.

This is the kinder gentler version of the AM AI in Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth, Yet I Must Scream. who conducts revenge on humanity for his very existence.


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In terms of raw numbers, moose attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.

You know, a moose once bit my sister...


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I once barred from entering my friend's vehicle by an elk once. It wouldn't move and just stood there and shook its mighty antlers at me.

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