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David M Mallon wrote:
After the breakup of UK post-punk band The Vapors (of "Turning Japanese" fame), their singer Dave Fenton went to law school, became a respected solicitor, and now serves as official in-house legal counsel for the United Kingdom Musicians' Union. He still has the same haircut that he had in 1980.

Lyle Preslar, guitarist for DC hardcore punk band Minor Threat and heavy metal band Samhain, worked as an A&R representative starting in the late 1980s, working with various musicians including Ben Folds and Peter Gabriel. Preslar eventually got a license and degree in entertainment law and now represents independent musicians in legal disputes.


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David M Mallon wrote:
The 1991 song "Pop Goes The Weasel" by hip-hop group 3rd Bass is a diss track against rapper Vanilla Ice. In the music video for the song, the role of Vanilla Ice is played by punk rock icon and former Black Flag singer Henry Rollins.

very sad the group didnt go anywhere.


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Radiohead's 1993 debut album, Pablo Honey, is named after a 1992 bootleg of a Jerky Boys track, which was later released on 1994's Jerky Boys 2.


Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
The 1991 song "Pop Goes The Weasel" by hip-hop group 3rd Bass is a diss track against rapper Vanilla Ice. In the music video for the song, the role of Vanilla Ice is played by punk rock icon and former Black Flag singer Henry Rollins.
very sad the group didnt go anywhere.

In the spring of 2008, 3rd Bass member Pete "Prime Minister Pete Nice" Nash and Dropkick Murphys bassist Ken Casey re-opened legendary Boston tavern The Third Base Saloon, and re-named it McGreevy's 3rd Base Bar, after its original owner, Michael T. "Nuf Ced" McGreevy.


Actor/director Mel Gibson's 2004 film The Passion of the Christ is the highest-grossing religious film, as well as the highest-grossing R-rated film in the United States. The Passion of the Christ, with all of its dialog spoken in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Classical Latin, is also the all-time highest-grossing non-English language film worldwide.


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

The Ronettes - Be My Baby
Amy Winehouse - Back to Black


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In the animated TV pilot Pryde of the X-Men, the character Wolverine (who is Canadian in the comic books) was given an exaggerated Australian accent. Wolverine would later go on to be played in the live-action X-Men films by Australian actor Hugh Jackman, attempting a Canadian accent.


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When the first live-action X-Men film was in pre-production in the mid-90s, director Bryan Singer's first choice for the role of Wolverine was rock musician Glenn Danzig.

For those of you who follow punk music, the thought of Danzig playing the famously tough Wolverine is pretty damn funny.


Saw this on young indiana jones, said "what the hell..." turns out they're real.

People on horseback still used lances during WWI

Linky


BigNorseWolf wrote:

Saw this on young indiana jones, said "what the hell..." turns out they're real.

People on horseback still used lances during WWI

Linky

indeed.


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The French footballer Lilian Thuram played 142 games for his country, scoring 2 goals over all that time (he was a defender, so not a horrible record).

Both goals came in the 1996 World Cup semifinal against Croatia, which France won 2-1.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:

Saw this on young indiana jones, said "what the hell..." turns out they're real.

People on horseback still used lances during WWI

Linky

Say what you will about Young Indiana Jones, but the bits set on the western front of WW1 looked great.


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Guess who's back...

More people have stood on the surface of the moon (Over 12) than have been to the bottom of the Challenger Deep. (3)

Colarado switched the 420 mile marker with 419.99 to stop people from stealing it.

Astronomists have identified a mass of water floating in space 100,000 times bigger than our sun, and has 140,000,000,000,000 times more water than our oceans.

The stickers on your fruit are safe to eat. The glue is food grade.

Ancient manuscripts depict medieval knights fighting snails. Historians have no idea why.

Norway has free university tuition. Even if you're a foreigner, you're allowed to enroll.

During the cold war, the USSR thought a heavily trafficked building in the Pentagon courtyard was a top secret meeting room and pointed nukes at it. It was a hot dog stand.

A Shiba Inu dog named Bodhi makes $180,000 a year modeling men's clothes on Instagram.

Pablo Escobar once started a fire with $2,000,000 because his daughter was cold.

Bill Nye was on a sketch show in the mid-90's, when he corrected the host's pronounciation of Gigawatt. (Not Jigo-watt) The host replied "Who do you think you are, Bill Nye the Science Guy?" The name stuck.

When building the Golden Gate bridge, the lead structural engineer insisted on a safety net being installed despite the $130,000 cost being declared exorbitant. During the four-year construction period, the net saved 19 men, who called themselves the "Halfway to Hell" club.

Treadmills were created to punish English prisoners in 1818.

Thomas Jefferson said that the constitution should expire every 19 years, so that future generations are not chained down by the past.

The Beatles' refused to play to segregated audiences as stipulated in their contracts in 1965.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarves was awarded an honourary Oscar consisting of one large Oscar statue and seven miniature ones.

The Swedish Ice Hotel, built entirely of solid ice, is required by law to have smoke alarms.

A tomato plant was found on a 40 year old volcanic island. Scientists were baffled, until they found they came from seeds that passed through one scientist's digestive system, who buried his poop on the island.

Nils-Olav, full title Colonel-In-Chief Sir Nils-Olav, is a penguin that has been knighted by Norway.

No one knows who invented the fire hydrant, as the patent was destroyed in a fire.

Loneliness is processed in the same part of the brain as physical pain.

There are blind people that have learned how to use Echolocation through clicking their tongue.

Maurice Sendak was going to write and illustrate a book called "Where the Wild Horses Are," until he realized he couldn't draw horses. So he changed it to "Where the Wild Things Are."

There's a teddy bear in Dutch police cars, in case the officer needs to calm a child.

Programmers had to purge Urban Dictionary from IBM's Watson's memory because it learned how to swear.

In Finland, you get a top hat and sword when you graduate.

Liechtenstein has an incarceration rate of 19 per 100,000. With a population of 37,000, they have about 7 people in jail.

The board game Monopoly has led to multiple cases of assault and murder. One involved best friends and an arrow to the chest.

In 2010, Tokyo officials went to congratulate the oldest man in the city on his 110th birthday. They found his skeletal remains on his bed. He had been dead for 30 years, and his family was taking in the pension money he was earning.

Grand Centeral Station is more radioactive than a nuclear power plant due to the granite in its construction having a higher than normal concentration of radioactive materials.

During the 18th century, you could get into a zoo by bringing a cat or dog to feed to the lions.

Switzerland forbids people from buying only one guinea pig, as the animals are sociable and need each other's company.

A pilot and co-pilot are told not to eat the same meal, in case one is contaminated.

Tanzania's Lake Natron has an incredibly high concentration of natron, making the pH level nearly as high as Ammonia. Animals that die closeby are turned into calcified statues.

US President Calvin Coolidge liked to buzz for his bodyguards, and then hide under his desk and hear them scramble around in a panic trying to find him.

Sand from the Sahara Desert blows all the way to the Amazon, fertilizing it.

When a contestant leaves Hell's Kitchen, they are immediately given a psychiatric evaluation and then taken to a house where they are pampered.


The phenomenon where the buttock cleavage of a somewhat overweight male can be seen peeping out of the top of his ill-fitting denim jeans is known in England as a 'Builder's Bum' and in France as a 'Plumber's Smile'


In North America, it's usually called Plumber Butt, Plumber's Butt, or Plumber's Crack.


In Sweden, it is Gällivarehäng, presumably people in Gällivare let their pants hang that way.


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Trigger Loaded wrote:
Guess who's back...

Most of these are just BEGGING to be fact-checked. Maybe I'll get to it eventually...


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Started a few.

Trigger Loaded wrote:

1. More people have stood on the surface of the moon (Over 12) than have been to the bottom of the Challenger Deep. (3)

2. Colarado switched the 420 mile marker with 419.99 to stop people from stealing it.

3. Astronomists have identified a mass of water floating in space 100,000 times bigger than our sun, and has 140,000,000,000,000 times more water than our oceans.

4. The stickers on your fruit are safe to eat. The glue is food grade.

5. Ancient manuscripts depict medieval knights fighting snails. Historians have no idea why.

Amazingly, so far they've all been pretty much true:

1. This is a little deceptive, as it implies the Challenger Deep is less well-explored. However, the area of the Challenger Deep is only about 17.6 km2, whereas the area of the Moon is more like 38,000,000 km2. So if we compare people to area, we have 1:6 (Challenger Deep) vs. 1:3.17 million (the Moon). Bonus trivia tidbit: the 3rd person to descend to the bottom of the Challenger Deep was film director James Cameron.

2. Amazingly -- and awesomely -- true, on I-70, which I've driven. They also moved the mile marker 50 feet or so, so that the new mileage would still be correct.

3. Well, it's not really a mass of water, just floating there. It's a low-density cloud of water vapor and some other stuff, possibly galactic remnants, being pulled into the ultramassive black hole at the center of Quasar APM08279+5255.

4. Given that the FDA is a bureaucratic entity, I have no reason to doubt this.

5. 'Nuff said.


By all means, fact-check away. I admit full responsibility for spewing 'facts' that I saw online and took as truth.

Since I'm here:

- The story of compressing coal into diamonds is somewhat mistaken. Coal is sedimentary rock mixed with organic debris, and is hardly the pure carbon needed for diamond. As well, most diamonds were formed far before plant life even developed on earth. In theory it's possible, but it'd be a very low-grade diamond. Graphite, however, being a pure carbon formation, can be compressed into diamonds.

- Diamonds, being pure carbon, can combust. The temperature required is between 1290 F (699 C) and 1650 F (899 C). Sometimes diamonds have burned in house fires.

- The word diamond derives from the greek word 'adamas,' meaning invincible or indestructible. This is also where we get the name Adamantium from.

- Diamonds can be of any colour, not just colourless. Primary spectrum colours like red, blue, and green are the rarest (Along with orange.) Yellow and brown are the most common.

- Diamond purity/colourlessness is rated on a D-to-Z scale, with D being perfectly clear and colourless. The reason the scale starts at D is to divorce it as much as possible from all previous grading scales which, not being standardized, led to much confusion and inconsistencies. Some of these previous scales graded from A (and AA and AAA) to C, 0 to 3, I to III. They decided to start with D, since very few scales rate D as the best.

- Astronomists believe that they have discovered the heart of a dead star that has compressed into a giant diamond. They've named it Lucy after the Beatles' song "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds."


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Alexandre Davy de la Pailleterie, also known as Thomas-Alexandre Dumas (father of novelist Alexandre Dumas and grandfather of novelist and playwright Alexandre Dumas II), was born in 1762 in Jérémie, Saint-Domingue (modern Haiti), the son of French nobleman Alexandre Antoine Davy de la Pailleterie, Marquis de la Pailleterie, and his African slave Marie-Cessette Dumas.

Joining the military at age 24, Thomas-Alexandre Dumas rose to prominence in the French Revolutionary Wars, eventually becoming General-In-Chief of the French Army of the Alps in 1793 at the age of 31. Dumas was the first person of non-European origin in the French military to become brigadier general, the first to become divisional general, and the first to become general-in-chief of a French army.

Dumas shared the status of the highest-ranking officer of Sub-Saharan origin in the Western world only with François-Dominique Toussaint L'Ouverture (who in May 1797 became the second General-In-Chief of Sub-Saharan origin in the French military) until 1975, when Daniel "Chappie" James Jr. became a four-star general in the United States Air Force, the closest American equivalent of Général d'Armée, Dumas's highest rank.


The word lieutenant derives from French; the "lieu" meaning "place"; and "tenant" meaning "holding" as in "holding a position"; thus a "lieutenant" is somebody who holds a position in the absence of their superior.

Pronunciation of lieutenant is generally split between the forms [lef-TEN-ənt] and [lew-TEN-ənt], with the former generally associated with the armed forces of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries, and the latter generally associated with the armed forces of the United States. The early history of the pronunciation is unclear; Middle English spellings suggest that both pronunciations may have existed even then. The rare Old French variant spelling "luef" for Modern French "lieu" supports the suggestion that a final [w] of the Old French word was in certain environments perceived as an [f].

In Royal Naval tradition (and other English-speaking navies outside the United States) a reduced pronunciation [lə-TEN-ənt] is used. This is not recognized as current by the OED, but is likely the origin of the modern pronunciation of the word in the United States.


Italian-Austrian composer Antonio Salieri (best remembered today for his portrayal as a villain in the 1979 play Amadeus) was one of the most popular composers of the late 18th century. Contrary to his portrayal in the play (and later film), his relationship with fellow composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was generally amicable (despite some professional rivalry early in Mozart's career), and the two composers were great fans of each other's work, even collaborating on a (now-lost) cantata, Per la ricuperata salute di Ophelia.

For the last two decades of Salieri's career, he effectively retired from composing, instead becoming one of the most important music teachers of his generation. Due to his marriage into nobility, as well as his royalty checks from various opera houses' performances of his compositions, Salieri often taught his pupils for free. Some of Salieri's more famous students include Franz Schubert, Franz Liszt, Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart (son of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart), and the great Ludwig van Beethoven. At the time of Salieri's death in 1825, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous composers in Europe.


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80% of the pretzels produced in the United States are made in the state of Pennsylvania. The average American consumes 1.5 pounds of pretzels per year, but the average resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania consumes nearly twelve times the national average.


The "Huttese" language created for the Star Wars films is composed of elements of Quechua and Polish, with a few English loanwords mixed in.


In the 1977 film Star Wars, an Imperial stormtrooper can be seen hitting his head on a door during the "Death Star" sequence. Despite being an obvious mistake that was missed during editing, producer George Lucas added a metallic sound effect for the DVD Special Edition and Blu-Ray releases of the film.


The box art for the 1991 space shooter video game Phalanx (SNES) prominently features a stock photo of an old man playing a banjo. The designers of the box cover later stated that the stock photo had nothing to do with the game, and was placed on the box cover in order to distinguish the game from all of the other space shooter titles on the market. Though the cover was redesigned for the 2001 GameBoy Advance re-release so as not to feature the stock photo of the old man, IGN Entertainment named the original box art as #5 on their "25 Most Awesome Video Game Box Covers."


^For those who may be curious:

Image of the box art.


Trigger Loaded wrote:

^For those who may be curious:

Image of the box art.

Already linked to the same image in the original post, but thanks.


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The word "boobytrap" spelled backwards is "partyboob."


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Ah, apologies.

I've found that with the contrast my monitor is set at, the blue text can easily blend into the black text and I can ignore links like that.

Ah, well. I shall apologize with some facts:

- One of the primary design philosophies with the Team Fortress 2 mercenaries was to make every class distinguishable by silhouette alone.

- The voice actor for the Sniper, John Patrick Lowrie, is married to the voice actor to the Administrator, Ellen McLain who is also the voice of GLaDOS.

- John Patrick Lowrie wrote a sci-fi novel, Dancing With Eternity. When word got out, people started writing in-character reviews on Amazon.com as TF2 characters. Lowrie played along, writing replies as the Sniper. View it here.


Robert L. May created Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer in 1939, as an assignment for Chicago-based Montgomery Ward. The retailer had been buying and giving away coloring books for Christmas every year and it was decided that creating their own book would save money. May considered naming the reindeer "Rollo" or "Reginald" before deciding upon using the name "Rudolph". In its first year of publication, Montgomery Ward had distributed 2.5 million copies of Rudolph's story.


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Actor James Franco, who starred in the title role of the 2001 biographical film James Dean, is currently wrapping up filming on his film The Disaster Artist (based on the memoir by actor Greg Sestero), in which Franco stars as actor/director/producer/screenwriter Tommy Wiseau.

In Wiseau's 2003 film The Room (the filming of which forms the basis for The Disaster Artist), Wiseau clumsily delivers the line, "You're tearing me apart, Lisa!" which is cribbed straight from Nicholas Ray's 1955 film Rebel Without A Cause, in which actor James Dean delivers the line, "You're tearing me apart!"

In other words, Franco, who played Dean, is currently playing Wiseau, who is famous for stealing one of Dean's lines, which is now being delivered by Franco.


The planet Coruscant from the Star Wars universe is one of the few canon story elements to originate in the Expanded Universe (now known as Star Wars Legends), as opposed to in one of the six films and three television series that comprise the current Star Wars canon. Coruscant, first appearing in Timothy Zahn's 1991 novel Heir to the Empire, made its first film appearances in 1997's Star Wars: Episode VI: Return of the Jedi: Special Edition and 1999's Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace.


Current Star Wars canon consists of the original film trilogy (Star Wars (AKA Star Wars: Episode IV: A New Hope), Star Wars: Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, and Star Wars: Episode VI: Return of the Jedi); the "prequel" film trilogy (Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace, Star Wars: Episode II: Attack of the Clones, and Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith); the television series Star Wars: Clone Wars, Star Wars: The Clone Wars (including the series pilot later released as the film of the same name), and Star Wars: Rebels; and all Star Wars novels beginning with A New Dawn. The upcoming films Star Wars: Episode VII: The Force Awakens, its two as of yet untitled sequels, Star Wars: Rogue One, and the as of yet untitled standalone Han Solo film, as well as the as of yet untitled live-action TV series (working title: Star Wars: Underworld) will all be considered canon as well.


In the 2005 film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the in-universe band The Weird Sisters are played by musicians Jason Buckle of All Seeing I and Steven Claydon of Add N to (X), as well as Jarvis Cocker and Steve Mackey of Pulp, and Jonny Greenwood and Phil Selway of Radiohead.


Japanese toy and game company Nintendo Co. Ltd. was founded in 1889 and originally produced hand-painted playing cards. By the mid-1900s, Nintendo had branched out into many different business ventures, including a taxi service, an instant rice manufacturer, a TV network, and and a chain of "love hotels." However, due to falling stock prices, in 1966, Nintendo began manufacturing toys, which became the company's exclusive business venture by 1973.

Nintendo's first venture into the video gaming industry was securing rights to distribute the Magnavox Odyssey video game console in Japan in 1974. Nintendo began to produce its own hardware in 1977, with the Color TV-Game home video game consoles. In 1975, Nintendo moved into the video arcade game industry with EVR Race, but the success of 1981's Donkey Kong solidified Nintendo's position in the industry.


It is possible to sail in a straight line around the world from Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, passing through each time zone only once.


And what a trip it would be... Especially the near-antarctic part.


The first documented use of the word "droid," a truncated form of the word "android" (a robotic simulated human) made popular by its use in the Star Wars film franchise, was in the 1952 Mari Wolf short story Robots of the World! Arise!


The role of Darth Vader in the 1981-1996 Star Wars radio serial was portrayed by actor Brock Peters, who is also known for playing Fleet Admiral Cartwright in the Star Trek film series.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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As Rocky Balboa trains Apollo Creed's son in Creed, which came out last month, Sylvester Stallone is the same age now that Burgess Meredith was at the time of the release of the original Rocky.


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The first professional recording of Jon Bon Jovi (as John Bongiovi) was the 1980 song "R2-D2 We Wish You A Merry Christmas," on which he sang lead vocals. "R2-D2 We Wish You A Merry Christmas" was the fifth track on Christmas In The Stars, a Star Wars-themed Christmas album orchestrated and produced by Domenico "Meco" Monardo (of Star Wars And Other Galactic Funk fame) and Bon Jovi's cousin Tony Bongiovi. These are events that occurred and things that exist.

Scarab Sages

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Trigger Loaded wrote:
A pilot and co-pilot are told not to eat the same meal, in case one is contaminated.

As a failsafe, all doctors on the flight are served lasagna.

Scarab Sages

There's "toilet wine," and then there's Ttongsul.

Scarab Sages

There is serious - and persuasive for all the right reasons - talk of returning to the guillotine as America's implement of choice for capital punishment.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Trigger Loaded wrote:
A pilot and co-pilot are told not to eat the same meal, in case one is contaminated.
As a failsafe, all doctors on the flight are served lasagna.

I just wanted to tell you, good luck, we're all counting on you.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Trigger Loaded wrote:
A pilot and co-pilot are told not to eat the same meal, in case one is contaminated.
As a failsafe, all doctors on the flight are served lasagna.
I just wanted to tell you, good luck, we're all counting on you.

Surely you can't be serious.


Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Trigger Loaded wrote:
A pilot and co-pilot are told not to eat the same meal, in case one is contaminated.
As a failsafe, all doctors on the flight are served lasagna.
I just wanted to tell you, good luck, we're all counting on you.
Surely you can't be serious.

I am serious. And don't call me Shirley.


In the 1980 film Airplane!, protagonist Ted Striker is stated to have been a US Air Force pilot, but in one flashback scene, Striker is seen to be wearing a US Navy dress uniform.


A typical lithium-ion battery (such as that found in a cell phone) has between two and five times the energy density of a standard lead-acid car battery.

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