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Silver Crusade

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Your average praying mantis is a Presbyterian.


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i saw a praying mantis once! it was pretty cool


Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
i saw a praying mantis once! it was pretty cool

They're pretty common where I live, though they're often hard to spot because they stay hidden. During the early autumn you see them more often as they begin to look for mates and places to lay their eggs.


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lucky7 wrote:
Your average praying mantis is a Presbyterian.

Dr. Science is never wrong. He knows more than you do-- he has a master's degree in Science.

Silver Crusade

David M Mallon wrote:
lucky7 wrote:
Your average praying mantis is a Presbyterian.
Dr. Science is never wrong. He knows more than you do-- he has a master's degree in Science.

That's right!

Silver Crusade

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Dark doesn't have any speed at all.


lucky7 wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lucky7 wrote:
Your average praying mantis is a Presbyterian.
Dr. Science is never wrong. He knows more than you do-- he has a master's degree in Science.
That's right!

Ha ha! Ranger Brad, I'm a scientist. I don't believe in anything!

Scarab Sages

Wil Wheaton is an avid, active homebrewer.

Silver Crusade

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Arnold Schwarzenegger, despite knowing German, was unable to do the German translation of Terminator, as his Austrian accent is viewed as a "hick" accent in Germany.

Now I want a Terminator movie where the Terminator has a Southern accent.
"Y'all better come with me if'n you wanna LIVE!"

Silver Crusade

David M Mallon wrote:
lucky7 wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lucky7 wrote:
Your average praying mantis is a Presbyterian.
Dr. Science is never wrong. He knows more than you do-- he has a master's degree in Science.
That's right!
Ha ha! Ranger Brad, I'm a scientist. I don't believe in anything!

My family loves that movie!


For the 2500 year old game of go, a rule called 'komi' was not added to compensate for black's advantage of going first until after the Edo period.


tæfl and go share in common the method of capturing pieces. The king piece is surrounded on four sides to capture it (ordinary pieces only two opposite sides), as is any individual piece in go.

Aside from having black and white pieces and playing on a grid, the similarities end there.


although archaeological evidence failed to turn up any dice as far as I know (but I could be wrong), there is a bit of literary evidence to suggest that ancient germanics sometimes used dice while playing tæfl and gambling.

I'm already familiar with the rules of a common form of tæfl, and it does not use any dice. if I were to hazard a guess, I would say that dice were used to determine how far pieces were allowed to move (ordinarily in tæfl they can move as far in one direction as you like without being blocked by the edge or another piece), or to determine bets to place on the game, or perhaps to determine who went first, or who got to play which side (tæfl is an asymmetrical game; one side possesses a kingpiece and few ranks and their goal is to escape the king to the corner of the board, while the other side possesses no king but more pieces, and their goal is to surround and capture the king).

It is the beauty of games that they tend to develop local house rules and diversify over time (and then being subject to the development of systematic tournament/league rules, but this sort of thing would only happen after the advent of record-keeping by its very nature), so I see no need to aim for impossible standards of exactness in reconstruction.


tarot and traditional playing cards have ultimately the same origin. it might even be apparent, seeing as tarot and playing cards each have four suits that happen to have different names.

not only that, but this very same origin seems to be in gambling in ancient china, and seems to be about as old as paper/printing (to my memory). the suits stood for single coins, strings of coins, ten strings of coins and so forth. (again, to my memory).


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The red-winged fairywren (Malurus elegans) is a perching bird in the family Maluridae. It is non-migratory, and endemic to the southwestern corner of Western Australia. The sexes are dimorphic: females, juveniles and non-breeding males have predominantly grey-brown plumage, but breeding males adopt brilliant colours, with an iridescent silvery-blue crown and upper back, red-brown shoulders, a black throat, grey-brown wings and pale underparts. Though the red-winged fairywren is locally common, there is evidence of a decline in numbers. Primarily insectivorous, it forages and lives in the shelter of scrubby vegetation in temperate wetter forests dominated by the karri (Eucalyptus diversicolor), remaining close to cover to avoid predators.


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god does not roll dice, he fudges them.


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It's been known for nearly 20 years that dams affect the Earth's rotation. Stop and consider what affect that might have on climate, just due to ecosystem and orbital impacts.

Now stop and consider the one they built in China. Even China admitted that it's an environmental disaster entirely on its own.

Scarab Sages

Jessica Brown Findlay was invited to dance with the Kirov Ballet at the Royal Opera House at age 15.


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CaptainGemini wrote:
It's been known for nearly 20 years that dams affect the Earth's rotation. Stop and consider what affect that might have on climate, just due to ecosystem and orbital impacts. Now stop and consider the one they built in China. Even China admitted that it's an environmental disaster entirely on its own.

From the article:

Quote:
These effects are several hundred times smaller than natural variations in Earth's motion, Dr. Chao said in an interview, and they pose no danger to people or the global environment.


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lucky7 wrote:

Arnold Schwarzenegger, despite knowing German, was unable to do the German translation of Terminator, as his Austrian accent is viewed as a "hick" accent in Germany.

Now I want a Terminator movie where the Terminator has a Southern accent.
"Y'all better come with me if'n you wanna LIVE!"

Funnily enough...


If I recall correctly (this is according to hearsay and memory) the dam on the nile river has a silt buildup problem

which, if true, is honestly ironic seeing as the nile's yearly habit of flooding and depositing silt (which the dam inhibits) was a boon to the agrarian society of egypt for countless generations. The entirety of egyptian was built on the flood, which facilitated the development of a calendar since it came at the same time every year.

At what point did a natural phenomenon so essential to society stop being a gift of the gods and started becoming a "problem"?


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homo heidelbergensis, an ancestral "species" (depending on your definition of a species) of both sapiens and neanderthalensis, had a wider birth canal than homo sapiens. it's believed to have led to longer pregnancies and children being more developed than their homo sapien counterparts at birth.

also, a study of the dna of the Sima group of heidelbergensis that was apparently put into review only this past week or so (isn't published yet) suggests that neanderthals diverged from heidelbergensis about 500 thousand years ago, which may put the origin of homo sapiens as older than 200kya, older than originally thought.


Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
At what point did a natural phenomenon so essential to society stop being a gift of the gods and started becoming a "problem"?

That would be the point when the Egyptians started wanting cheap electricity, a reservoir for drinking water, and the ability to regulate the yearly flooding. Kind of sad that a number of archaeological sites had to be flooded, though.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
CaptainGemini wrote:
It's been known for nearly 20 years that dams affect the Earth's rotation. Stop and consider what affect that might have on climate, just due to ecosystem and orbital impacts. Now stop and consider the one they built in China. Even China admitted that it's an environmental disaster entirely on its own.

From the article:

Quote:
These effects are several hundred times smaller than natural variations in Earth's motion, Dr. Chao said in an interview, and they pose no danger to people or the global environment.

No danger? If the earth spins faster, then the wind will go faster! Don't you even know that wind and climate are connected?! :P


Triscuit snack crackers are made from wheat which is first cooked in water until it reaches about fifty percent moisture content, then it is tempered, which is intended to allow moisture to diffuse evenly into the grain. The grain is formed into shredded wheat strands, by using slotted rollers. Webs are formed from the strands, then several webs are stacked together. The still moist stack of strands is crimped at regular intervals to produce individual crackers. The moisture content is reduced to five percent by oven baking.


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Randarak wrote:
Triscuit snack crackers are made from wheat which is first cooked in water until it reaches about fifty percent moisture content, then it is tempered, which is intended to allow moisture to diffuse evenly into the grain. The grain is formed into shredded wheat strands, by using slotted rollers. Webs are formed from the strands, then several webs are stacked together. The still moist stack of strands is crimped at regular intervals to produce individual crackers. The moisture content is reduced to five percent by oven baking.

They are also quite delicious.


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David M Mallon wrote:
lucky7 wrote:
Your average praying mantis is a Presbyterian.
Dr. Science is never wrong. He knows more than you do-- he has a master's degree in Science.

and a PHD in art appreciation?


David M Mallon wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
At what point did a natural phenomenon so essential to society stop being a gift of the gods and started becoming a "problem"?
That would be the point when the Egyptians started wanting cheap electricity, a reservoir for drinking water, and the ability to regulate the yearly flooding. Kind of sad that a number of archaeological sites had to be flooded, though.

I'm pretty upset about that.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
At what point did a natural phenomenon so essential to society stop being a gift of the gods and started becoming a "problem"?
That would be the point when the Egyptians started wanting cheap electricity, a reservoir for drinking water, and the ability to regulate the yearly flooding. Kind of sad that a number of archaeological sites had to be flooded, though.
I'm pretty upset about that.

It's pretty sad, but every time I think of the flooded temples and such, I remind myself to think of the millions of people who now have electricity, clean drinking water, and a reliable source of irrigation. History is very important, but taking care of the living takes precedence.


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Lagos, Nigeria (the 7th largest city in the world by population, and the largest in Africa) is twinned with, of all places, Gary, Indiana.


David M Mallon wrote:
Lagos, Nigeria (the 7th largest city in the world by population, and the largest in Africa) is twinned with, of all places, Gary, Indiana.

...

....
.....
I must do some research.


Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Lagos, Nigeria (the 7th largest city in the world by population, and the largest in Africa) is twinned with, of all places, Gary, Indiana.

...

....
.....
I must do some research.

I've never been to Lagos, but it seems like a much nicer place than Gary, Indiana. And I don't even like big cities.


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Despite having similar names, Glen Matlock, original bassist for the Sex Pistols, and Ben Matlock, fictional TV lawyer played by Andy Griffith, are two completely different people.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
lucky7 wrote:
The film "Pearl Harbor" is longer than the actual Pearl Harbor attack.

Keep in mind that the film is covering time BEFORE and AFTER the attack, so that's not particularly meaningful. I don't think the actual attack is stretched out any longer though.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
CaptainGemini wrote:
It's been known for nearly 20 years that dams affect the Earth's rotation. Stop and consider what affect that might have on climate, just due to ecosystem and orbital impacts. Now stop and consider the one they built in China. Even China admitted that it's an environmental disaster entirely on its own.

From the article:

Quote:
These effects are several hundred times smaller than natural variations in Earth's motion, Dr. Chao said in an interview, and they pose no danger to people or the global environment.

Admittedly, I should have tagged my post with sarcasm markers. That's my fault.

If you wanted to actually call me on something, you really should have read the third article. What I said about the dam being an environmental disaster is backed very much by science.


David M Mallon wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:
At what point did a natural phenomenon so essential to society stop being a gift of the gods and started becoming a "problem"?
That would be the point when the Egyptians started wanting cheap electricity, a reservoir for drinking water, and the ability to regulate the yearly flooding. Kind of sad that a number of archaeological sites had to be flooded, though.
I'm pretty upset about that.
It's pretty sad, but every time I think of the flooded temples and such, I remind myself to think of the millions of people who now have electricity, clean drinking water, and a reliable source of irrigation. History is very important, but taking care of the living takes precedence.

I guess that's fair.


[9/15/15, 1:53:53 AM] Bæmf: by the way it turns out that some s@%#ty anthropologist back in the day saw a neanderthal skull (before people knew they were a species of human) and decided that it belonged to a cossack who had some disease
[9/15/15, 1:54:05 AM] Нав Ганнусь: wtffff
[9/15/15, 1:54:08 AM] Bæmf: yea man
[9/15/15, 1:54:15 AM] Нав Ганнусь: wow
[9/15/15, 1:54:21 AM] Bæmf: found that out in lecture earlier today
[9/15/15, 1:55:36 AM] Bæmf: it's funny because some folks before him already theorized that the neanderthal skulls were some older species of human, then this dumbass comes along and is like "WELL ACTUALLY these are just modern people with diseases that affected the shape of the bones. also they're foreign because western europeans dont look like that obviously"
[9/15/15, 1:56:06 AM] Bæmf: fortunately he was debunked

*is slavic*


also another neanderthal skull found during the late 19th century was originally believed to have belonged to some british sailor who went AWOL. this was before the weird racial bone disease theories.

on a side note, there is a danish bog body that was falsely believed to have belonged to a queen of the high or late middle ages, and was given a queen's burial. really she was just someone from sometime during the iron age, which was when bog sacrifices from that region are usually dated. (they stopped doing those sacrifices centuries before the sixth century aka time of beowulf which is really most of what I need to know)

Scarab Sages

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There is a species of octopus that catches its prey by sneaking up on them and tapping them on (whatever passes for) their shoulder.


there is the head of a bog body found with really pretty hair in a cute little suebian knot. the knot was a bun on the side of the head that was popular amongst young men of the Suebi germanic tribe according to Tacitus, hence the name. (also take tacitus with a grain of salt; for example he misunderstood the nature of bog sacrifices)

I've tried on multiple occasions to learn to tie a suebian knot but can't seem to get it right. is my hair too thick? Is it not long enough? am I just stupid?


I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
There is a species of octopus that catches its prey by sneaking up on them and tapping them on (whatever passes for) their shoulder.

related

Scarab Sages

Egyptians like cheese. Egyptians have *always* liked cheese.


people act like in the middle ages+migration period viking age whatnot that people were just universally disgusting and full of filth and never washed ever

but your hair needs to be clean and combed really well for the suebian knot to work! and this was a popular hairstyle among the continental germanic tribes! and also combs made of wood or bone or walrus ivory are one of the most common archaeological finds, and could be lavishly decorated because they decorated EVERYTHING.

also during the viking age, anglo-saxons accused the vikings of being too obsessed with cleanliness and were jealous because they were getting all the anglo-saxon ladies. seriously

vikings were dandies, dudes. they liked brightly-colored, embroidered fabrics and jewelry, and tried to make it or get their hands on it when they could.

and dyes from sources native to europe were cheaper than you think.


here's some of what i know about viking age washing habits: they washed their faces every morning. At the beginning of every meal they washed their hands (which is more than can be said for most people today!!). In some places saturday was known as 'washing day'.

ibn fadlan complained about the washing habits of the rus, but he did exaggerate his complaints, and he was impossible to please anyway; due to being a muslim familiar with the tradition of never washing in the same water that was already washed in. If you got past the complaining, he did report that they have meticulous, daily washing rituals.


another thing: celts and germanics had soap before the romans did. You know this because tacitus reported in the 1st century that they had something called soap and described what it was. The romans washed with olive oil. No idea how well that worked for them.

soap (or rather the ingredients used to make it?) was also used for bleaching hair, which was also popular in the viking age. (this goes back to the fact that vikings were dandies)

chestnut leaves and/or nuts are also full of saponins and can be used to make a soap.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Marijuana is poisonous to Dogs.

So are tree nuts, they have a bacteria in them that twists their stomachs and kills them.

Peanuts however being Legumes are good for dogs tho and help give them a shiny coat so give your dogs more peanut butter to keep them healthy :-)


Saturday is Lördag in Swedish, i.e lögardag, meaning washing day, yes.

Is Saturday derived from the same word (saturate?), considering that the rest of the days are Old Norse deities and such?


Sissyl wrote:

Saturday is Lördag in Swedish, i.e lögardag, meaning washing day, yes.

Is Saturday derived from the same word (saturate?), considering that the rest of the days are Old Norse deities and such?

nope. it comes from the roman god saturn.

the days were given the names of germanic deities in germanic speaking languages, but there wasn't really an "equivalent" god for saturn.


Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

here's some of what i know about viking age washing habits: they washed their faces every morning. At the beginning of every meal they washed their hands (which is more than can be said for most people today!!). In some places saturday was known as 'washing day'.

ibn fadlan complained about the washing habits of the rus, but he did exaggerate his complaints, and he was impossible to please anyway; due to being a muslim familiar with the tradition of never washing in the same water that was already washed in. If you got past the complaining, he did report that they have meticulous, daily washing rituals.

interesting.


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The "Oreo Biscuit" was first developed and produced by the National Biscuit Company (today known as Nabisco) in 1912 at its Chelsea, Manhattan factory in the current-day Chelsea Market complex, located on Ninth Avenue between 15th and 16th Streets. Today, this same block of Ninth Avenue is known as "Oreo Way." The name Oreo was first trademarked on March 14, 1912. It was launched as an imitation of the Hydrox cookie manufactured by Sunshine company, introduced in 1908.

The original design of the cookie featured a wreath around the edge of the cookie and the name "OREO" in the center. In the United States, they were sold for 25 cents a pound in novelty cans with clear glass tops. The first Oreo was sold on March 6, 1912 to a grocer in Hoboken, New Jersey.

The Oreo Biscuit was renamed in 1921, to "Oreo Sandwich." A new design for the cookie was introduced in 1924. A lemon-filled variety was available briefly during the 1920s, but was discontinued. In 1948, the Oreo Sandwich was renamed the "Oreo Creme' Sandwich"; it was changed in 1974 to the Oreo Chocolate Sandwich Cookie.

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