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Randarak wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Randarak wrote:
Very easy to design into an engineering drawing though, assuming that the architect doesn't steal all of your electrical room space for something else less vital. :-)

Ha. Funny story.

The last apartment job I was on, the architect didn't reference the electrical print while drawing up the plumbing print. If everything had been built to spec, the water main and the washing machine hoses would have been coming up through the main breaker panel in every single unit in the building.

HA! :-D I've seen builds like that: Like running cold water piping through electrical rooms with lots of high voltage equipment underneath it.

That's not necessarily a bad thing, since the main ground is often bonded to the cold water line (if it's run in copper pipe), especially in residential construction. It used to be the standard years ago, but these days it's used as more of a backup for the grounding rod.


Randarak wrote:

In terms of raw numbers, moose attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.

You know, a moose once bit my sister...

A while back, up near where I grew up (Champlain Valley / Eastern Adirondacks), some guy got killed after he hit a moose while riding his bicycle down a steep mountain road.


David M Mallon wrote:
Randarak wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Randarak wrote:
Very easy to design into an engineering drawing though, assuming that the architect doesn't steal all of your electrical room space for something else less vital. :-)

Ha. Funny story.

The last apartment job I was on, the architect didn't reference the electrical print while drawing up the plumbing print. If everything had been built to spec, the water main and the washing machine hoses would have been coming up through the main breaker panel in every single unit in the building.

HA! :-D I've seen builds like that: Like running cold water piping through electrical rooms with lots of high voltage equipment underneath it.
That's not necessarily a bad thing, since the main ground is often bonded to the cold water line (if it's run in copper pipe), especially in residential construction. It used to be the standard years ago, but these days it's used as more of a backup for the grounding rod.

In this case, grounding is run to building steel. Those pipes had no business being run through that room, as it wasn't any sort of metal piping being used, and that equipment produce quite a lot of heat, despite the cooling system.


Randarak wrote:
In this case, grounding is run to building steel. Those pipes had no business being run through that room, as it wasn't any sort of metal piping being used, and that equipment produce quite a lot of heat, despite the cooling system.

Ah. Yeah, that's not good.


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On October 3, 1849, Edgar Allan Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore delirious, "in great distress, and... in need of immediate assistance", according to the man who found him, Joseph W. Walker. He was taken to the Washington Medical College, where he died on Sunday, October 7, 1849, at 5:00 in the morning. Poe was never coherent long enough to explain how he came to be in his dire condition, and, oddly, was wearing clothes that were not his own. Poe is said to have repeatedly called out the name "Reynolds" on the night before his death, though it is unclear to whom he was referring. Some sources say Poe's final words were "Lord help my poor soul." All medical records, including his death certificate, have been lost. Newspapers at the time reported Poe's death as "congestion of the brain" or "cerebral inflammation", common euphemisms for deaths from disreputable causes such as alcoholism. The actual cause of death remains a mystery. Speculation has included delirium tremens, heart disease, epilepsy, syphilis, meningeal inflammation, cholera and rabies. One theory, dating from 1872, indicates that cooping—in which unwilling citizens who were forced to vote for a particular candidate were occasionally killed—was the cause of Poe's death.


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Gibson Jerome "Gibby" Haynes, the lead singer of the alternative rock band B%%@@$$! Surfers, is the son of actor Jerry Haynes, best known as Dallas, TX-based kids' TV host "Mr. Peppermint." Haynes was a star on his high school's basketball team, and he attended Trinity University to study accounting. While at Trinity, Gibby was the captain of the basketball team, president of his fraternity, and was named the Accounting Student of the Year. After graduating, worked for a year as an auditor for the accounting firm Peat Marwick.


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Randarak wrote:

In terms of raw numbers, moose attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.

You know, a moose once bit my sister...

I hope she is okay. I hear that moose bites Kan be pretti nasti...

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Gisher wrote:
Randarak wrote:

In terms of raw numbers, moose attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.

You know, a moose once bit my sister...

I hope she is okay. I hear that moose bites Kan be pretti nasti...

Weremoose?


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Gisher wrote:
Randarak wrote:

In terms of raw numbers, moose attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.

You know, a moose once bit my sister...

I hope she is okay. I hear that moose bites Kan be pretti nasti...

No realli! She was Karving her initials on the moose with the sharpened end of an interspace toothbrush given her by Svenge - her brother-in-law - an Oslo dentist and star of many Norwegian movies: "The Hot Hands of an Oslo Dentist", "Fillings of Passion", "The Huge Molars of Horst Nordfink"...


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Apparently, today is World Egg Day. Who knew?


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It beats Compost Awareness Week, for certain.


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Randarak wrote:
Gisher wrote:
Randarak wrote:

In terms of raw numbers, moose attack more people than bears and wolves combined, but usually with only minor consequences. In the Americas, moose injure more people than any other wild mammal and, worldwide, only hippopotamuses injure more.

You know, a moose once bit my sister...

I hope she is okay. I hear that moose bites Kan be pretti nasti...
No realli! She was Karving her initials on the moose with the sharpened end of an interspace toothbrush given her by Svenge - her brother-in-law - an Oslo dentist and star of many Norwegian movies: "The Hot Hands of an Oslo Dentist", "Fillings of Passion", "The Huge Molars of Horst Nordfink"...

We apologize for the fault in these replies. Those responsible have been sacked.


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When Star Wars: Return of the Jedi was released on DVD in 2004, the original image of Anakin Skywalker as a Force ghost (portrayed by actor Sebastian Shaw) was replaced with stock footage of actor Hayden Christensen, who portrayed Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequel films. Christensen was not asked about or notified of his digital insertion into Return of the Jedi, and has gone on record to say that he was displeased with the change.


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David M Mallon wrote:
When Star Wars: Return of the Jedi was released on DVD in 2004, the original image of Anakin Skywalker as a Force ghost (portrayed by actor Sebastian Shaw) was replaced with stock footage of actor Hayden Christensen, who portrayed Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequel films. Christensen was not asked about or notified of his digital insertion into Return of the Jedi, and has gone on record to say that he was displeased with the change.

I am forced to respect him now.


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Contrary to popular belief, Dick VanDyke is still alive (he's 90 years old).


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In 1785, a 4th-century Roman gold ring (bearing the inscription "SENICIANE VIVAS IN DEO" - "Senicianus Lives In God") was discovered in a farmer's field near Silchester, Hampshire, England. In the early 19th century, around 30 years later, a lead curse tablet was discovered at the site of the Romano-British temple of Nodens at Lydney, Gloucestershire. The curse tablet bore an inscription reading, "DEVO NODENTI SILVIANVS ANILVM PERDEDIT DEMEDIAM PARTEM DONAVIT NODENTI INTER QVIBVS NOMEN SENICIANI NOLLIS PETMITTAS SANITATEM DONEC PERFERA VSQVE TEMPLVM DENTIS" - "For the god Nodens. Silvianus has lost a ring and has donated one half [its worth] to Nodens. Among those named Senicianus permit no good health until it is returned to the temple of Nodens."

It was not until over a hundred years later, in 1929, that a connection was made between the ring and the tablet. During his excavations at Lydney, famed British archaeologist Sir Eric Mortimer Wheeler, had come upon references to both the ring and the tablet in his research. Looking for more information on the obscure Romano-British deity Nodens, Mortimer Wheeler called upon the expertise of a 37-year-old linguistics professor and British history expert named John Tolkien. Many years after publishing his scholarly addendum to Mortimer Wheeler's publication on the dig site, Tolkien himself became known as something of an expert on cursed rings.


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Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
When Star Wars: Return of the Jedi was released on DVD in 2004, the original image of Anakin Skywalker as a Force ghost (portrayed by actor Sebastian Shaw) was replaced with stock footage of actor Hayden Christensen, who portrayed Anakin Skywalker in the Star Wars prequel films. Christensen was not asked about or notified of his digital insertion into Return of the Jedi, and has gone on record to say that he was displeased with the change.
I am forced to respect him now.

I've seen him in a few movies, and he's a damned fine actor when he puts his mind to it (see: Life As A House, Shattered Glass). On the other hand, he also seems to star in a lot of movies where his attitude is "f&&# you, I don't care, give me my paycheck" (see: Jumper, Star Wars).

I would bet money on the assumption that his portrayal of Anakin in Star Wars was a half-assed version of his portrayal of Sam in Life As A House.


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The name of the Wookiee species in the Star Wars films was inspired by an off-the-cuff line delivered by actor Terence McGovern while filming George Lucas' movie THX 1138, in which McGovern ad-libbed, "I think I just ran over a wookie on the expressway." Lucas liked the word enough to include it in an early draft for Star Wars, and the name stuck.


Randarak wrote:
Marvin, the Paranoid Android, is a fictional character in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams. Marvin is the ship's robot aboard the starship Heart of Gold. Originally built as a failed prototype of Sirius Cybernetics Corporation's GPP (Genuine People Personalities) technology, Marvin is afflicted with severe depression and boredom, in part because he has a "brain the size of a planet" which he is seldom, if ever, given the chance to use. Indeed, the true horror of Marvin's existence is that no task he could be given would occupy even the tiniest fraction of his vast intellect. Marvin claims he is 50,000 times more intelligent than a human, (or 30 billion times more intelligent than a live mattress) though this is, if anything, a vast underestimation. When kidnapped by the bellicose Krikkit robots and tied to the interfaces of their intelligent war computer, Marvin simultaneously manages to plan the entire planet's military strategy, solve "all of the major mathematical, physical, chemical, biological, sociological, philosophical, etymological, meteorological and psychological problems of the Universe except his own, three times over," and compose a number of lullabies.

Marvin was originally intended to be a short joke, but then the BBC hired the actor and Douglas Adams had to write dialogue for him in the script. Then he was so popular, that he decided to keep writing for him.


Transhumanism (abbreviated as H+ or h+) is an international cultural and intellectual movement with the goal of fundamentally transforming the human condition by eventually developing and making widely available technologies to greatly enhance human intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities. Transhumanist thinkers study the potential benefits and dangers of emerging technologies that could overcome fundamental human limitations, as well as the ethics of developing and using such technologies. The most common thesis put forward is that human beings may eventually be able to transform themselves into beings with such greatly expanded abilities as to merit the label posthuman.


Director and actress Sofia Coppola, daughter of director Francis Ford Coppola (and cousin of actor Nicolas Cage), asked family friend George Lucas if she could watch the filming of Lucas' then-upcoming film Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In response, Lucas, cast Coppola as Saché, one of the handmaidens of Queen Padmé Amidala, alongside future Pirates of the Caribbean star Keira Knightley.


David M Mallon wrote:
Director and actress Sofia Coppola, daughter of director Francis Ford Coppola (and cousin of actor Nicolas Cage), asked family friend George Lucas if she could watch the filming of Lucas' then-upcoming film Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In response, Lucas, cast Coppola as Saché, one of the handmaidens of Queen Padmé Amidala, alongside future Pirates of the Caribbean star Keira Knightley.

No one ever mentions poor Rose Byrne though, do they?

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
David M Mallon wrote:
Christensen was not asked about or notified of his digital insertion into Return of the Jedi, and has gone on record to say that he was displeased with the change.

Probably because he wasn't paid for it.


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A full list of Star Wars cameo appearances:

The Phantom Menace

Ben Burtt (lead sound designer) as scholar Ebenn Q3 Baobab
Robert Coleman (SFX supervisor) as holo-actor Romeo Treblanc and an unnamed Naboo pilot
Sofia Coppola (film director & Lucas family friend) as Naboo handmaiden Saché
Fay David (art department supervisor) as Naboo handmaiden Fé
Warwick Davis (actor, "Wicket W. Warrick," Return of the Jedi) as Tatooine arms dealer Weazel
Chrissie England (VFX producer) and Jim Morris (Lucas Digital president) as Twi'lek senator Orn Free Taa's aides
Nathan Hamill (son of actor Mark Hamill) as Naboo citizen Rehtul Minnau
John Knoll (senior VFX supervisor, Industrial Light & Magic) as Naboo pilot Rya Kirsch
Amanda Lucas (daughter of director George Lucas) as Tatooine dancer Diva Funquita and the voice of Trade Federation officer Tey How
Katie Lucas (daughter of George Lucas) as Tatooine slave Amee
Paul Martin Smith (film editor) as a Naboo noble
Rick McCallum (producer) as a Naboo noble

Attack of the Clones

Amy Allen (VFX producer) as Jedi Knight Aayla Secura, and as Black Sun operatives Mya Nalle, Yma Nalle and Lela Mayn
Ahmed Best (actor, "Jar Jar Binks," The Phantom Menace) as con artist Achk Med-Beq
Don Bies (SFX artist) as bar patron Artuo Pratuhr
Anthony Daniels (actor, "C-3PO," all Star Wars films) as con artist Dannl Faytonni
Justin Dix (SFX technician) as bar patron Dixon Just
Gillian Libbert (costume supervisor) as bar patron Lillea Bringbit
Amanda Lucas (daughter of director George Lucas) as bar patron Adnama
Jett Lucas (son of director George Lucas) as Jedi Padawan Warpoc Skamini / Zett Jukassa
Katie Lucas (daughter of director George Lucas) as Twi'lek dancer Lunae Minx
Zeynup Selcuk (SFX technician) as bar patron Zey Nep
Trevor Tighe (SFX technician) as bar patron Civ Sila

Revenge of the Sith

George Lucas (director) as Pantoran Baron N. Papanoida
Jeremy Bulloch (actor, "Boba Fett," The Empire Strikes Back & Return of the Jedi) as Alderaanian pilot Jeremoch Colton
Anthony Daniels (actor, "C-3PO," all Star Wars films) as con artist Dannl Faytonni
Nick Gillard (veteran stunt double and lead stunt coordinator) as Jedi Master Cin Drallig
Pablo Hidalgo (author) as opera patron Janu Godalhi
John Knoll (senior VFX supervisor, Industrial Light & Magic) as opera patron Tannon Praji
Robert Coleman (SFX supervisor) as holo-actor Romeo Treblanc
Roger Guyett (VFX supervisor) as opera patron Ottegru Grey
Denise Ream (VFX executive producer) as opera patron Onara Kuat
Jill Brooks (VFX producer) as an opera patron
Janet Lewin (VFX producer) as an opera patron
Lisa Shaunessy (publicity assistant) as Thesmean Senator Silya Shessaun
Jett Lucas (son of director George Lucas) as Jedi Padawan Zett Jukassa
Amanda Lucas (daughter of director George Lucas) as Senex Sector Senator Terr Taneel
Katie Lucas (daughter of director George Lucas) as Pantoran Senator Chi Eekway Papanoida
Mousy McCallum (daughter of producer Rick McCallum) as Jedi Padawan Bene

A New Hope

Joe Johnston (film director and Star Wars VFX designer and concept artist) as a stormtrooper and an unnamed Imperial gunner

The Empire Strikes Back

Ralph McQuarrie (lead concept artist) as Rebel Alliance General Pharl McQuarrie
Jeremy Bulloch (actor, "Boba Fett," The Empire Strikes Back & Return of the Jedi) as Imperial Lieutenant Sheckil
Harrison Ellenshaw (matte painting supervisor) as an unnamed Rebel
John Ratzenberger (actor and friend of George Lucas) as Rebel Alliance Major Bren Derlin

Return of the Jedi

Robert Watts (producer) as Imperial AT-ST gunner Watts
Richard Marquand (director) as Imperial AT-ST pilot Marquand
Ben Burtt (lead sound designer) as Imperial officer Dyer

Outside of the films, authors Michael A. Stackpole and Timothy Zahn, along with Star Wars creator George Lucas, lent their likenesses, respectively, to the characters of Jedi Knight Corran Horn, and the smugglers Talon Karrde and Jorj Car'das.


Hitdice wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Director and actress Sofia Coppola, daughter of director Francis Ford Coppola (and cousin of actor Nicolas Cage), asked family friend George Lucas if she could watch the filming of Lucas' then-upcoming film Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. In response, Lucas, cast Coppola as Saché, one of the handmaidens of Queen Padmé Amidala, alongside future Pirates of the Caribbean star Keira Knightley.
No one ever mentions poor Rose Byrne though, do they?

A) she was in Attack of the Clones, and B) she's an actual actress who went through the casting process.


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John Williams' iconic "Imperial March" theme didn't actually make an appearance until Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the second Star Wars film to be released.


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David M Mallon wrote:
John Williams' iconic "Imperial March" theme didn't actually make an appearance until Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the second Star Wars film to be released.

I actually knew that piece of trivia.. lol.. I still have the original vinyl lp of the score for New Hope. Bought it in 1977 and it's in perfect shape.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
John Williams' iconic "Imperial March" theme didn't actually make an appearance until Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the second Star Wars film to be released.
I actually knew that piece of trivia.. lol.. I still have the original vinyl lp of the score for New Hope. Bought it in 1977 and it's in perfect shape.

I suddenly feel very, very young...


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
John Williams' iconic "Imperial March" theme didn't actually make an appearance until Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the second Star Wars film to be released.
I actually knew that piece of trivia.. lol.. I still have the original vinyl lp of the score for New Hope. Bought it in 1977 and it's in perfect shape.

please ignore ant sounds of breaking glass or rummaging about in your house that you may hear in the next few hours.


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Actor James Earl Jones was hired to provide the voice of Darth Vader after most of primary filming for Star Wars had wrapped, with bodybuilder David Prowse playing the character of Vader. Jones was briefly considered to replace Prowse as the actor inside the suit, but George Lucas ultimately decided that he was too short to play the character.

Suit actor David Prowse's height: 6'5"
Voice actor James Earl Jones's height: 6'2"
Anakin Skywalker actor Sebastian Shaw's height: 6'2"
Stunt/fight double Bob Anderson's height: 6'1"
Anakin Skywalker actor Hayden Christensen's height: 6'0"

For those of you who doubt that he could have pulled it off, I present you James Earl Jones in 1970.


I had heard he was built but....damn.


The iconic "not many people know that" line often attributed to veteran British actor Michael Caine was actually said by Caine's friend and fellow veteran British actor Peter Sellers while doing an impression of Caine. To quote Michael Caine's 2008 interview from Parkinson:

"I'm always full of information, facts, you know? And [Sellers] was the first to-- he always had the new gadgets, right? He was the first one to have an answering machine, and I called him one day, and he wasn't in. And there was me, saying, "My name is Michael Caine, and I just wanted you to know that Peter Sellers is not in. Not many people know that." He invented that "not many people know that," and then everyone who rang him, they got me saying, "not many people know that."


David M Mallon wrote:

The iconic "not many people know that" line often attributed to veteran British actor Michael Caine was actually said by Caine's friend and fellow veteran British actor Peter Sellers while doing an impression of Caine. To quote Michael Caine's 2008 interview from Parkinson:

"I'm always full of information, facts, you know? And [Sellers] was the first to-- he always had the new gadgets, right? He was the first one to have an answering machine, and I called him one day, and he wasn't in. And there was me, saying, "My name is Michael Caine, and I just wanted you to know that Peter Sellers is not in. Not many people know that." He invented that "not many people know that," and then everyone who rang him, they got me saying, "not many people know that."

Not many people know that.


Freehold DM wrote:
I had heard he was built but....damn.

Hell, even when he was starting to get a little pudgy, back in his Thulsa Doom days, he still probably could have snapped a man in half.


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David M Mallon wrote:

The iconic "not many people know that" line often attributed to veteran British actor Michael Caine was actually said by Caine's friend and fellow veteran British actor Peter Sellers while doing an impression of Caine. To quote Michael Caine's 2008 interview from Parkinson:

"I'm always full of information, facts, you know? And [Sellers] was the first to-- he always had the new gadgets, right? He was the first one to have an answering machine, and I called him one day, and he wasn't in. And there was me, saying, "My name is Michael Caine, and I just wanted you to know that Peter Sellers is not in. Not many people know that." He invented that "not many people know that," and then everyone who rang him, they got me saying, "not many people know that."

Here is Peter Sellers doing the impression.


Gisher wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:

The iconic "not many people know that" line often attributed to veteran British actor Michael Caine was actually said by Caine's friend and fellow veteran British actor Peter Sellers while doing an impression of Caine. To quote Michael Caine's 2008 interview from Parkinson:

"I'm always full of information, facts, you know? And [Sellers] was the first to-- he always had the new gadgets, right? He was the first one to have an answering machine, and I called him one day, and he wasn't in. And there was me, saying, "My name is Michael Caine, and I just wanted you to know that Peter Sellers is not in. Not many people know that." He invented that "not many people know that," and then everyone who rang him, they got me saying, "not many people know that."

Here is Peter Sellers doing the impression.

On the same show, no less.


In the music video for singer-songwriter Neil Young's song "Harvest Moon," a younger version of Young is played by no other than a 23-year-old Dale Crover, drummer for the heavy metal band The Melvins.


The unabomber was one of the experimental subjects in MK ultra


H.P. Lovecraft's ex-wife, Sonia Greene, described her ex-husband as "an adequately excellent lover." She also asserted that he never told her that he loved her


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
The unabomber was one of the experimental subjects in MK ultra

That is still a big "citation needed", BNW.


Sissyl wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
The unabomber was one of the experimental subjects in MK ultra
That is still a big "citation needed", BNW.

It's on the Wiki, isn't that all the proof you need?

:)


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The wiki felt the citation was needed.


Sissyl wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:
The unabomber was one of the experimental subjects in MK ultra
That is still a big "citation needed", BNW.

Chase, Alston (2003). Harvard and the Unabomber The Education of an American Terrorist. W. W. Norton & Company. pp. 18–19. ISBN 0393020029.


Actor Jack Nicholson first made a name for himself starring in a series of low-budget films by legendary B-movie director Roger Corman, including The Terror, The Cry Baby Killer, The Raven, The St. Valentine's Day Massacre, and the original (non-musical) Little Shop of Horrors. (During this period, Nicholson also appeared on two episodes of The Andy Griffith Show as two separate characters: "Mr. Garland" and "Marvin Jenkins.") To this day, Nicholson and Corman remain friends, and Nicholson credits Corman as the one person who gave him a chance to become a real movie star.

Silver Crusade

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Speaking of Roger Corman, not a single film he's made has lost money.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
John Williams' iconic "Imperial March" theme didn't actually make an appearance until Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the second Star Wars film to be released.
I actually knew that piece of trivia.. lol.. I still have the original vinyl lp of the score for New Hope. Bought it in 1977 and it's in perfect shape.

I have the sound track to The Empire Strikes Back on 8-track tape, for no reason other than its on 8-track tape.


The piece of music (after the James Bond theme) used in the most recent Heineken commercial starring Daniel Craig (the one with the boat and the water skier) is a piece of stock jazz music that was used in various TV shows and commercials from back in the 1960's, but might very well be best known for being used in the Spider-Man cartoon from the 1960's (see episode King Pinned, amongst others).


David M Mallon wrote:
H.P. Lovecraft's ex-wife, Sonia Greene, described her ex-husband as "an adequately excellent lover." She also asserted that he never told her that he loved her

....so, he was perfectly competent??


In the movie Legend, the face of goblin Blix (played by Alice Playten) was designed after that of Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones. According to Playten, she thought up the idea, which was supported by director Ridley Scott. He then had Rob Bottin (special make-up effects) implement the concept.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
David M Mallon wrote:
Actor Jack Nicholson first made a name for himself starring in a series of low-budget films by legendary B-movie director Roger Corman, including The Terror, The Cry Baby Killer, The Raven, The St. Valentine's Day Massacre, and the original (non-musical) Little Shop of Horrors. (During this period, Nicholson also appeared on two episodes of The Andy Griffith Show as two separate characters: "Mr. Garland" and "Marvin Jenkins.") To this day, Nicholson and Corman remain friends, and Nicholson credits Corman as the one person who gave him a chance to become a real movie star.

Are you talking about The Raven with Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, and Vincent Price? (which I first saw in a School Assembly around Halloween oh so many years ago. Who did Nicholson play, the young male of the two lovers?

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