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The science fiction TV series Firefly first aired on FOX 13 years ago today.


David M Mallon wrote:
The science fiction TV series Firefly first aired on FOX 13 years ago today.

And I've still never seen more than 2 episodes.


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That's two more then I.


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David M Mallon wrote:
The science fiction TV series Firefly first aired on FOX 13 years ago today.

I've been feeling off today. Perhaps this is why.


I'm sure it was a good show. It just didn't hold my interest.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
The science fiction TV series Firefly first aired on FOX 13 years ago today.
And I've still never seen more than 2 episodes.

wise.


captain yesterday wrote:
That's two more then I.

lucky.


Freehold DM wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
The science fiction TV series Firefly first aired on FOX 13 years ago today.
And I've still never seen more than 2 episodes.
wise.

Yeah, Angel was way better.


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I've never seen Angel or Buffy.


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I saw an Angel, once.

Turns out it was mostly the LSD.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I've never seen Angel or Buffy.

builds small shrine to DungeonmasterCal


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Upper palaeolithic homo sapiens had a larger crainial capacity (and EQ) than homo sapiens in the present day


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On this day in 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy children's novel The Hobbit, which later served as a predecessor to The Lord of the Rings, was first published.


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Freehold DM wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I've never seen Angel or Buffy.
builds small shrine to DungeonmasterCal

Never saw Buffy, and I thought Angel was dumb. Dollhouse was OK, I guess, as was The Cabin in the Woods. Loved Firefly and Serenity, and I saw Avengers five times in the theater. Never got around to seeing Age of Ultron.

Back somewhat on topic, though:

While Joss Whedon is relatively well-known as being the first of several writers of the infamous cinematic turkey Alien: Resurrection, he also wrote full scripts or treatments for the films Speed, Waterworld, Toy Story, Titan: A.E, and Atlantis: the Lost Empire.


I have a friend who would think Whedon's crap in a bucket would be television or cinematic gold. He babbles on constantly about Whedon or Whedon related stuff (the Buffy and Angel comic books, for example) and it just completely makes me NOT want to have anything to do with the guy. I did enjoy Avengers but thought Cabin in the Woods was a waste of my Redbox dollar.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I have a friend who would think Whedon's crap in a bucket would be television or cinematic gold. He babbles on constantly about Whedon or Whedon related stuff (the Buffy and Angel comic books, for example) and it just completely makes me NOT want to have anything to do with the guy. I did enjoy Avengers but thought Cabin in the Woods was a waste of my Redbox dollar.

Given his filmography, he does seem to be capable of the highest of highs and the lowest of lows, as far as quality is concerned.


David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I've never seen Angel or Buffy.
builds small shrine to DungeonmasterCal

Never saw Buffy, and I thought Angel was dumb. Dollhouse was OK, I guess, as was The Cabin in the Woods. Loved Firefly and Serenity, and I saw Avengers five times in the theater. Never got around to seeing Age of Ultron.

Back somewhat on topic, though:

While Joss Whedon is relatively well-known as being the first of several writers of the infamous cinematic turkey Alien: Resurrection, he also wrote full scripts or treatments for the films Speed, Waterworld, Toy Story, Titan: A.E, and Atlantis: the Lost Empire.

couldn't leave Lensman and Nadia alone, could he?


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I have a friend who would think Whedon's crap in a bucket would be television or cinematic gold. He babbles on constantly about Whedon or Whedon related stuff (the Buffy and Angel comic books, for example) and it just completely makes me NOT want to have anything to do with the guy. I did enjoy Avengers but thought Cabin in the Woods was a waste of my Redbox dollar.

Bring your friend to me.

We have so much to...discuss.


Freehold DM wrote:
couldn't leave Lensman and Nadia alone, could he?

Who?


David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
couldn't leave Lensman and Nadia alone, could he?
Who?

Whedon, who else? He hasn't had an original idea in his head in..well, ever.


Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
couldn't leave Lensman and Nadia alone, could he?
Who?
Whedon, who else? He hasn't had an original idea in his head in..well, ever.

No, I don't know who Lensman and Nadia are.

Also, Atlantis ripped off Stargate more than anything else, right down to the logo.


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Atlantis has Milo :-)

Smurfy! Now I gotta get my Stargate fix.


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Comic book artist and illustrator Mike Mignola worked as the lead concept artist on the film Atlantis: the Lost Empire, and also contributed the cover art for the graphic novel adaptation of the film.

Silver Crusade

Freehold DM wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I've never seen Angel or Buffy.
builds small shrine to DungeonmasterCal

That's all it takes? I've never watched any of his TV shows. My entire exposure to his directorial work is the Marvel movies.


A heart attack is what it is called when blood flow is stopped through a coronary artery, leading to death of a part of the heart muscle.

I'm curious about the nature of the heart attack that is the 'default death' caused by the Death Note, which must always be instantly fatal, and can't necessarily be caused by plaque buildup in the arteries, because not everyone has that.


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Celestial Healer wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I've never seen Angel or Buffy.
builds small shrine to DungeonmasterCal
That's all it takes? I've never watched any of his TV shows. My entire exposure to his directorial work is the Marvel movies.

I have a larger, more beefcake-y shrine to you in another area.


Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

A heart attack is what it is called when blood flow is stopped through a coronary artery, leading to death of a part of the heart muscle.

I'm curious about the nature of the heart attack that is the 'default death' caused by the Death Note, which must always be instantly fatal, and can't necessarily be caused by plaque buildup in the arteries, because not everyone has that.

magic.


Freehold DM wrote:
Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

A heart attack is what it is called when blood flow is stopped through a coronary artery, leading to death of a part of the heart muscle.

I'm curious about the nature of the heart attack that is the 'default death' caused by the Death Note, which must always be instantly fatal, and can't necessarily be caused by plaque buildup in the arteries, because not everyone has that.

magic.

I suspected that a coronary artery is supernaturally pinched, cutting off the blood flow, but I imagine that it has to either kill enough of the heart muscle to be fatal instantly, or to cause a heart rhythm so abnormal it kills instantly.

I write fantasy from this perspective--that a single supernatural event (pinching of an artery in this case, or the manipulation of blood flow in another case, forcing it all into the delicate capillaries near the orifices) will kick off a chain of effects that are normally subject to the laws of the natural world.


All it has to do is clot some blood right in the coronary arteries. Myocardial infarctions are thrombotic events, unlike what was previously thought.


Dairy Queen was an early pioneer of food franchising, expanding its 10 stores in 1941 to 100 by 1947, 1,446 in 1950, and 2,600 in 1955. The first store in Canada opened in Melville, Saskatchewan, in 1953. The red Dairy Queen symbol was introduced in 1959. The company became International Dairy Queen, Inc. (IDQ) in 1962. In 1987, IDQ bought the Orange Julius chain. IDQ was acquired by Berkshire Hathaway in 1998. Dairy Queens were a fixture of social life in small towns of the Midwestern and Southern United States during the 1950s and 1960s. In that role, they have often come to be referenced as a symbol of life in small-town America, as in Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen: Reflections at Sixty and Beyond by Larry McMurtry, Dairy Queen Days by Robert Inman, and Chevrolet Summers, Dairy Queen Nights by Bob Greene.


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I love DQ. There was one in the town where I grew up where we would sit on our car hoods in the parking lot and play our car stereos with the trunks open after "cruising" around for awhile.

Silver Crusade

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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I love DQ. There was one in the town where I grew up where we would sit on our car hoods in the parking lot and play our car stereos with the trunks open after "cruising" around for awhile.

... I'm assuming there was some ritualistic or cultural reason for doing that last one?


It was a small town. Not much to do on the weekends. So people loaded up their friends and drove up and down a couple sections of town and then would sit for awhile and just hang out, listening to music, talking, sneaking beers between cops driving by and just enjoying the summer nights. The reason the trunks were open was because most of us had kickin' stereos and we liked to show them off by blasting music. It was before I discovered gaming.. lol.. but I wouldn't trade those memories for anything.

Silver Crusade

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I'm assuming the stereos were in the trunks?


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Rysky wrote:
I'm assuming the stereos were in the trunks?

The speakers were. I had a 1972 Monte Carlo with a large area behind the back seat where the speakers were mounted.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I love DQ.

You keep giving me reasons to like you.


Randarak wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I love DQ.
You keep giving me reasons to like you.

I do what I can.. lol


Wawa Inc. is a chain of convenience store/gas stations located along the East Coast of the United States. It operates in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and Florida. The company's corporate headquarters is located in the Wawa area of Chester Heights, Pennsylvania in Greater Philadelphia. As of 2008, Wawa is the largest convenience store chain in the Greater Philadelphia area, and it is also the third largest retailer of food in Greater Philadelphia, after ACME Markets and ShopRite.

The Wawa business began in 1803 as an iron foundry. In 1890, George Wood, a businessperson from New Jersey, moved to Delaware County, Pennsylvania; it was here that he began the Wawa Dairy Farm. Wood imported cows from the British island of Guernsey, and bought 1,000 acres (400 ha) of land in the Chester Heights area; the corporate headquarters would later be renamed Wawa. Since pasteurization was not yet available, many children faced sickness from consuming raw milk. Wood arranged for doctors to certify his milk was sanitary and safe for consumption, which convinced many consumers to buy the product. The strategy worked, and allowed the Wawa dairy to grow. Demand for dairy products grew rapidly during the 1920s, and so did the company. Wawa began using the slogan, "Buy Health by the Bottle," and served customers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, delivering milk to customers' homes.

In the 1960s, however, consumers began buying milk in stores instead of using home delivery. Wawa started to open its own stores to adjust to these market changes. On April 16, 1964, Grahame Wood opened the first Wawa Food Market at 1212 MacDade Boulevard in Folsom, Pennsylvania, which is still in operation today. The original Wawa store will be closing with the construction of a new gas station location nearby that is expected to open in spring 2016.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Rysky wrote:
I'm assuming the stereos were in the trunks?
The speakers were. I had a 1972 Monte Carlo with a large area behind the back seat where the speakers were mounted.

Ah! Okies, this ritual makes sense now.


Yogi Bear's name was similar to that of contemporary baseball star Yogi Berra, who was known for his amusing quotes, such as "half the lies they tell about me aren't true." Berra sued Hanna-Barbera for defamation, but their management claimed that the similarity of the names was just a coincidence. Berra withdrew his suit, but the defense was considered implausible and sources now report that Berra was the inspiration for the name.


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The Swedish journalist Dawit Isaak has been imprisoned by the Eritrean government for 14 years without a trial.


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Randarak wrote:

Wawa Inc. is a chain of convenience store/gas stations located along the East Coast of the United States. It operates in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and Florida. The company's corporate headquarters is located in the Wawa area of Chester Heights, Pennsylvania in Greater Philadelphia. As of 2008, Wawa is the largest convenience store chain in the Greater Philadelphia area, and it is also the third largest retailer of food in Greater Philadelphia, after ACME Markets and ShopRite.

The Wawa business began in 1803 as an iron foundry. In 1890, George Wood, a businessperson from New Jersey, moved to Delaware County, Pennsylvania; it was here that he began the Wawa Dairy Farm. Wood imported cows from the British island of Guernsey, and bought 1,000 acres (400 ha) of land in the Chester Heights area; the corporate headquarters would later be renamed Wawa. Since pasteurization was not yet available, many children faced sickness from consuming raw milk. Wood arranged for doctors to certify his milk was sanitary and safe for consumption, which convinced many consumers to buy the product. The strategy worked, and allowed the Wawa dairy to grow. Demand for dairy products grew rapidly during the 1920s, and so did the company. Wawa began using the slogan, "Buy Health by the Bottle," and served customers in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, delivering milk to customers' homes.

In the 1960s, however, consumers began buying milk in stores instead of using home delivery. Wawa started to open its own stores to adjust to these market changes. On April 16, 1964, Grahame Wood opened the first Wawa Food Market at 1212 MacDade Boulevard in Folsom, Pennsylvania, which is still in operation today. The original Wawa store will be closing with the construction of a new gas station location nearby that is expected to open in spring 2016.

Stewart's Shops is a US chain of convenience stores located primarily in eastern Upstate New York and southwestern Vermont. Headquartered in Saratoga Springs, the company is well-established, particularly in the Capital District. Within New York, its stores can be found as far north as the Canadian border towns, as far west as Oswego and as far south as Goshen at the northern fringe of the New York metropolitan area. Its Vermont outlets can be found in Rutland and Bennington counties. Known for branded ice cream, potato chips, milk, coffee and other drinks, the stores often include gasoline pumps. In addition, most also feature a small dining area, not common in U.S. stores of this type.

Stewart's has always been a business of the Dake family, which traces the chain's origins to Percy and Charles V. Dake making Dake's Delicious Ice Cream beginning in 1921 at the family farm in Greenfield, New York. Fourteen years later, the brothers started Saratoga Dairy in an old barn in Saratoga Springs. This move occurred in the same year that New York began requiring all milk to be pasteurized. Without this new local plant available, many local dairy farmers would have had to go out of business, and they were grateful vendors.

In 1938 they expanded into the city's old water works, and then went into making cheese, powdered whey and casein two years afterward, following another new property purchase, this time in Greenfield. That and the milk this plant produced were sold all over the Northeast, as far south as Maryland. As the war ended, the brothers bought an ice cream production facility in Ballston Spa from Donald Stewart. Charles S. Dake, newly discharged from the military and looking for something to do, decided to start selling Stewart's Ice Cream to the public fresh off the line. Since 1945, over 300 Stewart's Shops have opened in their operational area.

In the titanic rivalry between Stewart's, Wawa, Maplefields, Sheetz, and Byrne Dairy, I know where I stand.


I kind of miss Stewart's! But, that said, Buc-ee's is the very best of all chain convenience stores/gas stations/etc., now or ever in the past, and probably into perpetuity. They pride themselves on customer service, so a cashier starts at $11.86 an hour; the people who work the deli/jerky counters make more. The restrooms are spotlessly clean and have like a million stalls each; the deli sandwiches (made to order) are better than Subway's; the jerky counter includes stuff like elk, in addition to the standard beef and so on; their prepackaged snacks are awesome.


Kirth Gersen wrote:
I kind of miss Stewart's! But, that said, Buc-ee's is the very best of all chain convenience stores/gas stations/etc., now or ever in the past, and probably into perpetuity. They pride themselves on customer service, so a cashier starts at $11.86 an hour; the people who work the deli/jerky counters make more. The restrooms are spotlessly clean and have like a million stalls each; the deli sandwiches (made to order) are better than Subway's; their jerky counter includes stuff like elk, in addition to the standard beef and so on; their prepackaged snacks are awesome.

Stewart's is the same way as far as pay is concerned-- they start off at $10.00 per hour (more than I've made at all but two of the jobs I've had), and all employees are eligible for raises.

I've never been to Texas outside of the Dallas, Houston, and El Paso airports, so I've never been to a Buc-ee's, but at first glance they seem a little too big for me to get comfortable anywhere. I've always been a fan of the small, secluded dining areas at Stewart's.


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Today there are only two species of hippos, but we know of an additional 4 species that survived well into the Holocene and were likely wiped out by man, including three species in Madagascar (two of which were dwarfs, one of which was probably also closely related to the modern Pygmy Hippo), as well as a dwarf species on Crete. Although we think of Hippos today as African critters, up into the Pleistocene they could be found in most warmish regions of Europe and Asia, ranging as far north during interglacial periods as Germany and England. Even though they are big aquatic mammals with thick bones, we know surprisingly little about their evolution, especially in Asia.

I will note that 6 species of hippos in recent times is almost certainly an underestimate. We know little about end Pleistocene faunas in South Asia due to a poor fossil record, so some of the Asian Hexaprotodon hippos may have survived until recently. As well, some of the other islands in the Mediterranean may have hosted hippos into Holocene, which are generally considered different species. It's even possible that the European Hippo survived to the end Pleistocene, although I suspect the younger remains from Eastern Europe could be either misdated or represent the Common Hippo, which also ranged into Europe and may have competed with the European Hippo, resulting in its extinction.


We don't know whether or not the pleistocene megafauna extinction was caused by human activity, either.

I read an article about how in eastern north america, pleistocene megafauna populations were already on the decline before humans arrived in the region (which does not preclude the idea that humans may have finished them off, but it does preclude the idea that humans are solely responsible for the extinction of north american pleistocene megafauna; which sounds right to me because hunter gatherers are low population density and do not extract nearly as much resources from the environment as the higher density agrarian societies do)


The Great Auk was a large, penguin-like bird that lived off the coasts of western europe before it was hunted to extinction in the 19th century. Vikings hunted the auk.

also, it was the first animal to be called a 'penguin', though it was unrelated to what are called penguins now.


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Dinosauria is a clade, meaning it is a monophyletic group, meaning that it is a group in which all members ultimately share a common ancestor.

All birds are in the clade dinosauria.


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Adobe's Flash plugin for Mozilla's Firefox internet browser is a crash-prone piece of s*$! and can go f%*& itself.


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Aniuś the Talewise wrote:

The Great Auk was a large, penguin-like bird that lived off the coasts of western europe before it was hunted to extinction in the 19th century. Vikings hunted the auk.

also, it was the first animal to be called a 'penguin', though it was unrelated to what are called penguins now.

I recall reading that the reason it was hunted to extinction was because it was one of the first animals that people realized were becoming extinct due to human action. Which meant a lot of people went out and killed them to add their stuffed bodies their collections before they were all gone.

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