Starfinder Adventure Path #3: Splintered Worlds (Dead Suns 3 of 6)

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Starfinder Adventure Path #3: Splintered Worlds (Dead Suns 3 of 6)
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To Live and Die on Eox

Tracking the Cult of the Devourer, the heroes travel to the asteroid belt called the Diaspora, but they must face space pirates and other treacherous dangers of the asteroid field to find the cult's hidden command post. What the heroes learn in the Field of the Lost takes them to the dead world of Eox, where they must survive both the undead inhabitants of the planet and clandestine agents of the officially disavowed Corpse Fleet. Only then do the heroes learn that the Devourer cult is headed for a distant star system in search of clues to the location of an alien superweapon!

This volume of Starfinder Adventure Path continues the Dead Suns Adventure Path and includes:

  • "Splintered Worlds," a Starfinder adventure for 5th-level characters, by Amanda Hamon Kunz.
  • A gazetteer of Eox, the planet of the dead, including rules for disturbing necromantic augmentations called necrografts, by Owen K.C. Stephens.
  • Details on the exiled Corpse Fleet, the rogue undead navy of Eox, including new necrotech armor and weapons and additional Corpse Fleet starships, by Thurston Hillman.
  • An archive of strange new alien creatures, both living and undead, by Amanda Hamon Kunz and Owen K.C. Stephens.
  • Statistics and deck plans for a new starship, by Amanda Hamon Kunz, plus a rogue planet that hosts a secret Corpse Fleet base in the Codex of Worlds, by Jason Keeley.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-995-0

The Dead Suns Adventure Path is sanctioned for use in Starfinder Society Organized Play. The rules for running this Adventure Path and Chronicle sheet are available as a free download (1.7 MB PDF).

Other Resources: This product is also available on the following platforms:

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Getting better in embracing the setting, but not quite there yet

3/5

This was the AP where the writers finally began to realize what they had on their hands. It's not quite there but it's much better than AP #2.

The only issue I have with this AP is again they use painfully convoluted logic to make you march out into the boonies of Eox on foot when you could get there by spaceship in a couple minutes. I improvised and explained that given Eox's dead, flat surface with no trees or other surface elements that the person the group was seeking would be able to spot them miles away and they had to sneak up on them. But something more from the book might have been helpful (No smoothskins allowed to fly over anywhere other than the Pact Port!)


Strong Core

4/5

NO SPOILERS

As always with my reviews of AP volumes, the adventure itself is reviewed in the “Spoilers!” section below. Here, I’ll go over the non-spoilery back matter. I’ll just mention the cover and interior covers quickly: I love the creepy character on the front cover (far better than the one in Chapter One). The interior covers are the stats and layout for a Tier 4 vessel called a Nebulor Outfitters Starhopper--it could make a decent ship for a group of PCs. Anyway, the back matter proper consists of four entries.

• Eox (8 pages): This section starts with a two-page spread containing a sort of planetary map of Eox divided into its eastern and western hemispheres and with notable locations indicated by dots. The locations are then fleshed out in the text, with some of my favorites including Blackmoon (the subject of a Starfinder Society scenario), The Lifeline (a wall protecting the small section of the planet designed for living creatures from the rest), and the notorious Halls of the Living (completely believable and highly immoral reality television). The section does a good job updating Eox from its original appearance in Pathfinder while maintaining the setting connection. I imagine this entry is less important now after the publication of Pact Worlds, but it’s still a nice, concise overview of the planet. The section also contains a couple of pages on necrografts (augmentations that involve adding undead parts to living creatures—some are pretty good given the price).

• The Corpse Fleet (8 pages): This section details the (really interesting) history of the Corpse Fleet, renegades who refused to go along with Eox signing the Absalom Pact that created the Pact Worlds. The history section is adroitly opaque about whether the Corpse Fleet’s creation was secretly anticipated or even intentionally mandated by the Eoxian government. The section goes through the military structure, goals, and important individuals in the Corpse Fleet, and this last list has a bunch of great story ideas contained within it for homebrew GMs. The section ends with two pages each on military necrotech (mostly weapons with the “necrotic” property that hurt the living while healing undead) and on new Corpse Fleet ships. It’s all very well-written, and I don’t think the section has been reprinted elsewhere.

• Alien Archives (9 pages): We get seven new creatures: elebrians (a new playable race—the original inhabitants of Eox), ghouls (a necessity!), marrowblights (multi-armed undead with a weird “pounce” ability that isn’t very good), skreelings (offspring of skreesires), skreesires (kinda reptilian generic space monsters), jiang-shi vampires (inherited from Pathfinder and real-world mythology, their culturally-specific associations like roosters and rice sound a bit strange in a futuristic setting), veolisks (kinda like basilisks with a gaze that causes confusion and could be pretty dangerous).

• Codex of Worlds (1 page): In this issue, we’re told of Barrow, a rogue planetoid used as a shipyard and repair dock by the Corpse Fleet. It’s not really worth a full page, as a couple of lines could have done the same thing.

Okay, now on to the adventure!

SPOILERS!:

The planet-hopping nature of Dead Suns continues. If Chapter One was Absalom Station and Chapter Two was Castrovel, Chapter Three is (briefly) the Diaspora and then (mostly) Eox. At the end of Chapter Two, the PCs learned that the Cult of the Devourer had transmitted information on the possible whereabouts of the Stellar Degenerator to a base in the Diaspora. The background information is pretty interesting (and involved!), and PCs may have the opportunity to learn some of it in the course of the adventure. It starts with a long-dead prophet of the Cult of the Devourer named Nyara and her magnum opus, a tome called The Entropy of Existence and Glorious Rise of the Void. In her cryptic prophecies, allusion is made to what could very well be the Stellar Degenerator as laying somewhere within or beyond a distant, unexplored star system called Nejeor. As this chapter begins, the Devourer cultists in the Diaspora who received the transmission from the Castrovellian sect have already made the connection and set off for Nejeor. What they, and the PCs don’t know, is that the Corpse Fleet (renegade Eoxians) kept an eye on things, saw a transmission to this hidden base, raided it for information, and have also set off for Nejeor! The idea is that there’s a race for this superweapon, and if anyone other than the PCs win, the galaxy will suffer.

The adventure is separated into three parts.

Part 1 (“Field of the Lost”) starts with the PCs’ arrival in the Diaspora, where their starship is immediately attacked by a patrolling pirate vessel named the Rusty Rivet (a Nebulor Outfitters Starhopper from the inside front cover). This starship combat is intended to go the PCs’ way and can even be handled completely peacefully, as the pirate captain surrenders quickly and invites the PCs aboard so she can be conveniently interrogated about the location of the Devourer base. The set-up doesn’t speak very highly of the supposed vaunted Free Captains, but I guess that can be remedied in a future AP.

The pirates point the PCs to an asteroid, but the Starfinders will have to comb its apparently desolate surface to find a secret entrance to the underground complex. But even getting that far could be a challenge, as there’s a rogue sarcesian with a sniper rifle to make it difficult (the rationale for his placement there is a bit far-fetched, but I *do* like long-range encounters). In addition, there’s a back-matter monster: a skreesire (and its offsprings, skreelings) to be overcome. A skreesire can take some temporary mental control of foes and that, combined with a nearby acid pool, could prove pretty nasty.

Part 2 (“The Vanished Cult”) starts with the PCs discovering the cultist base is eerily abandoned. It’s a big complex with lots to explore, and wasn’t left completely unguarded: there are some cool-looking security robots, a veolisk (from the back-matter), and my persona -favorite, an awesome laser wall trap (don’t roll a nat 1 on your save!). Careful searching my clue the PCs in that the Corpse Fleet came here after the cultists left. This is definitely one of those (fairly common) situations where a group would be stuck if they didn’t have someone skilled in Computers. For better or worse, the group I was in had a super-Operative that could make any skill check in the game with ease. However, all the searching and hacking in the world doesn’t discover that the cultists and Corpse Fleet have set off for Nejeor. Instead, all the PCs have to go on is a vague idea that if the Corpse Fleet is involved, then Eox should be their next step. In any event, as the PCs hop in the Sunrise Maiden for whatever destination, two Corpse Fleet fighters who have been watching the asteroid swoop in to attack. What I find patently ridiculous is that the fighters wait for the PCs’ ship to get going before attacking, as it would have been a sitting duck while parked on the asteroid. Another example of a forced starship combat that doesn’t really make a ton of sense plot-wise.

Part 3 (“Planet of the Dead”) has the PCs’ headed to Eox to meet up with a contact provided by their Starfinder Society contact, Chiskisk. Chiskisk explains that the authorities on Eox have set up a specialised government agency called the Ministry of Eternal Vigilance to investigate the Corpse Fleet and that it’s headquartered in a city called Orphys. Like some real-world government agencies, the “Ministry of Eternal Vigilance” is essentially a tiny pro forma office that does little and mostly exists so that the authorities can claim to be interested. The Ministry of Eternal Vigilance is headed by a bored ghoul bureaucrat Waneda Trux, and this was probably my favorite part of Chapter Three. Props to the GM for making Waneda really come alive (pun!) as an NPC with limitless time and a limitless fondness for rules and regulations.

Waneda has a couple of leads to follow about Corpse Fleet activity in Orphys and, depending on how the PCs handled the Eoxian Ambassador’s special mission in Chapter 1, provides some different resources (a nice tie-in). The leads were actually planted by the Corpse Fleet to lure the PCs into a trap, and from a metagame perspective they work perfectly because plenty of adventures are premised on PCs following even sketchier evidence to get to the next encounter. But this section of the AP is far less of a railroad than earlier parts, as the PCs have some time to explore Orphys, a city given some memorable flavour by its connection to the flesh vat and necrograft industries. I particularly love a shopowner who calls himself Gentlesage--a corpsefolk wearing archaic finery (like a dented monocle and dingy top hat) who considers himself too fancy for his surroundings.

The clues eventually lead the PCs to a hermit outside the city (and outside of its environmental protections for living creatures). The hermit is a marrowblight Corpse Folk sympathiser (with cool artwork!), and she ambushes the PCs with the help of a pet ellicoth. Alas, this is the battle where my dearly departed barathu envoy B’rrlb’lub (a.k.a., “Excitable Flying Jellyfish”) was killed and added to the marrowblight’s “Skin Shack”. To add insult to injury, in our group’s next session we were walking back from the marrowblight when the *real* boss of Chapter Three (a jiang-shi vampire) springs her ambush. My new PC, a really interesting (honest!) wannabe-ghoul, got bull-rushed into a pool of acid for 20d6 damage per round and died. (A real bummer for me, but I can’t blame anyone but myself for that gaffe!) The vampire has a data module that provides the link the PCs need for Chapter Four--again, though, without some *really* good skill in Computers, a group could easily be stuck (especially because the data module has self-deletion countermeasure with some failed checks).

Despite losing two PCs in short succession, I really enjoyed the Eox portions of Chapter Three. The Diaspora stuff, on the other hand, was fairly forgettable, generic space-dungeon crawling. Next chapter, we leave the Pact Worlds behind and set off to explore strange new worlds and new civilizations.


So this is the book where players started getting engaged

4/5

I think the book did greater job of building up corpse fleet than previous book did building up devourer cultists :D At least judging by the overall story finally "clicking" for players at end of the ap. Then again, part of that is that this is incredibly slow build up ap anyway and you CAN'T understand full picture before this part:

This is story about three factions(Starfinder society, Devourer cult and Corpse Fleet) competing to reach superweapon first. I do kinda wish ap had more space to focus on that aspect, but either way this is the book where pcs finally understand what the ap is truly about and it is very fun book even as standalone.

Besides quirky npcs or interesting encounters,(and the gross stuff) it also has payoff for the best NPC of the ap Gevalarsk Nor quest in first book ;D

But yeah the book still unfortunately has some nonsensical railroading written in and I'm fairly sure there is actual plot hole in the story("Corpse Fleet wants to avoid attracting attention when they assassinate PCs, so they plant evidence of Corpse Fleet agents being around so that bureau will give PCs hints to go to in middle of nowhere to be ambushed!" ignores that eoxian government would still logically put two and two together :P) that players didn't notice.


A Weird and Wonderful World of Undeath

4/5

Splintered Worlds continues the uneven quality of the Dead Suns adventure path set by the last two books, but brings in some truly wonderfully weird, creepy and interesting settings and characters. There's a lot of writing to love here - from the eccentric undead of Eox to the spooky abandoned Cult base, to the blasted, hostile landscapes of bone and acid in the final confrontation. And on top of that, after two books of slow burning aimlessness, the plot kicks into gear and both stakes and enemies start becoming clear.

But at the same time, the mechanical aspects of the adventure are lacking in a few glaring areas. From traps that auto-magically break the rules to frustrate PCs, to stat block errors, to multiple dramatic contradictions between maps and text. And the story - for all its evocative locales and fun characters - makes little sense, contradicting itself and hamfistedly requiring GM railroading or big plot adjustments to get players to follow the AP's content.

Thankfully, those mechanical details are all fixable, and it doesn't take huge changes to the plot to make it logically consistent. But these are all things that the GM needs to realize ahead of time and fix (or not fix and deal with confused players mid-game). It does make the adventure more of an evocative framework to create your game, than an adventure that plays well if you just pick it up.

The Good (spoilers):
  • The descriptions, maps and art for Eox are all absolutely amazing. Knocked out of the park on cool imagery. The cult base is similarly amazing art-wise.
  • Eoxian characters are unexpectedly kooky and weird, with an obvious undercurrent of possibly evil creepiness to them. The encounters in the Splice with "friendly" shopkeepers are a joy. Lots of character background and details to help flesh them out.
  • The Eox article in the back is great!
  • An excellent variety of novel encounters, from snipers, to getting dunked in acid pools, to apartment block brawls, to dodging laser grids, to giant radioactive behemoths, to skeletons crawling out of walls of bone! Much much better variety and more interesting fights in this one than the previous two books.

  • The Bad (spoilers):
  • Ugh. The plot make so little sense. Why does the Corpse Fleet lay such an overly convoluted trail of evidence to draw the PCs out into the countryside? Why are the Devourer Cult computers wiped clear of evidence so thoroughly that the PCs have no lead? Why are all the hazards the Corpse Fleet had to fight through to get into the Cult base still alive/active? Why are the controls to disable a base defense BEFORE the base defense, rendering it impotent? Why are the PCs expected to travel over land everywhere? Theres a 50ft tall ellicoth that's assumed to somehow sneak up on a party. etc etc.
  • So many mechanical issues:
    There's another trap (Mind Spores) that circumvents environmental protections for no reason. This is easily fixed by making it a purely magical, mind-affecting trap, but its something that seems to be a common pain point for other groups running the AP. (There's also some spoiled food on a table, in which sniffing it gives the sickened condition for 10 mins - but everyone's in environmental protection 100% of the time, so it can never do anything). There's a marrowblight later on whose multiattack ability is always worse than just full attacking. And so on.
  • Some maps on Eox are not sufficient for the given encounters. When the PCs are investigating the apartment, for example, the map scales are off and the map doesn't match the text. Or trying to use the little inset map for the Trampleram fight. Or the lack of an interior view to the Marrowblight hut. Or the general lack of elevation info on the Asteroid map.

  • Eox... but where is Zo!?

    5/5

    Spoilers: All in all a great module, space pirates, a planet full of undead people, I just wish that Zo! could have been included interacting with the party (sure you can do this by yourself)...


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    Community & Digital Content Director

    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Announced for December! Image and description are provisional and subject to change prior to release.

    Scarab Sages Developer

    7 people marked this as a favorite.

    SO EXCITED that this is announced!

    We are going to the undead planet, folks (among other places).

    Paizo Employee Pathfinder Society Lead Developer

    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Exciting!


    I'm just looking forward to seeing more about the Bone Lords of Eox myself. :)


    Dot.

    Liberty's Edge

    2 people marked this as a favorite.

    Man, even when we TOOK THEIR GOD AWAY AND WON'T TELL ANYONE WHERE HE IS these darn cultists won't sit down and be quiet, noooooo....


    The levelling in Starfinder APs seems it will be a little slower than in PF ones.

    Silver Crusade

    Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

    That, or Starfinder isn't a 20-level game.


    I think I read somewhere that it is. Erik (I think) said that they toyed with the idea of capping it lower, but eventually decided it wasn't worth the effort in changing such a fundamental assumption.

    EDIT: I'm not only paraphrasing but also extrapolating there with respect to the reasons behind the decision. I'm sure I read somewhere that the levels would go from 1-20 though.


    Steve Geddes wrote:
    The levelling in Starfinder APs seems it will be a little slower than in PF ones.

    Well, the books are also shorter. They're just getting started up.


    Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
    QuidEst wrote:
    Steve Geddes wrote:
    The levelling in Starfinder APs seems it will be a little slower than in PF ones.
    Well, the books are also shorter. They're just getting started up.

    Exactly. I think the progression is just slower because these adventures are shorter than Pathfinder APs.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    It sounds like part four might be our first trip out of the solar system! Excited to see how a long jaunt in the drift plays!


    QuidEst wrote:
    Steve Geddes wrote:
    The levelling in Starfinder APs seems it will be a little slower than in PF ones.
    Well, the books are also shorter. They're just getting started up.

    Do you have an announcement providing the breakdown of pagecount somewhere you could point me to?

    I had assumed they were going to follow the same format as PF APs now that the fiction has been removed from the latter. I'm not terribly good at finding that kind of information though. :/


    Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
    Steve Geddes wrote:
    QuidEst wrote:
    Steve Geddes wrote:
    The levelling in Starfinder APs seems it will be a little slower than in PF ones.
    Well, the books are also shorter. They're just getting started up.

    Do you have an announcement providing the breakdown of pagecount somewhere you could point me to?

    I had assumed they were going to follow the same format as PF APs now that the fiction has been removed from the latter. I'm not terribly good at finding that kind of information though. :/

    How about the last sentence of the last paragraph in the product description above on this very page that says, "Each 64-page volume of the Starfinder Adventure Path also contains in-depth articles that detail and expand the Starfinder campaign setting and provide new rules, a host of exciting new monsters and alien races, a new planet to explore and starship to pilot, and more!"

    Personally, I'm half-deaf more often than I am blind, but I understand how it can be sometimes. :)


    Ah, yeah. I told you I wasn't good at finding information!

    Cheers.

    EDIT: Actually, I think I read that and my brain just forgot that the PF APs are 96 pages. I thought QuidEst was suggesting the backmatter/adventure breakdown was different. Appreciate the direction. Thanks. :)


    96 pages for 24.99
    64 pages for 22.99

    ouch


    Pathfinder Card Game, Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

    This chapter sounds like a TON of fun!

    Liberty's Edge

    Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

    Strange for there to be no official cover art so close to a release.


    Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    Surely they will update December releases this week. :-)

    Liberty's Edge

    Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

    It's a November release according to the store page.


    Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
    Tarpeius wrote:
    It's a November release according to the store page.

    November pre-order just means that the order auths will run near the end of November. The PDF/street date will probably be around the middle of December.

    Community & Digital Content Director

    Updated with final image and description!

    Liberty's Edge

    Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

    o_O

    Damn, that was worth the wait. Awesome art!


    Necrotech and necrografts. For those who want to be even more dead-ly. ;)

    Paizo Employee Starfinder Society Developer

    I got a chance to check out the art on my article last week... I think I like some of these ships more than the already beautiful(ly horrific) Eoxian ships! :D

    Dark Archive

    Damn you for putting an "Ellicoth" on the cover!
    I love these (magical) beasts, but at gargantuan size they are too big for a pawn and there are no similiar looking miniatures as stand-ins either! ;-(


    Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    So, necrografts. Do you think they're just cybernetics/biotech with some flavor, or will they have some unique rules?


    Wasn't expecting a living eoxian, despite knowing they were in the game. Wow. interesting art.

    Dark Archive

    So, who has the pdf and is willing to share info? ;-)

    Dark Archive

    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Well I have it, so if you have questions sure ask them


    CorvusMask wrote:
    Well I have it, so if you have questions sure ask them

    What're the player options available in the AP? Also, any chance of more specific animate dead rules?

    Dark Archive

    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    This is adventure module not a player book, so not much honestly. What it does have is necrocraft, elebrian stats and equipment/ships used by corpsefleet which could be looted/used/bought by players as well I suppose.


    CorvusMask wrote:
    This is adventure module not a player book, so not much honestly. What it does have is necrocraft, elebrian stats and equipment/ships used by corpsefleet which could be looted/used/bought by players as well I suppose.

    What are living elebrians like? (I really want them to have racials that help them with necromancy or something similar).

    Dark Archive

    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Well they have +2 con and int -2 wisdom, but otherwise they aren't necromantic species, just really knowledgeable one. They have ability to find weaknesses in creatures(as full action can do attack that adds half their level to damage once per creature) and can attempt knowledge skill checks untrained and take 20 in them with 2 minutes of time. So basically, 2 minutes and elebrians never need to google to find any information they want.

    Dark Archive

    So one thing that really annoys me so far:

    Spoiler:
    I still have no idea what Ambassador Nor's package was about. Book still doesn't explain why he wanted "content" of the package smuggled, while I can understand that PCs don't know that, as GM I still wouldn't know at this point what the heck it is about. At this point I have no idea if the AP will ever explain it and once I have all six parts, it is annoying to have to check later books to confirm something for earlier books.

    Also, little bit annoyed by encounters were someone is mind controlled but no explanation is given what happens if pcs break the mind control or avoid killing the mind controlled guy :P Seriously, its annoying when book as written just assumes players kill someone under control or have no chance of noticing it.


    Wait, even after this book we STILL don't know

    Spoiler:
    what Nor's plan with the package is? Not gonna lie, I think that's pretty frustrating, because I feel like that is something that should've been clear since book 1. RPing the guy without knowing his motivations is less than ideal.

    Dark Archive

    Yeah. I can guess that

    Spoiler:
    hes not allied with Corpsefleet(despite being his alignment) since he does help out PCs if he is still on good term with them, but beyond that? Yeah no clue at all. Heck I think its bit contradictory since Corpsefleet apparently did know about the package and it is mentioned in this book as well as point were they took notice of PCs.


    The only thing I can think of is that

    Dead Suns Spoilers:
    The soldier in the package is a deserter of the Corpse Fleet trying to get into Absalom Station to trade information for a new life, or something like that. The Corpse Fleet's aggressive attempts to retrieve her are in stark contrast with her own wishes, which to me confirms that her current actions go against the Fleet.

    Dark Archive

    2 people marked this as a favorite.

    Yeah, thats what it is seeming like to me, but as we just discussed, since its not actually confirmed to GM in any of three books, thats just guessing and even if answer is in one of three final books, its completely plausible for gm to have forgotten it and make wrong guess when they run the session since the answer isn't anywhere in early books. I mean, I wouldn't be surprised if it turns out it was actually for nefarious reasons and players dun goofed if

    Spoiler:
    they didn't smuggle the package.

    (I do get it that from player point of view, they aren't supposed to find out so they don't know whether they did right thing or not, it is decision that has consequences for them later on line either way. But GM still should know what kind of motivation character they are roleplaying has <_<)


    2 people marked this as a favorite.
    Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    I agree wholeheartedly with Corvus Mask, I would expect my players to try to find out more about this during this part of the AP and knowing the truth would be really helpful for the GM. I have no idea what reason there is for not having revealed this piece of information yet.

    Dark Archive

    More annoying to me, its actually almost addressed

    Spoiler:
    <_< The ghoul contact pcs have in Eox has example question to her about the package and her reply is pretty much "How the heck I would know?" Like at this point it feels almost intentional that they avoid telling GM why


    Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    Spoiler tags please!

    Dark Archive

    Hmm, I don't think anybody said anything really spoilery out of tags, but ok trying to remember that in future.


    Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    If you don't want to be bothered with spoiler tags, take it to the GM reference threads.

    Dark Archive

    So product criticism shouldn't be expressed in product thread? Anyway, someone should really sticky those Dead Sun GM reference threads


    Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

    Criticism is fine, but if it involves the adventure or previous adventures it should be done with spoiler tags.

    Lantern Lodge Customer Service Manager

    3 people marked this as a favorite.

    Added some spoiler tags. For the product discussion thread, if its spelling out plot points, its probably better to use spoiler tags and be safe. Thanks.


    Who wants to tell poor boy (yours truly) about them critters in the alien archive? And that new planet would be nice to hear about to. As always, you have my gratitude.

    Dark Archive

    Could one of the developers (@Thurston Hillman or @John Compton etc) please answer if the above discussed spoiler from book 1 will be revealed in book 4, 5 or 6 and if yes in which one?

    If not, how would you handle the situation as a GM?

    Thank you! :-)

    @CoruvusMask or others who have the pdf:

    1. Which necrografts are in the book and what do they roughly do?

    2. What are the additional Corpse Fleet starships (name, size & tier)?

    3. What is the new starship on the inside covers?

    4. Some details on the rogue planet that hosts a secret Corpse Fleet base?

    Thank you all.


    Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
    Steven "Troll" O'Neal wrote:
    Who wants to tell poor boy (yours truly) about them critters in the alien archive? And that new planet would be nice to hear about to. As always, you have my gratitude.

    Aside from the playable elebrians, we get a gaggle of undead creatures (some expected, some exotic) that all come with template grafts, so you can convert any humanoid to them. We also get a couple more general monster-creatures that work well in many environments and have some interesting mind-control powers.

    The new planet, Barrow, is a rouge planet (does not orbit a star) out in the Vast with a huge Corpse Fleet base/shipyard. At one point they tried to put planet-sized thrusters on it, but they blew a chunk off by accident.

    Marco Massoudi wrote:
    Which necrografts are in the book and what do they roughly do?

    Necrografts are a new type of augmentation. There are some unique necrografts (I'll get to those in a bit), but the neatest thing about them is that you can get any cybernetic or biotech as a necrograft instead for just 90% of the cost. The catch? You pick up the necrograft subtype, which makes you vulnerable to spells and other effects that target undead.

    All the necrograft-only augmentations come in mk 1 - mk 5, which span item levels 1 - 20. They include things like environmental protection, hidden natural weapons, and the ability to inflict status conditions or diseases on enemies. There's some other neat stuff as well.

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