Droogami

Arnox the Sabre's page

7 posts. Alias of Sebecloki.



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I'm thinking about a fairly significant redesign of the PF1e chassis.

One idea I was tossing about was to create a series of 'generic' classes based on major party roles. I was looking at a list like this.

Thus, there would be nine classes:

Blaster
Defender
Face
Healer
Librarian
Scout
Striker
Support
Utility Caster

Each of these generic classes would draw on the archetypes and class options for the classes under the role headings to customize a given character.

Anyone have any interest giving feedback/input to this idea? One question I still have is where the occult classes fit into this schema.


Ask me setting questions here and I will answer.


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Samuquan Kubburummelemana, umunsikgal of the Great Court of the Smoking Mirror in Eridug, teeming city of the Umbral Kobolds, found himself, for the first time in a very great number of cycles, at a complete loss for words.

But it was not just words that failed the regal seer, a gap in audible speech filled by the ethereal susurrations of his highly-ornamented kaunakes, the innumerable pinions of its terror bird feathers seeming to whisper menacingly in the still air of his departed master's bedchambers.

No, it was also action which failed to take shape in his usually acute mind.

He continued to stare at the enigmatic sand pictures which completely filled the expansive surface of the low altar. The rainbow array of colored granules twisted in a multitude of at once erotic and threatening patterns, as if it depicted a nest of vipers prepared to simultaneously consummate their desires and savagely attack some new prey.

"Great Mother of the Deeps!" Samuquan thought remorsefully to himself, "but what is to be done? And what could it all mean?"

Where was his departed master, the umunsikgalgal of the Great Court of the Smoking Mirror, greatest seer of the Master and Mistress of Eridug?

The Grand Conjunction of the Greater and Lesser Eclipses was due in only a paltry handful of cycles, and absent Enlil-Utu's assured guidance, the successful resuscitation of the dragon seeds stood in doubt, leaving the great city of the umbral kobolds in peril of a renewed assault by the formless xxyth and their endless legions.

Samuquan sighed again. Whatever he would intend to do, it must be done quickly.

A sudden noise arrested his attention, darkening the seer's vision before he could even turn his head...

I had a stroke of inspiration for a very distinctive campaign set in a homebrew world I've been developing for a little over a year, and which emerged as a customization of the Dark Sun setting.

This is the basic set up: the players are the inhabitants of a great city of umbral kobolds that exists in the Black, the dark plane and planet which exists as a dark reflection of Athas. This strange world was created during the Cleansing Wars when a creature of primordial chaos known as a xxyth devoured the Feywild. Now, the blighted world of dark skies, known alternatively as Tenebrian, Bane, and Shadowsfell, among other appellations, exists as a shadowy version of Athas, its sphere suspended over an immense black hole.

One side of the planet, facing the void, is consumed in a greater darkness than even the remainder of Tenebrion. The Dark Side, known also as the Void, is the domain of the creatures of chaos known as the xxyth. These entities were created from the nightmares of the long-departed creator god of Athas, whose anger called them forth from the northern seas of the Dawn Age to consume the world along with his rebellious divine children. Somewhere in the deepest recesses of this blighted region is the great maw of the xxyth lord, a dreadful pit of woe that reaches deep into the core of Tenebrion.

The lighter side of Tenebrion is populated by many strange peoples, including the rakshasa city of Alaka, a dark reflection of the city-state of Raam, and more importantly for the present story, the great city of the umbral kobolds, which is known as Eridug.

Eridug stands in the same location in Tenebrion as does the Free City of Tyr in the Tablelands. It is, however, a reflection of the greatness of the material plane city which was lost in previous ages. Eridug was founded by the kobolds who fled the wrath of Sacha, Champion of Rajaat, when he assaulted the Green Age city of Tyre, the last incarnation of the city-state before the rule of Kalak.

As such, it reflects Tyr's ancient majesty, with the four immense spires of the plinths known as the talons rising into the dark sky at the cardinal directions. Suspended above the dark lake at the center of the metropolis is the seemingly limitless expanse of the Great Pyramid of Ta'amtum, a vast black triangle miles in length, breadth, and height. It is only accessed via magic and the high tower which rises from the island in the midst of the deep black lake around which the city sprawls.

During the earliest era of the Green Age, the kobolds were the vice regents of the dragon kings, mysterious reptilian entities that arrived on Athas from a distant world, bearing the enigmatic blessings of the tenebrian seeds, mutagenic artifacts that took the form of obsidian orbs. These strange cold blooded monarchs ruled a large territory to the south of the Tablelands throughout the Green Age, but departed under circumstances in mystery equal to their appearance, leaving their former deputies at the mercy of Rajaat's savage generals.

Since those dark days, the umbral kobolds have adapted to their new lives in the Black, and tried to keep alive the memory of their former masters. Primarily they cherish the safekeeping of the last tenebrian seeds, whose powers shield them from the hordes of the xxyth. During their tenure in the Black, the priests of the umbral kobolds have devised a means of imbuing the seeds with the power of the Two Eclipses, the permanently obscured suns that hang in the sky above the 'light side' of Tenebrion.

However, the city has recently been thrown into chaos by the disappearance of its high priest, along with all the tenebrian seeds. He left only enigmatic hints of his plans, including a vast tome inscribed in an unreadable language and a complex mandala composed of multicolored sand.

Without the power of the tenebrian seeds, Eridug is thrown open to assault by the hordes of the xxyth, as well as their other enemies in the Lands of the Well, the dark inversion of the Tablelands. It falls upon a band of unlikely heroes to discern the fate of the seer and ensure the future of their people...

..................

So... if that all sounds interesting and I can get a decent group together, I'll start throwing up some additional fluff and character build rules. I'd want most of the characters to be umbral kobolds -- this is a variant LN kobold developed by a 3pp. publisher, but I'm open to other interesting shadow creatures that might be staying in the city. Check out my 'Dark Sun' campaign in my profile if you want to get some more setting info and an idea of my highly-customized gestalt build rules.

This would be a very story/fluff intense home brew adventure for people that enjoy that kind of thing, like to read long posts, and want to take an active role in contributing to a setting. I'll have a lot of fluff to offer, and make up a lot as we go along, but I'm also very open, and will want, players to help add to and expand the lore.

Let me know!


I'm interesting in taking this for a spin Porphyra Roleplaying Game, maybe just as a one-off, but maybe more depending on how it goes.

The setting I'm basically interested in using is Cerulean Seas: the Viridian Veil.

This would be a sub-setting in a highly customized Dark-Sun-esque setting I've developed over the last couple of years in a campaign on these forums: Link.

Here's the setting pitch -- the Viridian Veil setting exists in a vast, continent-sized cavern, where a sea of heavy water is trapped beneath an ocean of liquid carbon. This undersea of heavy water is inhabited by domed arcologies of ocean-adapted standard DnD races that are remnants of the Cleansing Wars wherein the Champions of Rajaat destroyed many of these species thousands of years ago. Some survivors used time travel to flee, and ended up in this strange setting.

The various domed arcologies would be high tech settings with substantial use of the PF 1e Technology Guide.

Simultaneously, this strange oceans is inhabited by dinosaurs and other megafauna, as well as savage races like sahuagin and ixitxachitl.

So, basically nuclear submarines facing off against vampiric megaladons and other insanity of that sort.

I'll use most of the character creation rules in the other campaign I linked, excepting the changes to things like spellcasting in the Porphyra iteration of the 3.0 chassis (i.e., gestalt, start 6th, etc.).

I'll put up a summary if there's sufficient interest. I'm mostly interested in a character concept for now -- I can fill in on more fluff if needed.


Has anyone seen this, and found it intriguing?

Porphyra Roleplaying Game

The final version won't be released until some time in August.

Here's a list of the changes:

Major Changes

Several tweaks in many of the classes to allow for greater flexibility or to account for other changes (rules cascade).
There is one spell list with spells organized by rarity/difficulty (simple, complex, exotic) and by descriptor
No hard division between divine magic and arcane magic. It is just called magic
Spells with long casting times or really expensive spell costs are moving to rituals which will likely come out later (in development)
Clerics have obligations to their faith and can earn disapproval
There are no alignments
Skill list is paired down in many cases with a couple new skills added. Minimum 2 skill points per level for all classes and monsters.
Feats have a scaling built in. This collapses feat trees. Teamwork feats are easier to use but offer no scaling.
Vision definitions adjusted and simplified.
New trap system by Keith J. Davies
Streamlined rules for minor NPCs
Disease and poison rules from Pathfinder Unchained
Caster checks harmonized for attack rolls for spells, concentration checks, and spell penetration
CMD used to resist Intimidation and other skill or feat based combat actions instead of unique mechanics for each.

Minor Changes

Races tend to have more universal bonuses to conditional bonuses.
Traits included in the primary rules
XP is simplified to require less math
Craft points for item creation
Poisons repriced
Vital statistics and carrying capacity streamlined
Additional combat maneuvers from the APG added
Magic schools include traditional schools and six elemental schools
Spellblights included
Magic item creation rules made less restrictive

Other Things Under Consideration

Reorganizing how iterative attacks work
Allowing both Acrobatics and Athletics to be used to jump
Still working on spontaneous spellcasters

Major Changes to the System Include:

Experience system has been simplified to make things quicker and easier to work with for the DM. This should be a transparent change to the players.
Crafting of items is now handled by craft points to reduce downtime.
Disease and poison use debilitation tracks over straight ability damage.
Feats scale at least once with increasing level or other requirements. This reduces the number of feats in our feat trees.
Features antithetical to the campaign setting but traditional within the SRD have been removed such as alignment.
Modified the way the NPCs work for the GM so that the process of generating them is easier.
Simplified the trap creation rules based on the work of Keith J. Davies.
Skill list have been modified. Some skills have been combined, some have been added, some have been lost.
Spellcasters now use d20 + CL + spellcasting modifier as a "caster check". Caster checks are used to target with spells, avoid distractions, and bypass spell resistance.
Spell lists are organized by spell complexity/rarity (simple, complex, exotic) and by spell descriptor. There is no such thing as an arcane spell or a divine spell.
Spells that have very costly spell components or take extended amounts of time to cast have been removed from the spell list. They will re-emerge later as part of a ritual magic book.
Vision rules have been streamlined.


This is a gentle probing for a prospective extended recruitment (like at least a month to allow interested parties to read up on the setting).

The setting is the old Alderac Warlords of the Accordlands.

This is a bizarro world fantasy setting. The elves are short-lived and evil. The orcs are regimented and highly-advanced technologically. The humans are in danger of going extinct, etc. In general, most of the basic tropes of Forgotten Realms or similar settings are turned on their head.

I've had these books for years, and I think they're something of a hidden gem that almost never gets mentioned, much less played.

Here's a link to a helpful summary of material on wayback machine.

http://web.archive.org/web/20110126221124/http://www.warlordrpg.com/

I'd want to use PF1e rules to model the fluff presented here, instead of relying on a set of books most people won't have access to. That would allow use of stuff like Spheres of Power, Path of War, etc. that would be appropriate for the setting.

The campaign would use the Campaign Adventure Book, but also some supplements from other sources like World's Largest Dungeon and World's Largest City, among other sources.

Take a gander at the website and let me know if this is intriguing. I'm moving tomorrow so I may not be able to reply extensively for the next 24-48 hrs., but I will return to this and my other games.


Friends,

We had someone make an awesome ancient intelligent weapon as a character to be wielded by an elf bloodrager from a savage tribe called the Blood Stealers.

That player appears to be AWOL, so I'm going to see if someone else wants to play that sort of specific role -- I'm looking for proposals for an intelligent weapon or a humanoid that can shape-shift into a weapon form.

Below are build rules and a summary of the story. The weapon would be a relic of ancient Kalidnay.

Rules:

Any third party etc. goes as long as it fits Athas. I'm going to throw in stuff from 3rd party sources and re-fluff it with abandon.

Classes: No multi-classing except for prestige classes. VMC or multi class archetypes instead. Gestalt with feat every level or one class with 3 feats every level.

5th level. You have two choices at that point.

One is to have 3 mythic tiers.

The other is to have 2 mythic tiers and 2 levels of a prestige class.

Statistics: 35 pts. buy or roll 5d6, drop lowest 2.

Defense: Wounds and Vigor system. If you roll less than 1/2 for Vigor any given level, take 1/2.

Combat: Alternative Action Economy.

Skills: Background skills (Unchained).

Feats: 1 per level.

*Automatic bonus progression as per 2 levels higher (the version where there are basically no magic items).

*Advancement by DM fiat instead of creature death -- I'm just going to level you up when you need to for the next piece, I don't have any interest in calculating XP and having to ration that out.

*Hero Points.

*Stamina and combat tricks available.

*Just choose the equipment that makes sense.

I'm open to suggestions...

Story Summary

The story thus far (courtesy your favorite minstrel)...

Thus have I heard...

In the early days of the Age of Heroes, the dolorous form of Destiny's Chariot came to wander amongst the interminable reaches of the Great Alluvial Sand Waste's south easterly reaches. This fabled moving palace, once the luxurious summer domicile of Kalid-Ma, sorcerer queen of Kalidnay, it was rescued a millennia past, following the vast city's sudden destruction, by the agents of House Vordon.

This redoubtable merchant enclave, though given birth in the lost city of Kalidnay, was reborn in what would, in our latter days, become the Free City of Tyr.

But just as they had been reborn in former times, so they faced ruin in these latter years, for the end of cruel Kalak's rule in Tyr brought the simultaneous abolishment of human bondage.

And thus Clan Ashtarte-Athirathu of House Vordon found itself impoverished, fallen from their recent majesty, and dispatched its favorite daughter, the Lady Almah, alongside her ever-dutiful major-domo Garavel, and my own humble person, to restore the forgotten trading post of Kelmarane. This a lost possession of the house lay far off, in the vicinity of the Lost Oasis, and, with the reclamation of this prize, the fortunes of the beleaguered clan stood in the gaze of a fresh upsurging, like a desert fountain thought dried up by the weltering sun.

Destiny's Chariot wended amongst the dunes in a strange journey astride the ruins of its birthplace, when its grand progress was arrested by unexpected apparitions in the distance, portending an unexpected life still stirred within the devastated city state.

What more, the caravan was halted by the admonitions of Faalcuun the Magnificent, a former apprentice of the supposedly long-dead sorcerer-king Dregoth of Giustenal. This terrifying, decrepit t'liz, a horrible remnant of a half transformed dragon, restored to a pale semblance of life as a essence-drinking undead abomination, dispatched its herald Nalcaros from the Pavilion of Mercy to stop the progress of House Vordon before the ruined city. For know that Faalcuun's great power had seized a marvel of the distant Green Age, a vast, mobile pyramid shaped by mysterious arcane energies.

Lady Almah dispatched a delegation to parlay with Nalcaros, the herald of Faalcuun, and likewise an undead creature. He belonged to a forgotten race, the gnomes, and stood as a brutal testament to the violent age of the Cleansing Wars.

Nalcaros ushered our heroes into his master Faalcuun's presence within the heights of his throne within the Pavilion of Mercy, where Dregoth's former apprentice revealed deep mysteries to those gathered before his awful personage.

For the ancient city of Kalidnay had been reawakened -- the black orbs containing the minds of the sleeping sorcerer-queen and her five greatest templars had been reawakened, and with them the Great Orrery, a colossal black ring that hung in the heavens above the ruins, and offered an open gate to dark powers wishing to enter Athas.

What more, this unanticipated stirring of the ancient sorcerer-queen's hateful spirit had drawn emissaries of the other sorcerer-kings of the Tablelands, who hoped now to secure the power for which they had felled their sister over a millennia ago -- the greater seed, an obsidian orb of great power which derived from a world accessible only through the portal of the Great Orrery. And so it was that the Shadow King Nibenay, Hamanu, the Lion of Urik, and the Dread King Dregoth had all sent their most trust worthy servants to wretch power from the ruins. And they should shortly descend upon the once sleeping city...

In addition, Faalcuun revealed to our heroes that the source of the greater seed, the Great Orrery, and other obsidian wonders of the Green Age was not, as they supposed, the halflings or the other powers of the age, but a species of ancient malevolent entities, who wandered the stars, known only by the name of Stoneburners. These entities, and their ancient rivals, the Glassmakers, were in fact responsible for all psionic and magical arts, as well as life on Athas.

Strengthened by the fell power of Faalcuun, our heroes decided to attempt an ingress of the city, whereby they would quiet the minds of Kalid-Ma and her templars stirring in the four Talons of the Mother, and the Great Temple at the heart of the city. By disabling the pylons at each of these locations, the threat to Athas would be at least temporarily halted.

Our heroes resolved to attempt an entrance to the ruins through the Riese, the name of the vast subterranean complex within the ancient diamond mines of Kalidnay. Upon arriving at the dead fire-mount, they found the complex not so abandoned as they might have expected -- and instead interrupted a gruesome sacrifice made by the servants a mysterious soul-trading fiend who now ruled the mines.

Helping the heroes was a small party from a distant world, deposited in Athas by the Great Orrery.

However, their quick intervention allowed them to save several intended sacrifices -- including a halfling warrior and druid, and a noble elf maiden of the Serpent Sing tribe.

The intellect devourers who parlayed with our heroes sought an alliance against a mysterious threat -- the serpent spiders, a race of extra dimensional wanderers who had recently come to the dark places beneath Kalidnay, and vied with the devourer's own master for control of the ruins of the ancient city-state.

The halflings revealed that they had been part of an expedition from distant Raam betrayed by disguised dray -- apparently a new race of draconic beings sworn to Dregoth of Giustenal. These had traded the captives to the morlocks, intellect devourers, and their mysterious master who now ruled the mines.

And so it was revealed that Dregoth's servants had already entered the ruins at the behest of their terrible master, but our heroes possessed no means of revealing the dray's arcane disguises.

At the urging of the rescued elven maiden, our heroes made a short journey to a forward camp of the Serpent Singer tribe, which resided within a ruined temple. There, one of the leaders of the tribe, the Dreaderseer Anubisemonekeh, parlayed with our heroes, and agreed to exchange the desired knowledge of aura-reading, which might reveal the presence of the disguised dray, in exchange for their provision of ancient knowledge from the kreen tomb that lay astride the temple where were gathered the elves.

While meeting with the elves, a mysterious stranger, known as Cae, arrived on the scene, claiming to hail from Balic by the shores of the Estuary of the Forked Tongue

And thus our heroes resolved to enter the tomb of the ancient kreen, servants of the Red God Dargulin, allay of the corrupted pyreen Rajaat.

A fierce melee with flying abominations at the entrance of the tomb dispatched one of our redoubtable heroes, who had no time to mourn.

Their entrance was again arrested by the arrival of three new strangers -- a dwarf imprisoned in a nightmarish machines, a cloaked figure from Raam, and a kreen awakened from its slumber within the tomb.

Before they could fully aquatint themselves with these newcomers, our heroes were again assaulted by the forces of the serpent spiders -- a party of troglodytes and their animal servants. After a fierce melee, the remaining troglodyte began to reveal much of its masters and their desires...

And so we return to the tremulous depths of the Mortuaries of the Mantis Priests....


Would anyone be interested in playing in the Earthdawn setting using some heavily house ruled PF1e races, classes, and sub-systems? I'm just going to make my own version instead of trying to use the Redbrick conversion. I'm looking for character concepts first and then I'll offer conversions for those ideas.


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I just saw the awesome humble bundle deal with the entire Shattered Star AP in it -- I had this idea for a PF1e celebration where we only use Paizo stuff but turn all the dials up to 111.

I'm trying to propose crazy build rules that can also be made in Herolab -- I don't use it but a lot of people do, so let me know what does or doesn't work people if there's any interest.

Biggest caveat: Paizo sources only. All Paizo, but only Paizo.

Stats: 102pt. buy (that's straight 18s), but no min or max.
Class: start at 1st level in 2 different classes (so second level). You also start with 1 level of an NPC class that reflects your pre-adventuring background.
Feats: you start with 45 feats. 4. 5. Have at it.
Equipment: 100,000 gold.
Hit Points: double maximum.
Skills: Background skills.

You can have any race or template, but this has to be a character that can function in Magnimar, where the campaign starts. If you're some crazy race/template combo that would frighten 99 percent of the population, you'll have to be under constant disguise or something.

And I want a good back story for really crazy stuff. I'll veto it if it's just a conglomeration of stats without any explanation.


Open.


Dot in.


Our party is currently exploring an ancient kreen tomb in the ruins of Kalidnay. We could use one replacement player.

Campaign Page

Rules:

Any third party etc. goes as long as it fits Athas. I'm going to throw in stuff from 3rd party sources and re-fluff it with abandon.

Classes: No multi-classing except for prestige classes. VMC or multi class archetypes instead. Gestalt with feat every level or one class with 3 feats every level.

5th level. You have two choices at that point.

One is to have 3 mythic tiers.

The other is to have 2 mythic tiers and 2 levels of a prestige class.

Statistics: 35 pts. buy or roll 5d6, drop lowest 2.

Defense: Wounds and Vigor system. If you roll less than 1/2 for Vigor any given level, take 1/2.

Combat: Alternative Action Economy.

Skills: Background skills (Unchained).

Feats: 1 per level.

*Automatic bonus progression as per 2 levels higher (the version where there are basically no magic items).

*Advancement by DM fiat instead of creature death -- I'm just going to level you up when you need to for the next piece, I don't have any interest in calculating XP and having to ration that out.

*Hero Points.

*Stamina and combat tricks available.

*Just choose the equipment that makes sense.

I'm open to suggestions...

Story Summary

The story thus far (courtesy your favorite minstrel)...

Thus have I heard...

In the early days of the Age of Heroes, the dolorous form of Destiny's Chariot came to wander amongst the interminable reaches of the Great Alluvial Sand Waste's south easterly reaches. This fabled moving palace, once the luxurious summer domicile of Kalid-Ma, sorcerer queen of Kalidnay, it was rescued a millennia past, following the vast city's sudden destruction, by the agents of House Vordon.

This redoubtable merchant enclave, though given birth in the lost city of Kalidnay, was reborn in what would, in our latter days, become the Free City of Tyr.

But just as they had been reborn in former times, so they faced ruin in these latter years, for the end of cruel Kalak's rule in Tyr brought the simultaneous abolishment of human bondage.

And thus Clan Ashtarte-Athirathu of House Vordon found itself impoverished, fallen from their recent majesty, and dispatched its favorite daughter, the Lady Almah, alongside her ever-dutiful major-domo Garavel, and my own humble person, to restore the forgotten trading post of Kelmarane. This a lost possession of the house lay far off, in the vicinity of the Lost Oasis, and, with the reclamation of this prize, the fortunes of the beleaguered clan stood in the gaze of a fresh upsurging, like a desert fountain thought dried up by the weltering sun.

Destiny's Chariot wended amongst the dunes in a strange journey astride the ruins of its birthplace, when its grand progress was arrested by unexpected apparitions in the distance, portending an unexpected life still stirred within the devastated city state.

What more, the caravan was halted by the admonitions of Faalcuun the Magnificent, a former apprentice of the supposedly long-dead sorcerer-king Dregoth of Giustenal. This terrifying, decrepit t'liz, a horrible remnant of a half transformed dragon, restored to a pale semblance of life as a essence-drinking undead abomination, dispatched its herald Nalcaros from the Pavilion of Mercy to stop the progress of House Vordon before the ruined city. For know that Faalcuun's great power had seized a marvel of the distant Green Age, a vast, mobile pyramid shaped by mysterious arcane energies.

Lady Almah dispatched a delegation to parlay with Nalcaros, the herald of Faalcuun, and likewise an undead creature. He belonged to a forgotten race, the gnomes, and stood as a brutal testament to the violent age of the Cleansing Wars.

Nalcaros ushered our heroes into his master Faalcuun's presence within the heights of his throne within the Pavilion of Mercy, where Dregoth's former apprentice revealed deep mysteries to those gathered before his awful personage.

For the ancient city of Kalidnay had been reawakened -- the black orbs containing the minds of the sleeping sorcerer-queen and her five greatest templars had been reawakened, and with them the Great Orrery, a colossal black ring that hung in the heavens above the ruins, and offered an open gate to dark powers wishing to enter Athas.

What more, this unanticipated stirring of the ancient sorcerer-queen's hateful spirit had drawn emissaries of the other sorcerer-kings of the Tablelands, who hoped now to secure the power for which they had felled their sister over a millennia ago -- the greater seed, an obsidian orb of great power which derived from a world accessible only through the portal of the Great Orrery. And so it was that the Shadow King Nibenay, Hamanu, the Lion of Urik, and the Dread King Dregoth had all sent their most trust worthy servants to wretch power from the ruins. And they should shortly descend upon the once sleeping city...

In addition, Faalcuun revealed to our heroes that the source of the greater seed, the Great Orrery, and other obsidian wonders of the Green Age was not, as they supposed, the halflings or the other powers of the age, but a species of ancient malevolent entities, who wandered the stars, known only by the name of Stoneburners. These entities, and their ancient rivals, the Glassmakers, were in fact responsible for all psionic and magical arts, as well as life on Athas.

Strengthened by the fell power of Faalcuun, our heroes decided to attempt an ingress of the city, whereby they would quiet the minds of Kalid-Ma and her templars stirring in the four Talons of the Mother, and the Great Temple at the heart of the city. By disabling the pylons at each of these locations, the threat to Athas would be at least temporarily halted.

Our heroes resolved to attempt an entrance to the ruins through the Riese, the name of the vast subterranean complex within the ancient diamond mines of Kalidnay. Upon arriving at the dead fire-mount, they found the complex not so abandoned as they might have expected -- and instead interrupted a gruesome sacrifice made by the servants a mysterious soul-trading fiend who now ruled the mines.

Helping the heroes was a small party from a distant world, deposited in Athas by the Great Orrery.

However, their quick intervention allowed them to save several intended sacrifices -- including a halfling warrior and druid, and a noble elf maiden of the Serpent Sing tribe.

The intellect devourers who parlayed with our heroes sought an alliance against a mysterious threat -- the serpent spiders, a race of extra dimensional wanderers who had recently come to the dark places beneath Kalidnay, and vied with the devourer's own master for control of the ruins of the ancient city-state.

The halflings revealed that they had been part of an expedition from distant Raam betrayed by disguised dray -- apparently a new race of draconic beings sworn to Dregoth of Giustenal. These had traded the captives to the morlocks, intellect devourers, and their mysterious master who now ruled the mines.

And so it was revealed that Dregoth's servants had already entered the ruins at the behest of their terrible master, but our heroes possessed no means of revealing the dray's arcane disguises.

At the urging of the rescued elven maiden, our heroes made a short journey to a forward camp of the Serpent Singer tribe, which resided within a ruined temple. There, one of the leaders of the tribe, the Dreaderseer Anubisemonekeh, parlayed with our heroes, and agreed to exchange the desired knowledge of aura-reading, which might reveal the presence of the disguised dray, in exchange for their provision of ancient knowledge from the kreen tomb that lay astride the temple where were gathered the elves.

While meeting with the elves, a mysterious stranger, known as Cae, arrived on the scene, claiming to hail from Balic by the shores of the Estuary of the Forked Tongue

And thus our heroes resolved to enter the tomb of the ancient kreen, servants of the Red God Dargulin, allay of the corrupted pyreen Rajaat.

A fierce melee with flying abominations at the entrance of the tomb dispatched one of our redoubtable heroes, who had no time to mourn.

Their entrance was again arrested by the arrival of three new strangers -- a dwarf imprisoned in a nightmarish machines, a cloaked figure from Raam, and a kreen awakened from its slumber within the tomb.

Before they could fully aquatint themselves with these newcomers, our heroes were again assaulted by the forces of the serpent spiders -- a party of troglodytes and their animal servants. After a fierce melee, the remaining troglodyte began to reveal much of its masters and their desires...

And so we return to the tremulous depths of the Mortuaries of the Mantis Priests....


Discussion open


"It is common knowledge throughout the Steadfast that we live in the Ninth World. Less common is the knowledge of how this designation came to be. It originates from great and often unacknowledged efforts by aeon priests both predating and within the Order of Truth to compile and review almost a millennium of exploring and cataloging of the Numenera. Through these heroic efforts we have discovered eight more-or-less distinct technological “fingerprints” on the Numenera we have studied that suggest they were built by similar processes or at least by minds with similar design philosophies. These identifiers are referred to as “Genea” within the Order. Most cyphers and artifacts come from the most recent so-called “Eighth World” though many do not and are believed to be time-displaced, though there are many known stasis-tombs dating from the Eighth World that preserve what appear to be relics from the Seventh. Of the Sixth and prior worlds all that remains is the occasional monolith or other mega-structure. In fact, though there seems to be significant macro-industrial First World Infrastructure throughout the planet, evidence for the Second and Third worlds is limited to only one or two examples with unique Genea which may just be anomalies. No physical evidence of the “Fifth World” has been found except as sketchy 8th World records in the datasphere. Furthermore the sequence of First through Eighth worlds is sometimes arbitrary. For example the evidence for the very existence of the Second and Third worlds is so tenuous that they may have been flip-flopped or they might have appeared at a different part of the sequence altogether (for example they could well be the Sixth World for all we know: perhaps that world was not centered on earth and so only a few artifacts made it here? Or maybe they were not separate ages at all)."

"The bottom line is that many if not most of the Order of Truth considers the “Nine Worlds” to be a largely discredited hypothesis. In reality the current world is known (obviously) and the “Eighth World” artifacts are so pervasive that it obviously existed. Beyond that there appear to be even more ancient “Seventh World” artifacts preserved by the “Eighth” and a few that seem older still and may be the “Sixth.” The very oldest of the numenera are noticeably distinct and so can be fairly called the “First World.” The “Second” through “Fifth,” however, are much less credible. So some in the Order say we should call the current epoch the Fifth World. Some have lower standards for the distinctions between different Genea, and suggest we may live in the Tenth, Thirteenth, or the Twenty-First World. Brother Morizon of Iscobal claims to have identified the unique Genea of no fewer than six thousand, four-hundred and twenty-nine prior worlds, though he admits that calling the current civilization the 6,430th World is not very catchy."

"Still others look to the oldest known artifacts, those of the so-called “First World” and note that they appear to be roughly a billion years old. Given such a vast abyss of time between then and now, they point out, how can we establish any timeline or narrative with any certainty? This intellectual faction are sometimes referred to as “Nth Worlders.” If pressed, most adherents of the Order of Truth will admit that this is ultimately the only truly logical explanation but even they will go right back to speaking of the Ninth World in their daily lives. The convention of referring to Eight prior worlds is now many centuries old and is deeply embedded in Steadfast culture. High Father Calavel himself seemed to believe it, which is good enough for most people even if they have no clue as to the evidence upon which he based his belief. At the end of the day the human need for a comprehensible narrative usually keeps any serious questions about the exact number and nature of the prior worlds confined to only the most rarified esoteric circles of the Order of Truth. The overwhelmingly vast majority of people in the Steadfast know nothing of Genea and simply take it on faith that theirs is the Ninth World, just as they have always been taught."

-- From the personal correspondences of Brother Lep Lezaro of the Order of Truth

DOT in as you please friends.


I'm thinking about doing a Table 2 for a campaign I'm currently running.

I have a lot of ideas and some immense dungeons that haven' been fully used. It should be easy for me to run, since all I have to do in a lot of cases is re-copy material.

HERE is a link to the current campaign if you'd like to take a gander.

This was the original pitch:

Quote:

Fellow Pathfinders,

I have a group who has decided to change gears with me and we're looking for a few more player for a high powered but brutal rendition of the Legacy of Fire Adventure Path set on Athas.

Short story, I was inspired by this post:

Laric Sep 5, 2011, 03:16 pm | Flag | List | Reply Dune Reaper

The first two adventures would work extremely well in Dark Sun with minimal conversion (change the gnolls to gith and take out the genie stuff). You could set it near the mountains of the Black Spine. These adventures would take your party from level 1-7.

The first two adventures are by far the best in the AP and although Amethal's suggestion are good, I would recommend ditching the rest of the AP as the modules are either not very good (#3 Jackal's Price) or really too much work to convert (#4 and #5). As mentioned by Amethal, Part 6 might be workable as a campaign finale with some conversion (tone down the wish stuff and switch the BBEG to a wizard transforming into a Dragon). The nice thing about the part 6 is that it revisits the locales of part 1 and 2.

For level 7 onwards, I'd actually recommend checking out the Slumbering Tsar Series as most of it (but especially the first three installments which takes the PCs from level 7 to 11) would work very well in Dark Sun with some minimal conversion. These adventures could be set in and around Giustenal. By the time you were done with these, Part 6 of Legacy of Fire might fit in well.

I'd like to try something like this using conversions of some of the Black Spine material (maybe using part of Litch Queen's Beloved from Dragon for the last part), and the Necromancer Games version of the City of Brass.

So... a little more info now that I've been running this close to a year -- the first scenario will be a lose conversion of the old Black Flames module set in the ruins of Kalidnay.

It might also be worth noting that I've ended up home brewing some elements of this version of Athas. For instance, all of the city-states have additional elements that draw upon the real-world culture upon which they are based. For instance, Raam's criminal underworld includes a society of Rakshasas who come from a parallel shadow city in the Dark. This version of Athas also includes a lot of planetary adventure elements, and emphasizes the sci-fi element from the revised 2e version of the setting.

Anyway, here's the build rules:

Rules:

Stats: 50pt. buy. No maximum or minimum.
Races: Have to be one of the Dark Sun races from the conversion document linked below; the only other options are if you come up with a Pathfinder equivalent for pterrans and aarakocra.

Classes:

*4th level gestalt. No 'multi-classing' except for prestige classes. I have posted below two netbooks of 3.5 prestige classes that cover a lot of options for the setting.
*2 Mythic Tiers, same feat progression as for the 'normal' classes.
* In this version of gestalt, you can stack identical class features instead of taking the quickest progression, .e.g, from the 'special abilities' part of the class table, thus excluding BAB, skill points, and saves.

Primarily, we are using a board-developed Pathfinder conversion:

Dark Sun Pathfinder Conversion

This conversion lacks a Gladiator class, for which the following are good options:

Gladiator I
Gladiator II

I'm also open to you souping up the material from this book to bring it in line with Pathfinder if you find an option you like:

Dark Sun 3.5 Core Rule Book

Prestige class options:

Prestige Class Appendix, Volume I
Prestige Class Appendix, Volume II

Several players have also found the following to be useful resources/options:

Multiclass Archetypes

Supplemental Mythic Rules

Hitpoints/Health:

We'll be using the Vitality and Wound system from the 3.5 Variant Rules.

However, your Wound points will be equal to DOUBLE your Constitution score, as in the Pathfinder version of this system.

Also, double Vitality at 1st level.

Take max for all rolls.

Also, see below on connected healing rules.

Action Economy:

For the Action Economy, you can use either the standard or the Unchained Action Economy for your actions.

I find the latter less of a headache than the normal system, but I'm leaving it as a parallel option so that builds that rely on swift actions aren't compromised. You can switch back and forth, you just have to declare each round which is operative.

Unchained Action Economy Cheat-Sheet

Initiative:

I do block initiative, as in the monsters go together, and the players go before and after the 'block' of the of the opponents. I find that makes things easier.

I use battlemaps in google slides, and love making maps and handouts, etc. I will do a lot of that for this game.

Skills: Background skills from Unchained.

Feats:

For feat progression, everyone gets the Pathfinder fighter progression of feats as if they were a fighter with 1 feat per level on each 'side' of the Gestalt. So, you get 2 feats per level, plus 1 additional feat on each side of the Gestalt for every level you would get a bonus feat as a Pathfinder fighter.

This means you get between 2 or 4 feats each level.

*Horrifically Overpowered feats series from Rouge Genius allowed. Horrifically Overpowered is its own type. Any feat marked as such can't ever be taken them as a bonus feat due to race or class; you can have a maximum of 1 Horrifically Overpowered Feat at 1st level, 2 at 3rd level, and an additional 1 every 3 levels thereafter.

Also, we the awesome Feat Tax rules of The Elephant in the Room blog are in effect.

Equipment: Just pick stuff that makes sense for your character.


I had an idea for a game I really liked but it didn't work out too well because a sand-box, open world design didn't seem to work for the player dynamic.

So, here I am, giving it another try, with hopefully some of the original players signing back up. This time, I'm going to pitch it again as a AP conversion to the Weird West, with a more defined rail-roady plot, but the same build rules.

Here's the idea -- this is the Werewolf the Apocalypse: Wild West setting with the Carrion Crown AP converted to this setting. Exalted is the pre-history of the world, so the big bad is an aspect of Malfeas/the Wyrm, and is something like the Red King of the Dark Tower, instead of Tar Baphon.

The setting is the Weird West of the Werewolf the Apocalypse: Wild West, with some additional stuff from the Dark Tower Series, Deadlands, Bone Tomahawk, and Cowboys and Aliens thrown in for additional Weird West flavor.

The starting place would be early 1860s in St. George Utah -- that's the replacement for the town in Carrion Crown. The Ustalav replacement will mostly be different places in 1860s Utah.

The initial hook is that the characters are burying a recently deceased professor friend, and have to deal with a haunting at the local jail.

Below are the build rules, and here is a LINK to the original recruitment if you'd like to check out rules adjudication questions .

Stats: 50 pt. buy; no max on score.

Races: humans with any werewolf(ish) template (or a class that achieves the same effect). Most players need to be this. I might allow one exception if you make a good case. This is a werewolf game!

Class: gestalt gunslinger(ish)/something else, start at 4th level.

The only exception to this is if you play a Native American character where gunslinger doesn't make sense. I'd like a large proportion of the players to be gunslinger gestalts.

Multiclass archetypes and VMC and prestige classes OK. No multiclassing on either side of the gestalt.

Mythic: gestalt 2 mythic progressions, 2 tiers.

Feats: 5 1st level. 1 per level after that.
Mythic feats also 1 per tier.
Feat tax rules.

Equipment: just pick stuff that makes sense.

HP -- Wounds/Vigor. Just take maximum for rolls.
AC -- Armor as Damage Reduction, piecemeal armor.

3rd party: basically anything as long as it makes sense for the setting.
Combat -- Unchained action economy.

Hero points

Combat/stamina everyone gets requisite feat free
Skill unlocks everyone gets requisite feat free

Unchained action economy but: a bonus swift action that doesn't count against the three regular actions; You get to keep your iteratives, and can make a full attack by taking 3 actions, similar to natural attacks.

ABP, starting as if level 5.

Animal companions have 2 mythic tiers, and advance with their owners


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This would be mostly out of the box, in contrast with some of my other games. Mostly I will just jack up the power of the opponents.

Stats:

*50pt. buy. Min/max as per normal rules-max 18, min 7, I believe. Then add or subtract racial etc. modifiers.

Races:

*Needs to make sense for setting. Drow Noble probably doesn't... 3rd party is fine. Should be mostly humans.

Class:

*Gestalt. Start at 3rd. 3rd party is fine.
*If power words exist from ultimate magic for your caster class, you have to use words of power instead of normal casting. This exempts occult classes etc.

*1 mythic tier. Gestalt two mythic progressions.

Other rules:

Ultimate Combat:

*Wounds and vigor. Double vigor at 1st level. Otherwise take half as minimum if you roll under that amount.
*Armor as damage reduction
*Piecemeal armor
*No iteratives
*Called shots

Unchained:

*Unchained action economy
*Background skills
*Skill unlocks. Everyone gets associated feat for free.
*Stamina. Everyone gets associated feat free.

*Hero points
*Double starting wealth standard for 3rd level.

Feats:

*One feat per level as well as the bonus feat progression for the Fighter class (so the progression is as if you were a Fighter getting 1 feat per level plus your class feats. If you are a fighter, you get two bonus feats every time you'd have gotten one).
*Same progression applies to mythic feats.
*Horrifically Overpowered feats series allowed. Horrifically Overpowered is its own type. Any feat marked as such can't ever be taken them as a bonus feat due to race or class; you can have a maximum of 1 Horrifically Overpowered Feat at 1st level, 2 at 3rd level, and an additional 1 every 3 levels thereafter.

*2 traits.

Guns are common/everywhere in this version of Golarion.

Campaign concept. You are reincarnated heroes from ancient Thassilon. Make up a story that takes that into account.

Caveat. This is a theory crafter game. Don't apply if you're worried about other players out optimizing you. Don't question someone else's build unless it's a rules issue - no complaints about optimisation.

Usually I'm open to debating rules ideas. I have a different approach for this one. This is the game I want to run. No substitutions, or individual exceptions. If the variant rules mess up a build idea, pick something else for this game.

I want 6-8 players. Happy to clarify issues, but please note above about my expectations for this recruitment.


Open


Dot.


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This is a re-summation/re-posting of a campaign idea I've been working on the rules for with a potential party for a few weeks:

This is a quasi-historical campaign which will take place during the 1400s in eastern Europe and Anatolia, and will deal with the life and reign of Vlad Țepeș. It is a legendary Earth where Vlad Țepeș will eventually become the famed Vampire Dracula.

The level of mythical/legendary elements in this historical setting is in line with contemporary cultural/religious beliefs. Thus, if people in eastern Europe believed in a certain kind of magic or mythological creature, then it exists to the degree that that cultural belief would suggest. For example, if there was a view that a woods was filled with goblins, than it is for the purposes of this campaign.

The cosmology of this version of Earth is that of the classical Gnostic creation myth, a dualistic approach to cosmology found in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Thus, there is a far-removed Neo-Platonic Creator, but the world was actually made by a vengeful demiurge, which is also the primary deity of revelation and mythology.

The time period in which the campaign begins is the first campaign of Vlad Țepeș in Wallachia on behalf of the Ottoman Empire. It will consist of Game of Thrones-inspired military adventures in Wallachia and political intrigue in the Ottoman court of Erdine.

Here is some additional information:

Dracula: The Reign of the Dragon

Vlad III, known as Vlad the Impaler (Romanian: Vlad Țepeș, pronunciation: [ˈvlad ˈt͡sepeʃ] ) or Vlad Dracula (/ˈdrækjələ/ (Romanian: Vlad Drăculea, pronunciation: [ˈdrəkule̯a] ); 1428/31 – 1476/77), was voivode (or prince) of Wallachia three times between 1448 and his death. He was the second son of Vlad Dracul, who became the ruler of Wallachia in 1436. Vlad and his younger brother, Radu, were held as hostages in the Ottoman Empire in 1442 to secure their father's loyalty. Vlad's father and eldest brother, Mircea, were murdered after John Hunyadi, regent-governor of Hungary, invaded Wallachia in 1447. Hunyadi installed Vlad's second cousin, Vladislav II, as the new voivode.

Hunyadi launched a military campaign against the Ottomans in the autumn of 1448, and Vladislav accompanied him. Vlad broke into Wallachia with Ottoman support in October, but Vladislav returned and Vlad sought refuge in the Ottoman Empire before the end of the year.

Upon the death of his father and elder brother, Vlad became a potential claimant to Wallachia. Vladislav II of Wallachia accompanied John Hunyadi, who launched a campaign against the Ottoman Empire in September 1448. Taking advantage of his opponent's absence, Vlad broke into Wallachia at the head of an Ottoman army in early October.[26][27] He had to accept that the Ottomans had captured the fortress of Giurgiu on the Danube and strengthened it.

The Ottomans defeated Hunyadi's army in the Battle of Kosovo between 17 and 18 October.[29] Hunyadi's deputy, Nicholas Vízaknai, urged Vlad to come to meet him in Transylvania, but Vlad refused him. Vladislav II returned to Wallachia at the head of the remnants of his army. Vlad was forced to flee to the Ottoman Empire before 7 December 1448.

Rules:

The characters will be using a set of house rules created on these forums. The following is a compiled and bookmarked pdf of the core rules: Kirthfinder Core Rules

Additional Matters:

Stats:

*50pt. buy
*No min/max
*We are using the optional Comeliness and Social Status/Class stats. These are purchased with the same 50 pt. pool at the same cost.

Races:

*Mostly humans -- need a good argument for something else. The Kirthfinder rules cover templates as racial classes.

Classes:

* Gestalt Kirthfinde base classes.
* Start at 5th level.

Defense:

*Hp double at first level, for every other level take 1/2 maximum as base if you roll lower for a given level.

Feats:

* One feat per level as well as the bonus feat progression for the Fighter class (so the progression is as if you were a Fighter getting 1 feat per level plus your class feats. If you are a fighter, you get two bonus feats every time you'd have gotten one).

Which I believe is one feat per level, plus an extra bonus feat per 2 levels as if you were a Fighter, and then any bonus class feats.

Equipment:

* As per the Kirthfinder rules, we're going to handwave equipment and have everyone just select things that are appropriate for the character.


I just saw this awesome map The Krampus Lair on rpgdrivethru, and that gave me an idea for a silly, high-powered one-shot.

The pitch -- you're all children in a village whose first-born sons have been kidnapped by the evil Krampus.

It will be fairly silly, but also totally gruesome, sort of like a campy B-movie schlock horror picture (e.g., Killer Clowns from Outer Space, etc.).

Krampus is CR 21 in Pathfinder, so the kids will have to be inexplicably high-powered, and that will be part of the silliness of it -- think arch-mage 12 year olds who have tantrums and throw meteor swarms.

The setting would be an 1800s Bavarian village.

Anyone down for that?

EDIT: another idea -- maybe everyone is a household pet, like a cat or pony, who has to get their human back from Krampus.


We could use a few more players for this game. It's the Wild West version of Werewolf the Apocalypse. The campaign concept is that Exalted is the mythic background of the world, so it's very high-powered/high-magic, despite it being historical.

Here's a link to the campaign info page.

A key caveat is that this is supposed to be like Red Redemption 2 -- it's very focused on RPing interactions and player-initiated exploration. There isn't a strong overriding plot like in a Paizo AP. I'm looking for players that want to collaborate on a story.

The first 'event'/area is a series of ritualistic murders involving masonry and Mormon temple rituals in 1860 Salt Lake City.

Here are the rules:

Stats: 50 pt. buy; no max on score.

Races: humans with any werewolf(ish) template (or a class that achieves the same effect). Most players need to be this. I might allow one exception if you make a good case. This is a werewolf game!

Class: gestalt gunslinger(ish)/something else, start at 4th level.

The only exception to this is if you play a Native American character where gunslinger doesn't make sense. I'd like a large proportion of the players to be gunslinger gestalts.

Multiclass archetypes and VMC and prestige classes OK. No multiclassing on either side of the gestalt.

Mythic: gestalt 2 mythic progressions, 2 tiers.

Feats: 5 1st level. 1 per level after that.
Mythic feats also 1 per tier.
Feat tax rules.

Equipment: just pick stuff that makes sense.

HP -- Wounds/Vigor. Just take maximum for rolls.
AC -- Armor as Damage Reduction, piecemeal armor.

3rd party: basically anything as long as it makes sense for the setting.
Combat -- Unchained action economy.

Hero points

Combat/stamina everyone gets requisite feat free
Skill unlocks everyone gets requisite feat free

Unchained action economy but: a bonus swift action that doesn't count against the three regular actions; You get to keep your iteratives, and can make a full attack by taking 3 actions, similar to natural attacks.

ABP, starting as if level 5.

Animal companions have 2 mythic tiers, and advance with their owners


Last time I asked about using the Kirthfinder house rules, I didn't get any interest, so here's trying again...

Here's the pitch -- the setting is like the Francis Ford Coppola 1990s Dracula, and you're all reincarnated vampire hunters, sent from your rest in Heaven to confront Dracula's return, and who are on the infamous vampire's trail. You'd need to create both your present-day incarnation, and whoever you were in the 1500s as part of your back story.

Rules (I'm going to try to be comprehensive, I'll update again when issues inevitably come up I have to rule on).

Race: Human

Stats:

50 pt. buy. No max/min.

Class:

* Start at 5th level.
* Gestalt Vampire Hunter (you have to be this class)/Kirthfinder Class (this is a really cool set of house rules developed by a board member) KIRTHFINDER. We will use the classes. You can use either the Kirthfinder or normal version of skills or feats. We will use the normal Pathfinder combat rules. We will use the normal Pathfinder version of spell casting, but you can use either the Kirthfinder or normal version of spells.

* Gestalt Mythic paths, start at tier 2 (just like gestalt rules applied to mythic)
* Animal companions and familiars get 2 mythic tiers (though not gestalt) as well.

Feats:

* Everyone gets feat for stamina and combat tricks and skill unlocks for free.
* One feat per level as well as the bonus feat progression for the Fighter class (so the progression is as if you were a Fighter getting 1 feat per level plus your class feats. If you are a fighter, you get two bonus feats every time you'd have gotten one).

Skills:

* Background skills
* Skill unlocks -- everyone gets associated feat for free.
* Can use Kirthfinder OR normal version of a skill.

Traits: allowed.

Equipment:

* Just pick stuff that makes sense for the character.
* Automatic bonus progression, start at if 5th level character.

Defense:

* Wounds and Vigor, take max.

* Horror Adventures

We'll being using rules from this as well.

For your story, I need you to tell me who you were in the 1500s under the reign of Vlad the Impaler, and who are are in 1890s Transylvania.


Discussion open


CHAPTER ONE: SIGNS AND TOKENS

The obligation of a first degree of the Nauvoo Endowment:

“Binding myself under no less a penalty than that of having my throat cut across, my tongue torn out by its roots, and buried in the rough sands of the sea at low-water mark, where the tide ebbs and flows twice in twenty four hours, should I ever knowingly or willingly violate this my solemn oath and obligation as an Entered Apprentice Mason. So help me God, and keep me steadfast in the due performance of the same.”

The obligation of a second degree of the Nauvoo Endowment:

“Binding myself under no less a penalty than that of having my left breast torn open, my heart plucked out, and given as a prey to the wild beasts of the field and the fowls of the air as a prey.”

The obligation of a third degree of the Nauvoo Endowment:

“Binding myself under no less a penalty than that of having my body severed in two, my bowels taken from thence and burned to ashes, the ashes scattered to the four winds of heaven, so that no more trace or remembrance may be had of so vile and perjured a wretch as I, should I ever knowingly or willingly violate this my solemn obligation as a Latter-day Saint. So help me God, and keep me steadfast in the due performance of the same.”

The 'Oath of Vengeance' of the Nauvoo Endowment:

"You and each of you do covenant and promise that you will pray and never cease to pray to Almighty God to avenge the blood of the prophets upon this nation, and that you will teach the same to your children and to your children's children unto the third and fourth generation."

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The year is 1860.

The place is Salt Lake City, UT.

What has come before...

The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement within Christianity that arose during the Second Great Awakening in the early 19th century and that led to the set of doctrines, practices, and cultures called Mormonism, and to the existence of numerous Latter Day Saint churches. Its history is characterized by intense controversy and persecution in reaction to some of the movement's doctrines and practices and their relationship to mainstream Christianity.

The founder of the Latter Day Saint movement was Joseph Smith, who was raised in the burned-over district of Upstate New York, and claimed that, in response to prayer, he saw God the Father and Jesus Christ, as well as angels and other visions. This eventually led him to a restoration of Christian doctrine that, he said, was lost after the early Christian apostles were killed. In addition, several early leaders made marked doctrinal and leadership contributions to the movement, including Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, and Brigham Young. Modern-day revelation from God continues to be a principal belief of the Mormon faith.

According to the account Smith told in 1838, he went to the woods to pray about which church to join but fell into the grip of an evil power that nearly overcame him. At the last moment, he was rescued by two shining "personages" (implied to be Jesus and God the Father) who hovered above him. One of the beings told Smith not to join any existing churches because all taught incorrect doctrines.

Smith also described many other visions involving angels. Some of his earliest visitations involved a Nephite prophet-warrior, who called himself Moroni. Smith said this angel appeared to him many times, and showed him where to find a set of buried Golden Plates containing ancient writings that the prophet-warrior had sealed in a stone box before his death, together with other artifacts. The writings on the Golden Plates, according to Smith, contained an account of the various nations that inhabited ancient America, and described how they were led to the New World by Jesus, but eventually lost their Christian faith through a series of wars and corruption.

After he said he received the Golden Plates, Smith began to dictate their translation to his wife Emma Hale Smith and various associates of his, including Martin Harris and, for most of the later translation, Oliver Cowdery. Smith said he translated the text through the gift and power of God and through the aid of the Urim and Thummim, or seer stone. The resulting writings were published in March 1830 as the Book of Mormon.

On April 6, 1830, Joseph Smith, Oliver Cowdery, and a group of approximately 50 believers met to formally organize the Church of Christ into a legal institution.By later accounts, this meeting was a charismatic event, in which members of the congregation had visions, prophesied, spoke in tongues, ecstatically shouted praises to the Lord, and fainted (Joseph Smith History, 1839 draft). Also, the church formally ordained a lay ministry. Smith and Cowdery, according to their 1831 account, were each ordained as "an apostle of Jesus Christ, an elder of the church". ("Articles and Covenants of the Church of Christ", Painesville Telegraph, April 19, 1831).

The movement more than doubled in size with the conversion of Sidney Rigdon, a former Campbellite minister, who led several congregations of Restorationists in Ohio's Western Reserve area, causing hundreds of his adherents to follow him into Mormonism. A fiery orator, Rigdon was called to be Smith's spokesman, and immediately became one of the movement's leaders. By 1831 the church's headquarters were established in Kirtland, Ohio, and Smith urged the membership to gather there or to a second outpost of the church in Far West, Missouri.

As the church was gathering to Kirtland, a second gathering place was established 900 miles distant, on the frontier in Jackson County, Missouri. Joseph Smith had revealed to Latter Day Saints that they were to prepare "the way of the Lord for his Second Coming", "for the time is soon at hand that I shall come...." (D & C 34:6,7) He also revealed that the "center place" of the City of Zion would be near the town of Independence in Jackson County. (D & C 57:3) Latter Day Saints began to settle the area to "build up" the City of Zion in 1831. Settlement was rapid and non-Mormon residents became alarmed that they might lose political control of the county to the Latter Day Saints. In October 1833, non-Mormon vigilantes succeeded in driving the Mormons from the county. Deprived of their homes and property, the Latter Day Saints temporarily settled in the area around Jackson County, especially in Clay County.

The Latter Day Saint movement was conceived as a restoration of practices believed to have been lost in a Great Apostasy from the true gospel of Jesus Christ. Temple worship played a prominent role in the Bible's Old Testament, and in the Book of Mormon.

On December 27, 1832, two years after the organization of the Church of Christ, the church's founder, Joseph Smith, reported receiving a revelation that called upon church members to restore the practice of temple worship. The Latter Day Saints in Kirtland, Ohio, were commanded to:

"Establish a house, even a house of prayer, a house of fasting, a house of faith, a house of learning, a house of glory, a house of order, a house of God."

Latter Day Saints see temples as the fulfillment of a prophecy found in Malachi 3:1 (KJV): "Behold, I will send my messenger, and he shall prepare the way before me; and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the Lord of hosts." It is believed to emphasize that when the Jesus comes again, he will come "to his temple."

As plans were drawn up to construct a temple in Kirtland, the decision was made to simultaneously begin work on a second temple at the church's colony in Jackson County, Missouri. Surviving plans indicate that both temples would have the same dimensions and approximately the same appearance and both were to be at the "centerplaces" of cities designed according to Smith's plan for the City of Zion.

Conflict in Missouri led to the expulsion of the Mormons from Jackson County, preventing any possibility of building a temple there, but work on the temple in Kirtland continued. At great cost and sacrifice, the Latter Day Saints finished the Kirtland Temple in early 1836. On March 27, they held a lengthy dedication ceremony and numerous spiritual experiences and visitations were reported.

With the help of sympathetic non-Mormons in Illinois, in the spring of 1839 the Latter Day Saint refugees regrouped and began to establish a new headquarters in Nauvoo. Smith and other leaders were allowed after several months of harsh treatment to escape Missourian custody, and they rejoined the main body of the movement in April, 1839. In 1841, construction began on a new temple, significantly more elaborate than the one left behind in Kirtland. The Nauvoo city charter authorized independent municipal courts, the foundation of a university and the establishment of a militia unit known as the "Nauvoo Legion." These and other institutions gave the Latter Day Saints a considerable degree of autonomy.

In 1839, the Mormons regrouped at a new headquarters in Nauvoo, Illinois. They were again commanded to build a "House of the Lord"—this one even larger and greater than those that went before. Plans for the temple in Nauvoo followed the earlier models in Kirtland and Independence with lower and upper courts, but the scale was much increased.

On May 3, 1842, Joseph Smith prepared the second floor of his Red Brick Store, in Nauvoo, Illinois, to represent "the interior of a temple as circumstances would permit". The next day, May 4, he introduced the Nauvoo endowment ceremony to nine associates: Associate President and Patriarch to the Church Hyrum Smith (Smith's brother); first counselor in the First Presidency, William Law; three of the Twelve Apostles, Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball and Willard Richards; Nauvoo stake president, William Marks; two bishops, Newel K. Whitney and George Miller; and a close friend, Judge James Adams of Springfield, Illinois.

Throughout 1843 and 1844, Smith continued to initiate other men, as well as women, into the endowment ceremony. By the time of his death on June 27, 1844, more than 50 persons had been admitted into the Anointed Quorum, the name by which this group called themselves.

The Nauvoo endowment consisted of two phases: (1) an initiation, and (2) an instructional and testing phase. The initiation consisted of a washing and anointing, culminating in the clothing of the patron in a "Garment of the Holy Priesthood", which is thereafter worn as an undergarment.

The instructional and testing phase of the endowment consisted of a scripted reenactment of Adam and Eve's experience in the Garden of Eden. The instruction is punctuated with personal covenants, gestures, and a prayer circle around an altar. At the end of instruction, the initiate's knowledge of symbolic gestures and key-words is tested at a "veil", a symbolic final frontier for the initiate to face the judgement of Jesus, before entering the presence of God in the celestial kingdom.

Whenever Latter Day Saints gathered in large numbers, they met with opposition from neighbors who suspected that Mormon bloc-voting would lead to theocracy. By the mid-1840s, many non-Mormons in Hancock County felt threatened by growing Mormon political power, commercial rivalries, and a new religion with at least two elements that were hard to digest in the religious community of that time: first, Latter Day Saints had a somewhat different perspective on the nature of God from traditional Protestants; second, the claim of modern revelation, together with the claim of new scripture, opened the canon of the Bible.

Smith's destruction of the Expositor exacerbated all these fears and non-Mormons throughout Illinois began to clamor for his arrest. When Smith submitted to imprisonment in the county seat of Carthage, the Governor of Illinois, Thomas Ford, left the jail, taking the only impartial local militia unit with him. With the jail being guarded only by two guards and a unit of anti-Mormon militiamen, the Carthage Greys, a mob of disbanded militia units, attacked without resistance. Joseph and his brother Hyrum were killed.

In the months following Smith's murder, it was not immediately clear who would lead the church. His brother, Hyrum, who was Assistant President of the Church, (and as such would have been Smith's natural successor) had died with him.

In a general meeting of the church at Nauvoo on August 8, 1844, Rigdon and Young presented their respective cases. As the only surviving member of the First Presidency (who had not officially apostatized), Rigdon argued that he should be made "guardian" of the church. Young argued that without Smith there, there was no presiding authority higher than the Twelve. Therefore, he proposed that the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles be constituted as the new presiding authority. A vote of the congregation overwhelmingly supported Young's proposal, said to have been caused by Brigham briefly yet miraculously having the "voice and countenance of Joseph Smith" during his talk.

The largest group of Latter Day Saints followed nine of the Twelve Apostles west, establishing a way station at Winter Quarters, Nebraska in 1846, and entering Salt Lake Valley in 1847. Having planted this initial colony in the Great Basin, Young returned to Winter Quarters and in December 1847 reorganized his faction of the church, establishing himself as the head of a new First Presidency. This reorganization led to additional schisms, including the break with Alpheus Cutler and what became the Church of Christ (Cutlerite) as well as Lyman Wight's group in Zodiac, Texas. Young's organization today, the LDS Church, is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah.

On July 24, 1847 143 men, three women and two children founded Great Salt Lake City several miles to the east of the Great Salt Lake, nestled in the northern most reaches of the Salt Lake Valley. At the time of its founding there were no Indians present in the Salt Lake valley. The first two in this company to enter the Salt Lake valley were Orson Pratt and Erastus Snow. These members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ("LDS Church") sought to establish an autonomous religious community and were the first people of European descent to permanently settle in the area now known as Utah. Thousands of Mormon pioneers would arrive in Salt Lake in the coming months and years.

Brigham Young led the Saints west after the death of Joseph Smith. Upon arrival to the Salt Lake valley, Young had a vision by saying, "It is enough. This is the right place. Drive on." (This is commonly shortened to, "This is the place"). There is a state park in Salt Lake City known as This Is The Place Heritage Park commemorating the spot where Young made the famous statement.

Salt Lake City was originally settled by Latter-day Saint Pioneers to be the New Zion according to church President and leader Brigham Young. Young originally governed both the territory and church by a High council which enacted the original municipal orders in 1848. This system was later replaced with a city council and mayor style government.

After a very difficult winter and a miraculous crop retrieval, in which Pioneers reported to have been saved from cricket infestation by seagulls, the "Desert Blossomed as the Rose" in the Salt Lake Valley. Early Pioneers survived by maintaining a very tight-knit community. Under Young's leadership Pioneers worked out a system of communal crop sharing within the various ward houses established throughout the Salt Lake Valley.

The California Gold Rush brought many people through the city on their way to seek fortunes. Salt Lake, which was at the cross-roads of the westward trek, became a vital trading point for speculators and prospectors traveling through. They came with goods from the East, such as clothing and other manufactured items, trading with the local farmers for fresh livestock and crops.

The Congress organized the Utah Territory out of the "State of Deseret" in 1850, and a few months later on January 6, 1851 the city was formally organized as "The City of the Great Salt Lake". Originally, Fillmore, Utah was the territorial capital, but in 1856 it was moved to Salt Lake City, where it has stayed ever since. The city's name was officially changed to "Salt Lake City" at the same time.

In 1857, when the Mormon practice of polygamy came to national awareness, President James Buchanan responded to public outcry by sending an army of 2500 soldiers, called the Utah Expedition, to investigate the LDS Church and install a non-LDS governor to replace Brigham Young. In response, Brigham Young imposed martial law, sending the Utah militia to harass the soldiers, a conflict called the Utah War. Young eventually surrendered to federal control when the new territorial governor, Alfred Cumming, arrived in Salt Lake City on April 12, 1858.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The date is the sixth of November, 1860. In recent U.S. presidential election, Abraham Lincoln beats John C. Breckinridge, Stephen A. Douglas, and John Bell, and is elected as the 16th President of the United States, the first Republican to hold that office.

Leaves are turning, and Utah’s mountain canyons will be aglow with yellows, oranges and rosy pinks for the next few weeks.

The Knutsford Hotel is an upscale hotel on the northeast corner of State Street and Third South (Broadway) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Historically, the site had been the location of the camp where the Mormons had planted their first crops. State Street enters Salt Lake City at 2100 South (State Route 201) and immediately passes west of the Salt Lake County Government Center.

The Knutsford Hotel was built in downtown Salt Lake City in 1591. The architects were the Omaha-based firm of Mendelssohn, Fisher and Lawrie. The general contractors, also from Omaha, were Rocheford & Gould. The hotel is a 132-foot-by-132-foot Victorian-influenced structure built primarily of granite at a cost of $750,000. The hotel has 250 rooms and is advertised as being completely fireproof. The hotel's unique name is in honor of the owner's birthplace in Knutsford, Cheshire, England. Gustavus S. Holmes is the owner and operator of The Knutsford. Holmes also owns The Angelus in Los Angeles, California and often advertises the hotels together.

Like stepping back to the times of wigged aristocrats, the Knutsford Hotel just off the northeast corner of State Street and Third South (Broadway) is hospitality of the highest order. As well as being jam-packed with everything a visiting royal could ever need, the lobby is one of the swishest hotel lobbies in the United States, with immaculate marble columns offset by breathtaking flower arrangements by renowned Californian floral designer Jeff Leatham. The flowers are arguably the highlight of the lobby, with 23 themed arrangements and 150 smaller bouquets put together by Leatham each and every week. Indeed, there's certainly a whiff of Oscar Wilde about the place. Aside from blooms, the lobby also boasts arches that would give the ones in Notre Dame a run for their money, as well as classic gray and wood paneling and 17th-century tapestries decorating the walls.

Underfoot, guests will find a Savonnerie carpet, while dotted around the awesome almost 4000-metre public space are 18th-century marquetry secretaries, Empire consoles and antique Boulle armoires. The entrance is also pretty impressive, with its art deco balustrades, feather-shaped medallions and glass entrance doors painstakingly restored during the last renovation.

Knutsford Hotel, Salt Lake City

Knutsford Hotel: Ground Floor

Knutsford Hotel: Grand Lobby


This is my pitch: I bought a bunch of Werewolf 20 stuff on sale on rpd drivethru, and I love the wild west setting, but I don't want to learn new rules, so we'd use the setting but not the rules.

The campaign would be reminiscent of Bone Tomahawk, Cowboys and Aliens, and other horror/sci-fi westerns.

I'm also very interested in this period of history -- I plan on incorporating a lot of material from the Ghost Dance, and early Mormon legendarium/history, as well as Civil War events.

We'd probably be playing in the 1850s to start out.

Rules:

Stats: 50 pt. buy
Races: humans with the werewolf template. Most players need to be this. I might allow one exception if you make a good case. This is a werewolf game!
Class: gestalt gunslinger/something else, start at 4th level. The only exception to this is if you play a Native American character where gunslinger doesn't make sense. I'd like a large proportion of the players to be gunslinger gestalts.
Multiclass archetypes and VMC and prestige classes OK. No multiclassing on either side of the gestalt.
Mythic: gestalt 2 mythic progressions, 2 tiers.
Feats: 1 per level instead of 1 every other level. Feat tax rules.
Equipment: just pick stuff that makes sense.
HP -- Wounds/Vigor. Just take maximum for rolls.
AC -- Armor as Damage Reduction, piecemeal armor.
3rd party: basically anything as long as it makes sense for the setting.
Combat -- Unchained action economy.
Hero points
Combat/stamina
Skill unlocks

Open to questions/concerns (especially if I forgot a rules issue), and hoping to have some interest...


Discussion open


|| Oasis of Khaldun || || Children of the Gods: Battlemaps ||

Chapter One: Mind Lords of the Crystal Citadel

Deep in the history of the Scarred Lands, the gods and titans joined forces to destroy the slarecians, a people of strange and terrible power. The full repercussions of this mighty war remain as much a mystery as its cause. What powers did the slarecians wield? Why were they such a danger that the mightiest beings in all of Scarn cast them down? And what of their legacy still threatens the people of the Scarred Lands in current times?

At the request of my liege, I am recounting the events that lead to His Splendor’s decision to forego his alliance with the Argent Dynasty of Aurimar. It began in our western holdings, the lands north of great Elz and bordering the Ukrudan Desert. Tall, emaciated beings approached our settlements and demanded both tribute and citizens in honor of some sort of pact made in centuries past. The settlers of course refused, never before beholding such alien beings and not recollecting any such agreement. But I have examined the old records, and I know the beings spoke truth. It seems that they did indeed possess an empire, centuries before the founding of Lede, and they regularly exacted tribute from inhabitants of this region, which had been left vulnerable after the retreat of the Dwarven Imperium. The records recount that the Ancients possessed little sense of time, and thus I suppose it is not surprising that they expected their pacts to hold even though generations have passed since they were last utilized.

The settlers’ refusal provoked an attack by the beings, which have come to be known as slarecians after the strange stone in which they clothe and arm themselves. Over time, the attacks have become more and more frequent throughout our northern and western holdings. Even Sumara, the Jewel of the North, has felt the touch of these mysterious marauders. And yet the mighty Empire of Lede has refused to provide any but the most meager of aid.

While the Argents demand increasingly more excessive taxes, entire settlements on our western flanks have been destroyed, the people abducted, their wealth stolen, the crops left to rot in the fields. Especially hard hit are those communities that have turned to the divine heresy, though of course the Seat of Thulkas cares little for their loss. The marauders seem to be all but unstoppable, and even our most powerful sorcerers of flame fall before them. Worse yet, their magic is so refined that witnesses claim the invaders need not even speak aloud or gesture to call upon Mesos’s gift, and none can see the flows of magic empowering their enchantments. Their unbreakable crystalline weapons rend our fiercest legionnaires, even as their magical might overwhelms our defenders’ minds or calls upon unearthly forces to decimate our troops. Showing neither mercy nor emotion, the creatures simply demand, and if refused, destroy.

In the face of such a menace, and owing to the obvious decadence of the Argents, the Seat of Thulkas has declared his independence that he may devote the resources needed to this threat. His Splendor has sent ambassadors to the creatures, and after much cajoling, the Ancients have agreed to renew the pacts of sacrifice and tribute. In fact, the slarecians have bestowed a gift upon his majesty, a sentient human head constructed of the same unbreakable slarecian crystal comprising the Ancients’ arms. As I was fortunate enough to attend the presentation of this gift, called a ‘muse’ by the Ancients, I witnessed a miraculous display of its power. His Splendor, informed that the muse had the ability to answer any question put to it, asked the image whether the lords of Aurimar would ever again possess the strength to rebuild their fragmenting empire. The eyes of the muse glowed a silvery light as it answered a resounding No, and we knew it to be true. Surely the sacrifice of a few slaves is worth the preservation of our western lands and such a magnanimous gift. The wisdom of the Seat of Thulkas is great indeed.

- Official Ledean records from the Zathiskite Province, dating back to the Argent Dynasty Oltana, High Scribe to the Seat of Thulkas, Regent of the Zathiskite Province -

THE cruel sun beats down, its one malevolent eye unblinking, and the sky is its co-conspirator with not even a wisp of cloud to soften the harsh rays.

The lizards take shelter in the shadows of the rocks where the sand is not hot enough to roast them, but there is no shade large enough for the lone caravan making its way through the seemingly trackless expanse of the desert. Each step sinks into the searing sand, the air is thick and hazy, each breath like drowning in larva.

Three days have passed, and it is morning in the Ukrudan Desert. The huge, golden sun rises over the edge of the barren world, and its rays fall on a lonely camel train that is already on the move.

The Ukrudan Desert is covered in rolling hills. Wind stirs up the wispy sand and the sun’s never ending rays beat down on mercilessly.

Salty sweat rolls off the noses and stings the eyes of the travelers.

Their clothing is overwhelmingly hot and sticky.

The stiff, dry desert breeze blows sand into their eyes and makes their hair stiff with salt.

Their tongues feels as if they are coated in fur and their lips are chapped and dry.

They long for crystal, cold water.

Heat rains down on them like the breath of Chardun's hell. The scorched sand shimmers in the intense white rays of the sun.

Their hats cocoon their heads in warm sweat, the arid heat burnt at their lungs.

Nothing and no-one moves in this penetrating heat unless they were desperate, and they were.

Heat pours into their veins as if pumped in through a hypodermic needle. It swirls in their brains inducing them into sleepy stupidity and no matter how much comes in, none of it seems to escape. The air is like breathing liquid fire and no-one dares walk barefoot outside for fear of blistering.

No matter how much they drink the thirst gnaws at them until sun down, when the welcome scarlet and tangerine lights up the horizon and ushers in the sweet relief of the night air.


I find the setting fascinating, but I'm not interested in learning a new rule set. Anyone have any interest in playing a conversion of the setting to Pathfinder 1e?


Hello friends,

I'm looking for another player or two for my Dark Sun campaign (link in my profile, including rules, etc. on the campaign info and recruitment threads).

The story so far: the heroes are part of an embassy dispatched from House Vordon of Tyr to revitalize a forgotten trading post named Kelmarane that is located near the Lost Oasis, in the far south west corner of the Tablelands. The trading post has been overrun by Gnolls.

The heroes' caravan, a moving palace called Destiny's Chariot, was stopped while passing the ruins of Kalidnay, from where House Vordon originated. Strange sounds and flickering lights were seen in the distance.

The caravan was accosted by the Pavilion of Mercy, a massive floating vessel shaped like a pyramid, and guided by Faalcuun the Majestic, a decrepit T'liz dragon, and former apprentice of Dregoth. He charged the heroes to enter the ruins of Kalidnay and close the Great Orrery, a trans-world gate which has been opened by mysterious forces, and which is guided by the awakened and wrathful mind of Kalid-Ma and her five greatest templars. These minds are located in five large pylons spread throughout the city, and must be deactivated to shut the gate. The parties of the other sorcerer-kings are drawing near, since it is rumored that the Great Orrery can open a door to a world that contains an artifact known as the 'greater seed' which can speed up the dragon metamorphosis process.

The heroes witness the Great Orrery open in the sky and disgorge a large and mysterious flying vessel with six wings, which descends into the ruins.

The Great Orrery also forms a wall of psionic orbs which surround the ruins, so the heroes decide to attempt to enter the ruins by going under this barrier -- entering through the tunnels of an abandoned Diamond Mine.

They enter the mine, and encounter morlocks engaged in a ritual sacrifice to a fire drake. They fight the morlocks to a standstill, and are currently negotiating with the intellect devouerer masters of the morlocks. The intellect devourers want the heroes to meet the 'Master of the Aerie,' a mysterious being who dwells in the depths of the Diamond Mines, who, the intellect devourers claim, wishes their aid in confronting new enemies that have emerged from the depths beneath the city -- the serpent-spiders.

I need some captives of the morlocks the intellect devourers are going to hand off to the PCs. They are survivors of a caravan from Raam that was betrayed en route by two of its guards, who were disguised dray in the service of Dregoth. They traded the caravan members to the morlocks in exchange for free passage through the mines.

Let me know if you have questions! Hope to hear from interested parties!


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I have an itch to do an historical campaign -- I find the Mongol conquests fascinating.

Here are some relevant wikipedia entries on the time period I am thinking about:

Mongol conquest of Khwarezmia
Khwarazmian dynasty
Mongol Empire

I was assuming the party would be persian, but I'm open to a mongol party as well. This would be a slightly legendary version of history with mongol shaman and iranian genie-binders and so on, but I am concerned with trying to incorporate a lot of historical detail.

Rules:

I'm a huge fan of alternative and house rules, but I'm going to try to reign myself in for this one so that the focus can be on research to play the characters correctly and write rich posts.

Attributes: I'd like to say just design something reasonable, like a non-mythic, reasonable historical character. But if that seems to open-ended, then 4d6, drop the lowest.

Races: only, or at least mostly humans. Maybe we could allow one half-jinn or something, but that's really not the point of this campaign. No elves or dwarves or other things that don't fit the cultural milieu.

Class/Level: start at 6th level to allow for one level of a prestige class if someone wants that. Open to most 3rd party sources that would fit the time period. I'm more concerned with flavor than a specific set of rules. Like, you can use Spheres of Might if you can fluff it for the setting. The magic systems from Akashic mysteries would work well with this setting.

Skills/feats: background skills.

Equipment: just choose something that would make sense for the character.

I'd imagine the story would start with the mongols arriving in the iranian court, but it would be different if the party were themselves mongols.

The major issue is if you're willing to put the time into playing in a historically-grounded game.

If that's a little too exotic, I'm also interested in perhaps running something during the Ottoman-Romanian Wars and the life of Vlad the Impaler, or something about the Napoleonic Wars.


Any fan of scarred lands out there?

My idea is the Chelish are replaced by Calastians.

I haven't looked at the Pathfinder conversion from Onyx Press, I'd be happy to just use equivalents from Pathfinder, like drow nobles for shadow elves etc. We can easily convert any 3.5 options by just adding feats.

This would be a high power campaign with a lot of optional 3rd party rules.

If there's interest, I'll try to start developing some conversion guidelines, or even get the Onyx Press conversion for everyone to use.


I've been interested in this monument of houseruling for more than a year -- would anyone like to okay a campaign using these rules (I would DM)? I'm imagining starting at 6th level to allow 1 level of the Paladin or Specialist Wizard Prestige Classes.

Any ideas for APs, or scenarios? I was thinking maybe a King Arthur or Robinhood setting but I'm open to ideas.


Friends,

I saw that a Ponyfinder bundle is available on BundleofHolding.com, and I've been sort of interested in this concept for a while, though I will confess to not being a professional bronie in terms of terms of my knowledge of the my little pony cannon 'friendship is magic' canon.

This will take awhile to put together if we do it -- I would imagine an extremely high powered campaign, starting at maybe 6th level with 3 mythic tiers, and based on one of the Paizo APs, something like Exalted, with a lot of alternative rules, 3rd party, and homebrew elements, including words from Godbound.

In other words, stuff like gestalt, players wielding artifacts, psionics, etc. It would be sort of like an anime in terms of style. You have to like/be willing to use lots of the Unchained rules alongside mythic, as well as a simultaneous combat/combat phases system. The character builds are going to be positively Byzantine, much more complicated than a standard Pathfinder character.

Any interest in or suggestions about what AP I can adapt to super powered pony adventure?

I probably want to run it in a my little pony version of some existing campaign world (though probably not Golarion), or a mashup thereof -- like I saw a fun idea recently for a convergence of Athas and Eberron where the subcontinents of the former Khovaire floated around over a sea of silt. Any ideas for that too?

The recruitment would run for several weeks at least if I sense there's enough interest.


Fellow Pathfinders,

I got a few players started on this idea last time I recruited, but sadly, in the way of many pbp, I find myself in need of some new players again...

So... here's the pitch.

The idea is that a party of characters from Monte Cook's Arcana Evolved world have been transported to Dark Sun to the ruins of Kalidnay, where they will make contact with an Athasian party for which I am running a conversion of Legacy of Fire.

The campaign will start in De-Shamod, the capital of the giants, and the characters will be on a spy mission as servants of the dragons who have returned from the west to reclaim their lands. They are hunting down rumors of a cult of the slassans (the spider/serpent hybrids who were the greatest servants of the fiend/dragon dramojh who the giants defeated several centuries ago). This cult, the Society of the Devil Serpent, is rumored to have recovered a dramojh artifact known as the phase heart that permits transport between worlds.

My main request is that you like to write, and aren't in 20 other campaigns so you can give this the time it would need -- I'm a very descriptive DM and put a lot of world building into my campaigns.

Thanks for taking a look, and let me know if you have questions.

Looking for 4-6 players.

Rules:

This is a high powered campaign with lots of optional rules:

5th level gestalt, 2 mythic levels OR 5th level, 2 mythic tiers (see feat options below).

You can try both these methods for character creation and pick the best: 5d6, take the best 3 OR 35 pt. buy.

1 feat per level if gestalt, 3 if single classed.

Background skills.

No multiclassing, only VMC or multiclass archetypes. Prestige classes allowed (racial classes count as prestige)

All 3rd party material allowed.

We are using spell points for all magic using classes.

Automatic bonus progression as 2 levels higher (so, the low-magic item version)

Wounds/Vigor

Hero points

Stamina/Combat tricks

Phased/Simultaneous combat

We are using the Pathfinder conversions of Arcana Evolved from this blog -- the Arcana Evolved classes have been mostly turned into archetypes, you will see here.

You can also use the Arcana Evolved racial classes, that weren't converted here(this wiki also has a setting overview)

Finally, here's a conversion of the feats here


Fellow Pathfinders,

I'm sending out feelers for a very strange foray into Dark Sun. Here's the basic idea:

The current players are a party of caravan guards for House Vordon of Tyr that have been accosted on their way to the abandoned settlement of Kelmarane, which the House wishes to retake from gnoll occupiers and restore to its former glory (i.e., a conversion of the first part of the Legacy of Fire adventure path).

While passing by the ruins of Kalidnay, they observe strange phenomena and are then accosted by an enormous barge under the direction of Faalcuun the Lawkeeper, a former apprentice of Dregoth who wants to recruit the PCs for some unknown task in the ruins.

Here's where you fit in -- if anyone's interested, I'm recruiting a group of 6-8 characters who have been cast onto Athas from the planet of Monte Cook's Arcana Evolved by the power of the Great Orrery, a trans-world gate controlled by the spirit of Kalid-Ma.

They are now stuck there. There is a party under the guidance of the giants and one connected with the dragons (you'd all have to chose which one of the two you want to come from). There are also other parties in the ruins, it's quite complicated.

We'd use some conversions of Arcana Evolved classes and races released in a pdf on pfrd.com publishing, and it's a high powered campaign with gestalt, mythic, and beginning at 3rd level, along with a bunch of other rules from Unchained and Ultimate Combat.

You can check out the current gameplay thread here if you're potentially interested, and I'll post some more info if a decent number of people are interested. The recruitment thread also has a lot of the rules.

Recruitment will run at least a few weeks since the current party is still negotiating their way into the ruins, and the idea is eventually you'll encounter them.


Discussion open:

@Tkk-Tkk -- what was the survival check for in your first post. I'm not clear what I need to adjudicate as DM.

Any questions from the players' side?


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My posts will often include brief excerpts from the work known as the The Wanderer’s Journal, an in-setting book that describes the world of Athas. I hope these passages will help to orient those players who are not already familiar with the Dark Sun setting to the peculiarities of this amazing world, which I unreservedly consider the finest product line to come out of TSR.

Who, you may well ask, is this ‘Wanderer’?

"The Wanderer is a mysterious figure whom everyone knows about but few can claim to have met. Tales say he’s a human cleric of earth who never stays in one place, perhaps because of an insatiable curiosity, He has one highly distinctive feature: His left arm is reptilian, covered with scales and marked by talon-pointed fingers. How he came to possess such a limb has never been revealed, but tales told around campfires speak of his many skills, fighting prowess, and knowledge about the world.”

“There’s an old traveler’s blessing circulating around Athas: “All you need on your journey is a sharp bone sword, a full water skin, and the Wanderer to guide you.”"

The Free City of Tyr

Tyr is located on the Tablelands, near the Ringing Mountains. It was one of the few cities with an iron mine and was thus quite wealthy. Tyr was ruled by King Kalak for a thousand years in a reign of terror. He was iron-fisted and refused to listen to his council of city elders. Drawing near the end of his reign, Kalak began the construction of a massive ziggurat in the arena. None were sure what the structure was for until the entire population was called to the arena to watch the ziggurat games. As soon as the fight ended (which featured the champion mul gladiator Rikus and his fighting partner Neeva) a great obsidian structure shot through the ziggurat and began to drain the life out of the spectators. None could escape, for the gates had been closed and could not be opened from the inside. The reason became apparent: Kalak was accelerating his transformation into a Dragon by robbing all the citizens of their life energies. At the last moment, Rikus would strike Kalak with the Heartwood spear, and although this did not kill the evil king, a band of heroes would finally end Kalak's thousand-year reign of evil.

--The Wanderer's Journal

House Vordon

Vordon deals in the gold from Walis, grain from Kalidnay and iron of Tyr. They also deal with textiles, obsidian and gems. They have a major base in Tyr as well but their base of operations has been Kalidnay for nine generations.

Once one of the most feared and respected of Athas’ great houses, House Vordon has become something of a laughing stock. In recent years, as Tyr’s vast resources have been slowly diverted to constructing Kalak’s ziggurat, House Vordon’s fortunes have declined. Trade goods were sold to obtain cash for materials, slaves were requisitioned and set to work on the monument, and the entire city has suffered. Now, Vordon has become an object of deri¬sion and ridicule by other houses, who chortle at Kalak’s senility and Vordon’s troubles.

House Vordon specializes in the export of iron from Tyr. This rare and vital element is in demand throughout the Tyr region. As iron’s primary supplier, Vordon can virtually set its own price. It is the iron trade, in fact, that keeps Vordon solvent as Tyr’s economy teeters on the brink of collapse.

Other export items include slaves, artwork, and textiles, but the shortage of labor as Kalak diverts more and more resources into the construction of his ziggurat virtually eliminates these as trade goods. Financially strapped and on the verge of starvation, Tyr has been forced to import vast quantities of food, water, and kank nectar. Vordon helps to provide the city with these items, but a chronic cash shortage within Tyr keeps their profits low.

The Vordon emporium takes up a full corner of Iron Square, lying to the left of Caravan Way as it enters the square. The front of the building houses the retail functions, while the rear consists of offices and storage. Directly across the street from the emporium next to the Nobles' Quarter, House Vordon maintains its main office and a large, very secure warehouse. A small, fortified outpost used for storage of wagons and pack animals can be found five miles south of Tyr.

--The Wanderer’s Journal

The Lost City State of Kalidnay

A great city known as Kalidnay once existed on the world Athas, ruled by the brutal sorcerer-king Kalid-Ma. He was noted for his strict laws, and even stricter enforcement. Even his own templars - men and women who served both as his enforcers and the city's religious leaders - were not immune to the law. Thus, Kalidnay had a reputation for being a harsh but fair city, unusual on Athas.

His most loyal templar was Thakok-An. A vicious woman, she retained her post by zealously enforcing all decrees and constantly extolling Kalid-Ma's virtues, appealing to his vanity. Singing the praises of her king was easy, since she desired him above all things.

The sorcerer-king of Kalidnay was unmatched in the arts of defiling magic (a type of spellcasting unique to Athas, where the caster draws life force from the surrounding area to power the spell). He was so strong, in fact, that the sorcerer-kings of the other cities feared him and plotted to kill him.

Thakok-An learned of their plot. Instead of telling Kalid-Ma about the plan, Thakok-An instead chose to save him herself and thereby earn his undying devotion. Maddened by the thought of losing him, she turned to the books of arcane lore stored in the king's palace, learning how to speed the process her king was already embarked upon - that of becoming a Dragon of Athas, the most powerful being on the planet. The price would be high, but she did not hesitate to pay it.

--The Wanderer’s Journal

Mood Music

“There is no escape—we pay for the violence of our ancestors.”

--Athasian proverb

The slow southern progression of Destiny’s Chariot, the great caravan wagon of House Vordon of Tyr, has already consumed the greater part of a week, and the end of its journey, the long-abandoned trading post of Kelmarane, still lies far beyond the mirages of the heat-scorched horizon.

Fortunately for the beleaguered merchant house and its fellow travelers embarked upon this perilous mission, the confines of the Chariot offer some respite from the relentless rays of Athas’ crimson sun. Indeed, the immense vehicle is surmounted by a regal palace with all the requisite accommodations, including a reliable water source supplied by the clerics of elemental water attached to this risky venture.

If the prevailing wisdom is to be believed, the origins of this marvelous engine lie in the Tablelands’ distant past, in House Vordon’s original home in the lost city of Kalidnay, where Destiny’s Chariot served as the mobile summer palace of the sorcerer-king Kalid-Ma.

Some twelve hundred years prior, in the 174th year of the King's Age, designated in the annals of the Tablelands as the “Year of the King's Contemplation,” the great city had been made into a ruin, its people mysteriously vanished from the face of Athas. The account of the sudden and unexplained cataclysm contained in the writings of the enigmatic Wanderer suggest that the sorcerer-king Kalid-Ma had attempted a precipitous ascent to full dragon form comparable to the later machinations of Kalak of Tyr.

In the wake of the cataclysm, a returning caravan of the merchant house salvaged the Kalid-Ma’s marvelous retreat, and concealed it from their rivals in other city states of the Tablelands within a hidden cavern complex in the Ringing Mountains which surround the city state of Tyr.

The unfathomable weight of the Chariot is steadily conveyed across the seemingly endless desert between Tyr and Kelmarane by the strength of two immense iguanasaurs, lizard-like beasts of burden of even great power than the immense mekillots that were generally the locomotive means of the Tablelands’ great caravans.

In the wake of Kalak’s death and the subsequent disruption of Tyr’s economy, House Vordon has dispatched its agent Almah Ravaska to revive a long-abandoned trading post situated near the ruins of Kalidnay, in the Lost Oasis.

In some respects, given the origins of House Vordon, the expedition could be seen as a kind of home-coming.

The intense temperature of the midday sun causes the air in the courtyard of the Chariot to shimmer with constantly-shifting waves of incandescent heat.

Just as in many previous days, Almah has invited the expedition’s company to partake of a bard’s entertainment in the cool shadows of the palace’s audience hall. Doubtless, House Vordon’s chief representative in this venture, upon whose shoulder’s its success depends, hopes that this diversion will alleviate both the tedium of the journey, as well as restrain any undue contemplation of the considerable perils that may await at its end…


I am going to be running this path in the PbP forums. I've read a couple of suggestions for how a Dark Sun conversion, but wanted to see if I could get a bigger thread with cool ideas going to inspire me about conversion schemes.

For instance, I had a thought of making the City of Brass an isolated isle of super-kaltori (fire ruvoka) in the Sea of Silt.

Ideas?


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Fellow Pathfinders,

I have a group who has decided to change gears with me and we're looking for a few more player for a high powered but brutal rendition of the Legacy of Fire Adventure Path set on Athas.

Short story, I was inspired by this post:

Laric Sep 5, 2011, 03:16 pm | Flag | List | Reply Dune Reaper

The first two adventures would work extremely well in Dark Sun with minimal conversion (change the gnolls to gith and take out the genie stuff). You could set it near the mountains of the Black Spine. These adventures would take your party from level 1-7.

The first two adventures are by far the best in the AP and although Amethal's suggestion are good, I would recommend ditching the rest of the AP as the modules are either not very good (#3 Jackal's Price) or really too much work to convert (#4 and #5). As mentioned by Amethal, Part 6 might be workable as a campaign finale with some conversion (tone down the wish stuff and switch the BBEG to a wizard transforming into a Dragon). The nice thing about the part 6 is that it revisits the locales of part 1 and 2.

For level 7 onwards, I'd actually recommend checking out the Slumbering Tsar Series as most of it (but especially the first three installments which takes the PCs from level 7 to 11) would work very well in Dark Sun with some minimal conversion. These adventures could be set in and around Giustenal. By the time you were done with these, Part 6 of Legacy of Fire might fit in well.

I'd like to try something like this using conversions of some of the Black Spine material (maybe using part of Litch Queen's Beloved from Dragon for the last part), and the Necromancer Games version of the City of Brass.

Rules:

Any third party etc. goes as long as it fits Athas. I'm going to throw in stuff from 3rd party sources and re-fluff it with abandon.

Classes: No multi-classing except for prestige classes. VMC or multi class archetypes instead. Gestalt with feat every level or one class with 3 feats every level or alternative rules for 'feat chains' posted below

35 pts. buy or roll 5d6, drop lowest.

Wounds and Vigor (Ultimate Combat).

Alternative Action Economy (Unchained (see cheat sheet below).

Background skills (Unchained).

Using mythic.

Automatic bonus progression as per 2 levels higher (the version where there are basically no magic items).

Advancement by DM fiat instead of creature death -- I'm just going to level you up when you need to for the next piece, I don't have any interest in calculating XP and having to ration that out.

Start at third level with 1 mythic tier. We're going to go 1 mythic tier every 2 levels.

Hero Points.

Stamina and combat tricks.

I'm open to suggestions...

CAMPAIGN DOCUMENTS:

RULES:

Dark Sun PF Conversion

House Rules

Alternative Feat Progression Rules for Single Class Characters

Unchained Action Economy Cheat-Sheet

Supplemental Mythic Rules


Greetings fellow Pathfinders,

I just got a private message of additional potential interest in this campaign, and we're at a good spot to add in some more players if there's anyone who would like to join, so I thought I'd attach the recruitment thread (this campaign platform got a bit muddled because I had an initial set of threads that got messed up by the system so I couldn't post in gameplay, so then I had to recreate the whole thing to start the gameplay thread, thus the initial "recruitment" thread is in a different campaign than the gameplay thread currently, and thus this is the recruitment thread for the second instantiation of the campaign I had to create).

Simple overview--it's a high powered underwater gestalt campaign using rules from Allura Publishing's Cerulean Seas with lots of 3rd party and home brew rules, and mostly focused on world building and political intrigue--most of the 'action' will be talking and exploring, so I'm in the market for players who want to role play, since there's going to be a lot less combat than in other games.

If there's any interest, have a look at the initial recruitment thread here , as well as the second version for the maps and gameplay, and rules documents here .

If you're interested, it might be helpful to read through the existing posts to catch up on the story. I'm telling it with flashbacks and a main timeline, something like the effect in Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive.

Thanks in advance for any interest, looking forward to hearing from other potential players.


Discussion thread opened.


Hrungnir's Flight:
----------------------------------------------

Year 987 of the Accord of Athanes

Report to the Lustrated Father Agerth:

Abluted Simund: “I had then seen this -- the Sleeper stirred, and the halls of the Chosen rang again with cry of battle and din of shield and spear.”

Lustrated Agerth: “And was it the same? Perhaps the Typhoon Struggle begins.”

AS: “As much as it could be other – I see now only shadows.”

LA: “Lustrated Birgerth, what think you?”

LB: “The reading of dreams is not our way, it is a thing of the tomb, and of the shadows. Only those who worship the dead would heed these phantoms.”

LA: “Should they be proven true….”

Fragment from the Tidehall, which was discovered following the destruction of Indomitable Will, having apparently drifted on the slow currents of the Orbragg and was recovered by Abluted Eirick three days before his death.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

The piercing din elides once again. Doubtless, it will arise again soon, likely in an interval shorter than its previous subsidence. Perhaps even before its recent eruption has ceased to resound within the seemingly infinite shards of amethyst, fluorite, tanzanite, and other orchid-hued geodes that encase the dizzying expanse of the Orbragg.

For a hopeful moment, the guttering shade which invariably consumes the chasm alongside the hideous tremors withdraws somewhat, allowing a million slivers of illumination to play across the mirrored surfaces encrusting the cavern’s dizzying miles of crystalline panes.

But it is, without reserve, a false hope.

Indeed, the vastness of the great vault has increased itself in recent times, for no longer do the mighty fleets of war barges assemble together for bold sallies against the Gorgaummoth, the accursed infinity of burning depths which both entomb the Sleeper and give tortured birth to Her endless hordes of virulent spawn.

From the fortified vantage of the hundred keeps that encircle the outer face of Last Redoubt, until recently imagined to be impregnable, the devastated carcasses of the other six Austorian bastions unfurl menacingly before the barricade sentinels, offering grim testimony of an impending and irresistible doom. For with the passing of each perilous hour, the city’s storied form, an expansive shelf, several miles in length, which presents a distinctive silhouette reminiscent of a miner’s sickle, lessens its promise of any lasting refuge from the multitude of tendrils, heaving fearfully in a great gibbous mass of writhing shapes, which are moving upward, slowly but inexorably, towards its blackened gates.

Soon, the Orbragg, millennium-long refuge of the Austorian people, must needs be abandoned for the upper reaches of the Auggammaon, and a last stand begun at the fortifications of the Dragon’s Teeth. And when they inevitably fail, the remainder of Athanes’ children will speedily join their forgotten fellows.

Unless some now un-imagined reprieve should be found…

In a violent inversion of its title, the Plaza of Assembly stands almost empty, leaving the solitary remaining shrine of the Old Faith practically unguarded, or at least so it appears.

Despite this, the congregated forces of those sworn to the Seven might at any moment sally forth from upon the broad esplanade which joins the unoccupied platz with the lofty ring wall of the Great Khthon, from whose once teeming fleets of battle barges only a handful of badly damaged craft survived the last sortie into the raging flames of the Gorgaummoth.


This seems to have come up before from my perusal of the forums. My campaign is here: I think I deleted a first post and messed it up. I would appreciate any assistance getting things back on track.

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