Trinkets and Treasures

Monday, June 25, 2018

Wayfinder. Bag of holding. Ring of the ram. Staff of power. Holy avenger.

The magic items you find during your adventures become a part of your story and let you do things beyond the techniques you've mastered and the spells you know. So how do these essentials of the game work in the Pathfinder Playtest?

Magic items are used in three major ways: by investing them, by activating them, or automatically. Invested items are ones you wear that you have to prepare as you don them, after which they work continuously. Activating items follows a system similar to that used for spells. Just as casting a spell requires you to spend actions to supply the somatic, verbal, and material components of the spell, activated items require you to use the Command Activation, Focus Activation, or Operate Activation action, or a combination of multiple actions. A potion requires you to spend an Operate Activation action to drink it. A necklace of fireballs requires you to spend 2 Operate Activation actions to unbind a bead and throw it. Activating a luck blade to reroll an attack just takes a mental nudge with a Focus Activation reaction (though you get to do that only once per day). Automatic activation happens with a small category of items that give their benefit whenever they're used for their normal purpose. A prime example is a sword with the frost property rune, which is always coated with frost and needs only hit a foe to deal extra cold damage.

Illustration by Wayne Reynolds

Resonance

Activating or investing an item costs 1 Resonance Point (RP). You might have heard a bit about this on the Glass Cannon podcast! Resonance is a new resource all characters have that can be used to activate items. Your innate magic item resonance is represented by a number of Resonance Points equal to your level plus your Charisma modifier. This ties back to the Pathfinder First Edition concept of Charisma as the main ability score tied to innate magic, as seen in the Use Magic Device skill and the fact that Charisma is used for spell-like abilities, oracles, sorcerers, and so forth. However, in Pathfinder Second Edition, true scholars of itemcraft *cough*alchemists*cough* might get to use their Intelligence instead.

The idea of resonance stems from the Pathfinder First Edition occultist, who was able to tap into the magical potential of items, and even before that to the idea of resonance between creatures and various magic items, as seen with the resonant powers of wayfinders. We've expanded that concept to apply to everyone. In practical terms, you're really unlikely to run out of Resonance Points unless you're using an absurd number of items, and you're at the greatest risk at low levels. You still have a chance even if your pool is empty, though. You can overspend Resonance Points! If you're at 0 RP, you can attempt to activate or invest an item anyway. You need to attempt a flat check (a d20 roll with no modifiers) against a DC equal to 10 + the number of points you've overspent today. So the first item has a 50% chance of working, and it gets more risky from there.

We expect Resonance Points to be a contentious topic, and we're really curious to see how it plays at your tables. It's one of the more experimental changes to the game, and the playtest process gives us a chance to see it in the wild before committing to it. Here are the advantages we see from a design perspective:

  1. Using items is clear and consistent. Spend the required actions and 1 RP, and you activate or invest your item. If someone else wants to use the same item, you can remove it and let them put it on and invest it themselves.
  2. You have less to track. We get to remove some of the sub-pools that individual items have (such as "10 rounds per day which need not be consecutive" or "5 charges") because we know you have an overall limited resource. There are still some items that can't be used without limit, but they get to be special exceptions rather than being common out of necessity.
  3. It puts the focus on the strongest items. Because you can't activate items indefinitely, your best bet is to use the most RP-efficient item, not the most gp-efficient item. You want a high-level healing wand because you get more healing for your Resonance Point rather than getting a bunch of low-level wands because they're cheap.
  4. Investiture limits what you can wear. That means we don't need to rely heavily on an item slot system, creating more flexibility in what kind of worn items are useful. You'll read more about this on the blog on Friday, when we talk about removing the magic item Christmas tree!

Will those benefits be compelling? Will people prefer this system over the Pathfinder First Edition system? We look forward to finding out!

Want to look at an item to see how this works in practice?

Cloak of Elvenkind Item 10+

Illusion, Invested, Magical

Method of Use worn, cloak; Bulk L

Activation [[A]] Focus Activation, [[A]] Operate Activation


This cloak is deep green with a voluminous hood, and is embroidered with gold trim and symbols of significance to the elves. The cloak allows you to cast the ghost sound cantrip as an innate arcane spell. When you draw the hood up over your head (an Interact action), the cloak transforms to match the environment around you and muffles your sounds, giving you an item bonus to Stealth checks. If you activate the cloak, you pull the hood up and are affected by invisibility for 1 minute or until you pull the hood back down, whichever comes first.

Type standard; Level 10; Price 1,000 gp

The cloak grants a +3 bonus.

Type greater; Level 18; Price 24,000 gp

The cloak grants a +5 bonus, and invisibility is 4th level. If you're also wearing greater boots of elvenkind, the greater cloak of elvenkind allows you to Sneak in forest environments even when creatures are currently observing you.

Here's a fairly complex item to show multiple parts of the system at once. The cloak of elvenkind is level 10, and there's also a greater cloak of elvenkind with an item level of 18. In case you missed it in the crafting blog, items have levels now, which indicate the point at which you can craft them (as well as being handy for the GM when making treasure hoards). Method of use indicates that this item is worn and that it's a cloak. A few items have this two-part listing because they're hard to wear multiples of. Multiple cloaks, multiple boots... not practical. Multiple rings or amulets? No problem.

This item is both invested (note the invested trait) and activated (as you can see by the activation entry). Investing the cloak lets you cast ghost sound. You get this benefit as long as the cloak is invested, which means you can cast the spell whenever you want without activating the cloak and therefore without spending more Resonance Points. You can also get an item bonus to Stealth checks from the cloak (+3 or +5 for a greater cloak). Finally, you can activate the cloak as you raise the hood, spending 1 Resonance Point to turn invisible! Certainly not every item has as much going on as a cloak of elvenkind, but several classic items seemed like they needed a little extra special treatment! What do you think? Too much?

How about something simpler?

Floating Shield Item 13

Magical

Price 2,800 gp

Method of Use held, 1 hand; Bulk L

Activation [[A]] Operate Activation


This master-quality light wooden shield (Hardness 6) protects you without requiring you to spend actions each round. When you activate this shield, you can release it from your grip as a part of that action. The shield floats in the air next to you, granting you its bonus automatically, as if you Raised the Shield. Because you're not wielding the shield, you can't use reactions such as Shield Block with the shield.

After 1 minute, the shield drops to the ground, ending its floating effect. While the shield is adjacent to you, you can grasp it with an Interact action, ending its floating effect.

You can hold this and use it just like any other shield. Activating it lets you free up a hand to cause the shield to float, where it protects you without you spending an action! While the floating shield offers far less Hardness than many magic shields of a similar level (some have Hardness up to 18!), it's not meant for Shield Block, and its abilities allow you to use it even with a character who needs both hands for other things.

Now let's look at two special types of items: one revamped classic and one brand-new category!

Staves

We went through several different iterations of staves. They needed to remain a powerful tool for spellcasters, but we also wanted them to appear earlier in the game so you didn't have to wait for most staves to appear at higher levels. Let's see the staff of healing!

Staff of Healing Item 3+

Invested, Magical, Necromancy, Staff

Method of Use held, 1 hand; Bulk 1

Activation Cast a Spell (1 RP)


Made of smooth white wood, this staff is capped at each end with a golden cross adorned with a multitude of ruby cabochons. A staff of healing adds an item bonus to the Hit Points you restore any time you cast the heal spell using your own spell slots, using charges from the staff, or from channel energy.

Type minor; Level 3; Price 60 gp; Maximum Charges 3

The item bonus to heal spells is +1.

  • stabilize (cantrip)
  • heal (level 1)

I've included only the level 3 minor staff of healing here. There are also versions at levels 7, 11, and 15, and they add higher-level heal spells, plus restoration, remove disease, restore senses, and more! A staff is tied to you, which means you have to invest it, unlike most held items. This investiture has two extra benefits. First off, it links the staff to you, preventing anyone else from investing the staff for 24 hours. More importantly, it restores charges to the staff equal to the highest level of spell you can cast. You don't have to expend any spells to do this; it's all part of using your Resonance Points. You'll notice this also means that if you find one of these as a 1st-level character, it will take you longer to recharge it than if you're a higher-level spellcaster. You also get the item bonus to healing as long as you hold the invested staff.

Now how do you cast these spells? Well, you activate the staff as part of casting one of the spells in it (spending 1 RP as usual). Then you have two options: You can either expend charges from the staff equal to the spell's level (1 charge for heal here) or expend one of your own spells of that level or higher. Yeah, your staff essentially lets you spontaneously cast the spells in it!

Trinkets

How about something completely different? One thing we wanted to add was a type of item that was like scrolls for martial characters. Spellcasters use scrolls and everyone uses potions, but how about something special that relies on nonmagical skills? Trinkets were the answer! Our first example was designed specifically for fighters.

Fear Gem Item 4

Consumable, Enchantment, Fear, Magical, Mental, Trinket

Price 11 gp

Method of Use affixed, weapon; Bulk

Activation [[F]] Focus Activation; Trigger You use Intimidating Strike, but haven't rolled for the attack yet.


Dark smoke seems to writhe within this obsidian gem. When you activate the gem, if your Intimidating Strike hits, the target is frightened 2 and flat-footed against your attacks until the end of your next turn. If the attack roll is a critical success, the target is flat-footed against your attacks for 1 minute.

Trinkets all have the consumable trait, meaning they're used up after being activated once. They have the "affixed" method of use, and as this one indicates, it has to be affixed to a weapon. You can activate it with a Focus Activation as a free action when you use the Intimidating Strike action from the fighter feat of the same name. This makes the Intimidating Strike more severe, increasing its effect to frightened 2 instead of frightened 1 and making it especially strong on a critical success.

Now how about a trinket that's less specific?

Vanishing Coin Item 9

Consumable, Illusion, Magical, Trinket

Price 85 gp

Method of Use affixed, armor; Bulk

Activation [[F]] Focus Activation; Trigger You attempt a Stealth check for initiative, but haven't rolled yet.

Requirements You are a master in Stealth.


This copper coin dangles from a leather strip strung through a hole drilled into the coin's center. It's usually tied just below the throat on a suit of armor. Until it is activated, the coin becomes invisible for a few seconds every few minutes, but always at random intervals. When you activate the coin, you gain the benefits of a 2nd-level invisibility spell until the end of your next turn.

Anyone with master proficiency in Stealth can use this trinket by affixing it to her armor. She can turn invisible by activating the coin when she rolls a Stealth check for initiative. Pretty useful in the first round of a fight!

Well, there's a lot to say about magic items, and we'll have more to say on Friday. For now, I'm going to leave you with a short list of some of the new items appearing in the Pathfinder Playtest Rulebook in addition to the classics.

  • Anklets of alacrity
  • Feather step stone
  • Forge warden
  • Grim trophy
  • Handwraps of mighty fists
  • Oil of weightlessness
  • Persona mask
  • Potency crystal
  • Runestone
  • Spell duelist's wand
  • Third eye
  • Virtuoso's instrument

Tell us what sorts of items you'd like to see in the final rulebook!

Logan Bonner
Designer

More Paizo Blog.
Tags: Pathfinder Playtest Wayne Reynolds
1,051 to 1,064 of 1,064 << first < prev | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | next > last >>

1 person marked this as a favorite.
MysticYeti wrote:

Admittedly, the idea of resonance felt strange to me at first but it's growing on me quickly. Personally, I'm bad at using daily item charges and consumables despite prefering to play spellcasters. RP looks like it'll genuinely improve item resource management.

One consequence of using Cha for resonance is that it oddly makes bards and sorcerers more of magic item aficionados than the wizard. Wizards have numberous gadgety archetypes in fiction; perhaps they're also a good candidate for Int to RP. Wizards also seem like a class that will want RP boosting class feats.

The idea of adding whole weapon dice to magic weapons sounds awesome but without more info it does look like it'll further ingrain magic item dependancy. Without that +3 longsword you'll be dealing 3d8 less damage, making monster hp that's blanced for the extra damage harder to chew through. It would be good to have support for low magic (or no magic) settings, not to mention magic item dependancy causes problems when the party is undergeared for their level. Sometimes loot falls behind by accident; GMs and players aren't infalible and sometimes the problem takes a while to fully correct. I love the effort going into making magic items more interesting, though I'd like to see some work go into making the game viable without magic items.

So let me get Vorpal straight:
You have to roll a natural 20, spend an RP, and then the monster must fail a Fort save?
*Limiting the snicker-snacker to 20s was smart of original Pathfinder (as compared to its former silliness attainable in D&D 3e).
*Spending resonance, I can stomach.
*But does getting your head lopped off really need a Fort save now? In my mind that's like making the guillotine a Fort save or die affair. This changes the whole French Revolution, not to mention the Jabberwocky. Honestly, I'm not a fan of this move even at the risk of Vorpal being OP. If it absolutely needs a balancing factor, maybe head lopping could cost extra RP? Everything else about Vorpal looks good to me on
...

As a player I don't want my character to auto-die because the GM rolled a 20.

As a GM I don't want an entire climactic encounter to end on the first attack because of one roll.

Keep in mind that in PF1 you had to confirm the crit to lop a head off. But there are no confirm rolls for crits in PF2 Playtest.

Also, Guillotines are already Fort Save or Die in PF1, since they deliver a Coup De Grace.


I feel like erring on the side of caution for "instant death" effects is prudent. If these things are too good, you're liable to ruin a bunch of drama when some die roll comes up wrong, whereas if they're too weak people are just going to buy better (but less swingy) items.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
ChibiNyan wrote:


EDIT:

I think the text has to be divided more clearly. Instead of saying all the activation shenanigans at the top, perhaps they should be with the relevant Ability. Something like this:

Cloak of Elvenkind:
(Flavor Text)
- While invested you may cast Ghost Sound cantrip as if it was prepared.
- [A] Operate: Put or remove the hood. You gain a bonus to Stealth when its put.
- [A] Activate: Spend 1 resonance point to gain the benefit of Invisibility for 4 minutes or until you remove the hood, whichever comes first.

THIS

SO MUCH THIS

Magic Items are going to be a PITA to figure out if they are not explicitly formatted this way. I had no frigging idea what required investing, what required RP to gain benefits, etc.

This is poorly formatted as is, and it should really be looked at.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

I previously posted on Wands and how they could work more like mini-Staves, i.e. not consumables, but I just wanted to revisit why I think they shouldn't be consumables in first place.

Thematically, they aren't "obviously" consumables likes Potions. Scrolls have easy visualization of the magical writing transforming into "floating glyphs" as spell manifests, the physical writing vanishing leaving dust (or blank paper, as you prefer). Wands obviously stick around after each usage, and IMHO it isn't obvious why they would dissolve after last charge, or the value to game of having 'chopsticks' left over from used up Wands. If you find Wand even with it's charges depleted it seems plausible it still is a Wand (which Stave charge mechanic better represents - it might not work for everybody right away, but a sufficiently high level caster could 'coax' it to re-charge and work again).

The mechanical purpose of the Wand AFAIK has been 'bulk buy discount' compared to scrolls. But how important is it for game to have this discount option? This isn't "Discount Shopper RPG". THe prices are built around power balancing for PCs. How does it serve the game to offer route for better prices, simply if you buy in bulk ahead of time? I don't see how that improves game dynamic. It just doesn't seem to enrich game to me, and the existence of bulk buy discount concept undermines calibration of level:WBL:character power. I don't see a reason why scrolls & potions can't alone fulfill the need for spell-consumables (with potions/elixers easier to use by all, but limited to swallower as target or effects physically targettable e.g. Dragonbreath, scrolls allowing 'actual casting' including targeting/AoE designation).

If we don't need 'bulk buy discount' spell consumables, then Wands' role is freed up. And I think 'mini-Staves' which aren't consumables but are re-chargable is good role. Exactly how Wands may differ from Staves is open question, and how spells in Staves/Wands scale / benefit from caster level/stats seems important to pricing. Cantrips in particular seem potentially more powerful than 1st level spells, but perhaps (especially Wand versions) would NOT auto-scale in spell level/effect?

(edited)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Mark Seifter wrote:

If so, a wand of invisibility is going to cost more like 1,000 gp and be something you find/buy/get closer to 10th level than to 4th. And it would invert the relationship between staves and wands, insomuch as...

Then maybe diverge dramatically from what wands were. Instead of multi-use spells in a can, go wacky with them.

Perhaps:

1) They can act as batteries, in which you store an additional spell known, but requires resonance invested to use.

2) Spend a point of resonance to remove the need for a Somatic action on a spell you are casting.

3) A particular wand is linked to a school of magic, and while wielded (and invested), they grant an additional number of spell points in that school. So wands would have degrees - Mark I, Mark II, etc.

Just spitballing, but if wands are kind of the odd man out in PF2.... and it sounds like they are..... why not fundamentally change their nature?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Sgtdrill wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:

If so, a wand of invisibility is going to cost more like 1,000 gp and be something you find/buy/get closer to 10th level than to 4th. And it would invert the relationship between staves and wands, insomuch as...

Then maybe diverge dramatically from what wands were. Instead of multi-use spells in a can, go wacky with them.

Perhaps:

1) They can act as batteries, in which you store an additional spell known, but requires resonance invested to use.

2) Spend a point of resonance to remove the need for a Somatic action on a spell you are casting.

3) A particular wand is linked to a school of magic, and while wielded (and invested), they grant an additional number of spell points in that school. So wands would have degrees - Mark I, Mark II, etc.

Just spitballing, but if wands are kind of the odd man out in PF2.... and it sounds like they are..... why not fundamentally change their nature?

4) Add bonus to attack roles with spells or increase DC (the equivalent of a magic weapon but for your rays).


Sgtdrill wrote:


Perhaps:

1) They can act as batteries, in which you store an additional spell known, but requires resonance invested to use.

That's a staff

Quote:


2) Spend a point of resonance to remove the need for a Somatic action on a spell you are casting.

That's a metamagic rod - although to be quite honest that was my first thought also until I considered metamagic rods, I do think the rule should be 'while using a wand, the hand holding the wand is considered 'free' for spellcasting (representing the use of a wand like a baton to direct the flow of magic).

Or - 'while holding a wand a wizard can concentrate on a spell using the wand as a free action, but he is unable to use the wand that round for any other reason' (representing the idle 'swish' of a wand to hold a spell).

Quote:


3) A particular wand is linked to a school of magic, and while wielded (and invested), they grant an additional number of spell points in that school. So wands would have degrees - Mark I, Mark II, etc.
I like this - I would love to have wands that did interesting things - like:

  • force an enemy to reroll a save (1 resonance - assumed for all)
  • Swap a spell from your spellbook into an open slot
  • Extinguish all open flames in a 120 foot radius
  • Act as a weapon (reaction - allows attack of opportunity - lasts 1 minute or until dispelled)
  • add 1 CL to a spell (element type, school, or other category) effect lasts one round

Or go back to 1e days and have wands be unique and otherwise unavailable effects to the game 'paralyses everything in a 60 foot cone' - but that would require charges - ideally low numbers to make them cool and useful but not 'game ending'.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
graystone wrote:
Vidmaster7 wrote:
You know saying things like that without reasoning behind that doesn't help sway people to your side.

It wasn't really an attempt to influence but a statement of fact. Anyone that was around for the Kineticist playtest should know my feeling and reasons: heck I think there's a pretty good chance Mark knows. It boils down to 'I don't want to punch myself in the face to power-up', especially incurable damage punches. In terms of "resonance work like Burn", 'I don't want to punch myself in the face to heal...'.

PossibleCabbage wrote:
In any case I really hope the Kineticist still uses Burn in PF2 and not spell points or resonance.
Oh I hope not: new pathfinder is the chance to fix it and make it playable to me. They could do like the alchemist [gets resonance+] with spell points [in essence, they can be the 'master' of them]. Though, I'd take most anything that wasn't burn.

Meanwhile I hope for the complete opposite. The Kineticist was perfection in what I wanted in a "primal elemental caster" with a cast from hit point ability. If they take away burn, they'd have to tear away so many things that made the class fantastically fun, and I'm worried about how they'd introduce kineticist without damaging what it is. Reducing them to a spell point system would feel boring and lacking.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
MusicAddict wrote:
graystone wrote:
Vidmaster7 wrote:
You know saying things like that without reasoning behind that doesn't help sway people to your side.

It wasn't really an attempt to influence but a statement of fact. Anyone that was around for the Kineticist playtest should know my feeling and reasons: heck I think there's a pretty good chance Mark knows. It boils down to 'I don't want to punch myself in the face to power-up', especially incurable damage punches. In terms of "resonance work like Burn", 'I don't want to punch myself in the face to heal...'.

PossibleCabbage wrote:
In any case I really hope the Kineticist still uses Burn in PF2 and not spell points or resonance.
Oh I hope not: new pathfinder is the chance to fix it and make it playable to me. They could do like the alchemist [gets resonance+] with spell points [in essence, they can be the 'master' of them]. Though, I'd take most anything that wasn't burn.
Meanwhile I hope for the complete opposite. The Kineticist was perfection in what I wanted in a "primal elemental caster" with a cast from hit point ability. If they take away burn, they'd have to tear away so many things that made the class fantastically fun, and I'm worried about how they'd introduce kineticist without damaging what it is. Reducing them to a spell point system would feel boring and lacking.

It's cool you liked it, but if given the options of a Kineticist using burn or a commoner, I'll pick the common every time. I can at least enjoy the commoner as for me burn is "fantastically" unfun.


graystone wrote:
It's cool you liked it, but if given the options of a Kineticist using burn or a commoner, I'll pick the common every time. I can at least enjoy the commoner as for me burn is "fantastically" unfun.

I mean, I could say the exact same thing about Wizards, but I rather just cotton to how the Wizard class just isn't for me instead of advocating for the removal of what other people like about it even if I don't.


PossibleCabbage wrote:
graystone wrote:
It's cool you liked it, but if given the options of a Kineticist using burn or a commoner, I'll pick the common every time. I can at least enjoy the commoner as for me burn is "fantastically" unfun.
I mean, I could say the exact same thing about Wizards, but I rather just cotton to how the Wizard class just isn't for me instead of advocating for the removal of what other people like about it even if I don't.

You can? What class feature do you dislike SO much that you don't want to play it? No snark, actually serious. What feature unique to wizards do you dislike?

As to why I advocate: I like the class except one feature, burn. As such I would greatly enjoy playing it. I think advocating for a version I find palatable is appropriate for a playtest. So a Kineticist is for me, just not one with burn.


graystone wrote:
No snark, actually serious. What feature unique to wizards do you dislike?

Prepared Casting without a "Burn these slots for something spontaneous in case you picked wrong" option.

Other prepared casters have a "you can always burn slots on something good no matter what you prepared" (cleric, druid, shaman), an archetype that makes your casting spontaneous (eldritch scion magus, ley line guardian witch), or enough else going on that I can ignore spellcasting entirely (paladin, ranger.)


PossibleCabbage wrote:
graystone wrote:
No snark, actually serious. What feature unique to wizards do you dislike?

Prepared Casting without a "Burn these slots for something spontaneous in case you picked wrong" option.

Other prepared casters have a "you can always burn slots on something good no matter what you prepared" (cleric, druid, shaman), an archetype that makes your casting spontaneous (eldritch scion magus, ley line guardian witch), or enough else going on that I can ignore spellcasting entirely (paladin, ranger.)

Isn't that what Spellbinder does? Or Exploiter Wizard [+ counterspell or Quick Study]? Hallowed Necromancer? And any wizard can pick up Fast Study to fill slots in a min.

PS: Thanks for the explanation. ;)

I can understand not liking prepared casting but as I pointed out, there are was to make it less awful for those that don't like that. That's really not the case for burn. It's true there are some different forms of burn and a single archetype without it but they are objectively bad. In typical paizo fashion, why use a scalpel to remove burn when an orbital nerf strike from space will do. :P And what's really galling is that several 3rd party publishers put out versions/alternatives to burn that weren't awful.

So if paizo had a track record of having options for the kineticist that I can work with, I'd be more inclined to not say anything on burn. So far... that's not a reality. If they make the class for the new game, I'd like it in a form I can play with. IMO that isn't odd or out of place and for me making it playable means murdering burn... It's not trying to take something away from someone else for spite because I don't like it or the class but because I really like the class and would like to enjoy it.

Paizo Employee Customer Service & Community Manager

Thanks for all the lively discussion so far in this thread. At this time we've decided to close up the blog discussion thread. If you have comments, questions or other things you want to post that do not fit into any currently open threads, you are welcome to start a new thread. Thanks!

1,051 to 1,064 of 1,064 << first < prev | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Archive / Pathfinder / Playtests & Prerelease Discussions / Pathfinder Playtest / Paizo Blog: Trinkets and Treasures All Messageboards