Paizo Top Nav Branding
  • Hello, Guest! |
  • Sign In |
  • My Account |
  • Shopping Cart |
  • Help/FAQ
About Paizo Messageboards News Paizo Blog Help/FAQ
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game

Pathfinder Adventure Card Game


Pathfinder Society


Starfinder


Starfinder Society

Life in a magic rich world.


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion

1 to 50 of 97 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>

This is a discussion on how magic would shape life in a magic rich world.

Eberron had some good ideas like magic carpet taxi and magical street lights.

So 1st I would say

Crops
With spells like create Demi plane, you could have crops that crow all year long, are secure from bugs and raiders/ thieves, and have limited access to only those you want. Plus they don't take up valuable land that you can use to expand your city.... Plus the area is no longer limited by natural features or weather conditions. You could have tasty secure crops all year long.

Transportation
Flying Cauldrons and brooms of flying. Wealthy noble children now have extreme sports involving personal conveyances. I can see drag races or just cruising around town in your pimped out flying ride...

Balls/parties
Alter self can make your hair/clothes and even you look different. I can see shops dedicated to alteration magic.

Culture
Prestidigitation can create objects that last for an hour and can heat and season them. So you could make food that tastes good and only lasts an hour that does not provide nourishment and thus does not make you fat. Noble Bulimics would find use for this...

Anyone one have any other thing that would fit here? What is your idea for a decadent magic based society?


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Quidditch


If you were to take it to the extreme of the Darksword Adventures game world (I'm showing my age) or even certain societies in Pathfinder and it's predecessors, those with magical ability become the ruling class with non-magical people as a subordinate or even shunned strata. Additionally, you could have a person's place in society determined by the nature of their magical ability.

On a practical level, everything is done with magic rather than physical effort. People don't hike up stairs, they fly. They don't ride a horse or wagon to another city, they take a magical conveyance or cast teleport. Battle mages become the enforcers and soldiers, along with abjurers, divine casters are the healthcare system and transmuters and conjurers control the weather and act as craftsmen.


So then those who show no talent for magic get tossed aside, banished or killed at birth. Interesting...


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I imagine the people would become so use to the wild and wacky that shapeshifting for fun and kinky reasons would become a thing.

Whole industries would completely become useless, so in spite all of the advancements in magic the economy would suffer because of a permanent underclass. Don't worry they wouldn't starve but they would be either teleported away or possible choose to sell themselves into slavery.


purify food and drink and create water could really have a huge impact on trade through hostile environments, such as deserts or the high seas. Endure elements and endure elements communal would also help with this. I'm sure there are a number of spells to help avoid getting lost, which would help with trade.

There has been quite a lot of discussion about create water and agriculture.

Purify food and drink would also help the food produced go further by making sure none was lost to spoilage.

Detect lies, speak with dead, and many other divination spells would change law enforcement.


Yeah I can see fetish shops becoming popular. You can appear as specific people or even undead or animals.. all manner of perversions.

Alcohol
You can age that bourbon 7 years over night.


yeah breaking the law would be very hard to get away with.


I thought Ebberon was rich in low level magic but high level magic was rare? So in such a world there'd be streets illuminated with magical light sources but no demiplanes just for growing crops.


Bill Redford wrote:
So then those who show no talent for magic get tossed aside, banished or killed at birth. Interesting...

Being deliberately provocative, are we?

OK then, in this (arguably real) world, people judged as deficient are sidelined and often sequestered. Go talk to any of the groups trying to get support for special needs. Look how poorly we do it even in the wealthy nations. You think it will be any different in your posited world?

The inability to sense magic will be analogous to blindness or deafness in being able to recognize magic environmental threats. If flight is the norm, then stairs and walkways are just inefficiencies, unless you are one of the few who need them....


Daw wrote:
Bill Redford wrote:
So then those who show no talent for magic get tossed aside, banished or killed at birth. Interesting...

Being deliberately provocative, are we?

OK then, in this (arguably real) world, people judged as deficient are sidelined and often sequestered. Go talk to any of the groups trying to get support for special needs. Look how poorly we do it even in the wealthy nations. You think it will be any different in your posited world?

The inability to sense magic will be analogous to blindness or deafness in being able to recognize magic environmental threats. If flight is the norm, then stairs and walkways are just inefficiencies, unless you are one of the few who need them....

Well considering this is a one possible hypothetical option (that I posited, not the OP) for a fictional scenario in a fictional setting - yes - that would be very unbalanced and could lead to a great deal of abuse by the magically gifted. This leads to a plethora of story hooks and RP options for the players. Which is what we look for in these games.

If folks haven't read the Darksword Trilogy it's a great series. The sequels were okay as I recall. Not bad, but hard to follow the original trilogy.

The original books were written by Margaret Weis and Tracey Hickman.


Decimus Drake wrote:
I thought Ebberon was rich in low level magic but high level magic was rare? So in such a world there'd be streets illuminated with magical light sources but no demiplanes just for growing crops.

I was giving Ebberon as an example with magic lights and magic sky ships and trains... but outside of Eberron, what would you find in a really magic heavy place.


"Being deliberately provocative, are we?

OK then, in this (arguably real) world, people judged as deficient are sidelined and often sequestered. Go talk to any of the groups trying to get support for special needs. Look how poorly we do it even in the wealthy nations. You think it will be any different in your posited world?

The inability to sense magic will be analogous to blindness or deafness in being able to recognize magic environmental threats. If flight is the norm, then stairs and walkways are just inefficiencies, unless you are one of the few who need them...."

No, not really. I can see a world take this stance though. If your only chance to succeed is based on magic, then yes you would only want children that excel in it...

But it could also become a Star Trek like Utopian society where you only have to work if you want to... Of the 2, the first is probably a more interesting setting conflict wise.


Purify Food & Drink, Create Water, and (most especially) Repel Vermin would make disease much less of an issue for those able to utilize/afford them.

Remember that the farming-demiplanes also require another, expensive spell -- Permanancy. Food would not suddenly become a right for all - those able to afford to set up these areas would charge as much as the market would bear.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The degree to which magic will effect society is governed by variables not established in the rules.

Who is able to learn magic? Anyone with a 11+ Int? Only those 1 in a million people with a special spark of magical whatever? For that matter how uncommon *is* an 11+ Int.

How expensive is it to train wizards? In the rules, all levels are equally difficult to obtain. If teaching someone to be a 3rd level wizard is no more difficult than teaching them to be a 3rd level expert there should be very few of the latter.

How wedded are you to the economics of the rules as written? A world where a skilled laborer earns 3sp/day and a 3rd level wizard earns 500gp/day (thanks to item crafting) is a world rapidly overrun with wizard training schools and cheap wondrous items. Why is there a rope industry if Robes of Infinite Twine can be made instead (RAW one 1,000gp robe can produce more than 10 million gp worth of rope per year)?

How are levels distributed? Is 1 person in 10 a PC class? 1 in 100? Is 1 PC classed person in 10 a wizard? 1 in 100? Of wizards are 1 in 10 high enough level to cast some spell (be it continual flame for street lights or create demiplane for super farms) or 1 in 1000?

For the most part the questions above have no official answers, but are essential to determining how a given spell or item would effect an economy or a society. Yes, every farmer would love to have Plant Growth cast on their fields, but if only one in a million people are level 5+ druids, then for the most part it won't have any effect. On the other hand if level 5th level druids can be found in every major community then it will be a ubiquitous staple of farming the way pesticide is in the real world.

Really the answer to all these questions is "the game world is a fiction, pick whatever answer generates the kinds of stories you like best". Do you want magic to be rare and wondrous? Wizards need a special spark and only a tiny number of people have it. Do you want a magic-punk world of flying cities and lightning powered railroads? Wizards are common and training them is cheap.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Debnor wrote:
Remember that the farming-demiplanes also require another, expensive spell -- Permanancy. Food would not suddenly become a right for all - those able to afford to set up these areas would charge as much as the market would bear.

I have a hard time imagining create demiplane ever being used for farming. A 13th level wizard would have to cast it 11 times to create a one acre plot of land at a cost of almost 200,000gp in permanency components. An acre just isn't providing 200,000gp worth of food anytime soon, the math doesn't pencil out.

There is some discussion here about how much food you got out of an acre of land with medieval methods, but it doesn't sound like much. The wizard's 200,000gp investment wouldn't be enough land to support even the wizard himself, let alone a society large enough to produce the occasional 13th level wizard.

Remember this is a game where a loaf of bread costs 2cp. Spending literally ten million times that to get an acre of land isn't a good investment.


Indeed. I think my original thought was "what kinds of things would you find in a very magic heavy society. I guess magic heavy could have different meanings.

I would say that Magic heavy here would mean magic is very common place. and most day to day is magic based. That said I would put common magic (say 0 level) is everywhere. Most places and people have access to such common magic. The higher you go up the more training and thus more expense is involved. A 0 level caster might work for the equivalent of a fast food place, or low level service job. The highest level may be executives at a company or heads of government.

The alcohol example I used above. The Brew Mages... I used this is a game in a home brew world. This is a guild, low level brew mages are the entry level blue collar workers. The highest level are Master Artisans whose works demand top dollar and are celebrities of reknown invited to exclusive parties and hobnob with royalty...


So along those lines, what other spells or magic do you think would become common place and replace mundane services.

Magic mirrors that can show things that are connected by other magic mirrors... like a television system.

Construction
Summoner construction companies that summon specialized summons list creatures to build or demolish.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

It may be useful to consider things spell by spell. Continual flame streetlights are occasionally mentioned, but I don't buy those either.

A continual flame spell costs 50gp (ignoring paying the caster), a common laborer earns 1sp per day. That street light costs 500 times the daily wage of a minimum wage worker, around $40,000 using my state's minimum wage. A) Municipalities can't afford $40,000 light bulbs. B) Even if they could people would steal them if the bulb is worth more than they make in a year. It is much more sensible to hire lamp lighters at a silver piece a day who can walk round town in the evening lighting scores of lamps.

Any spell with a material component cost is going to have that cost pegged at something relevant to a PC walking round with thousands of gp. A world where most laborers are dealing with small numbers of silver pieces as their basic currency these spells are going to be prohibitively expensive.


Ring_of_Gyges wrote:
Debnor wrote:
Remember that the farming-demiplanes also require another, expensive spell -- Permanancy. Food would not suddenly become a right for all - those able to afford to set up these areas would charge as much as the market would bear.

I have a hard time imagining create demiplane ever being used for farming. A 13th level wizard would have to cast it 11 times to create a one acre plot of land at a cost of almost 200,000gp in permanency components. An acre just isn't providing 200,000gp worth of food anytime soon, the math doesn't pencil out.

There is some discussion here about how much food you got out of an acre of land with medieval methods, but it doesn't sound like much. The wizard's 200,000gp investment wouldn't be enough land to support even the wizard himself, let alone a society large enough to produce the occasional 13th level wizard.

Remember this is a game where a loaf of bread costs 2cp. Spending literally ten million times that to get an acre of land isn't a good investment.

Fair point. I don't know if in a place where magic becomes very common if the prices to produce it might not become less, but either way its a fair point. a 13th level wizard should probably never be that common place...


Bill Redford wrote:


Crops
With spells like create Demi plane, you could have crops that crow all year long...

By Ilúvatiar! If these crops don't stop crowing, I'm going to "plant" my foot in some spellcaster's arse!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
JTDV wrote:
Bill Redford wrote:


Crops
With spells like create Demi plane, you could have crops that crow all year long...
By Ilúvatiar! If these crops don't stop crowing, I'm going to "plant" my foot in some spellcaster's arse!

:) Its a small price to pay for year long sweet corn...


I think what we're looking for are spells that a) have no casting cost beyond the caster's time, b) do something useful to common people, c) are low level and d) have long term effects. Healing magic seems like it would make a big difference.

If you read Detect Poison to detect spoiled food, then that might create something like food inspectors. It's low level (a 1st level cleric can cast it any number of times per day), it's free to cast, and it tells you reliably if food has spoiled. Unless casters are ridiculously rare, no one should be getting away with selling spoiled food.

Channeling would replace emergency rooms. A village priest can catch ~100 5ft squares in his burst of channeled positive energy. The priest can pack in every wounded person in town and heal them all multiple times per day for free. Hospitals for the wounded don't really make a lot of sense if there is even a 1st level cleric in town.

For similar reasons there shouldn't really be any blind or deaf people in Golarion. About 1/2 of 1% of people in the US are blind. If that figure were also true of Golarion and even one in a 100,000 people were divine casters level 5 or more, they could eradicate blindness in the whole population in less than a year.

Those are some examples that come to my mind immediately, I expect there are lots of other spells that would change society.


Timeless demiplane provides effectively free permanency on demiplanes. You could have one caster go around seeding it and have the lower level mages do the rest. You dont need expensive components for massive farms. Heck you dont need people in them. You can make them into moabius strips and send in constructs with a portal to your granary/mill plane.

Purify food and drink means you can eat whatever. Predistagion means you can make koolaid. Fabricate and false fous lets you manufacture just about anything.

You can create a whole civilzations with just this.


Ring_of_Gyges wrote:

It may be useful to consider things spell by spell. Continual flame streetlights are occasionally mentioned, but I don't buy those either.

A continual flame spell costs 50gp (ignoring paying the caster), a common laborer earns 1sp per day. That street light costs 500 times the daily wage of a minimum wage worker, around $40,000 using my state's minimum wage. A) Municipalities can't afford $40,000 light bulbs. B) Even if they could people would steal them if the bulb is worth more than they make in a year. It is much more sensible to hire lamp lighters at a silver piece a day who can walk round town in the evening lighting scores of lamps.

Any spell with a material component cost is going to have that cost pegged at something relevant to a PC walking round with thousands of gp. A world where most laborers are dealing with small numbers of silver pieces as their basic currency these spells are going to be prohibitively expensive.

False focus exists. Also you can call outsiders with it as a spell like ability. Or lower level alter summon monster on a mount spell and get spellcasting from them. You want the wizard who is set up for casting not blasty mcblastman.


Debnor wrote:

Purify Food & Drink, Create Water, and (most especially) Repel Vermin would make disease much less of an issue for those able to utilize/afford them.

Remember that the farming-demiplanes also require another, expensive spell -- Permanancy. Food would not suddenly become a right for all - those able to afford to set up these areas would charge as much as the market would bear.

I undercut your prices by uses timeless demiplane and replace the permancy cost with poppets and pocket the rest. The farming demiplane only requires permanency if you are a bad wizard.


Life would be utter alien. So much of human society is based around scarcity and needing huge organizations and nation-states of human manpower to ensure large-scale human survival. If magic is around, I don't need farmers to farm my food, builders to build my fortresses, or servants to manage my house, then a lot of the social glue that holds society (and cities in particular) together kind of falls apart.

Why have government or even a job when I can magic up everything I need? Why have war when I magic up entire realms of territory? Why emotionally compromise with others when I can literally make friends or lovers?

Also, immortality, necromancy and astral travel to afterlives is radicalize going to change how people view see death, which is another core aspect of human life.

Point is magic being omnipresent and largely available to people probably means humanity and human society becomes unrecognizable.

I suppose it could end up as a magical Star Trek utopia, but I've never really bought into Star Trek utopianism since it has never really examined how replicators probably made the non-artists and scientists of the world unemployed and with doing to really do, which given how people IRL have reacted to new technology taking their jobs I doubt everything would be fine.


Slim Jim's Laundromat, a continent-spanning franchise, in which for mere coin the commoner will load his soiled, fraying duds into marvelous machines which will treat them with Clean (Mending +75cp). -- Never be inconvenienced by stubborn stains or tears ever again! Phosphate-free and environmentally-friendly with no waste runoff.


Slim Jim wrote:
Slim Jim's Laundromat, a continent-spanning franchise, in which for mere coin the commoner will load his soiled, fraying duds into marvelous machines which will treat them with Clean (Mending +75cp). -- Never be inconvenienced by stubborn stains or tears ever again! Phosphate-free and environmentally-friendly with no waste runoff.

:) How much is the franchise fee?


Childrens lemonaid stands sell the perectly chilled and tasting beverages. Predistigation is so good. This random canteen of water is now the best hot cocoa.


I like the idea that you have a world so full of magic that it is in the water supply!!!
Any commoner who gets gets cut or a broken limb goes to some particular river or stream. (maybe it's not as extreme as I am thinking and a Druid or Unicorn lives near it enough to influence the water) He drinks the water or pours it on the wound and it slowly heals.

In an EXTREME magic world, the doors open and close for you. (if not for everyone, then just for kings and queens. No the doors don't make a "shushing" noise like trek.)

Maybe the farmer doesn't plow his field. Some animated plow does it. Sort of make a magic version of everything we have today.

Of coarse in the Extreme magic world, maybe our bodies have gotten used to the magic potions that heal us. But then that would be a Plot item.


Well, the Tippyverse is one way it can shake out, if it's magic rich and has plenty of high level casters or even just has a few but they cycle out every so often instead of all being in on keeping the world in stasis.

Beneficial traps are more of a grey area when it comes to Pathfinder compared to its predecessor, but there are ways to do it without those, especially the core aspects of it.

I suppose either magically assisted foundries that efficiently rust the iron created by Wall of Iron and then smelt it into steel that can be used or a version of Wall of Iron that produces iron that is usable from the get-go would be researched if they didn't go the Vudra route and just have a whole bunch of enslaved Elementals, Shaitan, etc. handling their mineral needs directly from the Elemental Plane of Earth.

There'd be more kooky old Wizards living on suns and in outer space than just the one in Golarion's system.

An especially construct or servitor-themed individual could have set into motion an immortal construction force to make a world or a smaller body that fools those within it into believing they're on a world as some kind of crazy generational colony ship or zoo or the like, between wrangling spare planetoids and comets and the like, filching stuff from other planes, and just straight up permanently creating matter.


ngc7293 wrote:

I like the idea that you have a world so full of magic that it is in the water supply!!!

Any commoner who gets gets cut or a broken limb goes to some particular river or stream. (maybe it's not as extreme as I am thinking and a Druid or Unicorn lives near it enough to influence the water) He drinks the water or pours it on the wound and it slowly heals.

In an EXTREME magic world, the doors open and close for you. (if not for everyone, then just for kings and queens. No the doors don't make a "shushing" noise like trek.)

Maybe the farmer doesn't plow his field. Some animated plow does it. Sort of make a magic version of everything we have today.

Of coarse in the Extreme magic world, maybe our bodies have gotten used to the magic potions that heal us. But then that would be a Plot item.

Do they sigh with a job well done as in the hitchhikers guide?

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

You really need to consider a few factors I think (need to leave for work in 5 minutes so only a brief post).

Industrial Magic vs High Magic

A magic rich world can have casters capable of creating demi-planes, raising the dead, travelling to other worlds but still have massive armies of uneducated peasants carrying on life as normal. The reason being those casters not only are limited to what they can do personally but they may not want to share it (more on this in a moment). On the other hand an industrial magic society can have a much lower level of magical ability (no teleportation or raising the dead) but because its industrialized everyone is able to benefit from it. They can't teleport but magically run carriages are a common thing anyone can buy cheaply, they can't create demi-planes but every crop produces to its best quality and quantity.

Control vs Access

Who has this power is it a wizard type situation where everyone can use even basic cantrips and can learn more powerful spells or is it only passed down in certain bloodlines. Do you get a meritocracy where the best and brightest rise to power or do you wind up with a small elite who are deliberately controlling access and teaching in order to shore up their own power. Its not that peasants can't use magic but rather that if they're taught you lose your control.

Blast out of time I wanted to post more maybe later.


In Red Dwarf a toaster went nuts. After it toasted all the bread in the house/spaceship it would order more bread.

Cultist would be a new NPC class. They have no magical aptitude, but they learn the skills they need for rituals. Rituals make golems, summon things longterm, and make useless land fertile.

Some fiction has fighters being specialized bodyguards for spellcasters. Granting all fighters better saves against magic would heal the imbalance at the same time.

Someone with 8 mental stats and aptitude can still cast cantrips. Such people justify the stat books found in ruins and dungeons. Demand finds a way.

Liberty's Edge

Very small armies, defence spending is best put towards training, paying and equipping high level spellcasters and their bodyguards as a military force rather than large numbers of low level troops easily wiped out by AOE damage spells. The exceptions would be areas that have spent decades at war.

High populations due to magic bolstering food production and magical healing keeping people alive longer and curing disease.

Every nation will be ruled by a magocracy. The actual sitting leaders may not be spellcasters but they will require the support of spellcasters to lead and will bow to the whims of the spellcasting elite. The position of spellcasters in society would be very privileged but there would also be systems in place to ensure that they progress in their magical aptitude as quickly as possible (The Bartimaeus Sequence does this pretty well).

Non-spellcasters, treated like second class citizens, will try to rebel. Most of these rebellions would be run by idiots and easily squashed, but the smart ones will first try to level the playing ground with magical items and rapid advances in technology.

Scarab Sages

Two problems with that one large parts of the spellcasting DnD classes are either extremely intelligent, wise or charismatic so they'd probably be well aware of the need to either keep the non-spellcaster happy or dead and would take steps to ensure rebelions didn't happen.

Two their the ones guiding tech/magic development and would ensure something that could level the playing field wouldn't come into play. The magic ages section of Kurtherian gambit seems to do this quite well (only read first book so far) with a villain actively avoiding taking more potential mages into the accademy because he realizes while it'd mean more money it'd also mean more mages and thus less individual power

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I do think that setting were "everyone is at least hedge wizard(aka has access to cantrips), with some having born with more magic(sorcerers) and some training to be better at magic(wizards)" would be interesting to actually see ._. I don't think such settings have been published though?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The Runequest rpgs were like that. Pretty deadly combat too, wh40k rp reminiscent. Spells for everyone but the good stuff for specialists.


CorvusMask wrote:
I do think that setting were "everyone is at least hedge wizard(aka has access to cantrips), with some having born with more magic(sorcerers) and some training to be better at magic(wizards)" would be interesting to actually see ._. I don't think such settings have been published though?

I’d recommend taking a look at Jim Buthcer’s Codex Alera novels if you want to see a story set in a setting like that.


So, assuming low level magic is common and the higher level magic is only for the wealthy and government, here are a couple of ideas;

Literal horseless carriages. Animated and controlled through magic devices. More expensive ones might have decorative animated statues to pull them. Anything from horses to dragons to dancing girls can pull the carriages.

Every day after the first emptying of the chamber pots, the street cleaners come out with their wands of prestidigitation to make things clean the streets and gutters and add a different scent every morning. On Sunday morning, they bring out the big guns with fire mephits to burn some of the bigger trash items left over from partying Friday and Saturday night, then the water mephits wash all the ash and soot into the gutters to make it easier for the regular street cleaners, who come to work an hour before sunrise on Sundays.

Druids or clerics of agricultural deities are hired to tend crops.

Every magic shop has a rack of wands of prestidigitation since most people can, at least, cast 0-level-spells.

Every magic shop also has it's own Wizard Mark that is placed on any item sold. In the case of items with charges, stores should guarantee to sell fully charged items. They have a charge tester (battery tester) behind the counter and they test it when the wand is bought. Any reputable store won't put their mark on an item they haven't tested first.

Of course, there's the walk-in cooler at your favorite inn. You take a big insulated room, have Ice Storm permanenced in the back, then a metal wall put up sealing it off from the rest of the room. If it stops keeping things cold. Call a professional to take a look at it. There is a warning sticker stating NOT to open that metal wall and try and fix it yourself. If you do, the company isn't liable for injuries and it will negate the warranty.

I would definitely suggest limiting this to a single magical city or just a couple at most. A whole world, even if it's mostly lower-level magic that everybody has access to, would quickly become over populated. There would be plenty of food (I like some elses idea of food inspectors, by the way), but no living space... Unless governments start creating extra dimensional spaces to house people, but they would need permanent Gates to get back and forth.

Dark Archive

ChaiGuy wrote:

Purify food and drink and create water could really have a huge impact on trade through hostile environments, such as deserts or the high seas. Endure elements and endure elements communal would also help with this. I'm sure there are a number of spells to help avoid getting lost, which would help with trade.

There has been quite a lot of discussion about create water and agriculture.

Purify food and drink would also help the food produced go further by making sure none was lost to spoilage.

Purify food and drink would also affect how long ships could remain at sea without reprovisioning, and how much cargo they could carry, as carrying barrels of fresh water would no longer be a necessity, as long as one or several members of the crew could turn saltwater to fresh drinkable water. I wouldn't want to rely on just *one* ship's mage or ship's medic handling that (putting one's eggs all in one basket), but if there are two or three such positions, and even a 1st level adept can handle the light work of purifying water for the entire crew, it should be a game-changer.

That same spell also would allow fresh fruit to be shipped from one end of the world to the other, and remain fresh and tasty.

Ray of frost could likewise allow frozen food to be kept frozen for months, as long as a spellcaster is there to cast that cantrip every couple of hours on the thin sheet of metal the food is lying on, keeping it cold.

Keeping bugs away will be a bigger threat, than spoilage due to temperature or bacteria or fungus.

Purify food and drink means that people at one end of the world will be able to eat bananas and tomatoes grown on a completely different continent, half a world away. It will likely be a status thing, to be able to offer up fare that one's guests have never seen before, from far-off 'exotic' lands.


Now, for "packaged" foods that will already require a purify spell to be safe to eat, wouldn't it be a good idea to just mix poison into it to deal with the whole vermin issue?

Oh, BTW, purify food and water doesn't say it makes food fresh and tasty, it makes it "pure and suitable for eating and drinking". I rather expect that the best you can hope for "out of the box" will be rather bland. Fortunately, bland is easy to deal with. Some people even prefer bland. (Personally, bland is Bleah.)
^-^
That 8 alarm chili is too much? A simple orison fixes that.

Oh, a permanent Chill Metal spell with some air circulation would probably make a safer, easier to contain refrigerator.


Oh yeah! I never thought of that! As it stands, nobles probably already have fresh food from all over. As you said, purify food is a low level spell. I imagine merchant companies who charge top coin for fresh food from all over Golarion.


You beat me in the post LOL

True about the Purify spell. I've always used it as i just keeps the food fresh. Bananas stay yellow, cooked meat won't spoil, etc... So, I assumed it would still taste the same, but you're right. A simple 0-level-spell fixes that.

As for the fridge, that was an idea from a looong time ago when we were coming up with funny tongue-in-cheek magic items in 1st edition and 2nd edition D&D. It matched walk in coolers at the time. You know how you always hear the coolant unit running? Same thing. That storm on the other side of the metal wall is dang noisy! LOL


Set wrote:
Keeping bugs away will be a bigger threat, than spoilage due to temperature or bacteria or fungus.

Repel Vermin, if you have a CL 7+ bard, cleric, or druid (or a CL 5+ ranger, or a CL 4+ ranger with bonus spells). Just have them recast it once every ten minutes per caster level.


Presdistagation can flavor anything to be anything. Purify food and drink makes the food edible. You can ignore vermin. Also issues with having enough space for people dont work. Look at litterally any design for megalopilises on a planetary scale and youll see that living space isnt an issue.


The problem with vermin is then reduced to how much the actually eat, which is a lot better than how much they spoil.


Oh! A guard guild (security guards) that hires out guards for nobles, stores, whatever. With each team, there is one that has a wand of Summon Monster. This one guard uses buckler and sword (or club) and holds the wand in his shield hand. The higher level the wand, the more money they charge. Basically, he's a K9 security guard. Works especially well if he can actually speak to what is summoned.


Continual Flame lighting would be a lot more likely and common.

Some multistory buildings may even have visible support columns where the entire column has been hit with a Continual Flame spell during construction to provide light to the area at night as well as illuminate the interior of the building.

Similarly, public places would be lit by objects that are big enough to be impractical to steal and that would also provide illumination to a wider area by extending the area from which that radius of light extends.

Eventually instead of Lighthouses, massive posts and pilings and sea-chains illuminated with Continual Flame could guide ships away from reefs and rocks and towards the proper path.

1 to 50 of 97 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Paizo / Messageboards / Paizo / Pathfinder® / Pathfinder RPG / General Discussion / Life in a magic rich world. All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.

©2002-2017 Paizo Inc.® | Privacy Policy | Contact Us
Need help? Email customer.service@paizo.com or call 425-250-0800 during our business hours, Monday through Friday, 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM Pacific time.

Paizo Inc., Paizo, the Paizo golem logo, Pathfinder, the Pathfinder logo, Pathfinder Society, Starfinder, the Starfinder logo, GameMastery, and Planet Stories are registered trademarks of Paizo Inc. The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game, Pathfinder Player Companion, Pathfinder Modules, Pathfinder Tales, Pathfinder Battles, Pathfinder Legends, Pathfinder Online, Starfinder Adventure Path, PaizoCon, RPG Superstar, The Golem's Got It, Titanic Games, the Titanic logo, and the Planet Stories planet logo are trademarks of Paizo Inc. Dungeons & Dragons, Dragon, Dungeon, and Polyhedron are registered trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc., a subsidiary of Hasbro, Inc., and have been used by Paizo Inc. under license. Most product names are trademarks owned or used under license by the companies that publish those products; use of such names without mention of trademark status should not be construed as a challenge to such status.