Ideas for Resurrect critical failure?


Advice


"Something goes horribly wrong—an evil spirit possesses the body, the body transforms into a special kind of undead, or some worse fate befalls the target."

Anyone have any ideas for how to run this? Like, what kinds of undead should they turn into? I'm also considering a chance of a reincarnate-like effect, turning into a random race or possibly creature.

Or, if you want to run a game where death has a lot of weight, a critical failure might mean that the creature can't ever be resurrected.


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I like the idea of never being able to be resurrected again, then make the body becomes some sort of undead that the party have to destroy with the same stats that it had when alive but with weakness to good and positive damage.


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Invert their positive/negative energy interaction, make them susceptible to good damage of they were not evil, and give weakness equal to 1/2 level against positive damage. They came back alive, but have one foot left in the grave.

Maybe talk to the player about them turning on the party at a crucial moment, either some complex plot they had running since the resurrection or them snapping when placed under a specific pressure. Maybe make this a permanent turning point, the critical failure is supposed to be worse than death so having them come back fine afterwards might not cut it.

A significant rebuild to the character maybe. The barbarian loses touch with the fury of dragons, but gains a connection with the spirit world they returned from. The cleric came back but only in the condition they abandon their deity and work for the Lady of Graves. Or the Prince of Lies. The champion was bent on liberating slaves, but after death to devils they now only desire vengeance. (Swapping to spirit totem, New deity, and a hypothetical revenge cause for champions).

Lots to work with really.


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I'm just going to leave this here:

https://pf2.d20pfsrd.com/monster/graveknight/

GRAVEKNIGHT 10
LE Medium Undead
Senses Perception +19; darkvision

Languages Common, Necril

Skills Athletics +23, Intimidation +22, Religion +19, Warfare Lore +20

Str +7, Dex +4, Con +4, Int +2, Wis +3, Cha +5

Items composite longbow (20 arrows), +1 Resilient full plate, greatsword

AC 31; Fort +21, Ref +19, Will +18

HP 175, negative Healing, rejuvenation; Immunities cold, death, disease, paralyzed, poison, unconscious

Sacrilegious Aura 30 feet. +17

Attack of Opportunity [reaction]

Speed 25 feet

Melee [one-action] frost greatsword +24 (cold, magical, versatile P), Damage 2d12+10 slashing plus 1d6 cold

Melee [one-action] fist +23 (agile, cold), Damage 2d6+10 bludgeoning plus 1d6 cold

Ranged [one-action] frost composite longbow +21 (cold, deadly 1d10, magical, range increment 100 feet, reload 0, volley 30 feet), Damage 2d8+6 piercing plus 1d6 cold

Devastating Blast [two-actions] (arcane, cold, evocation) 6d12 cold, DC 29

Graveknight’s Curse DC 33

Phantom Mount [three-actions] (arcane, conjuration) HP 58; AC 27, Fort +17, Ref +15, Will +14.

About

Graveknights are undead warriors granted unlife by a cursed suit of armor.

CREATING GRAVEKNIGHTS
You can turn an existing, living creature into a graveknight by completing the following steps. It’s best to build a graveknight from scratch, but if you don’t have the time, simply apply the template. A creature should be at least level 5 before being converted to a graveknight.

Increase the creature’s level by 1 and change its statistics as follows.

Increase its attack rolls, AC, saving throws, Perception, and skills by 1, its HP by 5, and its Strike damage by 1.
GRAVEKNIGHT ABILITIES
A graveknight gains the undead and graveknight traits, and its alignment is usually adjusted to evil. It loses any abilities that come from it being a living creature and any traits that represent its life, such as human and humanoid.

DARKVISION
Negative Healing Rejuvenation (divine, necromancy) When a graveknight is destroyed, its armor rebuilds its body over the course of 1d10 days—or more quickly if the armor is worn by a living host (see Graveknight Armor, below). If the body is destroyed before then, the process restarts. A graveknight can only be permanently destroyed by obliterating its armor (such as with disintegrate), transporting it to the Positive Energy Plane, or throwing it into the heart of a volcano.

Immunities death effects, disease, paralyzed, poison, precision, unconscious, plus one energy type (the same chosen for ruinous weapons below).

Sacrilegious Aura (abjuration, aura, divine, evil) 30 feet. When a creature in the aura uses a Positive spell or ability, the graveknight automatically attempts to counteract it, with the listed counteract modifier.

Devastating Blast [two-actions] (arcane, evocation) The graveknight unleashes a 30-foot cone of energy. Creatures in the area take 1d12 damage, plus an additional 1d12 damage for every two levels the graveknight has (basic Reflex save). The graveknight can use this ability once every 1d4 rounds. This energy damage is of the same type as that of its ruinous weapons (see below); Devastating Blast gains the associated energy trait.

Phantom Mount [three-actions] (arcane, conjuration, summon) The graveknight summons a supernatural mount as per phantom steed, heightened to a level equal to half the graveknight’s level. Unlike phantom steed, the steed’s AC and saving throw bonuses are all 4 lower than the graveknight’s, and the steed has one-third the graveknight’s Hit Points (rounded down). If the steed is destroyed, the graveknight must wait 1 hour before using this ability again.

RUINOUS WEAPONS
At the time of its creation, a graveknight chooses one of the following energy types that was relevant to its life or death: acid, cold, electricity, or fire. Any weapon the graveknight wields gains the effects of the caustic, frost, shock, or flaming weapon Rune, respectively, in addition to a +1 Striking weapon Rune. If the graveknight is 14th level or higher, its weapons instead gain the effects of the greater versions of both of these Runes.

WEAPON MASTER
The graveknight has access to the critical specialization effects of any weapons it wields.

ALTERNATE GRAVEKNIGHT ABILITIES
Although the abilities listed above are standard for a graveknight, you can create a more unusual graveknight by substituting one of the aforementioned abilities (except for its rejuvenation ability) with one of the following.

BETRAYED REVIVIFICATION
The graveknight died after being deeply betrayed. Instead of being immune to a type of energy damage, it is immune to mental damage, its weapons deal 1d6 additional mental damage, and its Devastating Blast deals mental damage with a Will saving throw instead of Reflex.

CREATE GRAVE SQUIRE
The graveknight can gift a piece of its armor to a willing ally, which becomes its grave squire. The graveknight can communicate telepathically with its squire at any distance, see through the squire’s senses, and cast suggestion as a divine innate spell through the telepathic link at will; the squire treats its degree of success as one step worse. If the graveknight’s main armor is destroyed, the squire’s piece expands to cover the squire’s body over 1d10 days, after which point it becomes the graveknight’s new body. The graveknight can have only one squire at a time, and must recover the gifted piece of armor if it wishes to create a new squire.

DARK DELIVERANCE
The graveknight has Positive resistance equal to its level.

GRAVEKNIGHT ARMOR
Wearing graveknight armor is very risky, for the graveknight’s essence rapidly parasitizes the new wearer, accelerating the graveknight’s rejuvenation. This agonizing transformation inevitably kills the host, transforming their flesh into the graveknight’s new body. Removing the curse allows a character to remove the armor, but if it ever wears the armor again, the curse returns. If the wearer dies from another cause while wearing the armor, or if the graveknight’s rejuvenation completes before the wearer dies from the curse, the wearer immediately progresses to stage 3.

Graveknight’s Curse (arcane, curse, necromancy) This curse affects anyone who wears a graveknight’s armor for at least 1 hour. Saving Throw Will save; Onset 1 hour; Stage 1 doomed 1 and cannot remove the armor (1 day); Stage 2 doomed 2, hampered 10, and cannot remove the armor (1 day); Stage 3 dies and transforms into the armor’s graveknight.

Section 15: Copyright Notice
Pathfinder Bestiary (Second Edition) © 2019, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Alexander Augunas, Logan Bonner, Jason Bulmahn, John Compton, Paris Crenshaw, Adam Daigle, Eleanor Ferron, Leo Glass, Thurston Hillman, James Jacobs, Jason Keeley, Lyz Liddell, Ron Lundeen, Robert G. McCreary, Tim Nightengale, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Alex Riggs, David N. Ross, Michael Sayre, Mark Seifter, Chris S. Sims, Jeffrey Swank, Jason Tondro, Tonya Woldridge, and Linda Zayas-Palmer

Liberty's Edge

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The Spellcaster trades their own life-force accidentally for the target of the spell instantly slaying the caster and reviving the target.


Pet cemetery (1980's one)

Might not be the a great movie, but that is what I imagine.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

The body gets hijacked by an Astradaemon, either completely leaving the soul displaced or maybe they fight each over for control. Or maybe the host doesn't know it now has a malignant rider with it.


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Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscriber

the soul is resurrected into a nearby body instead of the target. :P


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Have you ever seen "How to get ahead in advertising"?

At first the rezzed guy thinks he's fine, but little by little a second identity shows up, slowly increases in power, and then takes over.


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As above, but the second identity is a chicken.


Salamileg wrote:

"Something goes horribly wrong—an evil spirit possesses the body, the body transforms into a special kind of undead, or some worse fate befalls the target."

Anyone have any ideas for how to run this? Like, what kinds of undead should they turn into? I'm also considering a chance of a reincarnate-like effect, turning into a random race or possibly creature.

Or, if you want to run a game where death has a lot of weight, a critical failure might mean that the creature can't ever be resurrected.

To pick an undead, I'd probably start by seeing what undead options there are in the bestiary around the level of the character in question. If they have an appropriate suite of abilities, even better, like a Champion becoming a Grave Knight or ghost wizard for a spell caster.

For added drama I'd probably give the player of the deceased the monster stat block to run to try and murder their friends.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

There’s also the Mortics introduced in Tyrant’s Grasp, they’re all pretty cool.


Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscriber

hmm, possibly you can also run it as an adventure start where the soul has been captured by a powerful outsider and must be retrieved. give the trapped player a character, that they can play, native to the plane that is willing to help them retrieve their compatriots soul as they also have beef with the outsider.


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Here's an old list of fun ideas:

1000 Resurrection Effects


Honestly..
I'd pull the Ashley Williams Bad Ash Good Ash from Army of Darkness.

Basically roll a 1d2. One character is revived in location the other revived somewhere else (random like teleport or somewhere narritively fun)

They don't know this occured. But now therer are two of them. the bad one might've just attack them or might trick them. or if the bad one was far away cause issues they have to resolve

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I kind of like an idea from "Deadlands" called the Harrowed, the player comes back but with an evil spirit in tow. It is a battle to keep control, basically will saves with dc equal to character level dc...every failure the player gives in and the spirit takes over for a short time(GM takes over) and the will save dc goes up by one. At a certain point the player becomes and evil NPC fighting the party.

Seems like it could be a fun way to handle it :)

Or a level appropriate undead just attacks for a simpler solution


They come back with enemies. Psychopomps that were not so willing to let them back, devils coming to repossess their soul, angels claiming their death was part of the good outcome and needs to be preserved, ghosts jealous of them getting the fast track back to life, or whatever else fits the campaign. As the party rests these enemies start to catch up, and the character faces continued assaults from their enemy until they did again, this time for good.

They come back as a construct made of their own body. They can only be healed using the processes used to repair flesh constructs (which require raw materials of a grizzly sort) and will be destroyed upon death.


I will roll all the 3 checks myself, as DM, then, whatever the outcome, will resurrect the character as a success occourred.

Then I will give him a paper message with the degree of success:

1) critical success
2) success
3) critical failure > explaining him what happened and baselines about how to play.

He will have to read it away from the others, because the length of message could bring suspects about the outcome.

He will have then to achieve some sort of goal while possessing the character body. If he is successful, he takes over the character body permanently.

If detected, he could be exorcised or killed. Or maybe his friends will simply not care and prefer him as the previous guy, who knows. Adventurers are crazy, sometimes.

As for the tasks, could be something related to the enetity or the sender. Maybe a devil, or a fey. Or maybe even a god.

There won't be neither any possible Perception check nor magic able to tell if the character is an impostor. The party members will simply could suspect about him the more the adventure proceed.

While on the character's body he could use some of the stuff given by the new entity. Maybe by saying "hm hm" before asking the dm for a check.

There are infinite possibilities.

Dark Archive

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The target resurrects, but is only 'weakly' attached to this new life.

They no longer regain hit points naturally, but require healing from external sources to recover health. In addition, every night when they go to sleep, they 'die.' A Heal check or any amount of healing magic will revive them, but for the duration of their 'sleep' they are completely stone dead. In essence, they 'die' every night (or whenever they lose consciousness for other reasons), but are easily revived from these 'little deaths' and suffer no long-term mechanical effects, other than dreamless slumber and always 'waking up' cold and stiff, as they 'come back to life.'

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

How about Khal Drogo after his failed Greater Restoration by Mirri Maz Duur in A Song of Ice and Fire. The body is healed, but its a hollow shell. Alive, but not living.


The spell reanimated the body, but fails to bring back the soul. Until the soul is returned to the body, their alignment changes to neutral evil, attempts at possession automatically succeed, they have a permanent -5 to Charisma and Wisdom and lose any divine spellcasting they once had. They gain immunity to dream, fear, healing, mental and sleep effects, and no longer feel pain, empathy, or require sleep, and neither do they dream. If they are a cleric or paladin, they lose their powers as per the anathema penalty for their class. These effects are all permanent and incurable until the soul is reunited with its body through another resurrection ritual combined with additional conditions needed to secure the soul to make the second ritual work.

Edit: I forgot an important detail! The character also suffers an additional -5 penalty to deception, diplomacy and nature checks made to interact with animals, and a +5 to intimidation checks against animals. Dogs bark incessantly in the characters presence, and horses or other livestock panic and attempt to flee should the character get too close.


I find the idea of a critical failure on a resurrection to be a rather dumb idea (just my opinion, it's ok if you disagree). The character is dead, which is punishment enough for whatever they did that caused them to die.
Now if the party wants to resurrect them they need to spend the not so cheap resources to do so. Then if the party totally fails in their 1 roll to restore the character, you want to punish the dead character again by making them role-play their character a certain way and suffer significant ability penalties too?
Doesn't really sound all that fun to me and isn't that the point of these games... to have fun? Now if the affected character is interested in that by all means go ahead but, forcing all that on a character is the makings of a s*%~ty GM.


Katapesh Fried Chicken wrote:

I find the idea of a critical failure on a resurrection to be a rather dumb idea (just my opinion, it's ok if you disagree). The character is dead, which is punishment enough for whatever they did that caused them to die.

Now if the party wants to resurrect them they need to spend the not so cheap resources to do so. Then if the party totally fails in their 1 roll to restore the character, you want to punish the dead character again by making them role-play their character a certain way and suffer significant ability penalties too?
Doesn't really sound all that fun to me and isn't that the point of these games... to have fun? Now if the affected character is interested in that by all means go ahead but, forcing all that on a character is the makings of a s#*@ty GM.

To be fair, it's three rolls, not one.

As for the rest of it, the way I see it, after a character dies, the player getting to play them again isn't a given. It's a possibility. If a player wants to risk changes to their character to bring them back, it's their decision. As an example, in a campaign I'm wrapping up soon, two characters died at one point. As a side effect of all the powerful clerics in the area being killed recently, the only resurrection option available to them was reincarnation. One of the players chose to accept the risk this carried, and went through with it, and the other opted to play a new character.

I'm personally very happy with how Resurect works in 2e, because I've never liked how it's often a "Pay X amount of gold to come back to life" sort of deal. It's never been interesting, just a death tax.


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Katapesh Fried Chicken wrote:

I find the idea of a critical failure on a resurrection to be a rather dumb idea (just my opinion, it's ok if you disagree). The character is dead, which is punishment enough for whatever they did that caused them to die.

Now if the party wants to resurrect them they need to spend the not so cheap resources to do so. Then if the party totally fails in their 1 roll to restore the character, you want to punish the dead character again by making them role-play their character a certain way and suffer significant ability penalties too?
Doesn't really sound all that fun to me and isn't that the point of these games... to have fun? Now if the affected character is interested in that by all means go ahead but, forcing all that on a character is the makings of a s~*!ty GM.

Who says death or failed resurrection is a punishment for the players? A bad thing happening to a character is not necessarily a bad thing to the players. The whole "my character dying is always bad, and hardship experienced by a character is a hardship to the player" mindset is something that I have found is very limiting in rpgs, and players who learn to move past that and enjoy the story and the challenge and the downs as much as the ups tend to get a lot more out of the game.

The risk of death makes the challenge and consequences meaningful - and when a character dies, that can actually be a really interesting and fun experience where the impact and stakes feel so much bigger. A guaranteed resurrection isn't as tense and dramatic and interesting as one that has risks (and a guaranteed resurrection undercuts the good things about the death thing in the first place).

I know players (and this includes myself) who secretly hope that a 1 is rolled, because the party having to deal with the soulless husk of their dead friend trying to murder them has so much inherent weight and drama and can be really fun (especially if I get to creepily roleplay an off-putting wrong version of my character and get to fight my party in the bargain).

Death doesn't have to be a punishment to the player or the party - there are so many fun avenues to explore with a character death (and botched resurrection).


Tender Tendrils wrote:
Katapesh Fried Chicken wrote:

I find the idea of a critical failure on a resurrection to be a rather dumb idea (just my opinion, it's ok if you disagree). The character is dead, which is punishment enough for whatever they did that caused them to die.

Now if the party wants to resurrect them they need to spend the not so cheap resources to do so. Then if the party totally fails in their 1 roll to restore the character, you want to punish the dead character again by making them role-play their character a certain way and suffer significant ability penalties too?
Doesn't really sound all that fun to me and isn't that the point of these games... to have fun? Now if the affected character is interested in that by all means go ahead but, forcing all that on a character is the makings of a s~*!ty GM.

Who says death or failed resurrection is a punishment for the players? A bad thing happening to a character is not necessarily a bad thing to the players. The whole "my character dying is always bad, and hardship experienced by a character is a hardship to the player" mindset is something that I have found is very limiting in rpgs, and players who learn to move past that and enjoy the story and the challenge and the downs as much as the ups tend to get a lot more out of the game.

The risk of death makes the challenge and consequences meaningful - and when a character dies, that can actually be a really interesting and fun experience where the impact and stakes feel so much bigger. A guaranteed resurrection isn't as tense and dramatic and interesting as one that has risks (and a guaranteed resurrection undercuts the good things about the death thing in the first place).

I know players (and this includes myself) who secretly hope that a 1 is rolled, because the party having to deal with the soulless husk of their dead friend trying to murder them has so much inherent weight and drama and can be really fun (especially if I get to creepily roleplay an off-putting wrong version of my character...

That's great that you all had great experiences doing that, that's literally the point of these games. I too once had a NG Lv. 15 Ranger die and upon his resurrection with the GM's knowledge played him as a N/NE sociopath because a part of him didn't come back. "I" as the character pursued that story line because "I" thought it could be cool and fun.

What I'm trying to say is that a critical failure of a resurrection spell will essentially force that outcome possibly without the player's want or desire. I personally would rather just start a new character then be forced to play a character the way someone else wants. Basically, the GM and player should talk and agree about this development before applying it. That was the moral argument I was trying to make.


Pet Cemetery.


So I realized today that a failure on a ritual still spends the material components, unlike, Crafting or Identifying a spell. Resurrection doesn't charge you if the creature doesn't want to or can't return, but if they can and you fail the check you get charged.

Given the very hard DC of a creature on your level, that seems rather harsh. Especially when you consider you can't use hero points or other fortune effects, and it is quite hard to get bonuses to the checks in general. (Unless a heightened version of the ritual doesn't increase the DC, but that seems unlikely.)

My players were trying to bring back a dead PC tonight by pretty much emptying their coffers. There would be no second tries. I realized the problem: failure is not only punitive but isn't interesting. Success is obviously interesting, but so is critical failure. Failure is not, and it is demoralizing if nothing happens.

I actually wound up bending the rules tonight and letting the player character come back, but his soul had to be freed from a Devourer that came along for the ride. Letting the player run the undead monster was pretty fun and they got their friend back in the end. But I think a better solution might be if a failure didn't consume your diamonds and just cost you time. You can try the ritual again the next day, so it only costs you time... But you're hoping you get that success before you roll a critical failure.


Set wrote:

The target resurrects, but is only 'weakly' attached to this new life.

They no longer regain hit points naturally, but require healing from external sources to recover health. In addition, every night when they go to sleep, they 'die.' A Heal check or any amount of healing magic will revive them, but for the duration of their 'sleep' they are completely stone dead. In essence, they 'die' every night (or whenever they lose consciousness for other reasons), but are easily revived from these 'little deaths' and suffer no long-term mechanical effects, other than dreamless slumber and always 'waking up' cold and stiff, as they 'come back to life.'

Omigod this is terrible!

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

1. Death wants them back. Whenever there is a chance of bad things happening, it happens to them. And probabilities are increasingly stacked against their survival.

2. This is their last lease on life. Once they die again they will not come back. And they know it.

3. The whole campaign turns out to be an illusion. They were not brought back. They just believed they were.

Liberty's Edge

Given how many avenues there are to save someone from dying in the first place I honestly think the harsh failure results for Res are more than fair.

If there is one thing in the new system that I jive with the least it's that player characters are so much harder to kill given an encounter that is on-par for their level.

That may just be me though.


Its a YMMV thing, some players like to have bigger consequences and stakes then others, and those players probably prefer less reliable/more costly resurrections, or even permadeath.

Dark Archive

I'd probably go with the PC's soul trading place with a soul that has been captured by a Devourer, i.e. the other PCs have to figure out that their friend is now imprisoned inside the chest cavity of a Devourer, and the poor, babbling, mad soul that now inhabits their friend's body is the previous victim of that undead.

I might even go as far as to pretend everything goes as planned; the dead PC is resurrected, although they seem confused and there is probably some kind of fake (mechanical) consequence for the crit failure, such as that sould cannot be resurrected ever again. Then I'd have a private discussion with the player of said PC and give hints how to run the "new" character. It would be even more interesting if this soul is evil or depraved, but only if the players are comfortable with this. In any case the player could occasionally blurt out hints that would eventually lead the PCs into the lair of the Devourer, but only if they pay attention and put together all the pieces of the puzzle. :)


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In the parties desperation to be reunited with their fallen comrade, they are reunited with their fallen comrade - in Abbaddon. Instead of bringing their comrades soul back to the material plane, the botched ritual brings the party to the location of their comrades soul, which has gotten lost and is in abbaddon fleeing from daemons. The ritual rips a hole between planes, leaving a portal back to the material plane - the party must fight a pack of hungry daemons to get back through the portal, and have the option of going after their friends soul, which is being pursued by a more powerful daemon. If they defeat the more powerful daemon, they can reunite their friends soul with their body, and merely have to get through the lesser daemons to escape to the material plane.


They don't come back alone. An evil spirit (undead or fiend) comes back with them. Defeating this foe only temporarily banishes it, as it will come back 1d10 days later. Only the death of the resurrected character will cause it to stop returning.


Themetricsystem wrote:

Given how many avenues there are to save someone from dying in the first place I honestly think the harsh failure results for Res are more than fair.

If there is one thing in the new system that I jive with the least it's that player characters are so much harder to kill given an encounter that is on-par for their level.

That may just be me though.

You're not wrong, and I really liked the idea of ressurection being a risky endeavor in theory. In practice it gets a little wonky. There's a lot of narrative reasons to want to keep your same character in the rotation, but a lot of meta reasons why you might be better off just making a new character.

At level 11 a fully optimized character with master religion, +5 wisdom, and a +2 item bonus only has a 50% chance to succeed on the check. And the check costs a little under half the lump sum value of a kitted out new 11th level character. By contrast it costs the party nothing to get a new party member, and that's before you get to the prickly question of selling the possessions of the deceased.

I think spending all that money for nothing half the time or more feels pretty bad. Upon further reflection, I think the solution I landed on in play might be a good one in general. Basically treat a failure as a mixed success. They return to life, but there's a complication, hard choice, or thing the party has to do to get them back. The thread has had various ideas generated for what that could be.

I dunno, I'm still work shopping it.


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we got this covered already

Dark Archive

Freehold DM wrote:
we got this covered already

And that thread has plenty of fantastic ideas, but it is a generic thread, and this one is all about what happens when you critically fail in casting the ritual.

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