Class Preview: The Technomancer

Friday, July 28, 2017

To understand the technomancer class, it is necessary to remember that Starfinder is set in a universe where magic is a real, known, fundamental force of the universe. Just as some scientists study physics, and some study chemistry, in Starfinder it is possible to apply the scientific method to the understanding and manipulation of magic itself. With that context set, let's see how the Starfinder Core Rulebook defines the class:

To the uninitiated, magic and technology are completely unrelated, but you know there are more correlations between the two than most suspect. Magic and technology are just tools, and when combined into one discipline, called technomancy, they can be far more powerful than one or the other on its own. You utilize tech to empower, harness, and manipulate magic, and you wield magic to augment, control, and modify technology. You are an expert at hacking the underlying structure of the universe itself, bending the laws of science and nature to your will. Your technomancy— which is gained from scientific study and experimentation—manipulates the physical world, weaves illusions, allows you to peer through time and space, and if necessary, can blast a foe into atoms.

The technomancer has Intelligence as its key ability score, as this modifies its spells per day, many of its core skills, and the save DCs of its spells and class features. The class has an average attack bonus, poor Fortitude and Reflex saves, good Will saves, four skill points per level, and eight class skills. The class grants proficiency with light armor and proficiency (and eventually specialization) with basic melee weapons and small arms. Like the mystic, the game's other core spellcasting class, the technomancer is a spontaneous spellcasting class. It gains access to technomancer spells, ranging from 0-level to 6th level, which represent a significant part of their power.

Technomancer spells are more likely to focus on modifying, emulating, or interacting with technologic devices, evoking or manipulating core energy types (especially fire and electricity), and manipulating or altering raw magical forces. How a technomancer operates can be strongly influenced by their choice of spells known—caustic conversion, logic bomb, and microbot assault are all useful 2nd-level offensive technomancer spells, but each comes with its own advantages and limitations.

Technomancers also receive numerous class features to represent their use of technology and scientific principles in the manipulation of magic. Beginning at 1st level, technomancers gain access to a spell cache, which initially allows you to once per day cast any one spell you know without expending a spell slot. In time, you add a cache capacitor, which allows you to store specific spell effects in your spell cache, giving them 24-hour durations. At very high level, technomancers even gain the ability to regain Resolve Points when they cast their most powerful spells, and can fuse lower-level spell slots together to cast higher-level spells (or, if you combine two 6th-level spell slots and spend two Resolve Points, even cast wish).

Technomancers also select from a list of magic hacks, at 2nd level and every 3 levels thereafter, which are special abilities focused on manipulating magic, technology, or both. Magic hacks are often fueled by spell slots, giving technomancers a new (often very flexible) way to use that resource, but can also modify spells as you cast them, channel battery power into a spell a limited number of times per day, expend (in rare cases) Resolve to create impressive effects, or even simply let you use computers to set up magical surveillance or give you additional spells known. Aside from spell selection, magic hacks are the major customizable element of the technomancer class.

Here's a sample magic hack, this one available at 5th level.

Fabricate Arms (Su)
As a full action, you can expend an unused spell slot to temporarily construct a technological weapon or suit of armor out of raw magic. You can create one suit of armor or weapon with a level equal to or less than the level of the expended spell slot × 3, to a maximum of your caster level. The item appears in your hands, on your person, or in an adjacent square. You can use fuse spells with this magic hack. A weapon can't be larger than two-handed, and the size of the item can't exceed 10 bulk. The quality of the item is average for its type. Treat this as a spell of the same level as the expended spell slot. For example, at 10th level, you could expend a 3rd-level spell slot to fabricate a weapon of 9th level or lower, or expend a 4th- level spell slot to fabricate a suit of armor of 10th level or lower. The armor or weapon persists for a number of rounds equal to your technomancer level. At the end of this duration, the item disappears. You are proficient with (but not specialized in) any weapons you create with this ability. You can't create magic items, weapons made from a special material, or weapons that are expended with use (such as arrows, grenades, or missiles) with this magic hack.

Owen KC Stephens
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Mashallah wrote:

I am somewhat bewildered by this saying the Technomancer can use spells to regain Resolve Points.

I was under the impression they can never be regained and I even recall Owen Stephens saying that that was the design intent and that he thinks Paizo will never publish options that let you recover them.

Granted, it looks like regaining resolve might be more of a capstone ability than something everyone has access to. The game may also have changed since he made that comment, though more likely he just didn't remember the Technomancer ability off the top of his head.


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Angry Wizard wrote:
IonutRO wrote:
Or are arrows now a weapon instead of ammo?
Finally, I can play the Yondu character I've always wanted too.

I'm Mary Poppins Ya'll!

Sovereign Court

So I'm curious why this topic is in the Starfinder Forums and on Piazo Blog but not actually on the Starfinder specific blog?


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Hmm... Obvious use for the Fabricate arms is that its a cheaper alternative to carrying around 8 different types of energy rifles. Rather than the Soldier having to invest their hard earned cash into those rifles, the Technomancer can just identify the weakness and immunities of their current enemy, and fabricate a weapon for the Soldier on the cheap for the circumstance.

Also, interesting choice with being able to cast a 9th level spell by fusing smaller spell slots. If this applies to spells other than just Wish, that could make Technomancers able to be on par with a 9 spell level class without actually needing to possess 9 spell levels.

Liberty's Edge

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Lord Fyre wrote:
JRutterbush wrote:
Don Hastily wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:
The question I have is "would it be possible to reskin this class as something more ... psionic?"

Isn't their a phrenic adept archetype that you can add to any class?

That might do it

And the Technomancer is especially archetypable, since they don't hurt so much losing spells known due to the ability to pick up spell-slot-using class features.

Spells would become "psionic disciplines." They wouldn't even loose spells per say.

Spellcasters (the Mystic and the Technomancer) lose spells known instead of class features when taking archetypes.

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Mashallah wrote:

I am somewhat bewildered by this saying the Technomancer can use spells to regain Resolve Points.

I was under the impression they can never be regained and I even recall Owen Stephens saying that that was the design intent and that he thinks Paizo will never publish options that let you recover them.

From a game design perspective, Revolve points is still a static resource engine because that ability requires spending your highest spell slots, which are a finite resource that only replenishes when (I assume) your Resolve points replenish, too. In other words, this ability is essentially like saying "Your maximum daily Resolve increases by an amount equal to the number of spell slots of the highest spell level you can cast."

That's VERY different than an ability like grit where the only limit to regaining points is how many creatures you can kill and crit in a day.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Kiln Norn wrote:
So I'm curious why this topic is in the Starfinder Forums and on Piazo Blog but not actually on the Starfinder specific blog?

Because Paizo makes Starfinder? There isn't a Starfinder blog, there's the Store blog and Paizo blog.


Kiln Norn wrote:
So I'm curious why this topic is in the Starfinder Forums and on Piazo Blog but not actually on the Starfinder specific blog?

same here - it hasn't got any tags of any kind, so if you've got a tab open with just starfinder tags you won't see it

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
dharkus wrote:
Kiln Norn wrote:
So I'm curious why this topic is in the Starfinder Forums and on Piazo Blog but not actually on the Starfinder specific blog?
same here - it hasn't got any tags of any kind, so if you've got a tab open with just starfinder tags you won't see it

Ah, Okies. Was kinda confused about that post.


IonutRO wrote:
Why is a gun expending bullets/charges different from a bow expending arrows? Or are arrows now a weapon instead of ammo?

You could create a bow with this ability, just not arrows. (Im guessing there's a low-level "summon ammunition" spell, similar to "abundant ammunition" in Pathfinder.)

"Conjure Clip" - 1st level technomancer spell? :)

Liberty's Edge

Pax Rafkin wrote:
Cuttlefist wrote:
Dead Phoenix wrote:
Yes! I hate that trope, but as soon as technology shows up, magic either disappears or just does not play well with it. And the excuses for it always seem half assed... Glad that's not the case here.
I have never seen a good explanation, it was always just hand-waving about the two interfering with each other so your electronics short-circuited when you cast spells and your spells were weaker if you had a bunch of cybernetic implants, all because.
Shadowrun tries to explain it with something like, removing body parts for cybernetics lessens your life force...which affects your magic potential.

To be more precise it is not the removal of parts of yourself but rather the replacing of parts of yourself with artificial things that damages your essence which is something like your life force and serves as your connection to the forces of magic.


Shadowrun aside, does the mystic (or, hey, anyone else) get some form of game hacks to step outside the limits of the system in terms of spell levels, resolve points or other subsystems?


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graywulfe wrote:
Pax Rafkin wrote:
Cuttlefist wrote:
Dead Phoenix wrote:
Yes! I hate that trope, but as soon as technology shows up, magic either disappears or just does not play well with it. And the excuses for it always seem half assed... Glad that's not the case here.
I have never seen a good explanation, it was always just hand-waving about the two interfering with each other so your electronics short-circuited when you cast spells and your spells were weaker if you had a bunch of cybernetic implants, all because.
Shadowrun tries to explain it with something like, removing body parts for cybernetics lessens your life force...which affects your magic potential.
To be more precise it is not the removal of parts of yourself but rather the replacing of parts of yourself with artificial things that damages your essence which is something like your life force and serves as your connection to the forces of magic.

I was familiar with that explanation, and while it is definitely an explanation it's not really a satisfying one for me. Why is it technology interferes with your life force? What is the level of technology that does not interfere? Is a peg leg or similar replacement for a missing limb sufficient to diminish your essence? It raises more questions for me than it answers, still feels like a "because we need it to work this way" reason.

Liberty's Edge

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Cuttlefist wrote:
Why is it technology interferes with your life force?

Because you're taking a part of you that was alive and replacing it with something that is not alive. Your overall "aliveness" is now less.


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JRutterbush wrote:
Cuttlefist wrote:
Why is it technology interferes with your life force?
Because you're taking a part of you that was alive and replacing it with something that is not alive. Your overall "aliveness" is now less.

Like Darth Vader losing 40% of his midichlorians?


It all depends on what the rules of magic are. For example, maybe magic is the actions of disembodied spirits. Need a fireball? Call on a flame spirit. Need to make a Holy sword? Gotta placate an angel and the sword spirit. But cybernetic prosthetics are too new, so their spirits are young and willful, and you have to deal with them before you can cast a spell because you welcomed them into yourself. It's a bit like being possessed by a toddler.


ENHenry wrote:
IonutRO wrote:
Why is a gun expending bullets/charges different from a bow expending arrows? Or are arrows now a weapon instead of ammo?

You could create a bow with this ability, just not arrows. (Im guessing there's a low-level "summon ammunition" spell, similar to "abundant ammunition" in Pathfinder.)

"Conjure Clip" - 1st level technomancer spell? :)

doesn't seem much of a problem, laser rifles and equivalent are a thing, so just create one of them, or a melee weapon


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Shinigami02 wrote:
The biggest question I have with the Fabricate Arms is if you use it to create something that doesn't use destructible ammo (like a laser) does it come charged? Or will your options be "Use a round to make a melee weapon" or "Use a round and a half to make and load a ranged weapon"?

My new biggest question is how long it will be until someone makes a literal Fabricate Arm(s)-focused "Gil Hamilton of ARM" archetype for the technomancer (or better still, the envoy).


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Cuttlefist wrote:
I was familiar with that explanation, and while it is definitely an explanation it's not really a satisfying one for me. Why is it technology interferes with your life force? What is the level of technology that does not interfere? Is a peg leg or similar replacement for a missing limb sufficient to diminish your essence? It raises more questions for me than it answers, still feels like a "because we need it to work this way" reason.

I always thought of it as the spiritual/astral version of transplant rejection. In universe, an astral form is a real thing. Everybody has one. Merely losing a body part doesn't damage your astral form, nor does wearing things like prosthetic. Which means that phantom limb syndrome in Shadowrun it more literal than it is in reality. Your body is missing an arm, but your soul isn't.

Once you try to implant something into your body on the level of cyberware (and bioware too), then it starts interfering with your astral form. So from what I understand, your soul is trying to attach itself to a new part of you and failing. This static chokes off your ability to connect with magic.

This can be mitigated though. High grade gear is less intrusive on an astral level. So technology doesn't interfere with magic unless you try and implant it, but even then the more advanced the technology is the less it interferes. The analogy could be extended to how your body would react to a kidney from a poor donor vs a kidney from a close relative vs a kidney vat grown from your own cells.


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Stone Dog wrote:
Cuttlefist wrote:
I was familiar with that explanation, and while it is definitely an explanation it's not really a satisfying one for me. Why is it technology interferes with your life force? What is the level of technology that does not interfere? Is a peg leg or similar replacement for a missing limb sufficient to diminish your essence? It raises more questions for me than it answers, still feels like a "because we need it to work this way" reason.

I always thought of it as the spiritual/astral version of transplant rejection. In universe, an astral form is a real thing. Everybody has one. Merely losing a body part doesn't damage your astral form, nor does wearing things like prosthetic. Which means that phantom limb syndrome in Shadowrun it more literal than it is in reality. Your body is missing an arm, but your soul isn't.

Once you try to implant something into your body on the level of cyberware (and bioware too), then it starts interfering with your astral form. So from what I understand, your soul is trying to attach itself to a new part of you and failing. This static chokes off your ability to connect with magic.

This can be mitigated though. High grade gear is less intrusive on an astral level. So technology doesn't interfere with magic unless you try and implant it, but even then the more advanced the technology is the less it interferes. The analogy could be extended to how your body would react to a kidney from a poor donor vs a kidney from a close relative vs a kidney vat grown from your own cells.

That's a good breakdown of essence loss. It's worth pointing out that it's not just cyberware that causes essence loss- bioware implants do as well. The thematic stab is that transhumanism literally makes you less of a metahuman. It works pretty well.


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Aratrok wrote:
Stone Dog wrote:
Cuttlefist wrote:
I was familiar with that explanation, and while it is definitely an explanation it's not really a satisfying one for me. Why is it technology interferes with your life force? What is the level of technology that does not interfere? Is a peg leg or similar replacement for a missing limb sufficient to diminish your essence? It raises more questions for me than it answers, still feels like a "because we need it to work this way" reason.

I always thought of it as the spiritual/astral version of transplant rejection. In universe, an astral form is a real thing. Everybody has one. Merely losing a body part doesn't damage your astral form, nor does wearing things like prosthetic. Which means that phantom limb syndrome in Shadowrun it more literal than it is in reality. Your body is missing an arm, but your soul isn't.

Once you try to implant something into your body on the level of cyberware (and bioware too), then it starts interfering with your astral form. So from what I understand, your soul is trying to attach itself to a new part of you and failing. This static chokes off your ability to connect with magic.

This can be mitigated though. High grade gear is less intrusive on an astral level. So technology doesn't interfere with magic unless you try and implant it, but even then the more advanced the technology is the less it interferes. The analogy could be extended to how your body would react to a kidney from a poor donor vs a kidney from a close relative vs a kidney vat grown from your own cells.

That's a good breakdown of essence loss. It's worth pointing out that it's not just cyberware that causes essence loss- bioware implants do as well. The thematic stab is that transhumanism literally makes you less of a metahuman. It works pretty well.

Nice summary... But personally, I always hated the implications. Not of being less human mind you, but that it implies that your personhood is contingent on remaining so; though not nessacarily in a legal sense... If that makes sense.

It's like a weird double standard; at once saying the "soul" being intangible has nothing to do with the physical, only to turn around and say it has everything to do with the physical.


More 'SR essence loss' derail:
Luna Protege wrote:
Aratrok wrote:
Stone Dog wrote:
Cuttlefist wrote:
I was familiar with that explanation, and while it is definitely an explanation it's not really a satisfying one for me. Why is it technology interferes with your life force? What is the level of technology that does not interfere? Is a peg leg or similar replacement for a missing limb sufficient to diminish your essence? It raises more questions for me than it answers, still feels like a "because we need it to work this way" reason.

I always thought of it as the spiritual/astral version of transplant rejection. In universe, an astral form is a real thing. Everybody has one. Merely losing a body part doesn't damage your astral form, nor does wearing things like prosthetic. Which means that phantom limb syndrome in Shadowrun it more literal than it is in reality. Your body is missing an arm, but your soul isn't.

Once you try to implant something into your body on the level of cyberware (and bioware too), then it starts interfering with your astral form. So from what I understand, your soul is trying to attach itself to a new part of you and failing. This static chokes off your ability to connect with magic.

This can be mitigated though. High grade gear is less intrusive on an astral level. So technology doesn't interfere with magic unless you try and implant it, but even then the more advanced the technology is the less it interferes. The analogy could be extended to how your body would react to a kidney from a poor donor vs a kidney from a close relative vs a kidney vat grown from your own cells.

That's a good breakdown of essence loss. It's worth pointing out that it's not just cyberware that causes essence loss- bioware implants do as well. The thematic stab is that transhumanism literally makes you less of a metahuman. It works pretty well.

Nice summary... But personally, I always hated the implications. Not of being less human mind you, but that it implies that your personhood is contingent on remaining so; though not nessacarily in a legal sense... If that makes sense.

It's like a weird double standard; at once saying the "soul" being intangible has nothing to do with the physical, only to turn around and say it has everything to do with the physical.

If memory serves, there was flavor text or chat/discussion (likely by Smiling Bandit) in one of the Shadowrun 1e-4e sourcebooks that offered a different theory. The theory was that you are at full Essence at birth, and your Astral & physical forms are in sync. As you pick up cyberware, bioware, and certain genetic treatments, the changes to your physical form bring it out of sync with your Astral form, thus causing something like chi/ki resistance (as in an electrical circuit) aka Essence "loss". However, one or two of the multinats were supposedly testing a new version of tailored Leonization therapy that not only rejuvenated your physical form, but also altered your Astral form to bring it into alignment with your physical form (including the changes you had made to it). This would in theory, erase, or at least reduce, your resistance/Essence loss. Edit: I believe it was also posited that bleeding edge magical rituals available to initiates might create a similar effect.

There weren't any mechanics detailed (that I can remember), so it could have been a peek behind the curtain into underlying principles of Sixth World magic, or it could have been just flavor text and/or a plot seed for the GM to develop.


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

Hmm:
Assuming that such an explanation is true, then it would imply that cases where individuals experience zero essence loss are hypothetically possible; where their chi alignment is not as heavily contingent on their form. I feel like that's probably what qualities like biocompatibility was supposed to stand in for.

As for the idea of a treatment thing for that... Makes a nice mental image: A total cyborg emerging from a tank of some kind of liquid, while shinning with magic. No flesh left, but still somehow "alive"... Sounds amazing, like a rebirth. Like some kind of metal angel.

Anyways, closer on topic; anyone else hoping one of these magic hacks is basically access to a digital familiar? Like... Digimon?

Okay, maybe not that awesome, but still; the dualistic nature of the relationship between wizard and familiar has always fascinated me. It's like a reflection of the self given physical form. Carrying that over to digital space has always felt like a natural next step.

... That, and digital space entering meat space. The overlapping and fusion (in not just a metaphorical sense) of digital and material spaces feels like a natural outcome once you're able to bend space enough to create demi-planes and the like. Since at that point you can basically create a demi-plane that exists purely to act as a computer, with altered physics that replace needing it to be a mechanical computer, with it being a computer made entirely of reality hacks.

Or... Alternatively, one doesn't even need to go that far to pull it off. Digimon Tamers used an explanation that the transfer is more that the digital information is being re-synthesised into physical information using synthetic proteins created on site of transfer. Basically creating a pseudo "meat" body for them to use; except its closer to nanites I guess.

I'm sure someone is going to say they might have summoning, or remind me I've talked about how they might do summoning... But I should say, summoning isn't quite as intimate as a familiar is. It's missing that almost avatar or soul-link like quality.


Luna Protege wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

Anyways, closer on topic; anyone else hoping one of these magic hacks is basically access to a digital familiar? Like... Digimon?

Okay, maybe not that awesome, but still; the dualistic nature of the relationship between wizard and familiar has always fascinated me. It's like a reflection of the self given physical form. Carrying that over to digital space has always felt like a natural next step.

... That, and digital space entering meat space. The overlapping and fusion (in not just a metaphorical sense) of digital and material spaces feels like a natural outcome once you're able to bend space enough to create demi-planes and the like. Since at that point you can basically create a demi-plane that exists purely to act as a computer, with altered physics that replace needing it to be a mechanical computer, with it being a computer made entirely of reality hacks.

Or... Alternatively, one doesn't even need to go that far to pull it off. Digimon Tamers used an explanation that the transfer is more that the digital information is being re-synthesised into physical information using synthetic proteins created on site of transfer. Basically creating a pseudo "meat" body for them to use; except its closer to nanites I guess.

I'm sure someone is going to say they might have summoning, or remind me I've talked about how they might do summoning... But...

I would love a digital familiar! I hope this is somewhere in there.


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Archmage Variel wrote:
Luna Protege wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

Anyways, closer on topic; anyone else hoping one of these magic hacks is basically access to a digital familiar? Like... Digimon?

Okay, maybe not that awesome, but still; the dualistic nature of the relationship between wizard and familiar has always fascinated me. It's like a reflection of the self given physical form. Carrying that over to digital space has always felt like a natural next step.

... That, and digital space entering meat space. The overlapping and fusion (in not just a metaphorical sense) of digital and material spaces feels like a natural outcome once you're able to bend space enough to create demi-planes and the like. Since at that point you can basically create a demi-plane that exists purely to act as a computer, with altered physics that replace needing it to be a mechanical computer, with it being a computer made entirely of reality hacks.

Or... Alternatively, one doesn't even need to go that far to pull it off. Digimon Tamers used an explanation that the transfer is more that the digital information is being re-synthesised into physical information using synthetic proteins created on site of transfer. Basically creating a pseudo "meat" body for them to use; except its closer to nanites I guess.

I'm sure someone is going to say they might have summoning, or remind me I've talked about how they might do summoning... But...

I would love a digital familiar! I hope this is somewhere in there.

I remember Owen K.Stephens said that was in the list of things he wants to get in. I think it was back in the mechanic preview.


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Xayl wrote:
Archmage Variel wrote:
Luna Protege wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

Anyways, closer on topic; anyone else hoping one of these magic hacks is basically access to a digital familiar? Like... Digimon?

Okay, maybe not that awesome, but still; the dualistic nature of the relationship between wizard and familiar has always fascinated me. It's like a reflection of the self given physical form. Carrying that over to digital space has always felt like a natural next step.

... That, and digital space entering meat space. The overlapping and fusion (in not just a metaphorical sense) of digital and material spaces feels like a natural outcome once you're able to bend space enough to create demi-planes and the like. Since at that point you can basically create a demi-plane that exists purely to act as a computer, with altered physics that replace needing it to be a mechanical computer, with it being a computer made entirely of reality hacks.

Or... Alternatively, one doesn't even need to go that far to pull it off. Digimon Tamers used an explanation that the transfer is more that the digital information is being re-synthesised into physical information using synthetic proteins created on site of transfer. Basically creating a pseudo "meat" body for them to use; except its closer to nanites I guess.

I'm sure someone is going to say they might have summoning, or remind me I've talked about how they might do summoning... But...

I would love a digital familiar! I hope this is somewhere in there.
I remember Owen K.Stephens said that was in the list of things he wants to get in. I think it was back in the mechanic preview.
Owen KC Stephens said wrote:
It's not core, but it's literally at the top of my list of "things we need to do"


Huh. Still missing the Starfinder tag apparently.


Do they get a 'Form of the Machine' spell?


Umbral Reaver wrote:
Do they get a 'Form of the Machine' spell?

Well... Given that higher level transmutation spells that increase your size have probably been nerfed due to it not changing the damage dice, the major benefits of such spells will likely be the special abilities, natural armor bonus, and Ability score boost.

Still a pretty good boost, will probably only be lowered one spell level down at most, which would make the lowest level Draconic form spells roughly in like with the Technomancer's higher end spells.

... Enlarge and Reduce person will probably be pretty bad though, you may as well just replace it with the Cat's Grace and Giant's strength spells.

Anyways, if we get a form of the machine spell, its probably going to be used to get off 2 heavy weapon attacks, or a half dozen different implant weapon attacks.

This is my best guess.


Luna Protege wrote:
Umbral Reaver wrote:
Do they get a 'Form of the Machine' spell?

Well... Given that higher level transmutation spells that increase your size have probably been nerfed due to it not changing the damage dice, the major benefits of such spells will likely be the special abilities, natural armor bonus, and Ability score boost.

Still a pretty good boost, will probably only be lowered one spell level down at most, which would make the lowest level Draconic form spells roughly in like with the Technomancer's higher end spells.

... Enlarge and Reduce person will probably be pretty bad though, you may as well just replace it with the Cat's Grace and Giant's strength spells.

Anyways, if we get a form of the machine spell, its probably going to be used to get off 2 heavy weapon attacks, or a half dozen different implant weapon attacks.

This is my best guess.

They have already stated there are no spells or powers/abilities that alter a characters attributes in Starfinder (Bull's Strength, etc.). They have spells that can assist your various physical/mental/social abilities but they don't boost your attribute scores.

The level up boosts and 2/4/6 point increases are the sole exception at this time.


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Gilfalas wrote:

They have already stated there are no spells or powers/abilities that alter a characters attributes in Starfinder (Bull's Strength, etc.). They have spells that can assist your various physical/mental/social abilities but they don't boost your attribute scores.

The level up boosts and 2/4/6 point increases are the sole exception at this time.

.... yet another instance of "Why have mages not researched obvious forms of magic?"


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Is FORM BLAZING SWORD (summon weapon for vehicles) a Technomancer spell?


Umbral Reaver wrote:
Is FORM BLAZING SWORD (summon weapon for vehicles) a Technomancer spell?

Are you asking if Technomancers can form Voltron? That'd probably be a fairly high ability/spell (level 19 if not 20).


Nah, the Technomancer just casts the summon weapon spell based on the size and level of the vehicle. Voltron's combined form is what allows such a powerful weapon to be summoned.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Grave Knight wrote:
Umbral Reaver wrote:
Is FORM BLAZING SWORD (summon weapon for vehicles) a Technomancer spell?
Are you asking if Technomancers can form Voltron? That'd probably be a fairly high ability/spell (level 19 if not 20).

It can't be that hard if a bunch of precocious young people can do it.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Milo v3 wrote:
Gilfalas wrote:

They have already stated there are no spells or powers/abilities that alter a characters attributes in Starfinder (Bull's Strength, etc.). They have spells that can assist your various physical/mental/social abilities but they don't boost your attribute scores.

The level up boosts and 2/4/6 point increases are the sole exception at this time.

.... yet another instance of "Why have mages not researched obvious forms of magic?"

In this case, I imagine it is an acknowledgment that allowing dynamic changes to attributes slows down the game. This is especially true in PFS where you don't know what sort of weird buffs someone might be bringing in.

If the person you are playing with has a digital character sheet (HeroLab, PCGen, a really good spreadsheet), they have a better way to deal with it than someone using pen and paper, but you still need to check that everything looks to have been applied correctly.

As an example at the higher levels, having a brown fur Arcanist casting Elemental Body III on someone and then using their arcane reservoir or increase the attribute boost on one attribute can get really complicated. Especially since at that level, pretty much everyone has some attribute enhancing items.

The idea is great, but it can really bog down play.


So if I use my spell slot to make a weapon aND I make, say, a machine gun, I'm proficient, but I don't have specialization. What if I make a pistol, and I already have specialization with small arms? Am I still only proficient? So do I have specialization for that at that time?


Loving the Green Lantern powers.


BretI wrote:
Milo v3 wrote:
Gilfalas wrote:

They have already stated there are no spells or powers/abilities that alter a characters attributes in Starfinder (Bull's Strength, etc.). They have spells that can assist your various physical/mental/social abilities but they don't boost your attribute scores.

The level up boosts and 2/4/6 point increases are the sole exception at this time.

.... yet another instance of "Why have mages not researched obvious forms of magic?"

In this case, I imagine it is an acknowledgment that allowing dynamic changes to attributes slows down the game. This is especially true in PFS where you don't know what sort of weird buffs someone might be bringing in.

If the person you are playing with has a digital character sheet (HeroLab, PCGen, a really good spreadsheet), they have a better way to deal with it than someone using pen and paper, but you still need to check that everything looks to have been applied correctly.

As an example at the higher levels, having a brown fur Arcanist casting Elemental Body III on someone and then using their arcane reservoir or increase the attribute boost on one attribute can get really complicated. Especially since at that level, pretty much everyone has some attribute enhancing items.

The idea is great, but it can really bog down play.

I think instead they're going with damage bonuses, which seem much more functional.

The additional thing is tracking +4d6 damage on a shot (the technomage spell we saw months ago in the video) is worthwhile, while tracking a pile of +1 and +2 bonuses is just super annoying.


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Voss wrote:

I think instead they're going with damage bonuses, which seem much more functional.

The additional thing is tracking +4d6 damage on a shot (the technomage spell we saw months ago in the video) is worthwhile, while tracking a pile of +1 and +2 bonuses is just super annoying.

I hope it is a little bit more than that.

I seem to remember there being something about being able to create cone effects. I'm hoping they can do something like turning an AoE selective (Nice Shooting!). That would give some more options when opponents are grouped.

Being able to grant the special attacks can be a lot of fun. It is all the changes for size and attributes that slowed down the transformation and polymorph effects.

Liberty's Edge

Milo v3 wrote:
Gilfalas wrote:

They have already stated there are no spells or powers/abilities that alter a characters attributes in Starfinder (Bull's Strength, etc.). They have spells that can assist your various physical/mental/social abilities but they don't boost your attribute scores.

The level up boosts and 2/4/6 point increases are the sole exception at this time.

.... yet another instance of "Why have mages not researched obvious forms of magic?"

They have, they just haven't found a way to recreate those old spells. It's just a lost art after many centuries.


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Bulls strength and similar required bits of a bull. With golarion gone, the were no more bulls to get bits from


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But by the Starfinder era, spellcasters figured out how to cast spells with no components whatsoever. Even before then, sorcerers and other casters with the Eschew Materials feat could cast spells without such unpriced material components.

But I seem to recall reading about the existence of spells and magic/other items that boost Various things that improved ability scores would boost even in the absence of actual ability score boosters outside the standard Starfinder methods.


Yes, now we can cast spells without materials, but maybe the spells that were left behind are the ones that wouldn't work with this style of spellcasting? That's where other spells come into play


It's more a case that the spells work differently. You can cast a spell that makes you stronger, so you can carry more stuff or bend some iron bars, but it doesn't actually modify your stat.


Which is kinda what I was trying to say. That's more like it :)


This is the first I can recall seeing "bulk," which I'm guessing will be used in the encumbrance system instead of pounds/kilograms, taking an items size as well as weight into accounts. I can dig it.

So on the Fabricate Arms ability, why is it a flat 10 on the limit of the item's bulk, and not tied to the character's level (so higher level = bulkier items created)? You can't take this until level 5, so the minimum bulk for any item you make would be 5 -- would there be that many weapons or suits of armor with a bulk between 5 and 10, or a bulk of 11+, that would make this ability unbalanced?


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I assume it's because there will probably be vehicle-grade and ship-grade weapons that are super unbalanced in non-vehicle/ship combat and you know there are gonna be those players that use the most obscure combination of spells and abilities to summon orbital cannons and one-shot every major encounter because 'the rules don't say I can't!'


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BretI wrote:

In this case, I imagine it is an acknowledgment that allowing dynamic changes to attributes slows down the game. This is especially true in PFS where you don't know what sort of weird buffs someone might be bringing in.

If the person you are playing with has a digital character sheet (HeroLab, PCGen, a really good spreadsheet), they have a better way to deal with it than someone using pen and paper, but you still need to check that everything looks to have been applied correctly.

As an example at the higher levels, having a brown fur Arcanist casting Elemental Body III on someone and then using their arcane reservoir or increase the attribute boost on one attribute can get really complicated. Especially since at that level, pretty much everyone has some attribute enhancing items.

The idea is great, but it can really bog down play.

If I wanted to play a rules light game I'd play a rules light game. Removing basic obvious magic effects like "This sword is more accurate now" and "Increase your strength" is just stupid to me when it comes to world-building, especially when those effects Do exist in the setting since we know the past of the setting. Everything we've heard about magic in Starfinder sounds like every mage in existence has an int of 7 and is purposefully shooting themselves in the foot.


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Milo v3 wrote:


If I wanted to play a rules light game I'd play a rules light game. Removing basic obvious magic effects like "This sword is more accurate now" and "Increase your strength" is just stupid to me when it comes to world-building, especially when those effects Do exist in the setting since we know the past of the setting. Everything we've heard about magic in Starfinder sounds like every mage in existence has an int of 7 and is purposefully shooting themselves in the foot.

Well, the former is very metagame (what is a 'more accurate sword?'), and the latter can be done without recalculating bonuses.

You're assuming 'basic obvious magic effects' must act in a very specific fashion.

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