Pathfinder Battles Preview: Ch-ch-ch-changes

Friday, April 4, 2014

Before we get to today's Reign of Winter miniature reveals, I want to focus on a couple of important general changes to the Pathfinder Battles line that will begin with this set, both in terms of the number of figures per set and in terms of the subscription benefits offered to ongoing Pathfinder Battles Case Subscription.

Number of Figures Per Set

Starting with Reign of Winter, Pathfinder Battles sets will go to 44 figures plus the Gargantuan case incentive figure. This reduction in number of figures per set is designed to help WizKids get its costs in line, and also comes with the added benefit of providing more common and uncommon figures to folks who buy their miniatures by the case (something a lot of customers have been asking for). The number of figures in a case, brick, or booster does not change, just the composition of the set in terms of total sculpts.

A case should still contain a full set (as always in the case of a collated product we can't guarantee this, but it's certainly the goal). Below is the model rarity breakdown for a case:

56 commons, 32 uncommons, 8 rares, 28 large uncommons, 4 large rares.

Here is the figure breakdown for the Reign of Winter set:

7 common (Small), 6 common (Medium), 11 uncommon (Medium), 8 uncommon (Large), 8 rare (Medium), and 4 rare (Large).

The total number of figures per case and the overall price of the case will not change. The specific figure size breakdowns will differ slightly from set to set, but the model rarity breakdown should be stable from release to release.

Case Subscription Changes

When we started the Pathfinder Battles line, the original plan was to supplement set releases with frequent Encounter Packs, Builder Series mini-sets, and other "one-off" releases. These have proven to be less popular than we'd hoped both with the audience and with our partners at WizKids, so as time has gone on we've produced significantly fewer of these special releases than we'd planned to.

We set up our Ongoing Case Subscriptions—a vital backbone to keeping the Pathfinder Battles line in production since it establishes a baseline of sales for the brand—with these special releases in mind. The current model earns subscribers discount codes to use on these releases, with three different discounts for the case incentive figure, special Encounter Packs or Builder Series releases, and another discount for loose singles sold on paizo.com.

Starting with the Reign of Winter set, the Ongoing Case Subscription benefits will change to:

  • The right to purchase one limited-edition case premium figure at 75% off its normal retail price per case ordered. (Same as existing benefit)
  • 30% off the normal retail price of ALL Pathfinder Battles products on paizo.com, including the cases ordered as part of your subscription, all previously released product, all Encounter Pack, Builder Series, or special releases, and all loose, unpackaged singles.

To recap: Active a ongoing Pathfinder Battles Case Subscription to the Pathfinder Battles line receive a 30% discount on all Pathfinder Battles-branded products on paizo.com except the limited-edition case incentive figures, which can be purchased at 75% off. These discounts bring our pricing in line with other online retailers.

These benefits last only as long as your Pathfinder Battles Ongoing Subscription, and go away if you cancel your subscription. Existing coupon codes provided as part of our ongoing Case Subscription benefits remain active. Even though they are for 20% off instead of the new 30% discount, they can be used even after you've stopped your subscription.

It may take us a little time to update paizo.com to reflect these new changes, but they will be in place by the time Reign of Winter is scheduled to ship to customers in late May.

We think these new subscription benefits are easier to understand and more attractive to Pathfinder Battles fans. Our ongoing Case Subscribers are absolutely vital to the continued success of the Pathfinder Battles line. If you are collecting every set, I strongly encourage you to sign up for an Ongoing Case Subscription today. It really is the most important thing you can do to encourage a long and healthy life for Pathfinder Battles. We certainly appreciate it.

Today's Reign of Winter Previews

With all of that business out of the way, let's take a look at a few of the remaining figures from the Reign of Winter set!

Up first this week is the Zombie Panther, a nasty undead great cat ready to pounce on your player characters! This mangy critter is covered in spots exposing rotting flesh beneath its fur, from a nasty bit of exposed ribcage along its side to a significant element of his face where the skull is completely visible. I'm holding the production figure in hand as I write this, and I'm impressed with the effectiveness of what amounts to a pretty simple figure. At the common rarity, you'll have enough of this gross undead animal to build a neat encounter. It also makes a great familiar for a necromancer!

Here we have the Wolliped, an eight-legged beast of burden from the snow planet Triaxus. Though Wollipeds do not play a prominent role in the Reign of Winter Adventure Path, they do appear on page 90 of Pathfinder Adventure Path #70: The Frozen Stars, which also features Triaxus heavily. I threw the Wolliped in this set as my "Erik's Choice" figure because I thought he looked cool and I'd never seen anything like him in plastic before. As a big fan of planetary romance novels like A Princess of Mars, I'm also a sucker for alien mounts with too many legs. The Wolliped officially has an intelligence of 2, but the figure's face is quite expressive, and he could easily double as some sort of intelligent creature. He's slated at the uncommon rarity, and is a Large creature.

Last up this week is Zavackuul, a reclusive and eccentric aberration who dwells in an icy fissure somewhere during the Reign of Winter Adventure Path (no spoilers!). Zavackuul is a compulsive collector of victims, whom she entombs in ice and displays in her lair. The simple (but effective) paint job on this figure looks great, but the real stand-out here are the six (!) tentacles whipping off her central form, bringing a great sense of dimensionality to the miniature. Zavackuul is a Large, rare figure.

And that's it for this week. Please consider setting up an Ongoing Case Subscription to make sure you don't miss a single Reign of Winter figure!

Until next week,

Erik Mona
Publisher

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Tags: Miniatures Pathfinder Battles Reign of Winter
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Grand Lodge

To reiterate a theme, there are far more players than DMs. DMs will buy a case or two; or cherry pick the monsters in the aftermarket. Players will buy NPCs in the aftermarket. And the coolest miniatures rise to the top. That is why the iconics are selling at high prices in the aftermarket. The demand for these are the greatest.

The Dungeons and Dragons miniatures (DDM) line was very successful through very many sets. But in addition to appealing to players of the RPG, they created a separate game that used the miniatures. All miniatures whether monsters or NPC types were needed by all players. Power pieces from this "skirmish" game were in high demand during its heyday. This "skirmish" game created an additional demand.

When the economy tanked in 2008, Wizards of the Coast cut cost and discontinued the miniatures game. In their own words, the miniatures game only represented one third of the sales. ONLY!!! I don't know too many businesses that can survive losing one third of their business. Where is the DDM line today?

Overall the Pathfinder Battles line has done well without an added miniatures game associated with it. How much better could it do if it had one? It seems to me that Wizkids has a certain knack for creating miniature based games. Maybe they can't come up with something without using a clix base. Just a thought.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber
Mazra wrote:

To reiterate a theme, there are far more players than DMs. DMs will buy a case or two; or cherry pick the monsters in the aftermarket. Players will buy NPCs in the aftermarket. And the coolest miniatures rise to the top. That is why the iconics are selling at high prices in the aftermarket. The demand for these are the greatest.

The Dungeons and Dragons miniatures (DDM) line was very successful through very many sets. But in addition to appealing to players of the RPG, they created a separate game that used the miniatures. All miniatures whether monsters or NPC types were needed by all players. Power pieces from this "skirmish" game were in high demand during its heyday. This "skirmish" game created an additional demand.

When the economy tanked in 2008, Wizards of the Coast cut cost and discontinued the miniatures game. In their own words, the miniatures game only represented one third of the sales. ONLY!!! I don't know too many businesses that can survive losing one third of their business. Where is the DDM line today?

Overall the Pathfinder Battles line has done well without an added miniatures game associated with it. How much better could it do if it had one? It seems to me that Wizkids has a certain knack for creating miniature based games. Maybe they can't come up with something without using a clix base. Just a thought.

It's really hard to say. There are only so many dollars worth of discretionary "fun spending" available in the average household. Introducing a new minis game wouldn't (in my case) net any additional profit because I'm already spending as much as I can/will with Paizo and 3PP. I suspect many others are in similar situations, where their spending capacity is reached. While I'm sure there would be some increased spending, there'd also be a lot of redistributed spending, and the effort of maintaining and producing yet another product might not be worth whatever increase there was.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Cleanthes wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
Cleanthes wrote:
I can't say I'm all that surprised about the Builder Packs and Evolutions. I keep a pretty close eye on the aftermarket, and I'm starting to see signs of retailers dumping some overstock on some of those (especially the white dragons and the undead line), which suggests that they weren't doing as well as hoped.
Our own sales of the White Dragon Evolutions pack have inexplicably accelerated of late.
I'm glad to hear it! Has the red dragon set met expectations?

I'd say we're "content" with the numbers, which is more than "disappointed" and less than "happy".

Grand Lodge

Anguish wrote:
Introducing a new minis game wouldn't (in my case) net any additional profit because I'm already spending as much as I can/will with Paizo and 3PP. I suspect many others are in similar situations, where their spending capacity is reached.

You likely do not represent the additional demand. Nor does most that post in this thread, myself included. This additional demand is from RPG players that are not gamemasters. Or those that also like Wizkid's clix game. The point is that it would bring in some new buyers, with new disposable income into the marketplace.

It would need to be an easy to learn, fast paced and fun game.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

After going through and reading all of these posts, here are some ideas for Erik, and Paizo, to consider going forward with regards to the Pathfinder Battles line.

I encourage anyone and everyone to comment on these ideas. Do they sound practical, do they sound like something you'd buy? Do they sound like something you could see many people buying? What suggestions can you make to help make the idea better? What ideas, similar to mine or otherwise, do you have for other potential products?

Idea #1:

A future Pathfinder Battles set of all humanoid creatures.

What it is:

This would be in the vein of the Legends of Golarion line, but instead it would allow the company to show off some of the more unique humanoid characters in it's universe. It would also provide wonderful sculpts of NPC miniatures. In some cases, these NPC miniatures could also double up as PC miniatures, as many often do.

The reasoning behind it:

It sounds to me that while you have plenty of people claiming they want variety of monsters, the sales back up those who wish for more PC/NPC miniatures. Fair enough. This set would give the people what they want, and could provide one of your more popular lines. Despite how hard I bang the drum for more monsters, I would still buy this set in a heartbeat. This would be the type of set that would be a boon for any DM looking to increase his NPC collection. It would even have an appeal to some longtime players who just want a good variety of miniatures to choose from for the various campaigns they play in going forward.

The only real downside I see is that it might not look as cool in the advertisements, having just humanoids to show off. Leafing through these Adventure Paths and other sources, there are too many great illustrations that have not been used. In fact, releasing a set like this would even give you a chance to put out some of the NPCs that never made it from previously released sets. It seems to me that would make all those who do play every Adventure Path extremely happy, while also giving you a chance to play up those characters and thus bring in more Adventure Path subscribers.

This seems to me like a win-win situation to me. It doesn't matter who or what you put in here, as long as you continue working your selection magic. We've already been able to determine that it won't dampen the desire for future lines. Having a set of 45 humanoids won't suddenly discourage the love for a handful more showing up in future Adventure Path sets. I suggest trying something like this; if it falls flat then the worst thing that comes from it is that you've got 45 new PC/NPC humanoids for consumers to cherry pick as singles.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

In support of my first idea, here's an example of a great lineup of PC/NPC miniatures. I've decided to narrow the set down to only one source, the NPC Codex. (With a very small exception, sort of). Also, all but one of these miniatures has an illustration.

It's a 45-piece set, to reflect the recent change in the Pathfinder Battles line. The breakdown of rarities is below. I've included the name of the miniature in the codex, then the race, class and page number where he's located in the NPC Codex. Underneath each suggestion, I've included a bit of information on why that particular character was chosen for the set and suggestions on possible ways he or she can be used. I tried to put a spin on it as though each explanation is part of the Friday preview.

I encourage any and all constructive feedback.

Pathfinder Battles Line: NPC Codex

*Going with a 3 common (Small), 9 common (Medium), 3 uncommon (small), 9 uncommon (Medium), 8 uncommon (Large), 3 rare (small), 5 rare (Medium), and 4 rare (Large) set.

Commons – Small (x3)
--Dagger Master (Halfling Rogue) – page 158 NPC Codex
This shadowy killer would make for a great PC. He would also work just as well as one in a group of NPC assassins. As a common, a case would give enough for that small group.

--Pirate Queen (Halfling Ranger) – page 133 NPC Codex
This little fighting lady can pass herself off as a fighter, a ranger, or anything else along those lines. She has enough of a pirate look to her that she can fit well with the taller pirates from the Skull & Shackles group. And yet, without an eye patch or a gun in her hand, she can just as easily pass as a land-anchored character. This miniature would provide great versatility for PC or NPC characters alike.

--Crime Lord (Gnome Fighter) – page 94 NPC Codex
Proving that Gnomes can be fighters, too, this guy is great looking and fills plenty of needs. Need some Gnomish tower guards? This guy will do it. Is the Gnome king sending out a party of Gnome fighters with or against your player’s PC’s? This guy fits that mold as well. Really want to play a Gnome fighter and are searching for a cool miniature as representation, complete with neat helmet? Boom. This guy is perfect for you. Like the other two, this common would provide excellent versatility.

Commons – Medium (x10)
--Dwarven Rager (Dwarf Barbarian) – page 10 NPC Codex
It really doesn’t get any more straightforward than this guy. He comes, he beats you up, and he leaves. This particular Rager wears a scowl on his face and a nice suit of armor. He’s got a spikey shield and an axe and looks like he knows how to use them. He makes for a great PC Dwarf, either as Barbarian or Fighter. He also serves just fine with others like him, as foot patrol or a small troop.

--Shadow Cleric (Elven Cleric) – page 59 NPC Codex
This elven beauty wears simple garb to go with the look of determination on her face. Though she can pass as a Shadow Cleric, as per her name, this miniature doubles up just as nicely as an elven rogue. She makes for a wonderful PC or NPC, depending on whatever it is the DM needs.

--Savage Plant Sage (Half-Orc Druid) – page 63 NPC Codex
This menacing half-orc is druid in name but can just as easily pass himself off as a fighter or ranger. With his dark cloak, he can even pass for a half-orc rogue. The fact that he can pull off four different classes means that he works well as part of a hunting or fighting party. He can even be a part of a vicious town gang, and he definitely deserves the common rarity.

--Shieldbreaker (Dwarf Fighter) – page 87 NPC Codex
Another straightforward miniature, this dwarf is a fighter through and through. Dressed up in nice golden armor, this dwarf works as a fighter or paladin. While he’s not as versatile as some of the other commons on this list, he’s cheap enough that he can be the beginning of a great dwarven army.

--Steadfast Defender (Dwarf Monk) – page 100 NPC Codex
This staunch defender works as either a cleric or monk. He can even be used as a priest at a cleric’s temple. He’s slotted at the common rarity because not only does he work as a PC, but any good DM can use several of him to help form a small band of clerics or monks.

--Mage Slayer (Half-Orc Rogue) – page 155 NPC Codex
This half-orc works as a fighter, ranger, cleric, paladin or rogue. That list right there is versatility too good to pass up. He works as a singular PC, a menacing NPC, or in a group of NPC’s. Half-Orc fans will love to use him, while half-orc haters will love to kill him. Either way, slotted in at the common rarity, he’s a must-have.

--Storm Sorcerer (Elf Sorcerer) – page 163 NPC Codex
Though technically a sorcerer, this elf looks more like a fighter, ranger or even a cleric. This makes him a great fit for the common rarity, as he makes for an interesting option for a hunting, scouting, or fighting party.

--Ice Mage (Half-Elf Sorcerer) – page 171 NPC Codex
Considering her title, you’d think this half-elf would show more ice themes in her garments. That’s just as well, as she can easily pass off as a ranger or druid. As with all the other commons in this set, the versatility with this particular character is enough to give it the common rarity.

--Dilettante (Human Rogue) – page 151 NPC Codex
This human has the ability to pass himself off as a rogue, ranger, sorcerer or bard pc miniature. He even works as a cultist, noble, spy or other type of NPC miniature. His glowing frost dagger hints that he’s got more to his game than just a simple journeyman. Slotted at the common rarity, this guy comes in multiples so DM’s can put together a group of devious cultists to attack the PC party.

Uncommons – Small (x3)
--Sacred Guardian (Gnome Cleric Of Shelyn) – page 55 NPC Codex
This little guy is more of a talker than fighter, but he’s pretty cool looking all the same. Dressed mostly in nice green clothes and wielding a glaive, this particular character works well as a cleric PC. He can also pass as a noble NPC or throne room guard. He’s got enough of a jester look that he can even pass as a bard PC in a pinch. Slotted at the uncommon rarity, anyone purchasing a case will have at least a pair to use as guards for a holy site or to place in front of the door to the throne.

--Fey Friend (Gnome Druid) – page 72 NPC Codex
As is the case with most druids, this small character can pass equally well as a druid or fighter. He might even work as a fighter with more of a nature twist. He’ll also work as a PC miniature in the aforementioned roles, but having a couple of him allows a DM to use him as a scout for a gnome hunting party, or even as part of a fighting party.

--Thunder Wizard (Halfling Evoker) – page 182 NPC Codex
This little wizard looks like a serious menace. He’s got a blue-eyed stare to go along with his overall look of intense concentration. With a big ball of blue arcane energy in each hand, our small pal here can pass himself off as a sorcerer or wizard. He works great as a PC miniature for any player around the table hoping to play a little magic man. But because of the serious nature of his appearance, with those glowing blue eyes, a DM could pair him up with another of his ilk to create quite the malicious tandem to toss at his adventuring party.

Uncommons – Medium (x9)
--Death Dealer (Half-Orc Barbarian) – page 24 NPC Codex
Finding the right half-orc miniature as a PC barbarian can be troublesome. Despite all of the options out there, I don’t feel as any look truly fearsome. This guy would come along and change that, and even provide the DM with an ability to pair him up to add two very deadly NPC’s to a party of raiding half-orcs. Not only do the skull mask and shoulder spiked armor make him appear evil, but the +1 unholy ghost touch adamantine scythe he’s whirling around warns everyone to stay out of his way.

--Gambler (Dwarf Bard) – page 30 NPC Codex
This stout musician can travel from city to city, frequenting all the taverns, playing Kenny Rogers on his busted up lute and leaning on lady luck to pay his way. More a fisticuffs drunkard than a dungeon crawler, this dwarf obviously works well as a bard. He’s also got a hand of cards and a big mug of ale, representing an obvious party face and info-gatherer for the seedy side of town. He might pass himself off as a fighter with a musical soul, but he works just as well in pairs around a tavern table.

--Demon Hunter (Human Paladin) – page 127 NPC Codex
It takes a special breed to go hunt demons for a living. Luckily, for anyone with the stones to target, track down and kill such chaotic evils, this miniature exists. Wrapped from head to toe in medium armor and several non-form fitting types of cloth, it’s not even apparent to the untrained eye whether this particular Paladin is male or female, added an extra bit of versatility that most miniatures in this set cannot boast. Still, though she can easily pass as a paladin, the lack of religious symbols on her garments and gear allow her to easily pass herself off as a fighter or even a well-clad ranger. Despite her +4 cold iron evil outsider-bane greatsword, it’s her shortbow in hand and full to the brim quiver on back that most first see when gazing upon this holy warrior. With her hood up, only a nat 20 perception check is going to be able to break the versatility that keeps her race a guessing game between human, half-elf and elf. Despite what seems like a great PC miniature—and she is—this character also works well for a DM interested in pairing her up with her double and sending her out after the adventuring party.

--Bounty Hunter (Human Ranger) – page 135 NPC Codex
This hired human hunts his prey carefully from afar. Equipped in mostly light armor with a nice looking composite longbow, this miniature also keeps his hood up, to help hide whether he’s a human, elf, or something in-between. He makes for a great pc ranger, of course, but might even be able to pass himself off as a fighter or druid in light armor. He comes in this set at the uncommon rarity, giving players a chance to use him for their PC or DM’s the opportunity to pair them up and have the king of the land send them out after the pc party. Though not quite as versatile as some of the others in this set, he’s got that quintessential ranger look to him.

--Demon-Blooded Sorcerer (Half-Orc Sorcerer) – page 175 NPC Codex
Though most often associated with brute force, sometimes a half-orc is born with his ferociousness manifesting itself in his veins. With one glowing red hand giving off a wispy trail of arcane smoke and the other claw clutching a flaming greataxe, it goes without saying that this miniature represents a magic-wielding half-orc. Though the magic indicates he can pass as a wizard, he’s best suited for a PC Sorcerer or PC Druid gig. He comes in this set at the uncommon rarity so that DM’s have the ability to add a few sorcerers to any potential half-orc tribe they might be building.

--Cave Wizard (Dwarf Evoker/Wizard) – page 184 NPC Codex
Sometimes a dwarf spends so much time underground, hunting for those precious gems and ore, he has enough time to study as a wizard. This miniature allows a player to play a dwarven wizard either as an evoker or just a dwarf who illustrates the patience it takes to study, study, study. He’s got a simple staff to help him get around, and an outstretched hand ready to cast a spell. This spellcasting dwarf even comes with his very own familiar, a bat. This is another miniature with somewhat limited versatility, but finding a great looking dwarven wizard helps make up for that fact. Having said that, he can likely pass as a dwarven druid in a pinch, with his bat serving as an animal companion.

--Hateful Scourge (Half-Elf Druid) – page 76 NPC Codex
Finally, we have an elven druid wearing ironwood full plate in miniature form. This beautiful lover of the woods is most easily playable as a PC druid. She can also pass for a ranger in a pinch. One of the more appealing things about this miniature is that with her hood up, only the most observant can see two tiny points sticking out where her ears are. Anyone stumbling upon her might take an extra moment to decipher whether she’s an elf, human, or half-elf. And although she works great as a PC, she can help out a DM looking to put together a tribe of characters devoted to nature and the forest.

--Sword Savant (Elf Monk) – page 110 NPC Codex
Some monks train themselves to be killing machines without ever picking up a weapon. Others realize that, thanks to their increased agility and reflexes, they are able to take advantage of some of the more unique weapons in the world. And then there are monks like this character, who realizes that by placing all his focus into one weapon, he can become one with that weapon. This monk understands the mantra one mind, one blade, and one state of being. Clothed in garments that allow for ultimate, unimpeded movement, this elven monk can make for a good PC monk or fighter. With his garish garb, he can also pass for a cool looking NPC noble. He comes in at the uncommon rarity in this set, allowing DM’s a chance to utilize him as part of a high-powered, Jedi-looking tandem.

--Master Spy (Human Bard) – page 42 NPC Codex
Not all bards make their living playing taverns or traveling from town to town to play for the hard working people they meet. In fact, some bards perform a few times a week for nobles, but spend most of their time caught up in the intrigue and espionage of politics. Whether he hangs around his own city dabbling in the game of houses or is sent to a neighboring court to spy on their nobles, the master spy is perhaps as deadly as anyone in a role-playing heavy campaign. This miniature holds a sword in one hand and a goblet in another, indicating he’s game for anything as long as he can accomplish his goals. Well dressed and good-looking, this miniature makes for a great PC bard or rogue interested more in city politics and noble nitwits than the average player. He can also be doubled-up by DM’s so they can set a dynamic duo of spies after the PC party.

Uncommons – Large (x8)
--Savage Rider (Human Barbarian) – page 18 NPC Codex
If I lived out in the countryside, I’d be terrified to see this savage rider barreling towards me on his warhorse. Between the rhino hide armor and helmet that cover him, or the multitude of spear-like lances in his arsenal, I’m not sure what is more terrifying about this character. Though he pretty much just works as a mounted barbarian miniature, the fact that his head is covered up helps keep his true race a secret. With this versatility, and the ability to put a few of him together to provide a charging pack of savage riders that the DM can use to terrorize his party, this miniature is slated at the uncommon large rarity.

--Wild Lancer – (Half-Elf Barbarian) – page 12 NPC Codex
Thought not quite as intimidating in physical presence, these half-elf barbarians still look ready to wreck some open range havoc. Whether it’s the plethora of javelins on her back or her underrated skill atop a horse, these wild lancers make for a great mounted elf or half-elf barbarian PC miniature. Slated at the large uncommon rarity, anyone buying a case can cull together enough of them to hassle the party. Better yet, pit these graceful riders against the savage riders and let the party figure out what to do once they realize they’re caught in the middle.

--Forge Rider (Dwarf Paladin of Torag) – page 119 NPC Codex
Not every mounted paladin is going to be a big-bodied creature. This character is the perfect example. This dwarf rides a mount and wields a dwarven urgrosh, all in favor of protecting dwarven communities. This guy isn’t afraid to ride into combat, but he’s also content to hang bang, survey the scene, and direct his troops from a short distance. This miniature makes for a great dwarven fighter, cleric or paladin pc, dressed in full plate and ready to go from day one. If put side by side with others like him, he makes for an intimidating part of a dwarven army, especially against a party not expecting dwarven calvary.

--Mounted Paragon (Human Paladin) – page 123 NPC Codex
It doesn’t really get any more typical than a mounted paragon as far as mounted characters are concerned. Striking fear into the hearts of evil and undead with his holy lance, this lawful good character will go wherever he is needed most. Like many other miniatures in this line, wearing a helmet adds to his versatility by letting him function as a human, elf, or half-elf pc miniature. It goes without saying that he’s slotted at the large uncommon rarity in order to allow DM’s put together a great cavalry force for any army.

--Griffon Rider (Elf Fighter) – page 85 NPC Codex
The illustration in the NPC Codex only depicts the rider herself, but we’ve included her in this set already mounted on her Griffon because it’s too great of an opportunity to do otherwise. This elven fighter protects the skies, especially those near elven habitats. She is trained and skilled enough to fight in the sky, or swoop to create havoc for those party members stuck on the ground. Due to the fact that she can travel the land as the griffon flies, she also makes for a solid scout. Be careful, though, because she’s still a large enough target that those enemies hunting for aerial scouts can still bring her down. This miniature makes for a wonderful PC fighter, ranger or possibly even a druid. She is slotted at the large uncommon rarity so DM’s have a chance to put together an elven aerial force to attack the party.

--Desert Stalker (Half-Orc Ranger) – page 137 NPC Codex
A half-orc ranger in the desert actually exists? Yes. And even better than that, he’s riding a camel. That’s right, folks, this unique miniature sports a big half-orc on top of a bigger camel. The illustration of the half-orc ranger is on page 137. While he isn’t on a camel there, we’ve taken this great image and put him on a camel, his main mode of transportation. So why is he not a rarity? For starters, our buddy here looks so cool that we just had to give DM’s a chance to put together a small half-orc clan fit for the desert. Just as important, we’ve structured the miniature so that the half-orc can be removed, without breaking it, and the camels can be used as the herd animals they truly are. Versatility is truly the key with this guy.

--Bison (Animal Companion) – page 174 Bestiary 1
Instead of only putting out mounts with PCs on top of them, we’ve decided to do something a bit different with these last two large uncommon slots. First up, we have the Bison. One of the more underrated animals in the bestiary, this animal serves several purposes. The bison makes for a great animal companion, especially for a ranger or druid more at home on the plains. He also serves as an animal that a druid wild shapes into, thus providing an appropriate miniature for a druid PC. Bison are also one of the more plentiful herd animals. It’s for this reason we’ve given DM’s a chance to build up a herd of his or her own to send charging at a party.

--Rhinoceros (Animal Companion) – page 235 Bestiary 1
Our last large uncommon rarity piece is the rhinoceros. Like the Bison, this animal can be an animal companion to a druid or ranger. Furthermore, a druid is able to wild shape into a rhinoceros, allowing a druid PC to use this throughout a campaign. DM’s will be happy, because an attack on the party by a herd of rhinos can provide extremely devastating results. Buy a case and you’ll already have your own mini-heard.

Rare – Small (x3)
--Lion Tamer (Gnome Bard) – page 38 NPC Codex
As is the case with most of the rares in this set, the Lion Tamer is an extremely busy and intricate illustration. That’s one of the two very big reasons why he’s slotted as a rare, because getting this guy right, with all the bells and whistles, is going to be extremely difficult. Still, we feel that the quality of Paizo Wizkids miniatures has improved enough to where his sculpt and paint job can be done justice. The other big reason he’s a rare is his limited versatility. Bards are fun to play, but often overlooked when it comes to quality miniatures. Part of this is that the versatility of the bard character himself makes it easy to use other miniatures in place of a bard. Another reason is that, while really fun to play, smaller PC parties tend to eschew bards because of a misconception their roles aren’t as easily defined. We chose the Lion Tamer for this set not only because we love his artwork and his theme, but also because he provides a different type of versatility that we’ll get to later. Oh, and that ‘stache.

--Prankster Illusionist (Gnome Wizard/Illusionist) – page 185 NPC Codex
One of the tougher parts about selecting the right miniatures has been dealing with all the magic users. With some of the common and uncommon choices, there were often fewer indications that the miniature was, indeed, an arcane magic user. This provides some versatility and helped justify adding more than one in a case. However, with these rares we are focusing more on exclusive looks. It’s hard to imagine a line of 45 potential PC miniatures without including a Gnome illusionist. We’re just really happy this gal looks as great as she does. We included her as a rare because not only does she stand out as a Gnome magic user, but because it was important to us to get the details just right. Her color schemes, while simple and subtle at first glance, are actually quite intricate. We wanted to get the detailed design on the front of her tabard as accurate as possible. Her eyes, the face tattoo, her red ruby amulet of natural health and her wand of invisibility (or is it wand of mage armor) all are integral to the overall look and feel of the character. In order to provide a great PC miniature for games to come, we knew we had to get this sculpt perfect. And we believe that we did just that, what do you think?

--Dark Nature Priest (Halfling Druid) – page 77 NPC Codex
When it comes to smaller druids, we really like our iconic, Lini. But when we saw the beautiful artwork of this Halfling, we just knew he had to be included in the set. With his multitude of green hues, leather armor and darkwood wooden shield, he’s got a very earthy look that screams druid. His quarterstaff with dusty rose prism ioun stone, headband of wisdom, ring of protection and slingshot tucked away in his belt are all pieces that are visible and important to his overall look. We made sure we included all of this in his sculpt, including the unique shape and design of his armor. Perhaps what really helps this small guy stand out the most, though, is his cold blue-eyed stare emanating from his leafy tattooed/painted face.

Rare – Mediums (x5)
--Dog Rider (Halfling Barbarian) – page 11 NPC Codex
The little people races make for some great riders, and we decided to honor that by tackling this Halfling barbarian and his riding dog mount. The riding dog was the easy part, but we think you’ll still appreciate his riding saddle and leather barding. The tough part, and the main reason this sculpture requires a rare slot, is the Halfling himself. There is so much going on in this illustration that we really had to buckle down to get this right. Everything from the colored feathers in his hair to the two lances and buckler strapped to his back made this one challenging sculpt, not to mention the struggle to get it right on such a small size. The paint job was crucial, too, so that we wouldn’t mess up his feral-looking ferocious face. Instead of leaving it at that, we chose to take it one step further. We even moved his Halfling sling more to his left so as not to get in the way of his mount. What we are left with is what we feel is our best looking small mounted rider yet, and maybe one our best miniatures period.

--Earthfather (Dwarf Druid) – page 79 NPC Codex
After we first decided to make a line of miniatures based on the NPC Codex, we did a preliminary run-through to decide if there was enough artwork we liked and that we thought could make up a 45-piece line. One of the very first decisions made that day was the mighty Earthfather. With the amount of intricate detail, we knew that if we wanted to get this powerful druid right, he would definitely need to be slotted as a rare miniature. Everything we love about this illustration, the big white beard, unique ironwood full plate armor, the animated darkwood heavy wooden shield on his back and ghost touch quarterstaff in his raised hand is here. We even made sure to get the finer details into the sculpt and paint job, including the light hammer on his belt, cloak of resistance on his back, the ring of evasion and ring of protection on his hand, and even his big black boots of speed. With the unique and commanding look of this miniature, we think any player will love to use him as their druid PC. If nobody goes that route in the campaign, he makes a perfect NPC dwarven druid of great power for the DM to use against the party.

--Saintly Knight (Half-Orc Paladin of Iomedae) – page 116 NPC Codex
Sometimes Lawful Good things come in big, half-orc packages. That’s the case with this miniature. Although not quite as busy as some of the other miniatures that we’ve slotted at the rare level, we wanted to make sure to capture everything as is from the illustration. This miniature is also clearly a half-orc, and is limited to serving as a paladin, cleric or fighter, none of which we’ve included yet in this set. This paladin miniature is beautiful, with the detailed designs on his shield and armor showing up quite nice. His weapons are simple yet solid, and they look like the right ones for a character of his size. Both his cloak of resistance and waist pouch are included, too. And we can’t forget the green gem near the top-middle of his full-plate armor; it sort of ties everything together.

--Grand Necromancer (Human Necromancer Wizard) – page 193 NPC Codex
One look at this character should be all you need to understand why we chose him for this set. Necromancers are one of the most popular NPCs that DMs use for their campaigns. They also make for a pretty popular choice for a player that has decided to play a sorcerer or wizard of questionable morality. While necromancers come in all different shapes, sizes and races, we feel as though this one can act as the quintessential necromancer in any campaign for years to come. Decked out in an amazing bone-like suit of armor, we decided to slot him at the rare level of rarity so we could concentrate on all the intricate parts of attire. Everything is there and in meticulous detail, especially for a miniature. His bone armor, the white cloak covering his shoulder and hanging down in a simple, almost tattered look are all included on his sculpt. We even managed to get his pale skin, pale eyes, and amazing bone vertebrae staff complete with skull staff head. We are convinced that he’ll make for one of the best looking miniatures you’ve ever put down at your gaming table.

--Con Artist (Half-Elf Bard) – page 29 NPC Codex
Here we follow the old saying “another rare, another bard”. Well, maybe that isn’t an old saying, but it definitely should be. We’re bringing this miniature to you in rare form because of all the steps it took to get her right. Look at all those small but important details. You’ve got the leather armor, the masterwork rapier, her dagger and the ring of protection. As if that wasn’t enough, we had to make sure we got her beautiful blue clothing, distinct trousers and leather boots, and her multi-pouch belt all right. But perhaps more important than anything else, we needed to get her pose just right, in mid-performance on her violin. Whether this half-elf is buffing her allies, entertaining the people, or providing distraction for the rogue in her party, she is most clearly a bard. As a half-elf, she can pass herself off as a full elf or half-elf, whatever fits your PC best. She’s even perfect as the main NPC bard for many occasions: on the street, in a tavern or even playing privately for the nobles.

Rare – Larges (x4)
--Rider Of The Steppe (Half-Elf Paladin) – page 121 NPC Codex
Shooting a bow with accuracy from a moving horse seems like it would be one of the toughest things to do in combat. We couldn’t think of any illustration in the NPC Codex that would better represent the perfect character to accomplish such a task. This beautiful looking half-elf is garbed in a somewhat garish red outfit. The lesser amount of white and black in her outfit contrast with the red to make her stand out in nearly any situation where a bow is needed. Once on her horse, there is no way she’s going to sneak up and take anyone by surprise. Nor should such a proud paladin ever have that desire. As with our other mounted figures, the trick with this character isn’t the steed itself, but the appearance of the one on top of it. We wanted her sitting in her saddle drawn and ready to fire. This should provide great versatility for a PC that needs a fighter, cleric, ranger, paladin or bard of the ranged variety. It also lets the DM put her at the head of a small group of cavalry or other troop, allowing her to do her damage while commanding from afar.

--Master Universalist (Elf Wizard) – page 195 NPC Codex
Here we have a wizard on a horse. Wait, what? Why did we save a rare slot for a wizard on a horse, many of you might ask? We wanted to offer players the chance to get a rather unique miniature for a situation that comes up rather frequently in many campaigns, especially at the early levels. While most wizards will never attack from a horse, many still cast the Mount or Phantom Steed spell to help them with other tasks. Regardless of spell, the horse should stick around for an hour per level, making for a quick ride from village to village, riding around a town looking important, or simply running from area to area in a battle, doing wizardly things. Once a wizard can fly or teleport, the horse becomes a bit less useful in long-range circumstances. But until that point, why not treat yourself, the player, to a unique miniature that’s represents a much more common circumstance than one might first believe. We chose to, umm, mount the master universalist for a few reasons. She’s clearly an elf, allowing her to function as a pc elf or half-elf. She can even pass as a human if necessary, though the ears give her away at close range. Her appearance is simple and elegant. This allows further versatility, as she will serve as your characters mounted miniature of choice at low levels (when she has very little) or higher levels (when all her important stuff is tucked away on a different plane). Her right hand is holding a ball of fiery arcane energy, while her left hand holds a blue ball of arcane energy. Is she getting ready to toss a fireball? Perhaps call upon colder elements? Maybe it is the visual appearance the energy necessary to buff her companion that hasn’t yet rushed off to fight? Perhaps she’s picking out the right spot to change the terrain to better suit her party’s fighting style? We made sure to make her as detailed as possible without being too specific, letting her have a better chance at representing what her player wants to do.

--Valeros (Human Fighter – Iconic) – page 284 NPC Codex
Another saying that we hope will last the test of time is that every Pathfinder Battles line needs a good iconic miniature. While we haven’t yet gotten through our entire iconics line in their regular size, we thought we’d try something new. We’ve had many requests right here on these boards for a larger size of iconic miniatures. Some have said they’d like them for aesthetic purposes, to show their support of Pathfinder by proudly showing off a miniature in their home. Others have stated they’d appreciate larger versions of our iconics for more game-centric reasons. The primary reason for in-game purposes appears to be accurate representation of character after having his or her size enlarged by a spell or other force. We settled on Valeros to be our test guinea pig with this idea because although it’s often the sorcerer or wizard who casts the spell, it’s usually cast on the one who can do the most melee damage. Barbarians, Clerics and even Paladins make some sense, too, but for our first time we chose the fighter. If he’s a standout hit of this line, it will open up some more doors down the road for similar ideas. We also can’t think of a better line to test him out in than one already consisting of all PC/NPC miniatures.

--Lion (Animal Companion) – page 38 NPC Codex
This is our last miniature in this 45-piece Pathfinder Battles line, and thus our last opportunity to sneak in yet another animal. We decided to go with the lion because we like lions. This creature also makes plenty of sense given that we’ve included a Lion Tamer in the set. We took out the stupid blue ribbons in his mane, so while he might look less circus-y, he does look more ready to serve as an animal companion to the druid or ranger in your campaign. Heck, if you have a druid in your campaign he might just be more comfortable wild shaping into a lion and traveling around with your party that way. The look of terror on the faces of people passing by would be enough to make me do it, if I could. Either way, there is now an accurate, to scale, representation of a lion for any player in your campaign that wants one. And if you don’t have a druid or nobody claims the lion, by all means set him loose on your party… maybe they’ll reconsider using him for the following campaign. Fear not, though, as we’ve made him a rarity. That means you’re likely only to get one lion per case, pride be damned. But do you really need more? We like to think both Oz and Narnia proved that you only need one per realm.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Here's a quick numbers breakdown of the above thread.

I chose only from the standard races: Gnome, Halfling, Dwarf, Elf, Half-Elf, Half-Orc and Human.

I chose only the standard classes from the NPC Codex. There were no Witches, Summoners, etc. I also stayed away from the Prestige Classes and NPC Classes. I have some other ideas that better make use of the NPC classes from the Codex.

I tried to break down the 45 choices into an appropriate number of each race and class. Rarity slots were chosen for a number or reasons, with ease of sculpt and/or paint job playing a prominent role. Another important reason for my decisions was the versatility of each choice. I'm pretty confident with how these worked out, and it only took me about two hours of my life to figure it all out.

Small:
Halfling Rogue (Common)
Halfling Ranger (Common)
Halfling Wizard (Uncommon)
Halfling Druid (Rare)
Halfling Barbarian (Rare – Medium – Mounted)

Gnome Fighter (Common)
Gnome Cleric (Uncommon)
Gnome Druid (Uncommon)
Gnome Bard (Rare)
Gnome Wizard (Rare)

Medium:
Dwarf Barbarian (Common)
Dwarf Fighter (Common)
Dwarf Monk (Common)
Dwarf Bard (Uncommon)
Dwarf Wizard (Uncommon)
Dwarf Paladin (Uncommon – large – mounted)
Dwarf Druid (Rare)

Elven Cleric (Common)
Elven Sorcerer (Common)
Elven Monk (Uncommon)
Elven Fighter (Uncommon – large – mounted)
Elven Wizard (Rare – Large – Mounted)

Half-Orc Druid (Common)
Half-Orc Rogue (Common)
Half-Orc Barbarian (Uncommon)
Half-Orc Sorcerer (Uncommon)
Half-Orc Ranger (Uncommon – large – mounted)
Half-Orc Paladin (Rare)

Half-Elf Sorcerer (Common)
Half-Elf Druid (Uncommon)
Half-Elf Barbarian (Uncommon – large – mounted)
Half-Elf Bard (Rare)
Half-Elf Paladin (Rare – large – mounted)

Human Rogue (Common)
Human Paladin (Uncommon)
Human Ranger (Uncommon)
Human Bard (Uncommon)
Human Barbarian (Uncommon – large – mounted)
Human Paladin (Uncommon – large – mounted)
Human Wizard (Rare)
Human Fighter (Rare – Large – Iconic)

Animal Companions:
Bison (Uncommon – large – Animal Companion/Herd Animal/Wild Shape)
Rhinoceros (Uncommon – large – Animal Companion/Herd Animal/Wild Shape)
Lion (Rare – Large – Animal Companion/Wild Shape/Lion Tamer’s Pet)

Iconic:
Valeros (Human Fighter) – (Rare – Large)

Barbarians = 5
Bards = 4
Clerics = 2
Druids = 4
Fighters = 4
Monks = 2
Paladins = 4
Rangers = 3
Rogues = 3
Sorcerers = 3
Wizards = 5

Animal Companions = 3

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Pigraven wrote:
A future Pathfinder Battles set of all humanoid creatures.

So when we have a group of people saying "I want X and not Y" and another group saying "I want Y and not X", if we release a product that contains only X or only Y, we are guaranteed to lose part of the potential audience. But if we continue to release products that contain both X and Y, we know we will capture *some* of each of those groups, in addition to capturing the group that likes the mix of X and Y. In short, "all humanoids" is a much riskier proposition than the usual mix.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Vic Wertz wrote:
Pigraven wrote:
A future Pathfinder Battles set of all humanoid creatures.
So when we have a group of people saying "I want X and not Y" and another group saying "I want Y and not X", if we release a product that contains only X or only Y, we are guaranteed to lose part of the potential audience. But if we continue to release products that contain both X and Y, we know we will capture *some* of each of those groups, in addition to capturing the group that likes the mix of X and Y. In short, "all humanoids" is a much riskier proposition than the usual mix.

Oh, there is no doubt that this idea carries some risk with it.

But after reading every post on here from both Paizo representatives and fellow miniature enthusiasts, it sounds like the people who ONLY want monsters, or group Y, is rather minimal. Again, I don't have any actual sales numbers from Paizo or Wizkids (nor am I asking for them or even want them). So maybe the percentages aren't quite as as different as I imagined.

This isn't the type of thing I'd do with any regularity, even if it sells. It's the type of line I'd inject in between two already announced mixed (X and Y) sets. You don't lose any audience in the long-term this way, as those who desire only Y-type on the singles market will be ready for the X & Y sets to drop.

The people who actually buy the all-X case are likely going to keep most of their haul anyways. Those they do sell back into the market will likely be the commons or uncommons. These miniatures might appeal long-term to the group that wants mostly Y type. After all, even if that small fraction that wants only Y type, there is that possibility that they will at some point look to add more X type in the future.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Any chance we could get some confirmation on what the final case price is going to be with the promotional discount for subscribing?

Or just getting the subscription store entry updated, then we could just add to card and see :)


I just wanna congratulate Paizo for their marketing strategy. When I bought D&D boosters in the past, more often than not I ended up disappointed and feeling like I wasted 20$-40$ on a booster of nothing but commons and uncommons of below-average quality (Lords of maddness, I am looking at you!) - With Pathfinder Battles, I just got a ton of boosters from Miniaturemarket, and each one contained so many neat minis, regardless of rarity, that I was not disappointed.

The reason for this is oddly simple - unlike D&D, Pathfinder doesn't make Rares the best of the bunch in paint and sculpting. Some uncommons and even commons look just as nice. Moreover, there are many large uncommons that make D&D large rares pale in comparison, and they include many rare creatures. Moreso, the number of commons and uncommons per set is higher, meaning you get a greater selection when buying multiple boosters - so you won't end up with a lot of giant unpainted blobs like D&Ds Trebuchet or Nightwalker.


Pigraven wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
Pigraven wrote:
A future Pathfinder Battles set of all humanoid creatures.
So when we have a group of people saying "I want X and not Y" and another group saying "I want Y and not X", if we release a product that contains only X or only Y, we are guaranteed to lose part of the potential audience. But if we continue to release products that contain both X and Y, we know we will capture *some* of each of those groups, in addition to capturing the group that likes the mix of X and Y. In short, "all humanoids" is a much riskier proposition than the usual mix.

Oh, there is no doubt that this idea carries some risk with it.

But after reading every post on here from both Paizo representatives and fellow miniature enthusiasts, it sounds like the people who ONLY want monsters, or group Y, is rather minimal. Again, I don't have any actual sales numbers from Paizo or Wizkids (nor am I asking for them or even want them). So maybe the percentages aren't quite as as different as I imagined.

This isn't the type of thing I'd do with any regularity, even if it sells. It's the type of line I'd inject in between two already announced mixed (X and Y) sets. You don't lose any audience in the long-term this way, as those who desire only Y-type on the singles market will be ready for the X & Y sets to drop.

The people who actually buy the all-X case are likely going to keep most of their haul anyways. Those they do sell back into the market will likely be the commons or uncommons. These miniatures might appeal long-term to the group that wants mostly Y type. After all, even if that small fraction that wants only Y type, there is that possibility that they will at some point look to add more X type in the future.

I think you are completely missing the mark on what they're saying. Saying the people who only want monsters are the minority is not the same as saying they are negligible. Additionally even if they were there are plenty of people who want monsters and humanoids and would be unlikely to buy sets that only offered one or the other. Lastly I don't think a humanoid only set would increase sale at all given how many players buy only singles for the specific humans they want. So what you're purposing is a high risk option for zero gain.


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

I want both monsters and humanoids, but would be all for a set that provided minis that covered the NPC Codex. Ready made minis with write-ups at several different levels is a DM's dream. I don't think I'd limit it to just the most common races and traditional classes out of the Codex. I'd create a nice cross-section of the different things offered. Maybe by picking some of the best artwork.


A humanoid only set meant for generic NPCs/PCs would probably work best in a format like the builder series. Players could buy singles to widen their PC choices, and DMs would buy cases to fill out NPC roles for the entire campaign. Options for PCs are weirdly lacking in PFB... want to play a gnome monk? How about a male catfolk anything? Heck, just half-orc cleric is next to non-existant in the mini world, not just PFB. Things that are relatively common in PFS would be great, a halfling cavalier on riding dog would probably make a lot of people happy.

I am on a very limited budget, and since I can't buy cases or bricks, I have to collect a couple boosters at a time. In this way the builder series has been 50% successful for me. The goblins builder series was vital in filling out my collection to properly run Burnt Offerings. Unfortunately the undead set was next to useless except for the female ghoul. I think the problem stems from the wide range of CR the undead set had. "Cool, I got a vampire and a lich... too bad my PCs are level 3!"

In my mind the builder series should have stayed the way it was in goblins. Every mini can realistically be dropped next to any other from that set in a single encounter. The goblin "PCs" made for great variant creatures too to spice up encounters. But the undead set had far less utility. It was kind of just a random collection of undead. A kobold or orc set would likely be just as useful as goblins was. Every campaign needs to start somewhere, and killing some relatively cohesive tribes of low CR baddies is always fun. Anyway, WizKids have their sales data, so any speculation or anecdotes that say otherwise are moot.

In the end, I just want cool miniatures to use for my game. I like impressive larges, and I like detailed and dynamic mediums and smalls. As long as you guys keep making them, I will buy what I can!


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Pigraven wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
Pigraven wrote:
A future Pathfinder Battles set of all humanoid creatures.
So when we have a group of people saying "I want X and not Y" and another group saying "I want Y and not X", if we release a product that contains only X or only Y, we are guaranteed to lose part of the potential audience. But if we continue to release products that contain both X and Y, we know we will capture *some* of each of those groups, in addition to capturing the group that likes the mix of X and Y. In short, "all humanoids" is a much riskier proposition than the usual mix.

Oh, there is no doubt that this idea carries some risk with it.

But after reading every post on here from both Paizo representatives and fellow miniature enthusiasts, it sounds like the people who ONLY want monsters, or group Y, is rather minimal. Again, I don't have any actual sales numbers from Paizo or Wizkids (nor am I asking for them or even want them). So maybe the percentages aren't quite as as different as I imagined.

This isn't the type of thing I'd do with any regularity, even if it sells. It's the type of line I'd inject in between two already announced mixed (X and Y) sets. You don't lose any audience in the long-term this way, as those who desire only Y-type on the singles market will be ready for the X & Y sets to drop.

The people who actually buy the all-X case are likely going to keep most of their haul anyways. Those they do sell back into the market will likely be the commons or uncommons. These miniatures might appeal long-term to the group that wants mostly Y type. After all, even if that small fraction that wants only Y type, there is that possibility that they will at some point look to add more X type in the future.

I think you are completely missing the mark on what they're saying. Saying the people who only want monsters are the minority is not the same as saying they are negligible. Additionally even if they were there are plenty...

No, I get it. I wasn't saying that it's not a risk, just one that I think could work out. I'll provide some further reasoning in another post. That said, there is a part of me agrees with that last sentence. The more I think about it, I'm not sure it would increase sales, either. Because you'd still have Z-amount of miniatures that weren't as popular, and not picked on the singles market.

I do think they could sell cases this way, just not as much as the ones that sell with X and Y types of miniatures. Still, if they've already had to cut numbers from 55 down to 45, it's probably not something I'd try now.

I do think there are some better ways to sell PC/NPC's, and so I'll share those ideas at a later point.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

When I put together the previously posted list of the faux-set of NPC Codex miniatures, I did so with this list in mind. The list provides a breakdown of the old DDM lines into races. Then it looks at how the original seven races found in both the D&D 3.5 Player’s Handbook and the Core Rulebook in the Pathfinder line can be further broken down into the original 11 classes.

It's important to note this is only the old DDM line. I haven't gotten around to doing the Pathfinder lines yet, so there is no direct comparison available at this time.

In the first list, you’ll see races like Catfolk. Though they appear in both D&D and Pathfinder source books, I left out these additional races in my more extensive breakdown. Also, some races, like Dwarves and Elves, have a separate sub-race, like Duergar and Drow, respectively. I totaled them up and tossed out the relevant number in each race, as they are clearly separate in the Player’s Handbook and the Core Rulebook.

If anyone else has ideas on how to help get out some needed PC/NPC’s into the miniature market, please do so. I first started working on this list when I saw everyone complaining that we needed more Gnomes, Halflings and Half-Orcs. I wanted to see for myself what the breakdown on the race and classes is.

It’s important to note that this is just an overview I put together, and that my choices on each miniature are subjective. Some might look at a Dwarf dressed in full plate and still say it can be a ranger, but I don’t.

As for bards, my criteria is that a miniature in some way indicates itself as a musician or performer. This usually means that he or she holds a musical instrument, or has one tucked away on his or her belt. Failing that, it could mean that he or she holds a weapon, but is garishly dressed, as though in the middle of a performance.

I realize that some settle for using regular orcs as half-orcs, but there is actually a noticeable difference between most half-orcs and orcs in these lines. Because of that I kept them separate.

I realize that most half-elves and elves are interchangeable for miniature purposes, and I agree that’s a fair case. I kept them separate more out of respect because some were labeled “half-elf” while others were not. After all, half-elf is one of the original races in both books.

There is some blending that I did not account for. Some of the more shrouded humans and elves can be interchangeable, as they are often not discernable from each other.

The Humans and Elves have the most sculpts, by far. That makes sense, as they are the two most popular and most-often played races in fantasy role-playing games.

As this list shows, there is a true lack of miniatures for the small races, let alone a lack of quality. Half-Orcs also are under-produced. Half-Elves, technically, are under-produced, but that’s expected and acceptable considering the versatility that elf miniatures provide.

As for classes, far and away the most under represented miniature is the bard. Somewhat ironically, it was a search for a decent bard miniature that first led me down the path of collecting miniatures and using them in my campaigns. There are less than a handful of quality bard miniatures on the pre-painted plastic miniature market.

Without further ado, I present the Dungeon & Dragons Pre-Painted Plastic Miniatures Line:

There are a total of 642 non-humanoid miniatures in the old DDM line. There are also 446 total humanoid miniatures in the old DDM line.

The breakdown on the old DDM line is as follows:
Catfolk = 2
Creeper = 1
Dragonborn = 8
Dwarf = 42
Elf = 75 (6 = Half-Elf)
Extraplanar = 3
Gnoll = 11
Gnome = 7
Goblinoid = 40
Halfling = 21
Human = 159
Kenku = 1
Maenad = 1
Mongrelfolk = 1
Orc = 32 (9 = Half-Orc)
Reptilian = 29
Shapechanger = 8
Spirit = 1
Xeph = 2

We can toss out everything but the original seven playable races found in the Pathfinder Core Rulebook (and NPC Codex) for the purpose of why I think a miniature case close in content to the one I gave an example for would work.

We can also toss out 7 of the Dwarves, as 6 are Duergar and 1 is a Dwarven Werebear.

We can also toss out 1 Gnome, as the Deep Legionnaire is a Svirfneblin, thus clearly different in skin appearance than a regular Gnome.

We can toss out 27 Elves, as they are Drow, and thus clearly different in skin appearance than a regular Elf.

We can toss out 6 Elves, as they are Half-Elves. While Half-Elves can often pass as full Elves, and full Elves can often pass off as Half-Elves, they will be kept separate for the purpose of this breakdown.

We can toss out 1 elf because it’s a dying elf and has been classified as undead. I can’t tell if the elf was a drow or a regular elf.

We can toss out 5 humans. They were actually of the Were-form, in said Were-form, thus do not count as one of the base races.

Dwarf = 35
Elf = 41
Gnome = 6
Halfling = 21
Half-Elf = 6
Half-Orc = 9
Human = 154

I included the numbers above to help show how popular the main playable humanoid races appear to be. These numbers appear to reinforce two things I’ve come to learn.

1. PC/NPC miniatures are always going to be in a demand.
2. The smaller humanoids and the half-orcs are severely under-represented in miniature form. This is also the most common complaint I’ve heard/read from fellow collectors.

Breaking down the seven original races even further into classes:

*I chose to put fighters, paladins and clerics together because most of the miniatures with full plate can pass off as any of the three, despite some being prestige classes, etc. Some are clearer than others, but I decided to generalize for this purpose.

*Likewise, all Sorcerers and Wizards are put together, as in most cases they are difficult to tell apart.

Dwarf (35 overall):
--Barbarian = 4
--Bard = 0
--Cleric/Paladin/Fighter = 29 (including the Frost Dwarf)
--Druid = 0
--Monk = 0
--Ranger = 1
--Rogue = 0
--Sorcerer/Wizard = 1

Elf (41 overall):
--Bard = 0
--Barbarian/Cleric/Fighter/Paladin/Druid/Ranger/Rogue = 33
--Monk = 1
--Sorcerer/Wizard = 7
*I combined seven classes because some of them are tough to see, and I don’t have them all in hand. Generally speaking, there is about a 15-18-piece difference for each class. That means that there are roughly 15 pieces that can pass as a barbarian. While the same amount can apply to the cleric and to the fighter, not all overlap is the same. Some of that fifteen that represent the barbarian can also pass as fighters, while some can pass as paladins. Sometimes the piece can pass as all three, but it’s not always the case. It’s essentially one huge Venn diagram.

Gnome (6 overall):
--Barbarian = 0
--Bard = 0
--Cleric/Fighter/Paladin = 4
--Druid =
--Monk = 0
--Ranger = 0
--Rogue = 0
--Sorcerer/Wizard = 2 (Gnome Trickster could probably pass as Ranger or Rogue)

Halfling (21 total):
--Barbarian = 1 (mounted)
--Bard = 0
--Cleric/Fighter/Paladin = 7 (1 mounted)
--Druid = 0
--Monk = 1 (can pass as rogue/ranger/fighter)
--Ranger/Rogue = 10
--Sorcerer/Wizard = 2

Half-Elf (6 total):
--Barbarian = 0
--Bard = 1
--Cleric/Fighter/Paladin = 2 (Hexblade can pass as ranger/rogue)
--Druid = 1
--Monk = 0
--Ranger = 0
--Rogue = 1
--Sorcerer/Wizard = 1

Half-Orc (9 overall):
--Barbarian = 2
--Bard = 0
--Cleric/Fighter/Paladin = 4
--Druid = 0
--Monk = 1
--Ranger = 0
--Rogue = 2 (assassin can pass off as a ranger or barbarian, spy can pass off as bard)
--Sorcerer/Wizard = 0

Human (154 overall):

Instead of going through all 154, I’ll say that it’s heavy on martial classes and arcane spellcasting classes. Next up are ranged fighters, followed by a healthy dose of monks. Unsurprisingly, there are very few bards.

To be more accurate I’ll have to go through each miniature individually and determine whether it can be suitable for each class and mark it down. Then I’ll have to give percentages on how many of the total number can be used for each class. This is how I did the other races, but with far fewer numbers and more distinct sculpts, it was easier just to give numbers and a few exceptions in parenthesis.


That's a lot of stat crunching work there Pigraven. I really would like to see more pc/npc's, as aside from Skull and Shackles, the sets have had a very low introduction of pc/npc characters.

I really would like to see a Humanoids of Golarion set(s). I really believe these would sell very well, and would attract more than just GM's to the set.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

I really like your write-ups for the Player's Codex proposed minis list you put together, Pigraven. The ones Erik does are very helpful as a DM thinking about people-ing or monster-ing a world. Yours are similarly helpful. Thank you for sharing your ideas.

About your idea for a case of all PCs/NPCs, if the minis looked to be well-done I would buy a case. My main concern with all PCs/NPCs is the difficulty to paint faces of humanoids is often the most important and most critically judged part of those minis, thus making it tougher to please a wider audience, especially if those are not offset with something else in the set.

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