Damiel Morgethai

Evan Tarlton's page

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber. 627 posts. 2 reviews. No lists. No wishlists.




3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Reunited, and it feels so good!


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

In honour of Wrath of the Righteous being released, and to test my skills, I decided to make a version of the Riftwarden. All constructive criticism is most welcome.

Riftwarden Dedication (Level 2)
Uncommon Archetype Dedication
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisites: Trained in Arcana, Nature, Occult, or Religion; Trained
in a Lore skill related to a specific Plane, or in Planar Lore
Access: You are a member of the Riftwardens

You have been initiated into the Riftwardens. You become an expert in one of your planar skills. You gain access to the counter-summons focus spell, and a focus pool with 1 Focus Point that you recharge by meditating upon the planes and your duty to the world.

Counter-Summons (Focus 1)
Uncommon Abjuration Incapacitation
Cast (Reaction)
Targets a caster casting a summon spell within 30 ft.

You counteract a 1st level summoning spell as it is being cast. The spell automatically fails, and the spell slot is still expended.
Heightened (2nd) You may counteract 2nd level summoning spells
Heightened (3rd) You may counteract 3rd level summoning spells
Heightened (4th) You may counteract 4th level summoning spells
Heightened (5th) You may counteract 5th level summoning spells
Heightened (6th) You may counteract 6th level summoning spells
Heightened (7th) You may counteract 7th level summoning spells
Heightened (8th) You may counteract 8th level summoning spells
Heightened (9th) You may counteract 9th level summoning spells
Heightened (10th) You may counteract 10th level summoning spells

Planar Channel (Level 4)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication

You gain the planar channel focus spell. Your focus pool expands by 1.

Planar Channel (Focus 2)
Uncommon Abjuration
Cast One action to Two Rounds
Targets Varies

You channel the power of the Material Plane itself to damage Aberrations, Celestials, Fey, Fiends, or Monitors. Targets take 2d8 damage and make a basic Fortitude save.

One action (somatic) The spell has a range of touch
Two actions (somatic, verbal) The spell has a range of 30 ft., and the target takes an additional 8 points of damage
Three actions (material, somatic, verbal) The spell is a 30 ft. emanation, and targets take 2d8 damage
Two rounds If you spend 3 actions casting the spell, you can avoid finishing the spell and spend another 3 actions to empower it even further. If you do, targets take a -1 circumstance penalty to their saves

Heightened (3rd) Targets take 3d8 damage
Heightened (4th) Targets take 4d8 damage
Heightened (5th) Targets take 5d8 damage
Heightened (6th) Targets take 6d8 damage
Heightened (7th) Targets take 7d8 damage
Heightened (8th) Targets take 8d8 damage
Heightened (9th) Targets take 9d8 damage
Heightened (10th) Targets take 10d8 damage

Eradication (Level 6)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication

You gain a +1 circumstance bonus to saving throws against spells from Aberrations, Celestials, Fey, Fiends, or Monitors. Aberrations, Celestials, Fey, Fiends, or Monitors take a -1 circumstance penalty to saves against your spells. This penalty stacks with the penalty from a two round casting of planar channel.

Counterport (Level 8)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication

You learn the counterport focus spell. Your focus pool expands by 1.

Counterport (Focus 4)
Uncommon Abjuration Incapacitation
Cast (Reaction)
Target any teleportation effect within 30 ft.

You counteract any teleportation effect within 30 ft. of you if it of 4th level or lower. The spell automatically fails, and the spell slot is still expended.

Heightened (5th) You may counteract 5th level teleportation effect or lower
Heightened (6th) You may counteract 6th level teleportation effect or lower
Heightened (7th) You may counteract 7th level teleportation effect or lower
Heightened (8th) You may counteract 8th level teleportation effect or lower
Heightened (9th) You may counteract 9th level teleportation effect or lower
Heightened (10th) You may counteract 10th level teleportation effect or lower

Planar Scourge (Level 10)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication, Planar Channel

Your planar channel spell has greater effect upon its victims depending on how they saved against the spell.

Success They take 2 persistent damage
Failure They take 3 persistent damage
Critical Failure They take 5 persistent damage

Controlled Teleportation (Level 12)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication, Counterport

The caster may use counterport to seize control of any teleportation effect within 30 ft. Cast counterport, and make a counteract check.

Critical Success The creature using the teleportation effect materializes in a valid destination within 30 ft. of the caster, and is Stunned 1
Success The creature using the teleportation effect materializes in a valid destination within 30 ft. of the caster
Failure The teleportation effect works as intended
Critical Failure You are Stunned 1

Planar Purge (Level 14)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication, Planar Channel

Aberrations, Celestials, Fey, Fiends, or Monitors that fail or critically fail their save against a planar channel spell have to make another save against banishment. A critical fail means that their save is one degree worse. The penalties from Eradication or the two round casting of planar channel do not apply to this second save unless you have a specially gathered material component anathema to the target, as normal for banishment.

Greater Counterport (Level 16)
Archetype: Riftwarden
Prerequisite: Riftwarden Dedication, Planar Channel, Counterport

You may use counterport against one creature within 30 feet of you if it teleported since the beginning of your last round. The target makes a Fortitude save.

Critical Success Nothing happens
Success The target takes half damage as if an 8th level planar channel had been cast
Failure The target takes full damage as if an 8th level planar channel had been cast, and returns to its point of origin
Critical Failure The target takes double damage as if an 8th level planar channel had been cast, and returns to its point of origin

Heightened (9th) The spell deals damage as if a 9th level planar channel had been cast
Heightened (10th) The spell deals damage as if a 10th level planar channel had been cast


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello,

my payment method for this order was declined. My sincerest apologies. I have added a new payment method. I haven't been able to delete the old one, though. I think it might be because the system tried to use it for the order. In any case, I wanted to let CS know. Thank you very much.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Oh, this is magnificent. The choice of second-person for the narration... *chef's kiss*


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Before I start: yes, I know that not all archetypes are meant to fit well with all classes. The Halcyon Speaker archetype is itself an example of this. In addition to the spontaneous granted halcyon slots, the speaker is able to use their regular spell slots to cast halcyon spells. Therefore, the class is balanced around the expectation that the character who takes it will be able to cast arcane or primal spells. All well and good... until we come to the magus (and the summoner, but more clearly a problem for the magus).

The magus is an arcane caster, but for the purposes of the archetype he may as well not be. Prepared casters may heighten halcyon spells, but only to the highest level of halcyon spell they can cast. For example: if a druid takes the archetype at level 6, she gains the ability to cast 1st level halcyon spells. Even though she casts 3rd level primal spells, she may only use her 1st level spell slots to prepare halcyon spells.

Now, if a magus takes the archetype at level 6, he has a problem. He cannot cast 1st level spells anymore under the playtest's rules. He would still gain the spells known, and the spontaneous halcyon spell slot, but according to RAW, he cannot use his magus spell slots to prepare halcyon spells. Every time he gains more halcyon spells, he has no spell slots with which he may prepare halcyon spells. For the purposes of this archetype, he may as well not be able to cast arcane spells at all.

I concede that arcane and primal sorcerers are at a slight disadvantage compared to their prepared counterparts as written. Halcyon spells cannot be taken as Signature Spells, so those spells can't be heightened. Prepared casters can learn a 1st level spell and heighten it all the way to 7th if they take all of the spellcasting feats. There is precedent for preferential treatment, for lack of a better term. However, the magus is a prepared spellcasting class. I don't see the reason for the difference.

As things currently stand, the magus is strongly discouraged from taking this archetype unless they also take a multiclass archetype that grants them arcane or primal spellcasting (realistically the wizard or witch). However, that is an additional 4 feats tacked onto an archetype that already has more good feats than can be taken without house ruling (before factoring in the Magaambyan Attendant!). That forces the player to choose between mechanics and flavour, which is not a good place to be.

Secrets of Magic is a concurrent release with Strength of Thousands, which will use the Free Archetype variant. That mitigates the problem, but only for that AP. In a standard RAW game, the problem returns.

Maybe there's something I'm not seeing. I don't know. In any event, I wanted to raise this concern. One of my character ideas is a magus who studied at the Magaambya. While I don't need this archetype to play that, it would be nice to do so. I haven't forgotten about Magic Warrior, but my idea is more "warrior who has a broad knowledge of magic" and less "mysterious masked avenger."


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This is awesome. I love the little character details for all involved. Of course Dr.B doesn't take to combat quite as quickly as the others, but when she's in, she's in. Of course Velloro is iffy on stims. And hopefully Obo never changes.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Strategic Spell (level 4 Investigator feat)

Your ability to predict the flow of combat has expanded. You may now use the Cast a Spell action when Devising a Stratagem. You may only do so when targeting a single opponent. You must choose which spell to use when using this ability. If you use that spell later this round, you must use the result of this roll. You may substitute your Intelligence modifier for your Wisdom or Charisma modifier when making this attack roll. If you use your Intelligence modifier for the roll, you may add your Strategic Strike damage to the damage roll. As normal, if the target of your attack is the subject of a lead your are pursuing, you may use this as a free action.

I've obviously modified Magical Trickster for this feat, and I tried to balance it around what MT does for Sneak Attack. I kept it to a one target spell for that reason. I am very interested in any feedback you may have. Thank you.


Oh that's good.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello,

I'm just letting you know that I have not yet received Order #22049899. Tracking information tells me that it got to the Post Office, but nothing past that. I have received the following shipment, Order #24243778. Thank you.

ETA: I don't know if it's relevant, but just in case: I had an issue with my payment method for #22049899. The payment issue was resolved, and given the timing it's much more likely that the shipment was lost in the chaos of the current situation, but I thought I'd mention it just in case.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This is all great news! Will the Stheno be available for the Ancestry Guide?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello!

My latest order (Order # 22049899) was not shipped due to my payment method being declined due to my card being expired. I thought that I had already updated the information, but it looks like I was mistaken (or that I screwed up somehow). I have updated the card, I think, and if possible would like confirmation that all is now well. I am sorry for any inconvenience this may cause. Thank you very much.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

What it says in the title. I'd expected Halcyon spellcasting to be a Dedication, and it is, but unlike other Dedications it tops out at providing 7th level spells. Is that an error? If it isn't, then why does it stop there? The only thing I can guess is because the caster can choose whether or not a given Halcyon spell is Arcane or Primal, unlike normal Dedication spellcasting. For example, a wizard can cast heal as an Arcane spell or a druid could cast sleep as a Primal spell, with all the benefits of doing so. Is that the rationale?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

There are four mystical essences: Life, Matter, Mind, and Spirit. These essences power magic, and each tradition of magic uses two. Arcane uses Matter and Mind, Divine uses Life and Spirit, Primal uses Life and Matter, and Occult uses Mind and Spirit. That leaves two possible combinations to be explored: Matter and Spirit, and Life and Mind. What are your thoughts about what these might look like? Do any of the existing PF1 classes maybe map onto them? Here are my thoughts.

Matter and Spirit have an interesting interplay. One concerns the body, the other the soul. Just the body, however; there are no thoughts in play, and no life force either. That would leave an inanimate object. Do inanimate objects have souls of their own? There is a possibility, but it is more likely that they would absorb the spiritual essence of whoever or whatever used them, or lived near them. Is there a class that fits that bill? Why, yes. However, it has the wrong name. My bet is that this tradition will be represented by a renamed Occultist.

The Life essence is the "animating universal force within all things," (CRB 300) and the Mind essence allows for thoughts and memories. Therefore, the last tradition would have to control both things. Say, by using their thoughts to control the minds and bodies of others. This doesn't have to be solely offensive; there are a lot of ways such a mage could help their allies as well as harm the enemy. For my money, this tradition would be best represented by the Mesmerist, a caster that can convince both ally and enemy of anything, and can affect their bodies to back it up.

How does any of this sound? What are your thoughts?


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

So you're a cleric of a god. You decide that you want to better embody your god's nature, and you decide to get a bit of training in another class. Great! But... what class should you choose? Here are my thoughts.

This is only for the Big 20, and only uses the Core 12 (well, "rest of the Core 1" since Cleric is taken into account). I am limiting myself to (or in some cases forcing myself to find) three classes for each deity. With that out of the way, let's begin.

Abadar: Fighter, Rogue, Wizard. Laws are ultimately enforced by the sword, so it makes sense for a cleric of Abadar to hone their martial prowess (and it gives them an excuse to say "I Am The Law"). Rogues have a variety of skills, and learning the rogue's trade can help clerics hone their diplomatic skills or to become savvy to a criminal's tricks. Magic has a powerful place in upholding civilization, and wizardry provides a potent supplement to a cleric's magic, and one that can be customized as needed.

Asmodeus: Bard, Rogue, Wizard. Asmodeus is a subtle and tricky god, and deception is often his first recourse. Bards and rogues are very tricky, whether through magic or cunning. However, he is also a very powerful god, and he expresses that power through raw arcane might. Conjurers, enchanters, evokers, and illusionists would be especially popular choices for his clergy.

Calistria: Bard, Rogue, Wizard. Calistria and Asmodeus are very similar in some respects (and astoundingly different in others). A bard's ability to enflame emotion is very useful to a cleric of Calistria, and so is a rogue's cunning. Calistria is an elven god, and wizardry definitely has its uses. I don't just mean the subtle ones either, or am I the only one who sees Calistrians tricking groups of their enemies together and then dropping a fireball in their midst?

Cayden Cailean: Alchemist, Champion, Fighter. Cayden Cailean is the literal god of alcohol, so alchemy should be a popular pastime amongst his clergy. Their healing elixirs would have a little extra kick, their mutagens be a little wilder, and they'd be quite used to highly flammable 200 proof chemicals. However, he's also a god who is big into doing what's right, and he encourages his followers to do the same. Becoming a champion would exemplify that. Finally, he was a fighter in his mortal life, so dabbling in the fighter's path is an excellent way to become closer to him.

Desna: Bard, Ranger, Rogue. Dreams fall neatly into the occult sphere, so bard is a good choice for clerics who want to learn more about them. Rangers are the archetypical wanderers, so they are another very attractive choice. Finally, for all of their skill, a lot of rogues pray for good luck. A cleric of Lady Luck may well want to understand that more fully.

Erastil: Champion, Druid, Ranger. Okay, this is a gimme. Cleric-Champions are the defenders of the community, supplementing their spells with martial skill and the potent focus spells of the champion. Cleric-Druids are the perfect farmers, guiding their charges into sustainable agriculture so that the community may live indefinitely. Cleric-Rangers are both hunters and the community's first line of defense, driving off incaming danger where they can and wearing it down where they can't.

Gorum: Barbarian, Bard, Fighter. Barbarians give in to powerful instincts that give them great power, making them unstoppable in combat. Bards can stoke their comrades' rage, and bolster their courage when the enemy uses fear magic to break them. Fighters are the lords of battle, having great skill with all sorts of weapons. All of these are attractive to clerics of the god of war.

Gozreh: Barbarian, Druid, Ranger. Again, a gimme. Barbarians' instincts are primal things, druids understand the wild better than almost any other mortal, and rangers live as one with the wild. Any of these is ideal for a cleric of the god of nature, and in fact some clerics might take any two (just as Gozreh has two personae, so they might have two sets of extra skills).

Iomedae: Bard, Champion, Fighter. Cleric-Bards are historians and heralds, keeping the deeds of the faithful alive and using the word and the sword to uphold Iomedae's charge. Iomedae was THE Champion in life, so it is no surprise that her clerics might look into becoming champions as well. Finally, hers is a martial faith, so extra martial prowess is welcome.

Irori: Bard, Monk, Sorcerer. Bards know many secrets and can make for excellent mentors, very important in a faith that preaches excellence. Irori was a monk in life, so it's only natural that his followers would want to follow that path. Finally, the focus on self-discovery is bound to unlock any latent sorcerous potential, and the focus on self-mastery is bound to make clerics want to master their powers as part of the overall quest for perfection.

Lamashtu: Alchemist, Barbarian, Bard. Elixirs can help with healing and mutagens can unlock one's inner monster, so alchemist is bound to be an attractive choice. Giving in to one's darker instincts is also very fitting, so barbarian is good. Finally, bards are as good with nightmares as with dreams, and Lamashtu is the goddess of nightmares, so bards are in.

Nethys: Bard, Sorcerer, Wizard. Nethys is all about magic, and these three classes provide it. Bards turn the secrets of the cosmos into mystical songs, magic is a literal part of who sorcerers are, and a wizard's arcane magic complements the cleric's divine magic perfectly. All that study doesn't hurt either.

Norgorber: Alchemist, Bard, Rogue. Norgorber wears a lot of hats, so his clerics have a lot of reason to multiclass. Fortunately, each aspect has a perfect class to embody it. Cleric-Alchemists are perfect for Blackfingers, Cleric-Bards for the Reaper of Reputation, and Cleric-Rogues for Father Skinsaw or the Grey Master.

Pharasma: Ranger, Rogue, Wizard. Rangers excel at killing things, and Pharasma is both the goddess of death and has a particular hatred of undead, so ranger fits quite well. Rogues are also good at killing, in their way, but their skills can also leave a target alive so that they can pursue their destiny. Finally, wizards have access to both fire and force magic, and those undead immune to the first are all too vulnerable to the second.

Rovagug: Alchemist, Barbarian, Sorcerer. Bombs and mutagens would be very appealing to clerics of Rovagug, and barbarians are perfect fits for reasons I've gone into elsewhere. Finally, a sorcerer's power can be very destructive if it comes from the right source, and such sorcerers may well find the Rough Beast all too appealing.

Sarenrae: Champion, Druid, Wizard. Sarenrae is THE good goddess, and she should have a great many champions of all three types. It shouldn't be unusual for her clerics to also walk that road. She is also something of a nature goddess, as she is the goddess of the sun, and primal magic overlaps quite nicely with divine magic and her role as goddess of fire. Finally, as said elsewhere, arcane magic complements divine magic beautifully, and a wizard mas multiple tools to deal with evil in both a peaceful and a violent fashion.

Shelyn: Bard, Champion, Sorcerer. Many bards worship the goddess of art and beauty, and it's only logical that her clerics would dabble in those arts as well. She is not a particularly martial deity so champions should be rare, yet she strikes a chord in those who follow the redeemer's path. Her clerics might also embrace sorcerous powers regardless of their origin; there can be beauty in everything, no matter how repellent it might initially seem.

Torag: Alchemist, Champion, Fighter. Torag is the god of the forge, so most of his clerics try to make useful things. Dabbling in alchemy is just one more way to do that. He's also the god of protection, so more martially inclined clerics may be attracted by champion or fighter. The exact choice would depend on how exactly they see themselves defending: with the power of faith, or pure skill at arms.

Urgathoa: Alchemist, Fighter, Wizard. Urgathoa is all about consumption, so the class that makes potions that heal you or that make you more powerful is very attractive to her followers. The poisons are also very useful. She also prizes all forms of power, be they martial or mystical. A fighter's raw strength is useful, as is a necromancer's arcane might.

Zon-Kuthon: Druid, Monk, Rogue. There is an order of druids that reveres Zon-Kuthon, so his clerics might be interested in dipping their toes in the druid's craft. Divine and primal magic overlap nicely. Monks are highly disciplined and can be quite esoteric... even before visions induced by blood loss. Rogues can excel at hurting a creature without killing it, and are one with the shadows even when they have no magic.

Anyway, those are my thoughts. What do you think?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

The 1E Monster Manual had character stats for some creatures like the Aasimar and the Tiefling. Does anybody else think that we might get something like that this time around? The use of ancestry feats suggests not, but we could at least get the Orc (on top of the Hobgoblin, Leshy, and Lizardfolk, which are coming out as full ancestries in the very next month). If Planetouched, Geniekin and so forth are templates rather than true ancestries, we could get those as well.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This is what the titles says: a translation of the ysoki for the Playtest. This isn't something I will use for official purposes, but rather for homebrew fun. Here goes nothing:

YSOKI
HIT POINTS 6
SIZE Small
SPEED 20 feet

ABILITY BOOSTS
Dexterity
Intelligence
Free

ABILITY FLAW
Strength

LANGUAGES
Common
Ysoki

BONUS LANGUAGES
At 1st level, if your Intelligence score is 14 or higher, you can also select one of the following languages: Draconic, Dwarf, Gnome, Goblin, Jotun, or Undercommon.

TRAITS
Ysoki
Humanoid

DARKVISION
You can see in darkness and dim light just as well as you can see in bright light, though your vision in darkness is black and white.

YSOKI ADVENTURERS
Some backgrounds are particularly suitable for ysoki. The merchant background well represents the cultural propensity for bargaining, the acrobat background well represents the skills needed to get around in a crowded ysoki warren, and the blacksmith background well represents the cultural propensity for tinkering. The entertainer, nomad, scholar, and street urchin backgrounds also fit the ysoki quite well.
Ysoki gravitate to classes which require physical or mental quickness. The ranger and the rogue need the former, the wizard needs the latter, and the alchemist needs both.

ANCESTRY FEATS

Animal Speaker (Feat 1)
Ysoki
You recognize the squeaking of rodents as a language of its own. You can ask questions of, receive answers from, and use the Diplomacy skill with rodents, such as mice, rats, prairie dogs, and chipmunks. The GM determines which animals count for this ability.

Animal Whisperer (Feat 5)
Ysoki
You hear the sounds of animals as conversations instead of unintelligent noise. You can speak to all animals, not just rodents. You gain a +1 bonus to Diplomacy checks to Make an Impression on animals.

Cheek Pouches (Feat 1)
Ysoki, Heritage
You can store up to one cubic foot of items weighing up to 1 Bulk in total in their cheek pouches, and you can transfer a single object between hand and cheek as a swift action. You can disgorge the entire contents of your pouch onto the ground in your square as a move action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

Cleanliness (Feat 1)
Ysoki
Trigger: You make a save against a disease
Ysoki strive to keep themselves and each other immaculately clean, to make it difficult for disease to spread. You a gain a +2 circumstance bonus to saves against disease, and whenever you exceed the save DC to recover from a disease effect by 5 or more, you are treated as if you had succeeded at two consecutive saving throws.

Cornered Fury (Feat 1)
Ysoki
You fight viciously when cut off from friends and allies. Whenever you are reduced to half or fewer of your hit points, and you have no conscious allies within 30 feet, you gain a +2 bonus to your melee attack rolls and to armor class.

Discerning Smell (Feat 1)
Ysoki, Heritage
You can smell and taste all sorts of exotic flavors that are too nuanced for the human palate. You gain a +2 circumstance bonus to sense an unseen creature that is close enough for you to smell (typically within 30 feet, though halve the distance if you are upwind and double the distance if you are downwind). For more information about senses, see page 301.

Surface Sprinter (Feat 1)
Ysoki
Your time on the surface has made you a very fast runner. Your Speed increases by 5 feet. Additionally, when you use the Stride action, you can ignore difficult terrain in one square during that move.

Swarming (Feat 1)
Ysoki
Ysoki are used to living and fighting communally, and are adept at swarming foes for their own gain and their foes' detriment. You and another ysoki can share the same square at the same time. If two ysoki in the same square attack the same foe, they are considered to be flanking that foe as if they were in two opposite squares.

Tinker (Feat 1)
Ysoki
Trigger: You make a Crafting check to create or repair an item
Ysoki have a spatial sense which provides a special insight on the creation and repair of items. You gain a +2 circumstance bonus whenever creating or repairing an item.

Very Sneaky (Feat 1)
Ysoki
Taller folk rarely pay attention to the shadows at their feet, and you take full advantage of this. You can move 5 feet further when you take the Sneak action, up to your Speed (see page 158). In addition, if you critically succeed at a Stealth check against a creature, your target remains flat-footed during your attack. The GM doesn't reveal that your Stealth check resulted in a critical success until you declare your attack.

So this is what I've concocted. How does it look?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

We all have classes we want to see beyond the core 12, and I'm sure we're all wondering about how those classes might be in 2nd Edition. The Witch isn't the only one of mine, but it's the one I think I can most easily approximate for the playtest without multiclassing or having to, you know, fully get into game design. These are my thoughts on how to go about it, based on what we know to date. This could be made laughable once we get the full playtest. I expect that it will, if it isn't already, but I don't care.

(Note: I don't intend to use this for running the playtest. That would ruin the point. It's solely for fun)

Thematically, the witch is a bit of an odd duck compared to its arcane kin. The magic doesn't come from innate power or general study or both. It is facilitated by a patron, which will doubtlessly have its own reasons for doing this. There is a general witch spell list, but the patron also teaches a particular set of spells. Also, the patron doesn't directly interact with the witch. It sends a familiar to serve as intermediary. The witch must commune with the familiar to prepare spells.

Let's get down to the mechanics. The obvious choice is to use the wizard as a base chassis. Use the proficiencies, saves, and so forth for the witch. However, instead of arcane focus, you get a familiar. I'm doing away with arcane focus because a spellbook shouldn't be a good trade for a feat, but a familiar could be. And yes, just as a wizard can spend a feat to get a familiar, a witch can spend a feat to get arcane focus. They'd use their familiar instead of a bonded item.

Wizards have schools, and witches have patrons. I would use sorcerer bloodlines to approximate the patron. The bloodline spells would serve as the specialist spells, and the bloodline powers would serve as the hexes. This has the advantage of being straightforward, and the downside of being constrained. You get an extra spell slot per spell level, but you have to prepare that particular spell within it. Specialist wizards have several options per spell level. A witch wouldn't, but that would be the tradeoff.

There could be a workaround, though, if you're willing to spend the feats. Clerics can take extra domains, so let's give the witch a similar option. Call it "Extra Secrets," or something like that. It gives them access to the spell list and basic power of another bloodline, with additional powers being unlocked with feat investment. You could even have them take Expanded Patronage a second time, much like clerics can have up to three domains. The fluff explanation would be that the patron is giving the witch access to extra secrets. Patrons are less defined than gods or bloodlines anyway.

What spell list should the witch have? Much like the bard, the witch has access to spells not found on other arcane lists. We could do what the sorcerer does and tie spell list to bloodline/patron. It should correspond to the initial bloodline/patron, so as not to get too broad. All patron spells would be prepared in normal slots as well, so taking Extra Secrets would provide additional options as well as making no too witches alike.

Finally, the patrons should have anathema. They don't have to tutor the witches, after all. If the witches anger them, the familiar should go away. The witch would keep all prepared spells and remaining spell points, but wouldn't be able to regain them until they make things right. If that means a witch gets down to just cantrips, oh well. "Don't turn down a chance to make money or increase fame" would be thematic for a draconic patron, and "don't turn down a challenge" could work for an imperial patron.

Anyway, those are my thoughts based on what we know. They're likely to change once we have the playtest (and I'll be shocked if they don't). What do you think?


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Okay, let's try this again.

I started the original thread to have a discussion, and for a couple of days it was great. Then the trouble started, and the discussion was derailed. Some of that is probably on me. I don't think I was clear enough in my initial post. For that I apologize, and I won't make that mistake again. So... this a thread to discuss a CG Paladin Code and the sorts of things that might be in it. Discussing this in good faith requires the potential existence of such a Code. If someone wants to make a "Why A CG Paladin Code Cannot Exist," then I invite that person to do so with my full blessings (not that they are needed). All I ask is that such debates be kept out of this particular thread so as to prevent derailing. Thank you very much.

The original thread is here: What Would A CG Paladin Code Look Like?

To sum up, my speculation for a CG Paladin Code is as follows:

1) You must never willingly commit an evil act, such as murder, torture, or casting an evil spell.

2) You must not take actions that you know will harm an innocent, or through inaction cause an innocent to come to immediate harm when you knew your action could reasonably prevent it. This tenet doesn't force you to take action against possible harm to innocents or to sacrifice your life and future potential in an attempt to protect an innocent.

3) You must act with honor, never cheating, lying, or taking advantage of others.

4) You must inspire people to find their purpose in the face of adversity, and help them to do so to the best of your ability, unless it violates a higher tenet.

This led to some very healthy and very helpful debate, and some other ideas emerged. The following two seem to be the most popular. The first comes from poster Deadmanwalking:

1) You must never willingly commit an evil act, such as murder, torture, or casting an evil spell.

2) You must not take actions that you know will harm an innocent, or through inaction cause an innocent to come to immediate harm when you knew your action could reasonably prevent it. This tenet doesn't force you to take action against possible harm to innocents or to sacrifice your life and future potential in an attempt to protect an innocent.

3) You must always defend the autonomy of innocents from those who would violate it. If one person is forcing an innocent to do anything against their will, you must attempt to stop this act, using words if possible and force if necessary.

4) You must personally respect the autonomy of others, never forcing them to engage in any particular course of behavior. You may advise and admonish, but never actually force them to do as you wish them to. Except as necessary to fulfill the higher tenets, of course (ie: jailing a criminal who harmed or violated the autonomy of innocents is acceptable in order to prevent such behavior).

The second (which was posted initially first but which got some further refinement, hence its position) is from poster Bardess:

1) You must never willingly commit an evil act, such as murder, torture, or casting an evil spell.

2) You must not take actions that you know will harm an innocent, or through inaction cause an innocent to come to immediate harm when you knew your action could reasonably prevent it.

3) You should treat others with courtesy, dignity, and respect. Do not cheat, steal, or lie to others unless it is necessary to protect the life and freedom of innocents.

4) You must not violate another's free will, neither allow others to violate your own free will.

5) You must stand against tyranny, unjust impositions and privation of liberty, unless this violates a higher tenet.

6) You must be a beacon of hope, show mercy, be compassionate and sow joy in this world. How these are done is less important than leaving the world a better place than it was during your lifetime.

7) The greater good and the lesser good are not mutually exclusive. You must strive to find a solution that benefits both the community and the individual. No single life has more weight or importance than any other, and a single individual has the same importance on the cosmic balance as the destiny of a world.

Further, poster willuwontu proposed that #4 & #5 of Bardess' Code be combined into:

4) You must stand against tyranny, unjust impositions and deprivation of liberty. You must not violate another's free will, neither allow others to violate your own free will.

So that's where we stand right now. How do those look to you? What ideas do you have? Further, how might these play out with various gods that could have CG Paladins?

And as a final note, and not to belabor the point, but: critiquing the ideas is fine and leads to good discussion. It's even possible to do so from a traditional LG Paladin perspective. I'd like to give a shout-out to poster Iron_Matt17, who was a positive model of how to do this. This sort of thing is more than welcome. Critiquing the very notion of a CG Code is not welcome. It just derails the discussion and gets us nowhere. Thank you. I look forward to your ideas, and I'm sure many others do as well.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

(Before I begin, I just want to say that this is a thread for speculation. I have no interest in hashing out the argument. I'm using the term CG Paladin for clarity's sake. We have Antipaladin for the CE alternate class and Tyrant for the LE anti-pally archetype, but no specific term for a CG variant)

One place of general agreement in the Great Paladin Debate is that the Code is important to a paladin. We have the 1e Pally Code, and we have the Anti-Pally and Tyrant Codes, but we don't have a CG Code. So... what would it look like?

First, let's look at the 2e Paladin Code. I've chosen this one because it's unlikely that we'll get a CG archetype at this point, so if we do get a CG paladin, it will be in 2e. For the purposes of this thread, I'm assuming that deity specific tenets are less important than the general tenets. In descending order of importance, the four general tenets are:

1) You must never willingly commit an evil act, such as murder, torture, or casting an evil spell.

2) You must not take actions that you know will harm an innocent, or through inaction cause an innocent to come to immediate harm when you knew your action could reasonably prevent it. This tenet doesn't force you to take action against possible harm to innocents or to sacrifice your life and future potential in an attempt to protect an innocent.

3) You must act with honor, never cheating, lying, or taking advantage of others.

4) You must respect the lawful authority of the legitimate ruler or leadership in whichever land you may be, following their laws unless they violate a higher tenet.

Tenet #1 is perfectly in accordance with a CG outlook. "Don't do evil." One can be of a good alignment and still do some evil things without repercussions, but exemplars of good do not have that option. They should not. Tenet #1 can stay as is, and where it is.

Tenet #2 is also perfectly in accordance with a CG outlook, and for the same reason. Any exemplar of a good alignment puts others ahead of themselves, especially innocent people. Tenet #2 can stay as is and where it is.

Tenet #3 seems more dicey for a CG character. The benevolent trickster archetype is very CG. However, it's relatively low down on the list, and that gives room to lie or cheat if it is to protect an innocent. Besides, just as a LG Paladin thinks that good is more important than law, a CG Paladin should think good more important than chaos. Lying and cheating aren't good if they are for oneself, but they can be good if they are used to help others. Tenet #3 can stay as is and where it is.

Tenet #4 is where we come into problems. Chaos doesn't care about external laws, and a CG person isn't likely to take them into consideration when deciding to do the right thing. A CG Paladin would only really consider external laws insofar as they affect the innocent or their companions (or perhaps themselves, in the "don't throw your life away for nothing" tenet). So, let's ditch this one. The question becomes, what should replace it?

Chaos seems more individualistic than order, so that is where I would start. The fourth LG tenet is focused on society. The fourth CG tenet should be focused on the individual. I posit something like:

4) You must inspire people to find their purpose in the face of adversity, and help them to do so to the best of your ability, unless it violates a higher tenet.

How would this play out practically? If you find someone who wants to be an artist in the face of parental disapproval, then you should persuade them to stand their ground, and help them as best you can. Try and talk to their parents. However, if it's a choice between talking to their parents and saving a life, save the life first then have the talk. If you find someone who wants to be a serial killer, then stop them. Get them psychiatric help, have them sent to jail, stick to them like glue if that prevents them from killing someone. However, if you have to choose between tailing the person or helping put out a fire in an orphanage, put out the fire first, then get back to it.

So, those are my thoughts. A CG Paladin's code should be:

1) You must never willingly commit an evil act, such as murder, torture, or casting an evil spell.

2) You must not take actions that you know will harm an innocent, or through inaction cause an innocent to come to immediate harm when you knew your action could reasonably prevent it. This tenet doesn't force you to take action against possible harm to innocents or to sacrifice your life and future potential in an attempt to protect an innocent.

3) You must act with honor, never cheating, lying, or taking advantage of others.

4) You must inspire people to find their purpose in the face of adversity, and help them to do so to the best of your ability, unless it violates a higher tenet.

What is your opinion?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm wondering as to the status of Order 4368165. I still haven't received it. I had thought that it somehow might have gotten mixed in with Order 4372829 (because of when I subbed to Starfinder), but I've gotten that order and it only contained what it was supposed to contain (SFPG, Dead Suns 1, Ruins of Azlant 1). Any assistance would be most appreciated. Thank you.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

This is very interesting. I love the bits of worldbuilding revealed here, like how androids use computer viruses to get "drunk" the same way that organics use alcohol.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello,

I received a new credit card as my old one was due to expire in a couple of months. I used my new card to make a purchase (Order 4205204) and it worked. I think I've followed the steps needed to update my subscription to use my new card, and I'd like to know if that was successful. Thank you.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I am rather intrigued by the idea of a kitsune vigilante. It's the whole natural ability to change shape that makes it fit thematically. I was wondering about which particular build or archetype would work best with the kitsune. I'm leaning towards Magical Child at the moment. Any thoughts?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello,

I'm really sorry about this, but due to the recent sinking of the Canadian dollar in relation to the American, I have to cut back on what I order. Please cancel my Adventure Path subscription. The rest are fine to keep. Thank you very much for your time, and I'm sorry for any inconvenience.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I am two episodes in so far, and so far I am loving it. It is slow, yes, but the end of the second episode sees both a jolt of adrenaline and some of our questions are being answered. I'm looking forward to more... in a few hours, after I wake up.


7 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I understand why the hybrid classes from the ACG weren't included in the Variant Multiclassing section. The designers felt that they weren't distinct enough from their parents. I understand the rationale, but I disagree. The new classes possess something unique to themselves, and I posit that the distinct features warrant their own VMC.

I begin at the beginning, and probably the easiest: the Arcanist.

Arcane Reservoir: At 3rd level, she gains the arcane reservoir class feature as an arcanist of her character level -2.
Arcanist Exploit: At 7th level, she gains one arcanist exploit. She treats her character level as her effective arcanist level when determining whether or not she can select an exploit.
Consume Spells: At 11th level, she gains the consume spells class feature, but she can only use it with spells that are on the arcanist spell list, even though she can cast them using another class' spell list.
Improved Exploit: At 15th level, she gains one additional arcanist exploit.
Greater Exploit: At 19th level, she gains one additional arcanist exploit.

If you think that this looks like the magus VMC with the serial numbers filed off... you got me. That's exactly what it is. I did say it was probably the easiest.

Next up, for something more complex: the Bloodrager.

Bloodline: At 1st level, he must select a bloodrager bloodline. He treats his character level as his effective bloodrager level for all bloodline powers.
Bloodrage: At 3rd level, he gains the bloodrage class feature for a number of rounds per day equal to his Constitution modifier + his character level.
Bloodline Power: At 7th level, he gains his bloodline's 1st-level bloodline power.
Improved Bloodline Power: At 11th level, he gains his bloodline's 4th-level power.
Greater Bloodline: At 15th level, he gains his bloodline's 8th-level power.
Greater Bloodrage: At 19th level, he gains greater bloodrage.

This one is much trickier. The bloodrager has more class-related powers than the arcanist. I focused on the bloodrage as the definitive power, and proceeded from there.

These are only my ideas. I'd be very interested in seeing yours, and not just for these two. I think we can come up with some stellar work if we put our heads to it.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello. At the risk of looking like an idiot, I'd like to let you know that I appear to have made a mistake. I was checking on my Strategy Guide order, which I pre-ordered (#3490399). I saw that it was in my sidecart, and that it would ship with the next shipment. I took that to mean that it would come with the next release in that line, which is next month's Pathfinder Unchained. I wanted to get it as soon as it was ready, so I adjusted the order, and now it looks like I have accidentally ended up ordering it again (#3490400). I don't need two copies of the book, so if you can get rid of one of those orders, that would be fantastic. If not, well, I guess it will be a reminder to myself to go to Customer Service the next time something seems off. Either way, I thank you for your time.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hello,

I received my shipment notice on Friday Sept 19. It's now Thursday the 25th and the shipping info is still not on the UPS website. They say to contact the shipper if the info isn't present after 72 hours. The shipment isn't late, it takes 4-8 business days and that timeframe hasn't passed yet, I was just hoping for an update. Any info would be much appreciated. Thank you.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

According to Bestiary 4 (or so I'm told--the 30th can't come quickly enough!), Cernunnos, Cthulhu, and Pazuzu are CR 30, which is Paizo's capstone. Higher than that and you're in god territory. I don't know much about Cernunnos, but Pazuzu has fought post-ascension Lamashtu several times, and Cthulhu... well, Cthuuhl ftagn. Of course, this has led me to wonder: who are the others? Who are the other big kids on the block? These are some of my guesses and the reasons, and please feel free to add your own.

I'll stick with the Demon Lords for now:

Abraxus. He's one of the oldest, and the Final Incantation is suitably super-powerful.

Deskari. Mostly for meta reasons. WotR is just going for broke, and to my mind it would make sense for it to end with a fight with the most powerful opponent possible. I don't know if he's normally that powerful, but we're dealing with power-boosting artifacts, so who's to say that he can't get a little boost in time to fight a party of level 20 MR 10 PCs?

Nocticula. Most of the others are afraid of her, and it looks like even Lamashtu is concerned. That's a telling sign.

Orcus. I confess to D&D Nostalgia Goggles. This one could go either way, depending on whether he lives up to his worshipers' hype or not. He might not, but I have this vision of uninformed mythic adventurers saying "Oh this is a minor demon lord, look at the small cult! How much trouble could he-- RETREAT! OH SWEET MERCIFUL GODS RETREAT!"


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I was reading this thread and I got to thinking about the fiends' celestial counterparts. To that end, I read the entries in the Bestiaries to refresh my memory. This is what I realized.

One thing that struck me is that the Archons and the Azatas are concerned with the same things as their direct opposites (the Demons and the Devils, respectively). The Demons are about destroying the body, but the Archons are about protecting it. They protect mortals by taking the fight to the fiends, and they teach mortals to protect themselves by imparting their values of discipline to them. Also, while the Devils seek to enslave the mind, the Azatas seek to liberate it. They deliberately hang back, inspiring mortals to greatness but allowing them to fight their own battles (except when the fiends attack directly, in which case the Azatas happily help even the odds).

By contrast, both the Daemons and the Agathions are deeply concerned with life itself, with the Daemons seeking to take it and the Agathions seeking to foster it. Their methodology is just as different. The Daemons seek to destroy mortal beings, but the Agathions seek to keep the natural world in balance, with only a few breeds (Draconals, Vulpinals) focusing their attentions upon mortals. The Agathions preserve life by preserving the world.

Finally, we get to the Angels. They are an especially interesting case because they don't have an opposite number among the fiends. The text says that they and the Agathions act as go-betweens for the other celestials, but my feeling is that the Angels play this role far more often. They cover all three Good alignments (though individual Angels may have a preference), and that diversity gives them great insight into the nature of Good. They engage in the war of Good and Evil on a cosmic level (for lack of a better term), and that sense of the bigger picture seems to give them a unique role amongst the celestials. It seems to me that by not giving them a fiendish counterpart race, Paizo is saying that Good has a self-awareness that Evil lacks.

... well, at least until Golarion's fiends form an IFCC :D

Those are just my thoughts, anyway. What do you think?