Helpless Character?


Rules Questions


Hi,

Can a helpless character that is occupied by the same square as a combatant be pulled out of combat by a character behind the two without provoking an AOO?

And what is the rule if the same helpless character is healed, brought to consciousness and is still occupies the same square as the combatant? Since two characters cannot occupy the same square.


Improved Bull-Rush/Drag/Reposition wrote:
An enemy being moved by a Bull-Rush/Drag/Reposition does not provoke an attack of opportunity because of the movement unless you possess the Greater Bull-Rush/Drag/Reposition feat.

I'd use a guide and say you can move others without them provoking. I think as a general rule non-voluntary movement doesn't provoke.


A helpless character is not really a functional character. They by definition cannot move by themselves and should be treated as an object. Looking at the table moving a heavy object is listed as provoking an attack of opportunity so pulling a helpless character out of combat would likewise provoke an attack of opportunity. But since you can only attack the creature provoking the AoO the character that pulls the helpless character out is the one take the attack of opportunity. The helpless character and the character that was originally sharing his space do not provoke the AoO.

The rules for accidently ending movement in an illegal space would cover the second part of the question. Again the helpless character did not do anything so all the rules would apply to the person actually performing the actions. The rules state that if you end your movement in an illegal space you put your figure in the last legal position you occupied, or the closest legal positon if it is closer. So depending on where the character pulling other was you may end up in the same space you where or probably one next to it. Since the square where the helpless character was, is still occupied that is not a legal space. That may mean that you provoke another AoO for moving, but chances are you are only moving 5’ so are safe.

All the risks are to the character trying to save his helpless party member. Saving a helpless person is a heroic action and those are seldom safe. This not only follows the rules, but heightens the sense of dramatics.


If the character doing the pulling is in a Threatened Square--which is likely in the given scenario--then he would indeed Provoke an Attack of Opportunity just like he would if he were attempting to pick up a dropped weapon or something.

But would the helpless character Provoke an Attack of Opportunity? He is Moving out of a Threatened Square, but in situations like this, that does not always Provoke. I guess it would depend on the mechanism by which you do this.

If you are using the Bull Rush, Reposition, or Drag combat maneuver, the Helpless character does not provoke, but these combat maneuvers specifically state that the target does not provoke. If you Grapple-Move the helpless character out of a Threatened Square--no such exclusion mentioned--the helpless character probably does Provoke AoOs.


The helpless character is in a square with another character currently engaged in combat. The character that wants to pull the helpless character out of combat is directly behind(thus not currently in a threatened square)the two occupying the same square. So I would rule that since the pulling character is putting his arms in the same square as the helpless character he would provoke an AOO as Mysterious Stranger mentioned.


Forced movement does not provoke


While forced movement does not provoke an AoO, both picking up an item and moving a heavy object specifically state they do. Both of those are also considered move actions. Again the helpless character is not provoking the AoO, but rather the person attempting to pull him to safety. The character pulling the helpless character is also the one who will take the attack, not the helpless character.

If picking up a dagger from the square where the helpless character is in provokes an AoO, then why would not pulling the much larger and heavier character not?


It seemed they were asking if the helpless character provokes


If the combatants who is occupying the square is friendly, the it would follow the rules of moving through a friendly space. Your helpless downed ally can be pulled safely out of a space occupied by another friendly ally at no risk.

Conversely if the combatant who is occupying the space is hostile, then you would provoke multiple times in this action. First you would provoke when attempting to pick up your ally. You would provoke again when you move out of your current space, since Ethan would be moving out of a threatened space. Your downed ally would provoke as well at that same moment for moving through an enemy space. Finally when you make your second 5-ft of movement, your downed ally will provoke for a second time for moving out of a threatened space. Depending on if the hostile has reach or not, and if it is natural or a reach weapon, you may potentially provoke more.


Chell Raighn wrote:

If the combatants who is occupying the square is friendly, the it would follow the rules of moving through a friendly space. Your helpless downed ally can be pulled safely out of a space occupied by another friendly ally at no risk.

Conversely if the combatant who is occupying the space is hostile, then you would provoke multiple times in this action. First you would provoke when attempting to pick up your ally. You would provoke again when you move out of your current space, since Ethan would be moving out of a threatened space. Your downed ally would provoke as well at that same moment for moving through an enemy space. Finally when you make your second 5-ft of movement, your downed ally will provoke for a second time for moving out of a threatened space. Depending on if the hostile has reach or not, and if it is natural or a reach weapon, you may potentially provoke more.

As I said earlier forced movement does not provoke the helpless ally cannot provoke from being pulled around and even if he did provoke you cannot provoke twice from the same movement. He also never went through the enemy square he only left it. pathfinder cares about the square you are entering not the square you are leaving. Your grasp of the rules seems lacking I suggest you re-read the combat section for pathfinder


vhok wrote:
pathfinder cares about the square you are entering not the square you are leaving. Your grasp of the rules seems lacking I suggest you re-read the combat section for pathfinder

You may want to re-read the combat section yourself.

Quote:

Provoking an Attack of Opportunity

Two kinds of actions can provoke attacks of opportunity: moving out of a threatened square and performing certain actions within a threatened square.

pathfinder cares about the square you are LEAVING not the square you are entering.


Yes I was too unclear about my comment. I was referring to moving through someone’s square and in terms of terrains not AOOs when I said they only care about the square you are entering. Also you said nothing to backup the helpless character provoking from being dragged.


Attacks of Opportunity

Sometimes a combatant in a melee lets her guard down or takes a reckless action. In this case, combatants near her can take advantage of her lapse in defense to attack her for free. These free attacks are called attacks of opportunity. See the Attacks of Opportunity diagram for an example of how they work.

In order to provoke an attack of opportunity the person provoking must do one of two things. First is to let down your guard, the second is to take a reckless action. Since a helpless person cannot take any actions that means performing a reckless action is not possible. By definition a helpless person cannot further let down their guard. So unless you are claiming that a helpless person always provokes an AoO they don’t meet the requirements for the first option. I don’t think anyone believes that being helpless provokes an AoO.


It is beyond funny that being completely helpless provokes fewer attacks than briefly letting down your guard to, e.g., loose an arrow. Such are game rules.


Except that nowhere in the rules does it say that a helpless creature can’t provoke attacks of opportunity, nor do the rules state that forced movement doesn’t provoke. There are specific types of forced movement that do not provoke, requiring specific use of certain actions or actions that function as those actions. If you are using the drag action, then yeah, your helpless ally doesn’t provoke, but if you are moving them through some other means they would still provoke unless the action used stares otherwise. In the rules for attacks of opportunity it states that movement, regardless of action, always provoked. That is the general rule, specific movements that do not provoke have their exceptions stated in their specific rules.

If I have overlooked something please provide the rules excerpt that I missed or link to the FAQ or Errata ruling on it. Until then, the rules are clear that movement of any kind provokes unless the specific movement says otherwise, and there are no rules exceptions for helpless targets.


blahpers wrote:
It is beyond funny that being completely helpless provokes fewer attacks than briefly letting down your guard to, e.g., loose an arrow. Such are game rules.

Couldn't one reading of the rules be that one can indeed spend his attack of opportunity against a fallen opponent within reach? Isn't an unconscious person a valid target for a quick swing that doesn't require much thought?

Side question : What kind of action is it to voluntarily let one's guard down for an instant? I'd say it is a free action by comparison to what can be achieved with each kind of action but I haven't been able to find substance about it.


blahpers wrote:
It is beyond funny that being completely helpless provokes fewer attacks than briefly letting down your guard to, e.g., loose an arrow. Such are game rules.

Sorry, this was a sidetrack and poorly timed.

Non-forced-movement-related sidetrack:
I meant in general, not due to forced movement. One only passingly familiar with the idea of attacks of opportunity might reasonably conclude that a character simply being helpless would provoke constantly by virtue of the fact that the character's guard is continuously at least as lowered as it is when performing an action that would normally provoke. But the rules don't work that way.

More on the subject:

It is true that there are cases involving forced movement in which the rules specify that the forced movement doesn't provoke an attack of opportunity (e.g., bull rush). I don't know of a case in which the rules specifically specify that forced movement does provoke an attack of opportunity except for Greater Bull Rush, which is itself reversing a previous explicit statement about not provoking. This leads me to believe that the default is that forced movement does, in fact, provoke unless otherwise specified.

But given the rules' penchant for "clarifying text" as well as how overloaded the term "movement"/"moving" is in Pathfinder RPG, it's reasonable to conclude the opposite as well. *shrug*

Edit:

Agénor wrote:
Side question : What kind of action is it to voluntarily let one's guard down for an instant? I'd say it is a free action by comparison to what can be achieved with each kind of action but I haven't been able to find substance about it.

Unspecified. Normally one provokes an attack of opportunity as a consequence of taking (or attempting to take) another action. I won't say that you can't do it at all because I don't follow the "nobody can poop in Pathfinder RPG" school of rules parsing, but expect table variation.


Chell Raighn wrote:

Except that nowhere in the rules does it say that a helpless creature can’t provoke attacks of opportunity, nor do the rules state that forced movement doesn’t provoke. There are specific types of forced movement that do not provoke, requiring specific use of certain actions or actions that function as those actions. If you are using the drag action, then yeah, your helpless ally doesn’t provoke, but if you are moving them through some other means they would still provoke unless the action used stares otherwise. In the rules for attacks of opportunity it states that movement, regardless of action, always provoked. That is the general rule, specific movements that do not provoke have their exceptions stated in their specific rules.

If I have overlooked something please provide the rules excerpt that I missed or link to the FAQ or Errata ruling on it. Until then, the rules are clear that movement of any kind provokes unless the specific movement says otherwise, and there are no rules exceptions for helpless targets.

I already posted the rules citation. But here it is again. Pay attention to the bolded parts.

Sometimes a combatant in a melee lets her guard down or takes a reckless action. In this case, combatants near her can take advantage of her lapse in defense to attack her for free. These free attacks are called attacks of opportunity. See the Attacks of Opportunity diagram for an example of how they work.

Threatened Squares: You threaten all squares into which you can make a melee attack, even when it is not your turn. Generally, that means everything in all squares adjacent to your space (including diagonally). An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened square provokes an attack of opportunity from you. If you're unarmed, you don't normally threaten any squares and thus can't make attacks of opportunity.

An attack of opportunity is provoked by specific actions the character takes. The AoO can only be used on the character taking those actions. This is stated in the first paragraph and repeated in the second. When someone is forcibly moved they are not the ones taking the action, the person moving them is the one taking the action. There is no rule specifically stating that forced movement does not provoke an AoO, because there is no need. There is no way that forced movement can be the result of an action of the character being moved. If it where it would not be forced movement, it would be voluntary movement.


That doesn’t say that forced movement doesn’t provoke, not does it say that a helpless target can’t provoke. That outlines the normal conditions for provoking, yes, but when you look at the complete rules for attacks of opportunity there are far more that just two conditions. The two conditions are just broad categories that all of the conditions can be sorted into. Attempting to trip a target is a reckless action that creates an opening in your defense by lowering your weapon to attack at your opponents feet. Charging past an opponent is movement. Etc...

The lack of a rule specifically stating that forced movement doesn’t provoke does not mean that the rule is not needed. The lack of a rule specifically stating it doesn’t make either view completely accurate, but in fact is what leads to confusion and debate on the topic. However, the existence of specific rules for specific actions to not provoke on forced movement, combined with the “specific trumps general” aspect of the rules does lend itself to the general being opposite of the specific. And we have the specific rule that movement provokes regardless of action. Non-action movement fits that qualification still.

Additionally, there is one example of involuntary movement that specifically states that it does provoke, however that one example states it as a very clear clarification due to explicitly not provoking from the opponent who triggered it. The goblin feat Roll With It. The feat has this to say about involuntary movement:

Quote:

This involuntary movement provokes attacks of opportunity normally if you move through threatened squares, but does not provoke an attack of opportunity from the creature that struck you in the first place.[\quote]

Note that it states explicitly “as normal” which has the direct implication that involuntary movement is intended to provoke unless otherwise stated.


You left out a very import part of this feat.
If you are struck by a melee weapon you can try to convert some or all of that damage into movement that sends you off in an uncontrolled bouncing roll. To do so, you must make an Acrobatics check (DC = 5 + the damage dealt from the attack) as an immediate action. If you succeed in this check, you take no damage from the actual attack but instead convert that damage into movement with each point equating to 1 foot of movement.

The feat states that you need to take an action. Essentially what it does is allow you to take a modified move action as an immediate action instead of a move action. The reason it provokes an AoO for moving is because you took the action and moved. This is a completely different scenario then a helpless person being dragged by another character. It also does nothing to disprove my argument.

My argument is not about forced or involuntary movement; it is about the fact that you do not provoke an AoO due to the action of another character. The only thing I have ever seen in the game that allows you to make an AoO against character based on the actions of another character is the advance rogue talent opportunist. That is a clear case of the specific rule overruling the general. Other than that I don’t know of anything in the game that allows you to take an AoO on a character based on the actions of a third character. If you can find an example of this that is that is not a special ability please post it.


Mysterious Stranger wrote:

An attack of opportunity is provoked by specific actions the character takes. The AoO can only be used on the character taking those actions.

So would you say that a mounted rider moving past a enemy character is not subject to an AoO? Only the mount is subject to the AoO?

(I actually agree with you that forced movement generally does not provoke, but I don't think the rules are really clear enough to make a solid argument for either side).


That question is a lot less clear.

If the mount is not trained for combat you will provoke an AoO. Controlling a mount not trained for combat in a combat is a move action. That also probably falls under controlling a frightened mount which the rules specifically state provokes an attack of opportunity.

If the mount is trained for combat, that is a much more difficult situation. It also depends on exactly what you are doing. If you are simply going past the other person you probably do not provoke an AoO. Guiding your mount does not take an action. If the mount is making an attack, that requires a fee action. That satisfies the requirement that in order to provoke an attack of opportunity you have to take an action in a threatened square. In this case I can see that both sides may have a valid argument. Personally I would say that it does not, but that is my opinion.


Mysterious Stranger wrote:
An attack of opportunity is provoked by specific actions the character takes.

Including moving. I don't see where a distinction is made in the rules between moving and being moved.

Attacks of Opportunity wrote:
Sometimes a combatant in a melee lets her guard down

Being Helpless certainly means your guard is "let down."

Being Bull Rushed, Dragged, or Repositioned out of Threatened Squares does not Provoke Attacks of Opportunity unless the mover has Greater Bull Rush or something, But all 3 of those Combat Maneuvers specify that those kinds of movement do not provoke attacks of opportunity. There is no reason to suppose that forced movement in some other way also wouldn't.

Mysterious Stranger wrote:
There is no rule specifically stating that forced movement does not provoke an AoO, because there is no need. There is no way that forced movement can be the result of an action of the character being moved. If it where it would not be forced movement, it would be voluntary movement.

But there are 2 ways of Provoking Attacks of Opportunity. Performing a Distracting Act and by Moving. In other words, you don't have to be the performer of the Move Action in order to move so as to Provoke the AoO.

Actually the "Move" Move Action is on the list of Distracting Acts that you can Perform that would Provoke the Attack of Opportunity. The fact that Moving out of a Threatened Square is given a separate category from Performing a Distracting Act implies that the target does not necessarily have to be actively taking actions in order to Provoke. And that opens the door to involuntary movement Provoking Attacks of Opportunity.

Honestly though, this question seems academic vis a vis the OP:

KenkuKen wrote:
Can a helpless character that is occupied by the same square as a combatant be pulled out of combat by a character behind the two without provoking an AOO?

The helpless character can certainly be Dragged, Repositioned, or Bull Rushed out of a Threatened Square, even an occupied square without provoking an Attack of Opportunity. If the performer of any of these Combat Maneuvers is in a Threatened Square, she does provoke unless she has Improved Drag or something.

It seems that the only thing we are arguing about now is if you are Grappled out of a Threatened Square. I am confident of the position that being Grappled out of Threatened Square does Provoke Attacks of Opportunity, since the rules do not specify that you don't. And there is no rule that I know of that says that provocative movement out of Threatened Squares has to be voluntary movement.


The rules are not unclear like people keep saying. They are quite specific in this respect. To provoke an AoO you must perform an action in a threatened square. The chart is only clarifies which action actually provoke. The bolded sentence is quite clear about what is required to provoke an AoO

Threatened Squares: You threaten all squares into which you can make a melee attack, even when it is not your turn. Generally, that means everything in all squares adjacent to your space (including diagonally). An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened square provokes an attack of opportunity from you. If you're unarmed, you don't normally threaten any squares and thus can't make attacks of opportunity.

If you don’t take an appropriate action you do not provoke. The fact that moving out of a threatened square is a qualifying act does not mean that anytime you move out of a threatened square you provoke. What it means is that if you take an action that causes you to move out of a threatened square you provoke an AoO.

The character who is moved out of a threatened square by the action of another character has not performed and action. The character who moved them is the one that performed the action. Taking an action is a well-defined game term. What Action did the helpless character take when he was pulled back?

The character that pulled the helpless character back on the other hand has performed an action and will provoke if in a threatened square. Moving a heavy object is specifically listed as provoking an AoO. So even if the character pulling them back has an improved combat maneuver they will still provoke if they are in a threatened square.


Mysterious Stranger,

Before we prosecute our debate any further, we should contextualize it within the domain of the OP's question.

KenkuKen wrote:
Can a helpless character that is occupied by the same square as a combatant be pulled out of combat by a character behind the two without provoking an AOO?

I think we all--including you and I--agree the answer to this question is "Yes."

Anyone who is pushed or pulled by any of the Combat Maneuvers Drag, Reposition, or Bull Rush does not Provoke Attacks of Opportunity even if they are so moved out of Threatened Squares. The descriptions of these Combat Maneuvers specifically say so.

If the person, technically the Attacker, performing those Maneuvers is in a threatened square herself, she does Provoke Attacks of Opportunity unless she has some Feat or special ability like Improved Reposition or something.

The Attacker can cause the target she is Bull Rushing, Dragging, or Repositioning to be Provoking Attacks of Opportunity via special Feats such as Greater Bull Rush, and there are other ways. But that does not seem to be what the OP is talking about. The OP seems to be talking about dragging (not necessarily Dragging) a Helpless Ally out of harm's way.

So, what are we arguing about here, really, and do we really need to continue?


Mysterious Stranger wrote:

If the mount is not trained for combat you will provoke an AoO. Controlling a mount not trained for combat in a combat is a move action. That also probably falls under controlling a frightened mount which the rules specifically state provokes an attack of opportunity.

Yes, but the AoO generated here is not an AoO for movement past an enemy. It is an AoO because we have a specific rule telling us that controlling a frightened mount generates an AoO. A separate AoO would (or would not, depending on how you view forced movement) be generated if the mount then moves as well.

Personally I think the whole issue is very much context based - and thus very subject to GM discretion. I would not give someone an AoO if they were standing next to an open window that someone fell past. I would give someone an AoO against a rider of a combat trained mount that move past them (or against the mount, but not both - I treat rider and mount as one creature for this purpose). I would not give an AoO against a helpless opponent who was dragged away - but would grant an AoO against the person doing the dragging (the rules are explicit on this second part regarding moving a heavy object).


Scott Wilhelm wrote:

Honestly though, this question seems academic vis a vis the OP:

KenkuKen wrote:
Can a helpless character that is occupied by the same square as a combatant be pulled out of combat by a character behind the two without provoking an AOO?
The helpless character can certainly be Dragged, Repositioned, or Bull Rushed out of a Threatened Square, even an occupied square without provoking an Attack of Opportunity. If the performer of any of these Combat Maneuvers is in a Threatened Square, she does provoke unless she has Improved Drag or something.

Just to clarify that last part, you provoke from the target of your maneuver. So if you drag an unconscious ally out of an enemy's square then your unconscious ally gets a free AoO (if they want it), the enemy does not.

EDIT: You may provoke for other reasons though - if you Drag/Bull-Rush your ally then you're likely moving out of a threatened space. Reposition is usually the superior maneuver here.


Whats being asked her is basically what redirection is. No other maneuver really fits the bill. Redirection DOES NOT provoke attacks of opportunity on the target being moved, you need a feat for that. (i have a high level flowing monk, taught me all about reposition maneuvers)

Reposition
Source: PZO1115.

You can attempt to reposition a foe to a different location as a standard action. You can only reposition an opponent that is no more than one size category larger than you. A reposition attempts to force a foe to move to a different position in relation to your location without doing any harm. If you do not have the Improved Reposition feat or a similar ability, attempting to reposition a foe provokes an attack of opportunity from the target of your maneuver. You cannot use this maneuver to move a foe into a space that is intrinsically dangerous, such as a pit or wall of fire. If your attack is successful, you may move your target 5 feet to a new location. For every 5 by which your attack exceeds your opponent’s CMD, you can move the target an additional 5 feet. The target must remain within your reach at all times during this movement, except for the final 5 feet of movement, which can be to a space adjacent to your reach.

An enemy being moved by a reposition does not provoke an attack of opportunity because of the movement unless you possess the Greater Reposition feat. You cannot move a creature into a square that is occupied by a solid object or obstacle.


Combat maneuvers are used against an unwilling opponent. You don’t really need one vs a willing or helpless ally. You don’t need to perform an overrun maneuver to move through a square ooccupied with a friendly character, so why do you need to perform a reposition or bulrush to move a willing target?


Mysterious Stranger wrote:
Combat maneuvers are used against an unwilling opponent. You don’t really need one vs a willing or helpless ally. You don’t need to perform an overrun maneuver to move through a square ooccupied with a friendly character, so why do you need to perform a reposition or bulrush to move a willing target?

A helpless target has no ability to prevent you from moving into her square, so you don't need to make an Overrun Check.

A helpless target, even a helpless Ally still weighs something, still needs to be grabbed onto, and it is happening in combat who might not want their victims to be removed from their clutches, so I think it makes a lot of sense to require a check. Since they are helpless, I suppose they should not be able to apply their Strength or Dex mods, or apply any Feats.

The other reason why you'd need to perform a Reposition or Drag Combat Maneuver is that the those are pre-existing game mechanics that describe what you the OP is trying to do.

MrCharisma wrote:
you provoke from the target of your maneuver.

Oops. Missed that part.


There is a preexisting game mechanic that covers pulling a helpless character out of a threatened square. It is called moving a heavy object. It is listed in the core rule book under actions in combat. It is considered a move action and provokes an AoO. There is no roll involved you simply declare that you are pulling the character back and take the AoO.

Going by the rules a helpless character is considered to have a 0 DEX, but takes no penalty to STR or other stats. So your 10th level fighter who is helpless ends up with a 15 CMD assuming a STR of 10. That means a 1st level character with average stats has to roll a 15 to pull him back. That is a 25% chance of success. This could further be reduced by any magical effects that may be in place that are affecting combat. For example if the party is being affected by bane that means you take a -1 penalty on your attack roll, so now you have a 20% chance of success. If the character trying to pull him back has a lower STR the chance is even less. Even if the character pull him back has a high CMB a natural 1 still fails.


Attackers also get a +4 to hit vs helpless enemies, so those % chances you gave shouod be 20% higher.

On a more important note: If you're a 1st level character trying to rescue a helpless 15th level character you likely have bigger problems. Running or begging for your life are more probably better actions.


Actually you don’t get a +4 to hit a helpless character; the helpless character takes a -4 penalty to AC and is treated as if he had a 0 DEX. AC is not CMD so that does not apply. My example was probably over the top, but the fact remains that using combat maneuvers for this makes it a lot harder to try and save your teammates.

Instead of a 1st level character trying to save a 15 let’s say the 5th level wizard is trying to save the 5th level fighter. The fighter has a 16 STR, and the wizard has a 8 STR. That puts the fighters CMD at 13 to the wizards +0. So the 5th level wizard has a 35% chance of pulling his teammate back from danger, and provokes an AoO. Using the move heavy object he still provokes an AoO, but if he survives he has a100% chance of success.


Mysterious Stranger wrote:
Actually you don’t get a +4 to hit a helpless character; the helpless character takes a -4 penalty to AC and is treated as if he had a 0 DEX. AC is not CMD so that does not apply.

Actually it does.

Combat Maneuver Defense: Each character and creature has a Combat Maneuver Defense (or CMD) that represents its ability to resist combat maneuvers. A creature’s CMD is determined using the following formula:

CMD = 10 + Base attack bonus + Strength modifier + Dexterity modifier + special size modifier

The special size modifier for a creature’s Combat Maneuver Defense is as follows: Fine –8, Diminutive –4, Tiny –2, Small –1, Medium +0, Large +1, Huge +2, Gargantuan +4, Colossal +8. Some feats and abilities grant a bonus to your CMD when resisting specific maneuvers. A creature can also add any circumstance, deflection, dodge, insight, luck, morale, profane, and sacred bonuses to AC to its CMD. Any penalties to a creature’s AC also apply to its CMD. A flat-footed creature does not add its Dexterity bonus to its CMD.

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