Magic Items That Destroy Worlds


Pathfinder First Edition General Discussion

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I'm a big fan of magic items. Everyone who knows my posting history knows that I've a great love for the magic item creation rules, a great love for examining how magic and magic items can affect the world in various great ways.

Magic can create energy from nothing. Making a generator that generates infinite power in Pathfinder is not difficult. It doesn't require high level magic. It's actually pretty rudimentary. By 5th level, magicians of various sorts (arcane / divine / psionic) can begin shaping the world in new and wondrous ways. I actually enjoy these ideas, as they let us break away from worlds entirely of medieval-esque norms and expand our horizons to fill the world with everything from tribal bands of barbarians (not the class) and shamans to powerful empires built on magic and technology.

However, there's a few magic items that are a bit...worrisome. Magic items that by their very existence can throw things very far out of whack, and may even by their very purpose inadvertently destroy the world.

Many of us know of the decanter of endless water that, unlike create water makes no mention of the water leaving existence after it has poured in. If taken purely for its mechanics, one of these could be tossed into the ocean on geyser mode and destroy the world (it might take some time).

I personally have this standing house rule that if a magic item would destroy the world through creating something the created materials vanish after a period of time. In fact, any magic item I make always has a duration on "produce" generated from it.

Today a friend of mine showed me an interesting and cool item that can "break" a world very easily. The Robe of Infinite Twine.

We determined that if you have something to draw off the rope (such as an undead creature, a machine, a construct, or some other automated process) you can produce almost 2500 gp worth of hemp rope every 24 hours, or around half that if you're pawning it at 1/2 price. Given that the robe itself is only 1,000 gp, it pays for itself in the first day. Any world with such an item needs no actual hemp to create hemp ropes, instead you would soon have factories where people simply pull 10 ft. of rope every 6 seconds, or 100 ft. per minute. That's some serious productivity!

Off the top of my head, spells like wall of stone/iron have similar possibilities (these are absolutely awesome for building forts and such on the fly and on the cheap).

What other fun world-altering things can everyone add to this thread? :D


I bet the twine wrapped around the world several million times could cause some interestingly hard to imagine (mundane like delaying/blocking travel) and really big problems like causing completely different weather systems)


Someone has an atomic bomb magic item. It's a magic physics meets real world physics thing.


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Tiny Coffee Golem wrote:
Someone has an atomic bomb magic item. It's a magic physics meets real world physics thing.

Muahahaha. So that's what happened to that one country in Eberron. :P

Snow_Tiger wrote:
I bet the twine wrapped around the world several million times could cause some interestingly hard to imagine (mundane like delaying/blocking travel) and really big problems like causing completely different weather systems)

Indeed. I could only imagine the sheer number of crazy practices that could come out of generating 100 ft. of hemp rope per minute (hrpm?). You could get really crazy with it if you combined it with some ring gates and a few sentient constructs with a lyre of building. Entire cities made of hemp rope. :P


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I think the atomic bomb thing may have been me back when Tiny Coffee Golem made a thread about defending a city.

Long post:

Spoiler:
Ipslore the Red wrote:

A true creation trap at CL 20th that creates either equal quantities of matter and antimatter osmium at 640 kilograms per cubic foot for 12800 kilograms of matter and antimatter converting each other to pure energy.

The amount of energy released in joules is equal to the square of the speed of light, 3*10^8 m/s, squared, or 9*10^16, times the mass in kilograms, giving us a final result of 1.152*10^21 joules of energy, or 115,200 petajoules.

One megaton is equivalent to 4.184 petajoules. The energy released by this trap every time it's activated is equal to roughly 27533.5 megatons of TNT.

For comparison, the Tsar Bomba, the largest manmade explosion in real life, was 57 megatons. It leveled a village some 55 kilometers away from its test site, made a mushroom cloud 64 kilometers high, and created a shockwave that could be measured even after its third passage around Earth. Now, and this is the important bit, that bomb was less than 1/400th as powerful as the explosion our true creation trap would create.

Collateral damage? No problem. Just give your city immunity to fire, radiation, and whatever other damage types your GM decides a matter/antimatter reaction causes.

Alternatively, just have it create 20 cubic feet of supercompressed hydrogen plasma. Hydrogen's the most common element, so it should be nice and cheap.

EDIT: Two factors to consider- the true creation trap would be ridiculously expensive, but you only ever need one.

And explosions don't scale linearly. It's 483 and a bit times stronger than the Tsar Bomba, but it won't be 483 times bigger. You don't have to worry about destroying the entire planet.


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I was disappointed to learn that Trapped Puzzle Box does not summon cenobites.


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Exle wrote:
I was disappointed to learn that Trapped Puzzle Box does not summon cenobites.

I am disappointed this thread was mostly concerned with economics and a few long term weather effects. I came in here expecting death star level. Sure, nuclear winter is nice, but it hardly takes much off the mass of the planet. This is why I am always wary of items or creatures that could "destroy the world". Looking through the bestiary, I could easily find plenty of creatures that could survive any of that stuff, so you could hardly even call it the end of all life on the planet.

I wanted to discuss the logistical problems of having real planet destroying objects as mcguffins. Names the fact that they either should have been destroyed in the collateral damage or at least lost in the debris of the planet's tiny bits and lost in the infinite void of space.

I think that the XKCD "What If?" section has spoiled me on worst case scenarios taken way to far. Thinking about that decanter of endless water, you could probably look up the one about "New Netherlands" and get some perspective on how long it would take for a single constant change in water level would take to have obvious effects.


lemeres wrote:
I wanted to discuss the logistical problems of having real planet destroying objects as mcguffins.

Sounds to me like the ball's in your court now. Why don't you serve? :)


Ashiel wrote:
lemeres wrote:
I wanted to discuss the logistical problems of having real planet destroying objects as mcguffins.
Sounds to me like the ball's in your court now. Why don't you serve? :)

Unfortunately, my knowledge of wondrous items and the like is rather sparse. I do know that there were magical items on this scale within the game setting by looking at the planet Eox on the map of the setting's solar system. Anything that can turn a life sustaining planet into one irregularly shaped chunks surrounded by a thousand moonlets is something that I can get behind (because I sure as heck do not want to be in front of it)

Also, I like anything that taught me the word "moonlet".

EDIT: the star map was slightly misleading, since I thought the Diaspora was part of the whole Eox thing, but I still stand by my comment about its apparent shape and deadness.

Dark Archive

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The sphere of annihilation used to be the standard example. Get one, move it to the bottom of the deepest trench in the ocean, and wait, water pressure / Brownian motion will keep pushing water (and fish, whales, etc.) into it to be annihilated until the oceans are gone, replaced by some deep valleys filled with mud.

The same process could also mess with the planet itself, if it has a molten core, or, much more slowly, if it has a solid core (just put it slightly off-center in the big ball of iron or whatever that is the core, and planetary rotation and subsidence will continually expose it to new iron, which will get eated, until the entire surface of the earth is undergoing a foot or so of daily 'settling' as it collapses into the latest swath of empty space beneath it).

But that's a slow boring process compared to how fast you could destroy an entire region by polymorphing up some green slime (which would turn a jungle measuring a thousand miles on a side into a giant patch of green slime pretty darn fast), or by unleashing a shadow (wraith, spectre, greater shadow, dread wraith) into a village, or tossing a chunk of brown mold into a volcano in the desert.

The way burrow speeds work, and the existence of an underdark or darklands, would allow bulettes, purple worms, umber hulks, thoqqua, etc. to undermine entire civilizations in relatively short times and collapse them into the caverns beneath. That would also kill the burrower, but it's not like any of those creatures are exactly brain trusts...

Silver Crusade

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^^^^ Y'know, it might be interesting to run through the magic item lists and hazard lists with that thought process in mind to see whether the SCP Foundation would classify them as Safe, Euclid, or Keter...


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Readily Available Potion of Contraceptive
Ubiquitous Crystal Ball of Television
Easily Affordable Scrying Pool of Internet Entertainment

/world


This is not exactly a magic item, but a trap. It's a magical staircase that slings those who step on it into mindboggling speeds. In its description it says, that the victim's speed doubles every step they take. So assuming an average 75kg (~155lbs) person and 70 steps would equal something comparable to Tsar Bomba =D


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Ashiel wrote:
Many of us know of the decanter of endless water that, unlike create water makes no mention of the water leaving existence after it has poured in. If taken purely for its mechanics, one of these could be tossed into the ocean on geyser mode and destroy the world (it might take some time).

The decanter produces 5 gallons per second, or 22 litres. The Earth (which is probably roughly Golarion-sized) has a sea surface area of approx 3.6e8 km2. So each second, the sea would rise by about 60 attometres. Assuming that a 10cm sea surface rise is enough to cause some additional distress (need to rebuild a harbour wall, occasional flooding, etc), in a mere 50 million years someone might suggest switching the decanter off.


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Mikaze wrote:
^^^^ Y'know, it might be interesting to run through the magic item lists and hazard lists with that thought process in mind to see whether the SCP Foundation would classify them as Safe, Euclid, or Keter...

Like the idea but isn't Keter defined by a "vigorous, active hostility to human life, civilization, and/or spacetime" and "capable of causing significant destruction in the event of a containment breach"?

All of that kinda indicates that only sentient SCPs would quality, so only intelligent magic items.

Hmm... would be actually cool to have a malevolent, omnicidal intelligent magical item like a sphere of annihilation.

Incidentally, some of Set's suggestions could qualify as Keter, shadows, maybe green slime but also ghouls are self-replicating, hostile and capable of great destruction.


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Mudfoot wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Many of us know of the decanter of endless water that, unlike create water makes no mention of the water leaving existence after it has poured in. If taken purely for its mechanics, one of these could be tossed into the ocean on geyser mode and destroy the world (it might take some time).
The decanter produces 5 gallons per second, or 22 litres. The Earth (which is probably roughly Golarion-sized) has a sea surface area of approx 3.6e8 km2. So each second, the sea would rise by about 60 attometres. Assuming that a 10cm sea surface rise is enough to cause some additional distress (need to rebuild a harbour wall, occasional flooding, etc), in a mere 50 million years someone might suggest switching the decanter off.

How about using a Cubic Gate? Permanent 20 foot diameter opening to the Elemental Plane of Water? Just not really if water and such are displaced through Gates.

The 10% chance per minute of an outsider coming through is also nice.

Would probably still take a few million years to hurt anyone :P


Ipslore the Red wrote:

I think the atomic bomb thing may have been me back when Tiny Coffee Golem made a thread about defending a city.

Long post:

** spoiler omitted **

True Creation:
Components V, S, M (5 x item value in misc. components)

So what do you figure the item value of antimatter or hydrogen plasma would be? ;)
Hydrogen is common but the 'item value' would probably include the cost of synthesis, which would probably be virtually infinite in a lowtech world like Golarion.


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Mudfoot wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Many of us know of the decanter of endless water that, unlike create water makes no mention of the water leaving existence after it has poured in. If taken purely for its mechanics, one of these could be tossed into the ocean on geyser mode and destroy the world (it might take some time).
The decanter produces 5 gallons per second, or 22 litres. The Earth (which is probably roughly Golarion-sized) has a sea surface area of approx 3.6e8 km2. So each second, the sea would rise by about 60 attometres. Assuming that a 10cm sea surface rise is enough to cause some additional distress (need to rebuild a harbour wall, occasional flooding, etc), in a mere 50 million years someone might suggest switching the decanter off.

Yep. It would take some time. It's just funny to think that if one was left on in geyser mode and not retrieved / shut down, eventually it would destroy everything. The more you had running at a time, the faster it would work. Not overnight to be sure, but still pretty bad. :P

Another mess that some players of mine came up with was Brown Mold. Brown mold is a common hazard found in dungeons and is about CR 2 as an encounter. This bizarre organism feeds on heat and cannot be burned. Instead, trying to burn it or bringing fire or significant heat within an area with it in it, it begins spreading like wildfire and causes the area nearby to become so cold as to deal steady nonlethal cold damage every round on the round (in essence, it's colder than some of the most frigid places on the planet, given the speed in which you take nonlethal cold damage from the elements).

One of my players collected some of this stuff when they encountered it in a dungeon and proceeded to cover some bloody burning skeletons with the stuff when the party was about to raid the camp of a BBEG. The undead just spread and spread the mold all over everything, killing it with the frigid cold while the undead (being immune to nonlethal damage) just continued to march and burn, burning their enemies and then freezing them too as the mold grew over and around them like rolling brown fuzz.

When the party decided to go in, they just used ray of frost over and over again to clear away the mold to allow them to pass. None of the bad guys (or I in fact) had foresaw such a tactic. At 3d6 nonlethal cold damage / round to anything within 5 ft. of the patches of mold (and the mold doubling in size every round), it's very dangerous and a single burning skeleton covered in the stuff could probably wreak havoc running through a town.


I did comment on the cost in my original post, Quite-big-but-not-BIG Bad. Vaguely condescending winky emoticons are unnecessary.

And hydrogen synthesis is relatively cheap. Lightning is plasma. Skrik nettles, among others, create hydrogen to stay afloat. Antimatter is harder, but there's plenty of quasielemental planes.


Most of the Elemental Planes have subjective gravity, so there's really no pressure to force substances through Gates. Atmospheric pressure on the material plane may well be greater in almost all cases, so loss of atmosphere could be a bigger problem than flooding. Currents in the planes might affect flow, currents change, so it may be an (overall) net sum-zero equation.


Setting it so that gravity throws something through a gate into the elemental plane of air could potentially be dangerous. I like the idea that it wouldn't work due to the subjective gravity on another plane though. That would at least help with the "omg, perma-gate at the bottom of the ocean" concern. :P


lemeres wrote:
Exle wrote:
I was disappointed to learn that Trapped Puzzle Box does not summon cenobites.

I am disappointed this thread was mostly concerned with economics and a few long term weather effects. I came in here expecting death star level. Sure, nuclear winter is nice, but it hardly takes much off the mass of the planet. This is why I am always wary of items or creatures that could "destroy the world". Looking through the bestiary, I could easily find plenty of creatures that could survive any of that stuff, so you could hardly even call it the end of all life on the planet.

I wanted to discuss the logistical problems of having real planet destroying objects as mcguffins. Names the fact that they either should have been destroyed in the collateral damage or at least lost in the debris of the planet's tiny bits and lost in the infinite void of space.

I think that the XKCD "What If?" section has spoiled me on worst case scenarios taken way to far. Thinking about that decanter of endless water, you could probably look up the one about "New Netherlands" and get some perspective on how long it would take for a single constant change in water level would take to have obvious effects.

Well if wrapped around enough times, the pressure exerted on the earths surface will probably cut the earth in half (because all the hemp rope would be in one circumference of the globe)


Gravity could pull water through a horizontal Gate if gravity acts through such phenomena. To a limited extent through a vertical one too, as 1/2 the planet's mass is to either side of the gate.

Most established settings have permanent planar portals here and there. It seems they create regional effects, but eventually the zone stabilizes; sooner or later pressure from either side will equalize. Deep oceanic gates would push water out of the plane (gravitational pressure), open air gates would pull water out (gravitational pull).

Presumably the gods keep track and try to keep things even. For player created gates, selectively permeable membranes are the quick and dirty solution.


Ashiel wrote:
Mudfoot wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Many of us know of the decanter of endless water that, unlike create water makes no mention of the water leaving existence after it has poured in. If taken purely for its mechanics, one of these could be tossed into the ocean on geyser mode and destroy the world (it might take some time).
The decanter produces 5 gallons per second, or 22 litres. The Earth (which is probably roughly Golarion-sized) has a sea surface area of approx 3.6e8 km2. So each second, the sea would rise by about 60 attometres. Assuming that a 10cm sea surface rise is enough to cause some additional distress (need to rebuild a harbour wall, occasional flooding, etc), in a mere 50 million years someone might suggest switching the decanter off.
Yep. It would take some time. It's just funny to think that if one was left on in geyser mode and not retrieved / shut down, eventually it would destroy everything. The more you had running at a time, the faster it would work. Not overnight to be sure, but still pretty bad. :P

Actually, that is less time than it took for whales to evolve from small rat/possum/whatever things. If the setting is anything like earth, then the biosphere would easily be able to react to such changes. And given the amount of time it would take to actually flood the whole planet, I would imagine that everything would be able to grow gills by then.

No, when I look for 'end of a planet' from this type of item, I am looking for how long it would take for the decanter to turn it into a water based gas giant, and then star and eventually black hole. But considering the fact that I can only vaguely believe that anything in the setting is a million years old (with the whole creation gods meddling everywhere thing lend a lot of credit to the 'young earth' theory here), I think even the gods would be dead before we saw anything like that. Plus the decanter would probably bust from the pressure long before it got to gas giant.


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Sooooo...... you could completely destroy Golarion and the whole planetary system by using Interplanetary Teleport on a piece of Brown Mold to transport it to the sun?

You could destroy an entire plane by planeshifting it to the Plane of Fire. Kinda surprised that hasn't happened yet, should be plenty of dungeons with both Gates and Brown Mold.


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Mikaze wrote:
^^^^ Y'know, it might be interesting to run through the magic item lists and hazard lists with that thought process in mind to see whether the SCP Foundation would classify them as Safe, Euclid, or Keter...

Now I wanna make an adventure where 682 is unleashed upon the unsuspecting world of Golarion.

The Tarrasque ain't got s@#+ on that.


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Rynjin wrote:
Mikaze wrote:
^^^^ Y'know, it might be interesting to run through the magic item lists and hazard lists with that thought process in mind to see whether the SCP Foundation would classify them as Safe, Euclid, or Keter...

Now I wanna make an adventure where 682 is unleashed upon the unsuspecting world of Golarion.

The Tarrasque ain't got s&%! on that.

So that's what Rovagug is!


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I've always been a fan of the good ol' fashioned wightpocalypse.


Polymorphing a wall of iron to magnesium would mess up an armada.

Picking some of the radioactive ones would create a local end.

The Quite-big-but-not-BIG Bad wrote:


Hydrogen is common but the 'item value' would probably include the cost of synthesis, which would probably be virtually infinite in a lowtech world like Golarion.

Depending on how you define "craftsmanship" all but free with the fabricate spell. Otherwise you have to also use magic to get skill ranks.

The Quite-big-but-not-BIG Bad wrote:

Like the idea but isn't Keter defined by a "vigorous, active hostility to human life, civilization, and/or spacetime" and "capable of causing significant destruction in the event of a containment breach"?

Sounds like a gang of PCs more than an object.


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Claxon wrote:
I've always been a fan of the good ol' fashioned wightpocalypse.

Shadowocalypse is pretty cool too. There's essentially nothing that can reasonable stop it if shadows wanted to wipe out the living. The shadows are letting us live but who knows why.

A single shadow could enter a human village at night and coup de grace someone with their touch attack while they slept. Given they make no sound and have amazing Stealth modifiers and can pass through objects, avoiding the shadow is something essentially impossible in most village-type locals. Once one person, such as a low-strength child, dies to the shadow's 2d6 strength damage attack, you have two shadows, and then so on and so forth. They fly with perfect maneuverability and they are tireless and do not need to eat, and since they are intelligent undead if they are harmed by something without dying they will heal several HP / day.

A single village could be taken out in a single night with no one knowing what happened. Each of those villagers, now under the control of the original could move on to take an entire city. The worst part is likely few would know what was happening until it was too late.

We live because the shadows choose to let us live. The only other explanation is nothing less than direct divine intervention and we all know that's not going to happen since the gods have better things to do, like letting mortal heroes have the world. :P

Scarab Sages

A Sphere of Annihilation, parked at the bottom of the ocean.

The reverse of the Decanter of Endless Water.


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If someone dumped a Sphere of Annihilation at the bottom of the ocean, an Aboleth would come along and think "That's useful. I'll have that." It might take a few dozen Aboleths before one got control of it, but even so...


Well you could just toss the sphere of annihilation into the sun. That is game over for the world.


robert best 549 wrote:
Well you could just toss the sphere of annihilation into the sun. That is game over for the world.

Only the surface world. The Underdark does just fine without it.

A magical device that would produce oxygen. It would keep producing oxygen until the concentration reached a point where everything spontaneously catches fire.

Liberty's Edge

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Extinction level magic items don't seem to be terribly common. Though, with a little conversion work, there is always The Apocalypse Stone.


Joshua Goudreau wrote:
Extinction level magic items don't seem to be terribly common. Though, with a little conversion work, there is always The Apocalypse Stone.

Hm, cool. :D


robert best 549 wrote:
Well you could just toss the sphere of annihilation into the sun. That is game over for the world.

Easier said than done, given how hard it is to voluntarily move the sucker. A Reach Spell Teleport Object might work, though the Sphere is more of a magical force than an object. And there's always the Sun god(s) who will rectify the situation before it gets too bad.

Which is why most of these doomsday schemes will fail; fantasy worlds have gods who tend to look down on mortal hubris and have wrath sticks.

Scarab Sages

Mudfoot wrote:
If someone dumped a Sphere of Annihilation at the bottom of the ocean, an Aboleth would come along and think "That's useful. I'll have that." It might take a few dozen Aboleths before one got control of it, but even so...

Gaining control of the sphere would not slow down its consumption of the surrounding water.


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The Doomsday Shenanigans with Gates and Planar Portals is the sole reason why certain Inevitables (Lhaksharuts) exist in the first place.


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Magical Item that can cast Teleport Object and Greater Creation at-will/x/day.

Rods from Gods anyone?

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16

Brown Mold is still vulnerable as mold and is killed by direct sunlight (presumably UV). Tossing it at the sun wouldn't do you any good. Ditto the volcano, as soon as it was daylight, and who knows if it could survive the poisonous vapors in the air.

For cheap bombs, creating the higher base alkaline metals and tossing them in water can get you QUITE an explosion (potassium and higher).

==Aelryinth


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Aelryinth wrote:

Brown Mold is still vulnerable as mold and is killed by direct sunlight (presumably UV). Tossing it at the sun wouldn't do you any good. Ditto the volcano, as soon as it was daylight, and who knows if it could survive the poisonous vapors in the air.

For cheap bombs, creating the higher base alkaline metals and tossing them in water can get you QUITE an explosion (potassium and higher).

==Aelryinth

Um, actually it's not. Brown mold has no vulnerability to sunlight, nor do molds in the environment chapter universally have a vulnerability to sunlight. The only mold in the environment chapter that is affected by sunlight in any way is the Green Slime (is destroyed by fire, cold, or sunlight) and Yellow Mold (becomes dormant in sunlight).

Brown mold is completely unhindered by sunlight. @_@


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So any level 17/18 wizard, sorcerer, oracle or cleric could destroy the entire solar system in a standard action?
Nice


Joanna Swiftblade wrote:

Magical Item that can cast Teleport Object and Greater Creation at-will/x/day.

Rods from Gods anyone?

Wow. O.o

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16

Magic‎ > ‎Spells (Paizo)‎ > ‎S‎ > ‎

Sunbeam

School evocation [light]; Level druid 7; Domain sun 7

CASTING

Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S, DF

EFFECT

Range 60 ft.
Area line from your hand
Duration 1 round/level or until all beams are exhausted
Saving Throw Reflex negates and Reflex half; see text; Spell Resistance yes

By the way...

This spell deals only half damage to ships.
Source Skull & Shackles Player's Guide

DESCRIPTION

For the duration of this spell, you can use a standard action to evoke a dazzling beam of intense light each round. You can call forth one beam per three caster levels (maximum six beams at 18th level). The spell ends when its duration runs out or your allotment of beams is exhausted.

Each creature in the beam is blinded and takes 4d6 points of damage. Any creatures to which sunlight is harmful or unnatural take double damage. A successful Reflex save negates the blindness and reduces the damage by half.

An undead creature caught within the beam takes 1d6 points of damage per caster level (maximum 20d6), or half damage if a Reflex save is successful. In addition, the beam results in the destruction of any undead creature specifically harmed by bright light if it fails its save.

The ultraviolet light generated by the spell deals damage to fungi, mold, oozes, and slimes just as if they were undead creatures.
====================
Brown Mold is mold. It's found inside, out of the light. If sunlight didn't kill it, then the WARMTH would only feed it, and it would leap out to devour the world.

And it's vulnerable to UV, which is why you don't find it in more locations. Plus, it restricts it's own growth by feeding on warmth, turning the area cold, and being unable to expand more.

is it instantly vulnerable to sunlight as a reaction? No. It'll probably soak up some heat, expand, and then get baked to a dead tan.

===Aelryinth


Aelryinth wrote:
The ultraviolet light generated by the spell

This is an effect of the spell, not an effect of the sun, you're confusing the two.

Also molds, fungi, slimes etc... grow just fine in sunlight IRL, this is just a special effect of the spell.

RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16

Ultraviolet light.

That's the key word. Not 'the spell'.

There's only one other source of UV in the game. If UV from a spell can harm something, presumably natural UV can, since the same creatures don't have UV resistance. You know, the same way Fire from a spell can hurt something, and fire from a, well, fire can hurt them.

It's specifically saying that those creatures are vulnerable to ultraviolet light. That's the key point, not that 'magic is creating it makes them vulnerable to it'.

==Aelryinth


Not really, it isn't saying anything about UV light in general, just about the specific UV light that is being generated by this one spell in particular.

[Edit]: no matter, RAW doesn't state that all UV light damages molds and such and I seriously doubt it was RAI that one specific spell defines all interaction between the sun and fungi, molds and slimes. If that were the case, an enormous portion of the kingdom Fungi would be extinct.


Yeah, no, that's an effect of the spell. It's an effect of the spell. Just like the energy will instantly kill undead creatures (and only undead creatures) vulnerable to sunlight because the spell says it will.

The molds say specifically if they are vulnerable to sunlight or not. This spell says it damages to molds as though they were undead creatures.


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Aelryinth wrote:

Ultraviolet light.

That's the key word. Not 'the spell'.

There's only one other source of UV in the game. If UV from a spell can harm something, presumably natural UV can, since the same creatures don't have UV resistance. You know, the same way Fire from a spell can hurt something, and fire from a, well, fire can hurt them.

It's specifically saying that those creatures are vulnerable to ultraviolet light. That's the key point, not that 'magic is creating it makes them vulnerable to it'.

==Aelryinth

Nonmagical fire hurts creatures because we have rules describing how much damage you take when you're on fire, how to avoid catching fire, douse yourself, etc.

"UV Damage" is not a thing. Sunbeam just does extra damage to fungi, mold, oozes, and slimes. Unless- looking at that list you're using as evidence- you're going to suggest that all mushrooms disintegrate in sunlight, which I don't think is true. :P

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