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Sean's consolidated advice thread


RPG Superstar™ 2012 General Discussion

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Designer, RPG Superstar Judge

21 people marked this as a favorite.

For last year's competition I posted a list of 27 "auto-reject" topics for RPG Superstar. I'm linking them here just so these ideas are fresh in everyone's mind.

These aren't really "auto-reject" topics, they're design traps to avoid when designing your item. We judges have to evaluate hundreds of items and narrow the field to just 32 competitors. If you put a target on your back and give us an easy excuse to reject your item, you've made a mistake.

Read what's been done in previous competitions. Avoid these traps, pitfalls, auto-reject categories, whatever you want to call them. There's an incredible amount of advice online for this competition--use that advice to make your item better. There's advice to help you win, and advice to keep you from crashing and burning.

And understand that there are wondrous items in the Core Rulebook that fall into these traps--and likewise understand that RPG Superstar isn't just "design an item that would be acceptable filler for a big book of magic items." To make it into the Top 32, your item has to be exceptional, not merely adequate.

(I've moved #27 to the top of the list because it's the rule that breaks all rules. To quote myself, "Every single one of these 27 advice posts is here to help steer you away from mistakes that could make the judges reject your item. Going against that advice can be risky. But sometimes taking a risk is the way to get noticed, to make progress.")

Below this list are some other handy links about the competition, submitting, writing, and design.)

One last bit of R1 advice: Include the Item's Name

* Work on your item in a program that allows you to save. Save early, save often. When you're ready to submit your item, copy it from the most recent version of your saved file and paste it into the submission window. We've heard horror stories of people who compose their item in the submission window, and lose their submission due to a browser glitch, power failure, or accidentally closing the window. Don't let this happen to you!

* Make sure you know how to post an item. Posting your submission works just like making a message board post--you can preview how your submission looks before you make that final decision to post. Use the preview function! Use it!!!

* Work on several ideas, and submit the one you like the best. Variety can help your creativity.

* Know the rules. You don't have to know all the rules, but read up on the stuff that's relevant to your item. If you're designing an item for cavaliers, make sure you've thoroughly read the cavalier class...

* Read the judge and fan comments on previous Top 32 items to see why they were kept. If you have time, read the "Judges, please critique my item" threads to see why they were rejected.

* Make sure your item doesn't exceed the word count limit for the round. Seriously--one word over and you're disqualified. Use the word count function in your typing program, they're all pretty close (Paizo uses Microsoft Word, FYI), and if you use the Preview button when you submit, it'll tell you the word count for your submission. If it's over the word count (300 for a wondrous item, including the item name and all the stat block info), edit it down.

* Check your item for spelling and grammar errors. Then check it again. Then hit the Preview button. Then check it again. Then, if you're satisfied, hit Submit.

* Submit something, even if you don't think it's very good, or if you don't think it's good enough. If you never actually submit an item, you have a 0% chance to win the competition.

* Be ready for criticism and try to learn from it.

* Remember the Paizo message board policies, especially unwritten Rule 0, "Don't be a jerk."

* Read Seabyrn's thread about passive voice in writing.

And, just for fun, here's my example from last year of an item submission that fails for many, many reasons.

Designer, RPG Superstar Judge

It's okay to reply here if you have questions or comments. :)


I can't think of anything that wasn't already asked/discussed in the individual threads.

Cheliax Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Pathfinder Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Campaign Setting, Companion, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
It's okay to reply here if you have questions or comments. :)

request to sticky this thread

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013 aka Breelo Babblebock

Last year mine was nixed for being a plot device. Can you expand on this or comment on which rule it would violate.

RPG Superstar 2009, Contributor

Breelo Babblebock wrote:
Last year mine was nixed for being a plot device. Can you expand on this or comment on which rule it would violate.

A plot device item is usually a wondrous item who's sole purpose generally hinges on one single application or occurence in a campaign where it would be relevant. It's probably meant to help move the story (or plot) in a certain direction, either acting as a plot hook all by itself or only ever fitting into a campaign setting through the specific introduction of a particular plotline the author likely has in mind. We generally don't view these types of wondrous items as Superstar-worthy. They may make perfect sense for your home game. They may even make perfect sense for the plotline of your home campaign. They don't, however, make for for useful innovative, widely-available, and imminently usable items for general play. And we're far more inclined to look kindly upon those than the plot device item.

My two cents,
--Neil

Star Voter 2013

Breelo, a 'plot device' item would be an item that has a very specific, very limited purpose.

"This item allows you to breath underwater in the swamps" is a plot device.

"This item allows you to breathe underwater X minutes a day" is a wondrous item.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I would think that the

very minor spoiler for Jade Regent:
Amatatsu seal
in Jade Regent would be an archetypal plot device item. See its properties below in the spoiler--I'd probably rate this a moderate spoiler, albeit an oblique one and only related to The Brinewall Legacy.

Spoiler:
The Amatatsu seal is a minor artifact that is one of the royal seals of Minkai. Its function is to identify scions of the Amatatsu family, and protect them from harm via various spell effects it has at its disposal. If there is nobody of Amatatsu blood left alive, the seal can also invest a person as an official scion of the family. Additionally the Amatatsu seal cannot be transported by teleportation magic. The write-up uses the excuse that being immune to teleportation magic makes it harder to steal, but in reality the entire Jade Regent AP is meant to be a journey adventure, and if the restriction wasn't there, the PCs could just grind their way to sufficient level/wealth that they could access teleportation magic, and short-circuit the entire AP.

And while I know that as a minor artifact, the Amatatsu seal would be rejected outright from RPG Superstar, I'd love to hear any of the judges' takes on it from a design perspective, in the context of what's being asked of contestants.

--Mike

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4 , Marathon Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

RonarsCorruption wrote:

Breelo, a 'plot device' item would be an item that has a very specific, very limited purpose.

"This item allows you to breath underwater in the swamps" is a plot device.

"This item allows you to breathe underwater X minutes a day" is a wondrous item.

Hi Ronars, I'm not sure this was such a good example. "This item allows you to breath underwater in the swamps" is more of a niche item than a plot device. A plot device would be something like... hmmm... "This item allows you to breathe underwater in the land of the Swamp Queen".

In the later, the problem is not only that it has a specific use, but actually that it ties the item to a storyline revolving around the "Swamp Queen" somehow.

Maybe that wasn't the best example either, but I think it's something along those lines.

[EDIT] Breelo, I just took a look at your item (Mannequin of Misdirection) and it doesn´t strike me much as a plot device, except, perhaps, for the last part about confusing divination spells. Maybe the judges felt that confusing divination spells is not really an useful feature, but rather a way of overcoming a specific plot situation where a BBEG is trying to find you, for instance (just a guess).

RPG Superstar 2014 Top 4, RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

A "plot device" is usually item which suggests a particular direction for the campaign, such as a magical mirror which reveals the most beautiful maiden in the land, or a sword which can be used to claim a throne, to take some examples from popular myth. Magic beans which create beanstalks allowing travel to cloud giant lairs would be considered plot devices: they are not useful in a campaign which has nothing to do with traveling to the clouds, but in a game where the whole point is to visit the clouds, they're perfect.

Basically... what Neil said.

-Mike

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013 aka Breelo Babblebock

Pedro Coelho wrote:
RonarsCorruption wrote:

Breelo, a 'plot device' item would be an item that has a very specific, very limited purpose.

"This item allows you to breath underwater in the swamps" is a plot device.

"This item allows you to breathe underwater X minutes a day" is a wondrous item.

Hi Ronars, I'm not sure this was such a good example. "This item allows you to breath underwater in the swamps" is more of a niche item than a plot device. A plot device would be something like... hmmm... "This item allows you to breathe undewrwater in the land of the Swamp Queen".

In the later, the problem is not only that it has a specific use, but actually that it ties the item to a storyline revolving around the "Swamp Queen" somehow.

Maybe that wasn't the best example either, but I think it's something along those lines.

[EDIT] Breelo, I just took a look at your item (Mannequin of Misdirection) and it doesn´t strike me much as a plot device, except, perhaps, for the last part about confusing divination spells. Maybe the judges felt that confusing divination spells is not really an useful feature, but rather a way of overcoming a specific plot situation where a BBEG is trying to find you, for instance (just a guess).

I appreciate your comment Pedro. I didn't intend my question to start a discussion on plot devices, I just was looking for a little more information to avoid that mistake this year.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4 , Marathon Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Mike Kimmel wrote:
a magical mirror which reveals the most beautiful maiden in the land, or a sword which can be used to claim a throne

Now THESE are good examples.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013 aka Breelo Babblebock

I FOUND IT! Rule 4. Thanks everyone.


A question has occurred to me on designing items. I doubt it's an auto-reject, but is putting a character's name into the item's name usually viewed in a negative light? E.g. "Edward's scintillating sword" vs. just "scintillating sword".

(I know anything named sword is surely not a wondrous item. I just wanted an example that would clearly not be anything like my, or another person's, submission.)

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4 , Marathon Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Jonathon Vining wrote:
is putting a character's name into the item's name usually viewed in a negative light?

I can't link you to a specific post, but that subject is addressed in the critique threads (I know, there are thousands of posts there). If I remember correctly, it is not really an auto-reject, since at least one item from previous years has done this (Paper-Folding Instructions of Master Mo).

The problem is, unless that character's name actually refers to a Golarion character, the name doesn't mean anything, and might be a little distracting. Plus, that practice is not really a standard for Paizo; even classic spells that had character names on it have dropped it (like Mordenkainen, but I guess there are some intelectual properties issues there). A few items that had Golarion gods names in it have actually made the cut, and fit in the scenario (Pharasma seems to be a lucky choice).

If you put a meaningless name in your item's title, it runs the risk of A. sounding like a home-campaign item or B. sounding like a plot device (as though you´re introducing a character associated to that item).

RPG Superstar 2009, Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The judges did a panel discussion at PaizoCon this past June and I distinctly recall us giving some insight on the impulse to include character names in the names of wondrous item submissions. Rather than repeat all that, I'd encourage everyone to just give it a listen. The recording runs about an hour...

So You Want To Be A Superstar

Cheliax Star Voter 2013

and now i read this again after post my item and fear i should have read them before post my item...

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8 , Star Voter 2013

While I can't listen to the podcast (so this might be repeating) some 'traps' in putting a name with the item are that it can be a) distracting/disruptive "Who the heck is Moe? How fantasy like is the name Moe?" or that it could eat up text/be boring. "Centuries ago, an alchemist named moe wanted to please the king. He made a tankard of great beauty..."

My personal advice? Save the names for artifacts.

RPG Superstar 2009, Contributor

I really liked Ryan's take on it...

Ryan Dancey wrote:
"If your characters didn't play in a game with Gary Gygax, they don't get to be in the name of a wondrous item..."

Star Voter 2013

Jonathon Vining wrote:
Is putting a character's name into the item's name usually viewed in a negative light? E.g. "Edward's scintillating sword" vs. just "scintillating sword".

If you still wanted to try to refer to a character you made, try to make it a more generic version of the name. The last leaves of the autumn dryad is a perfect example - it's definitely not a specific character, but it very well could be, somewhere.

Using the case of Edward's Scintillating Sword - perhaps the Scintillating Vampire's Sword? It sounds cool, and it implies a connection to a(n infamous) figure, but so long as the item isn't about the figure, it adds coolness, rather than the trouble that an actual name would cause.

And Pedro, you're absolutely right. I was just trying to come up with an example super quickly. Allow me to ammend it to: "allows four people to breathe underwater in the Swamps of Foon" versus "allows breathing underwater"

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014 aka Hodge Podge

Jonathon Vining wrote:
Using the case of Edward's Scintillating Sword - perhaps the Scintillating Vampire's Sword?

Hmm, I don't know, this make's it sound like it's the vampire that's scintillating, which means something totally different (maybe in a good way!). I think "Scintillating Sword of the Vampire" sounds best.

Neil:
Thanks for posting that! I was relieved to find that my method was more or less identical in most respects to what you had all suggested. (I think it should have been called the "Corset of Contortion" if the whole size/reach thing was going to be the most prevalent aspect.)

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8 , Star Voter 2013

Hodge Podge wrote:
Jonathon Vining wrote:
Using the case of Edward's Scintillating Sword - perhaps the Scintillating Vampire's Sword?
Hmm, I don't know, this make's it sound like it's the vampire that's scintillating, which means something totally different (maybe in a good way!). I think "Scintillating Sword of the Vampire" sounds best.

I think they were making Twilight jokes. (Edward is a Twilight Vampire, right?)

Star Voter 2013

I don't know if that's what was originally intended, but yes - that's the direction I went with it. ;)

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 16 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014 aka Hodge Podge

Oh, I totally missed that. I haven't seen or read it. I remember now that the guy's name is Edward! Good one! Hahahaaa~ XD

In that case, "Sword of the Scintillating Vampire".


Matthew Morris wrote:


I think they were making Twilight jokes. (Edward is a Twilight Vampire, right?)

Yes, he is.

You don't have a little sister obsessed with that horrid series and not learn a few things about it.T-T

How about the Sword of Scintillating Vampirism? Turns you into Edward Cullen on a crit and cause the wielder to act as if a whiny angst teen in a badly written novel.

Star Voter 2013

Hodge Podge wrote:
... "Sword of the Scintillating Vampire".

Here's an interesting discussion that was brought up last year - which is better: Item of the Adjective Name, or Adjective Name's Item?

In the final round of last year, the comment was made how many adventures, and items, were in the X of the Y format - Rise of the Runelords as one of many examples.

So in this specific case, and for all of those people in the future with similar items; Scintillating Vampire's Sword, or Sword of the Scintillating Vampire?

RPG Superstar 2014 Top 4, RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Marathon Voter 2014

RonarsCorruption wrote:
So in this specific case, and for all of those people in the future with similar items; Scintillating Vampire's Sword, or Sword of the Scintillating Vampire?

In this case, sword of the scintillating vampire is more clear than scintillating vampire's sword, which doesn't indicate which (the vampire or the sword) is scintillating, so I'd go with the former option.

In general, I would just pick whichever sounds better or is more clear!


Mike Kimmel wrote:
RonarsCorruption wrote:
So in this specific case, and for all of those people in the future with similar items; Scintillating Vampire's Sword, or Sword of the Scintillating Vampire?

In this case, sword of the scintillating vampire is more clear than scintillating vampire's sword, which doesn't indicate which (the vampire or the sword) is scintillating, so I'd go with the former option.

In general, I would just pick whichever sounds better or is more clear!

Well is a 1 eyed 1 horned flying purple people eater a 1 eyed 1 horned flying purple monster that eats people, or is it a 1 eyed 1 horned flying monster that eats purple people?


Or does it only eat one-eyed, one-horned purple humans?

Shadow Lodge Star Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

Question about #14

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Standard violence and drug use don't trigger this response, but sexual violence, pregnancy, abortion, infanticide, and harm to children do. Them's the breaks, folks--don't include these elements in your wondrous item design if you have any chance of progressing to the later rounds of the competition.

Why is pregnancy in and of itself on this list of no-nos? Yes, I could see it abused. But if handled respectfully, I could see something fairly interesting, though not this year since I tipped my hand by asking the question?

Designer, RPG Superstar Judge

If it's something that allows a pregnant woman to continue adventuring, that's putting a fetus in danger, which is a no-no in terms of PR.

If it does anything negative to the fetus, that's a no-no in terms of PR.

If it does anything positive to the fetus, that's potentially a no-no in terms of PR.

And if it does much of anything else, it's not really an item that's about adventurers, which means it's probably not appropriate for RPG Superstar.

Shadow Lodge Star Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

Sean K Reynolds wrote:

If it's something that allows a pregnant woman to continue adventuring, that's putting a fetus in danger, which is a no-no in terms of PR.

If it does anything negative to the fetus, that's a no-no in terms of PR.

If it does anything positive to the fetus, that's potentially a no-no in terms of PR.

And if it does much of anything else, it's not really an item that's about adventurers, which means it's probably not appropriate for RPG Superstar.

Got you. I still have one that would work under those restrictions. It won't be my contest entry but it's good to know. I'll post in the Voluntary auto reject afterwards.

RPG Superstar 2009, Contributor

An example of what Sean's talking about came through in year two or three of RPG Superstar. It was called a stone baby. Essentially, it's a very rare, real-life condition of pregnancy by which a fetus dies before it's born and calcifies in the mother's abdomen as her body seeks to prevent the baby's dying tissue from infecting her. Someone sought to create a magic item using one these calcified stones that was once a living thing, wrapping a wondrous power around it (which was mostly beneficial, not evil-aligned or anything). But, losing a child during pregnancy is a very traumatic thing. It's not a good idea to make light of that by introducing a wondrous item based around a theme like a stone baby. Far better to avoid it entirely. And the same goes for pretty much every other pregnancy-related idea...

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014 aka Standback

Still no-no in terms of PR:
Immaculate Lyre

When a lullaby is played upon this lyre, all female creatures in a 50-foot radius must succeed on a Constitution save (DC 13) or become immediately with child. All creatures thus affected are immediately teleported to a luxurious monastary, where all their needs are provided for and the children are granted the very best of care and education.

Each use of the lyre requires the expenditure of 1000gp in child support.

RPG Superstar 2014 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

1000 GP per month? Or just a flat fee?

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4 , Marathon Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Concerning "Wondrous Item advice #20: Item makes GMing harder" :

Does this include exploring rules that are long and complex and end up seeing little gameplay? Mechanics that are rule-intensive usually slow down play and require a lot of rules checking (at least until all players are familiar with them). This doesn't go against anything explicitly stated in the advice #20, but I would think it actually does "make GMing harder".

RPG Superstar 2009, Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The "makes GMing harder" advice is mostly centered around items that put an undue burden on the GM by making him track a whole bunch of silly stuff. An example would be the item that identifies "the nearest treasure greater than 1,000 gp" or something dumb like that. This means everytime the PC activates that device, the GM has to stop and consider everything that might be around the PC, whether or not there's an item worth that much, etc.

Other examples are items that require a lot of bookkeeping on the part of the GM. If he's having to track multiple effects on multiple targets as a result of the item's use, that complicates gameplay and creates additional hardship on running the game when the GM already has a lot of other things to worry about. Items that reverse time are a good example of this as the GM has "undo" everything that's happened up to the point that time begins to flow again. Or items that let you swiftly read and sort through the past history of things causes the GM to have to invent backstories for everything right on the spot.

That's not to say items such as these can't make it into a book of magic items. It just might not be viewed as Superstar. A lot of it depends on what kind of mojo you're bringing with it and how clear you can make the mechanics for the GM and players to interpret at the game table.

As for exploring other rules that are "long and complex"...we're not asking you to regurgitate those rules in your wondrous item submission. Rules are contained elsewhere in the Pathfinder Core Rule Book for a reason. It's so you can invoke them without being repetitive and save people time, while keeping your item's description as clear as possible.

As for rules that "end up seeing little gameplay"...well, it's generally not a good idea to craft a wondrous item for submission to RPG Superstar that isn't going to see play all that often. In other words, a good Superstar item generally ought to be one with enough "wow" factor that it has multiple players fighting over who gets to own it. And, it should be an item that everyone (including the GM) wants to see used in actual play with some degree of frequency. Else, it's just a boring item most players would trade-in for something more compelling or useful to their PCs.

That said, if you can find a rule that sees little gameplay, but your item gives a compelling reason for using that set of rules more frequently in an innovative way, well that just might be something that really catches the judges' eyes, because you're potentially discovering and filling an underserved niche for your item.

Make sense?
--Neil

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4 , Marathon Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Neil Spicer wrote:
Make sense?

It does, thank you.


So, going over the auto reject notes I was considering #26 and how it pertains to "test" items. That is items that require a character to make a roll of some sort to gain a benefit or gain a detrimental condition. Would it be grounds for an auto rejection? Or would it depend?

Andoran Star Voter 2013

Sean, I notice most people don't put the item name in all caps, despite that being the standard in the rule book. Moreover, last year you commented on someone's item with "ARRGH, ITEM NAME IN ALL CAPS! ME EYES!!"
Given that I have an unusual concern for your eyesight over the next few weeks, what's the expected style?

(Yes, I know I far more important things to worry about but your post made me laugh then got me thinking about first impressions.)

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Marathon Voter 2013 aka Breelo Babblebock

marv wrote:

Sean, I notice most people don't put the item name in all caps, despite that being the standard in the rule book. Moreover, last year you commented on someone's item with "ARRGH, ITEM NAME IN ALL CAPS! ME EYES!!"

Given that I have an unusual concern for your eyesight over the next few weeks, what's the expected style?

(Yes, I know I far more important things to worry about but your post made me laugh then got me thinking about first impressions.)

I just submitted. [Edit] There are two boxes. One small one for the title and a larger box for everything else. I put the name in the small name box and it automatically makes it all caps (and doesn't take any formatting). I decided to also put the name in the larger box as well with the formatting indicated in the rules. It looked fine.

Marathon Voter 2013

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
TarkXT wrote:
So, going over the auto reject notes I was considering #26 and how it pertains to "test" items. That is items that require a character to make a roll of some sort to gain a benefit or gain a detrimental condition. Would it be grounds for an auto rejection? Or would it depend?

I think it might fall foul of #8 too, due to the test results (probably) being a die roll. But I'm no judge!

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Dedicated Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014 aka Standback

1 person marked this as a favorite.
marv wrote:

Sean, I notice most people don't put the item name in all caps, despite that being the standard in the rule book. Moreover, last year you commented on someone's item with "ARRGH, ITEM NAME IN ALL CAPS! ME EYES!!"

Given that I have an unusual concern for your eyesight over the next few weeks, what's the expected style?

No caps.

The places where things look as though they're all caps is just a text style, applied to the non-caps text. (IIRC, Sean's talked about how the same text field can be used in different places for different styles. So in a real product, caps-locking it in one place can make it look messed up in other places.)

So in conclusion: No caps lock. Thanks for checking :)

Designer, RPG Superstar Judge

TarkXT: I'll channel Clark and say, "how many items in the Core Rulebook do that?"

marv: What Standback said--anything you see in the book that looks like all caps is just regular text with a style applied. You never need to type in all caps.

Marathon Voter 2013

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Sean K Reynolds wrote:

TarkXT: I'll channel Clark and say, "how many items in the Core Rulebook do that?"

It may be the lack of sleep, but I have no clue what you're implying there.

Star Voter 2013

It's a response the judges have used a number of times in terms of questions about item format. Basically, if you have a question about it, ask yourself first "How many items in the core rulebook do that".

Examples of questions where this has been the response are:
- do I type my item name in all caps?
- do I include a backstory with my item?
- can I include a character name in my item?

If your answer is "none" you're probably better off not doing that particular formatting thing you were considering.

BIG FAT NOTE: This only applies to format. If it's an effect that nothing else does, *do* do it. ;)


While the item name not being in all caps may be confusing, as this is how the entries appear in the rulebooks, it is explicitly mentioned in the Round 1 Rules.

Lantern Lodge Star Voter 2013

I'd also like to add a note to that. Don't forget to include every bit of information you're supposed per the format set forth in the Rules. Just clicked in my head that despite everything else, I forgot to add the Construction requirements for my item before submitting it.

In other words, don't be me.

Good luck to everyone else though!

Marathon Voter 2013, Dedicated Voter 2014

Severed Ronin wrote:

I'd also like to add a note to that. Don't forget to include every bit of information you're supposed per the format set forth in the Rules. Just clicked in my head that despite everything else, I forgot to add the Construction requirements for my item before submitting it.

In other words, don't be me.

Good luck to everyone else though!

Not to add insult to injury, but even without Construction requirements, there's always a chance that your item was so good, the judges might have forgiven you the slight and let it through. But by advertising your mistake, you've shattered anonymity, and even if your item is the best item in the history of items, there's nothing they can do for you now.

There seem to be a lot more people flirting with the anonymity line this year, telling us exact moments they submit or other details. Or maybe that's just my imagination.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4 , Marathon Voter 2013, Star Voter 2014

Nazard wrote:
There seem to be a lot more people flirting with the anonymity line this year, telling us exact moments they submit or other details. Or maybe that's just my imagination.

I´m getting that feeling too, a lot of "just submitted my item this very instant" posts going around...

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