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Judy Custom Avatar

Judy Bauer's page

Associate Editor. 341 posts. No reviews. No lists. No wishlists.


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An editor swims up out of the depths of the Gen Con Crunch to dot this thread for study.

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Akata Witch was great, by the way—sort of a Nigerian answer to Harry Potter, if slightly darker. Totally recommended, and I now have all of the library's books by Nnedi Okorafor on order!

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Ravens are sacred there, but crows are hated. I don't think we've committed to whether tengu are crow-people or raven-people, or Irrisenis perceptions of them, but I could easily see the ambiguity making people nervous, not knowing whether they should be honored or stoned.

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Loved the Oz books when I was a kid; read dozens. Tried to go back to them a few years ago, but had a hard time getting into them again for some of the reasons mentioned above (racial caricatures, dated portrayals of gender rolls) as well as being creeped out by how blasé the characters are about death and maiming. (Makes sense in context, but when you think about it as an adult—eeeeee! See also this.) But I still wish I could grow a lunchpail tree!

Also! Breaking up my slow-motion Decameron reading with Nnedi Okorafor's Akata Witch (Nigerian urban fantasy) and Molly Gloss's The Jump-Off Creek.

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2 people marked this as a favorite.

Also in Skull & Shackles:

Spoiler:
Hurricane King Kerdack Bonefist's partner, Hyapatia, is a lamia—she's out to him and his first mate, but otherwise keeps her nature a secret. They are very much in love, and on their (NE/CE) date nights, they like to watch blood sports at Port Peril's arenas and host violent orgies.

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They probably would be welcome in Kaer Maga.

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Tried reading Jeff Vandermeer's Finch, but had to set it down; turns out "fungal steampunk noir," while fascinating, is as gross as it sounds, the women are few and othered, and there's just a LOT of torture.

So, back to Decameron until my next library hold comes in.

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Those interested in Arcadia should also check out this thread, which has a wealth of ideas and references!

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A similar case has been moving through the Texan courts for a while now, and should be decided by the Texas Supreme Court this spring. (Last update I could find was in February—anyone know anything more recent?)

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2 people marked this as a favorite.
Mikaze wrote:
From River Into Darkness and Bastards of Golarion, we've yet to see any artwork for the Ekujae elves that actually gave them dark skin. Right now the most suitable artwork for an Ekujae character is actually the portrait for the Animal Lord from the Bestiaries.

There's also Asweya Stiyo from Towns of the Inner Sea (page 51)—she's is half-Ekujae, half-Garundi. But yeah, it's an issue we're wrestling with.

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4 people marked this as a favorite.
thejeff wrote:
It's marketing material. It was [OP's] first contact with the setting. First impressions matter. And [OP] got a bad one.

This. We want to put our best foot forward at all times—if we misstep (hopefully rare!), being called on it helps us do better in future.

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In Wisconsin/Minnesota (US) in the winter, typical greetings include "How about that weather?!" and "Cold enough for you?"—uttered from 2–3 feet away (but hey, that's just making room for everyone's cocoon of coats and fleeces!). And the wave while holding the steering wheel that BigNorseWolf mentioned is reduced to raising your index finger.

In Seattle, hugging is mostly reserved for goodbyes.

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Congratulations, Victoria, I look forward to your module hitting my desk! And well done all four of you—I suspect we'll be seeing more of you in the future. ;-)

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I'm from WI, land of 10,000 swamps, where knowing how to swim is basic for safety (including during winter, for sport on frozen lakes). And my parents love swimming and canoeing, so getting us kids in the water was a high priority for them. I've been swimming with waterwings/inner tube as long as I can remember, and started lessons around kindergarten. I got up through basic rescue, but I was still too little to do lifeguarding—you had to be able to lift someone off the bottom of the pool—and I lost inertia with lessons after that, other than the basic course required for high school gym and a swimming test needed to graduate college.

I swim whenever I can, though since I strongly prefer swimming in lakes and rivers, I'm limited to visits home and Seattle's rare 80ºF+ days. And like Drejk, I HATE swimming with my face in the water (plus you need to see what's around you if there's boat traffic), so I use strokes/variants that keep my face out.

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5 people marked this as a favorite.

Mathfinder Campaign Setting: Land of the Linear Kingdoms

Not a title, but please include the compass as a double weapon that deals piercing damage.

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If you do include it, be very careful to keep the blurb jargon-free, and instead focus on the leadership/communication/organization/flexible response aspects. In fact, I'd call what you're doing something other than gamemastering, because people who don't know what it is will skip right past that bullet point without reading it.

Good luck!

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(Dot.)

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6 people marked this as a favorite.
Generic Villain wrote:
Cori Marie wrote:
And more good breaking news! Governor Brewer made the right call and vetoed the Religious Freedom bill!

[...]If that awful bill had been signed into law, it would have made such an excellent wedge issue for the 2014 midterms. That injustice could have ignited the base while simultaneously winning over independents. Those are two things the Democrats will desperately need next November.

Emotionally, I'm glad what's-her-face vetoed it. Pragmatically, not so much.

I get what you mean—but pragmatically, wanting it to pass for a downstream political goal is throwing thousands of people under the bus for political points. It's our lives you're gambling with! Please keep that in mind before you regret too much that queer folks (and people perceived as queer) kept their right to, e.g., buy groceries, or call the loss of that right "excellent."

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The free Player Pack download also includes the barbarian class, so that's another option for your players. Let us know how it goes!

Edited to add: The Pathfinder wiki is a great resource for learning more about our campaign setting!

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10 people marked this as a favorite.

Breaking news! A Texas judge just struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage: link

Sadly he imposed a stay pending appeal—no beachhead possible yet.

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Comrade Anklebiter wrote:

Four Lions

This is one of the sickest, blackest comedies I've ever seen. It being Britishiznoid, or rather, Pakistani-Britishiznoid, there's a lot that flew over my head...but OMG!!! this movie is bad ass.

Such a good film—and so sad. Have you seen The Infidel, Comrade? It's in the same vein, but more lighthearted.

Also! For anyone in the Seattle area, the Nordic Heritage Center is showing the wonderful film Kitchen Stories in March—with complementary homemade soup, bread, coffee, and church-basement-style desserts!

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8 people marked this as a favorite.

Just because this amuses me—my partner just won a copy of Legally Wed at a reading, and by odd coincidence we're actually in the book!

Well, sort of... It's fiction, but partly set during a real event, the first night of weddings when WA got in marriage equality. It mentions folks serenading those waiting in line—and we were among the carolers. I guess that means we're in print as sound effects? :P

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Freehold DM wrote:

Also, remember when I said I was editing QUILTBAG erotica? Well, the place REALLY liked what I did - I'm not going to be editing piece by piece, I'm going to be their go to editor from now on! I already signed one contract for piece by piece work, another is being sent to replace that one with my new role as line and content editor!! I'm also getting a copy of the first work I edited sent to my house!

I'M FREAKING OUT!!!!!!

Congratulations, Freehold DM! It's such an awesome feeling when the quality of your work is rewarded. ^.^

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The hotel also has a menus for local restaurants that deliver, most of which should be cheaper than their resto—just ask at the front desk. The closest grocery store is a Safeway (should be 24 hr) about 1 mile north, which is closer if you hop one stop up the light rail.

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Happens with deaf characters and actors, too. Rage!

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5 people marked this as a favorite.

Probably, at least a bit? From the brief time I spent in a gAySL convo group, some people did have, not sure if you'd call it an accent so much as their (sometimes very gendered) body language strongly pervading their signing as well? But I'm no expert, will ask around.

And while we're on the combined subject of queerness, gender, and ASL, I totally recommend this ASL cover Somebody I Used to Know, respun as a conversation between lesbian exs in SF. Very different dynamic from the original version—in the sung version the woman's voice sounds so meek for most of the song; there is nothing meek about the woman signing that part in this cover. Which makes me listen again and kick myself for my assumptions about the weight of softer, higher voices.

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Got home from concluding a campaign on Friday and thought I'd decompress with Blackout, book three of the Newsflash trilogy. And then read half of it in a sitting. Totally recommend that series, esp. for anyone who enjoyed World War Z (the book).

As bonus fun, it was partly set in Seattle! Yay local color!

Quote:
The Seattle branch of the CDC wasn't technically in Seattle at all; it was across the lake, in Redmond. The facility was located on part of what used to be the main Microsoft campus, before the Rising demonstrated every possible flaw in their architecture.

Soooo... apparently the place where I transfer buses every morning fares not so well. Less yay. But I'm sure down in the uncanny valley we'll be fine, right?

Right?!

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thejeff wrote:
Though I'd assume it's safe to say none of them ended with absolute disaster: The world is not locked in an endless Reign of Winter for example.

If the players fail to achieve the AP's main goals, things could get pretty dire (spoilers for Wrath of the Righteous).

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2 people marked this as a favorite.

Tenar, in the later books of the Earthsea Chronicles! (She has an in-book rumination about old, marginal women being scorned/persecuted as witches in Tehanu.)

One of those books also has a tale of an old woman in a fishing village who one day takes flight as a dragon.

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Mikaze wrote:
There are romance novels floating around though, as some NPCs have been spotted with them lining their bookshelves and running the gamut in implied quality and taste.

That's my sense, too—that they showed up in a couple adventures or campaign setting articles. (Was there an erotic flip-book in one of the novels? Maybe Prince of Wolves?) Another place you might look for author names is in the short blurbs that begin many of the articles in the campaign setting and AP lines. For example in Fey Revisited, there's a blurb by Avad the Blind from a book called Visions of Sights Unseen, rhapsodizing about the nymph who blinded him. (The blurb about an encounter with a satyr in the same book was an anecdote, not a written work, but would fit well into a Decameron-esque collection of tales.)

And oh man. Now I'm also imagining the book trove characters could bring back from Earth after Rasputin Must Die!... Though unless the PCs spent a lot of extra time exploring, they might not have access to much beyond Soviet propaganda and soldiers' pin up cards. And maybe H. G. Wells wouldn't seem so fantastical if you grew up on Golarion. :P

Quote:
If you're okay with making some up, personally I'd recommend Micha Zhain's Fireflies By Night.

Pls novelize at earliest convenience.

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Is anyone else watching The Fosters? We're catching up, and I'm loving this show: interracial lesbian couple with a mix of biological, adopted, and foster kids navigating their complicated family/professional/high school/legal situation. Partly it's enjoyable because it has awesome queer and PoC characters who are portrayed as complex people, not stereotypes, but also because despite road bumps, the characters respect each other and communicate and work to make good decisions and apologize, which is sooooo refreshing. There's still plenty of conflict because the world is a tough place and families are complicated and ugh high school. The characters aren't unrealistically perfect; instead they're people visibly working at being better and supporting each other. And life isn't magically better once you're out.

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Kalervo Oikarinen wrote:
The colors of this radiant, green cloak ripple like the northern lights. Upon command the hextouch cloak dissolves into a vortex of luminous, green fog that begins to churn around its wearer. The fog allows the wearer to feel the presence of anyone within it and send her magical energies crackling towards them...

+1

I am so sad my players' PCs are still too low level for me to use either version on them. :P

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Seattle-area folks! More showings have now been added on the 24th and 25th:

http://www.siff.net/cinema/knights-of-badassdom

A bunch of us Paizonians went tonight, and it was delightful (albeit gory). Recommended!

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This would be a super helpful item for the module

Spoiler:
Tears at Bitter Manor.

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1 person marked this as a favorite.

This was one of my top three, in part because the mental image was so great. Good luck with the next round!

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Jacob W. Michaels wrote:
This was another of my favorite items -- just loved the flavor on it. The visuals are impressive. Congratulations, Mark!

One of mine, too! Onya!

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2 people marked this as a favorite.

If their monsters are as strong as their wondrous items, you're in for a treat, Liz!

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Congratulations to you all, and good luck on the next round! ^_^

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Congratulations to all who made the top 32! Super excited to use some of these items in my home game... :D

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I wouldn't call it a shift. It certainly wasn't a free pass for me if it was a throwaway reference or the item wasn't otherwise strong, and as the earlier post notes, it's risky given external judges who might not know why something's a really good fit for the setting. But a well-designed item that also picks up some aspect of the setting and runs with it (even if not by name)—that was extra appealing to me personally.

But at minimum, items really have to be able to stand on their own and catch the interest of someone who doesn't know the setting. The reference should also be well-integrated into the item's flavor and abilities, and not too narrow or limiting. An item found in only one minor River Kingdom is going to be downvoted just like, say, an item that works only for sorcerers from a particular bloodline.

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Phew! Finally finished going through all 100. Man, you all love your shadow items...

Since most of the items did more or less ok in terms of grammar and punctuation (thank you!), I looked hardest at clarity of wording and explanation, and whether items' abilities made sense together and matched their flavor. Simple and well-defined beats out a random grab bag of useful abilities or amazing but hand-wavy item for me any day! Only a few items directly referenced our campaign setting, some more successfully than others. But I did take note when an item would have a clear appeal to members of a particular organization.

I look forward to seeing how the ranking plays out over the course of this weekend! (I think my favorites are safe—better check!)

Edit: Almost forgot! Folks—for your own sakes, in future contests, please spell your item's name correctly!

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Bunnyboy wrote:

In medieval times, safety and traditions were valued much higher, that you could easily sacrifice your freedom for those. People didn't think themselves individuals, but parts of society, even property of their families, countries and faiths.

Which of these sounds right?

Prince kiss the princess ending her hundred years old curse and they were happily married till end of their lives.

Prince kiss the princess ending her hundred years old curse, but princess leaves him later, because the world has many princes to kiss and no one today will marry their first love.

[Ninjaed by a million people after several interruptions. :P]

Even when the goal is immersion in a period, it's important not to be overly reductive about people's agency and options in a medieval/renaissance era. In the curse scenario, for example, other possible endings include the following:

• Prince kisses the princess, ending her hundred-year-old curse, and they marry. The princess soon begins an affair with a poet that lasts for years. (See Boccaccio's bio!) The prince likewise keeps a series of favorites of both genders; the princess deposes him, claiming his affairs have destabilized the kingdom. (See Edward II's bio!)
• Prince kisses the princess, ending her hundred-year-old curse, but his family deems her unsuitable, and he's already promised to someone else anyway. They carry on an affair regardless, and the prince later appoints their children to important political positions.

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thejeff wrote:

I'd also like to see more races with sexual patterns very different than humans. Extreme sexual dimorphism, physical and/or mental, not necessarily big strong violent males/small weak docile or manipulative females, but definitely leading to very gender based roles.

Sex switching during the lifecycle, like some fish do?
Or more than two sexes? I'm thinking Varley's centaurs, but now that I look they only had two sexes. Up to 4 could be involved in reproduction though.

I hope we get to explore Outsea in the River Kingdoms in greater detail for much that reason—the ceratioidi are a good example of extreme (and complicated) dimorphism.

For examples of more than two sexes, I'd recommend Octavia Butler's Lillith's Brood series.

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Not reptilian, but there's a queer avian-mammal pairing in Shattered Star (harpy/catfolk).

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RJGrady wrote:
Has any Paizo product ever depicted a relationship between a reptilian humanoid and a mammal, homosexual or otherwise?

Sort of? See Pathfinder Tales: Pirate's Honor for a relevant example.

Set wrote:

As for the subtopic of other races, such as Lashunta, and gender, there are a few races, such as Lizardfolk and Grippli, in the Bestiaries, that don't have anything really spelled out in the way of gender [...], making for all sorts of sideways possibilities, such as either or both of those races not having a fixed gender, but assuming male roles (and physiology) in times when it would not be suitable to reproduce, and more and more 'turning female' as conditions are suitable for having lots of kids (a bumper crop of food, a new territory opening up, etc.). Gender relations in a race that switches gender situationally could be pretty fluid, even by the standards of humanoids who think themselves pretty open-minded.

In such a case, a 'queer' individual (defining 'queer' as someone who is bucking traditional gender roles) might be one that very strongly prefers being only one gender, and takes steps to avoid transitioning, or disguise signs that it has transitioned, since it doesn't like being the other gender than the one it prefers.

1. Your mention of gripplis reminded me: it would also be interesting to explore orientation in species where reproduction is external and potentially completely decoupled from expressions of physical affection.

2. Reminds me of The Left Hand of Darkness, set in a world where people take on gendered attributes only when they (more or less) go into heat, and consider permanent gender a form of perversion.

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Yeah, they were working on a distribution deal last summer, not sure if it came through. *knocks on wood* And maybe watch your public library holdings too!

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Folks familiar with Scandinavian cinema, have any of you seen Kekkonen tulle/Village People? It's coming to a film fest here, and looks intriguing, but the trailer is only in Finnish, so I'm having a hard time selling my partner on it.

Unrelated recommendation: Fanie Fourie's Lobola: comedy about a Boer man and Zulu woman who fall in love, despite the opposition of their families; the bride's father insists the groom must first pay a lobola (bride price) of 65 cows—more than for Winnie Mandela! Funny, honest, and doesn't try to pretend that everything will be easy and happy ever after.

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7 people marked this as a favorite.
Louis Lyons wrote:
A marriage between two people not able to produce offspring through their union would be of little to no benefit to powerful noble/merchant families. And its why very little pomp and circumstance surrounded the marriages of elderly noble couples past their child-bearing years compared to that of younger couples.

Though we do have the counter example of Trade Prince Aaqir al'Hakam, who simply adopted children with his husband.

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Watched a number of films while visiting my Aged Ps, mostly selected based on keywords "international" and "difficult childhood." My favorites were Life, Above All, the story of a 12-year-old girl fighting the culture of secrecy and shame surrounding AIDS in South Africa (pretty devastating), and Story of the Weeping Camel, a film where the people all actually make good decisions and treat each other well (absurdly satisfying to me)—the tension comes instead from animal misbehavior and culture clash.

And a belated +1 for Babette's Feast!

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Glad you like it! I got about 70% through the first one during the plane ride to Irrisen (a.k.a. northern WI)--still need to finish the top and thumb, and stitch over the body, beak, and feet of the bird: back of hand, palm. Happy holidays, all, and may those in the Northern Hemisphere enjoy the return of the light, while those in the Southern Hemisphere enjoy the summer!

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