Taking 10 on Dinner Checks


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So for the past several months, I've found myself taking over the food management (shopping & cooking) duties for my parents, and it looks like this'll be the permanent new normal. I find that I usually only have one day a week, rarely 2, to prepare and cook a full meal from scratch (like Monday's cottage pie, parm-rosemary version of these biscuits, and a basic lettuce-tomato-onion-carrot salad). And Mom & Dad won't eat most of my usual inexpensive single-slaad fare (ramen, beans & rice, hamburgers, microwave burritos, etc.*)

So, do you all have any suggestions for family dinner meals, especially ones that are simple and/or easy to cook & prep (like slow cooker meals)? Do you have any go-to meals that your families enjoy?

FWIW, tonight's dinner is slow-cooker chicken breasts in half-marinade/half-chicken broth, (canned) creamed corn, baked potato, and stuffing (from a box).

(* Yes, there is more to my diet than peppermint and coffee.)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Oh yeah, good question. Let me raid the recipe book when I get home.


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:


(* Yes, there is more to my diet than peppermint and coffee.)

drunken lies!


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(1) Lasagna
(2) A large roast chicken, then converted into chicken soup (2 cooking days, but I feed a family of 4 for 4 nights this way)
(3) As you said, a good pot roast
(4) My son absolutely loves it when I boil up a massive pot of spaghetti, then every night grill up a salmon or chicken breast and just put it onto the pre-prepared pasta. You can even add veggies to the pasta. It's cooking every night, yes, but it's easy cooking.

I'll try to think of more...


Pork roast with sweet tomatoes and apples in the slow cooker. Some apple cider for liquid. Add the apples late if you want to preserve texture. Cabbage or carrots optional is you like more variety.

Savory seasoned beef roast with whole fresh mushrooms, quartered or boiler onions, halved corn on the cob. Broth of choice over all in the slow cooker.

Also, take a look at pressure cooker recipes, opposite concept from the slow cooker.


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Yeah lasagna is pretty good.

Roast chicken is also good. In the slow cooker, it gets too tender (at least when I've done it) and literally falls apart, which should be fine... but Dad is a picky eater, and heaven forbid he accidentally eat any non-breast meat. I tend to spatchcock a whole roaster, stuff cold butter & herbs under the skin, rub the skin with some salt and baking powder (helps crispen it), and roast it on a rack over veggies. Some day I want to do a chicken galantine (Pepin is amazing) after I've leveled up a couple times.

Pot roast and pork roast are also good options. My only caveat is I like to use a paring knife to make slits/pockets in the meat, then stuff whole garlic cloves in each. Unfortunately, that's tough to do unless it's fully defrosted. Grandma and then my mom always made savory pork roasts, so apples, sweet tomatoes, and/or cider with it would be weird to us though.

They're getting a bit tired of spaghetti and sauce. I like to make Tyler's recipe, but I replace the 1/2 tsp sugar with pineapple marmalade or honey. It's also good way to use up slicing tomatoes and grape/cherry tomatoes when they're really ripe; I just cook it a bit longer. Mom has still has a few large jars of store bought sauce that she has hoarded in the pantry that I need to keep working toward using up.

Java Man wrote:
Also, take a look at pressure cooker recipes, opposite concept from the slow cooker.

Mom is freaked out by pressure cookers (weird pressure cooker explosion with one of her aunts when Mom was a kid ⊙.☉ ) and won't let them in her kitchen.

---

Tonight's slow cooker chicken breasts came out well-seasoned and very moist, but again, was fall apart-y.

The Exchange

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Rice. Stir fried pea shoots with prawns. Dark sauce sesame ginger chicken thigh pieces. Slab of St Louis seasoned ribs from Costco. Bibigo Mini Wontons in canned chicken stock garnished with spring onion. 1 cup chicken stock to 3 cups water.

Try chicken beast instead of chicken thigh if your Dad wants beast meat. Also add more sesame oil since chicken breast is dry.

Yeah my recipes are Asian, because I am.

The Exchange

Stir fried prawns with Chinese cooking wine/mirin, salt and blackpepper.

Dark sauce Swai Fillets with Szechuan Chilli.

Broccoli stir fried with Sliced sausage and oyster sauce.

Miso sauce marinated chicken breast.

Teriyaki chicken breast.

Sliced string beans and egg omlette/sliced onion and egg omlette.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Basics with Babish

I have cooked the chicken, sweet potato and apple recipe and it was the good stuff. Took probably 45-50 minutes, but only about 20 minutes was active chopping/cooking/active stuff.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Tacos.


pizza, ramen


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I have two small kids who are picky eaters, so there's not a huge repertoire of dishes that don't take up a huge amount of time and are fairly simple. And healthy. Here's what I can remember from the top of my head, and if you're interested in any of them, I can post the exact recipes.

Salmon - add olive oil, white cooking wine, lemon juice, tarragon, and pepper. Bake for 20 minutes at... 425?

Parmesan chicken muffins - fill a bowl with ground chicken, an egg, a bit of salt and pepper, italian seasoning, and parmesan cheese. Put the mixture in a 12-muffin tin and cover with pasta sauce. Bake for 20 minutes at 350. Sprinkle some shredded mozzarella on top and put it back in the oven to melt the cheese (2 minutes is fine).

Balsamic chicken and vegetables - Chicken breasts sliced in half to make them thinner. (Or I just buy chicken "cutlets.") Marinate in a mix of balsamic vinegar, olive oil, garlic, basil, parsley, salt, and pepper. Chop up a whole mess of vegetables into one-inch chunks while the chicken is marinating. I usually use a zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, a red onion, and a red bell pepper, but you can use pretty much any vegetables that sound appealing. I think the original recipe called for asparagus. Toss the vegetables with same marinade used for the chicken, minus the garlic. (Not the actual same marinade; just mix up more of it for the vegetables.) Put the chicken on a baking sheet, put the vegetables around the chicken, and bake it. (This one is a favorite, but chopping all the vegetables can be time-consuming for some. I've used pre-cut vegetables when the extra cost is worth the time it will save me.)

Avocado sandwiches - My son especially likes this one. Toast bread, put avocado slices on toast and smear it slightly so it doesn't fall off. Season with salt and pepper. PUT IN MOUTH AND MASTICATE.

I have an easy pork chop recipe for the oven, but it sounds like you have chops covered.

I used to use the slow-cooker a lot more, but logistically it got harder and harder to fit into the day, and the kids were never crazy about any of the recipes we tried.

Heh. Just last night my mom was over to spend Halloween with us, and she marveled once again that I was cooking, saying something like, "Where is my son! Who is this man who knows how to cook all these things?!" I replied with a big sigh and said, "It's just following directions, Mom," which got a laugh out of her.

Also, do you grill? Few people turn down steaks, and they're usually pretty easy.

Paizo Employee Managing Editor

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Corn, chicken, and pumpkin chowder: This is a fall and winter favorite; I usually use butternut squash instead of pumpkin.

The whole category of "skillets" includes a bunch of easy options that are faster than hotdishes (a.k.a. casseroles). Here are a few we make that are pretty parent friendly/
Cabbage and sausage skillet: My notes say to go heavier on the cabbage and that regular rice works fine.
Sausage, pepper, and rice skillet: We often add mushrooms and use smoked paprika instead of paprika.
Mexican beef and rice skillet: Add garlic while browning the hamburger.

Also, once you start acquiring a set of reliable recipes, I recommend making a spreadsheet so you can look up your options all at once and record any modifications.


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Sorry, my family dinners always count as threatened so you can't take 10...


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<3

I cannot help here at all, but I'm praying for and rooting for you!


In case anyone here is mining the thread for their own ideas:

Saturday's dinner: Roasted pork chops, black-eye peas, green peas for Dad (he hates black eye peas), and stuffing

Sunday's dinner: Braised Italian sausages and baked macaroni & cheese (not from a box)

Monday's dinner: Large "to go" meat lovers pizza from Aldi.

Tonight's dinner: Beef enchiladas and refried beans. If Dad is picky, I've got a pack of sliced deli roast beef for a sandwich.

Tomorrow's dinner: ???


Ambrosia Slaad wrote:

In case anyone here is mining the thread for their own ideas:

...Tomorrow's dinner: ???

Dinner will be tilapia fillets in parchment, baked potato (for Mom & Dad), and tabouleh (for me)


I make a dish of either pork chops or chicken breasts in the slow cooker. Just add a can of cream of chicken soup and a package of dry ranch dressing mix and let it cook about 4 to 4 and a half hours. It's pretty good and makes its own gravy.


My take 10 dinners are as follows...

Shepherds pie.

Salisbury steak.

Chicken(bone in) with rice and peas and frozen veggies.

Chinese food.


One thing I've been doing with rice lately:

Get wild rice (I just use the generic supermarket blend). I use a rice cooker (I found a $15 one at Target that is awesome. Like, witchcraft has to be involved because it makes the rice perfectly every time.)

Instead of water, use broth (any kind). Add a tablespoon of lime juice and a tablespoon of soy sauce to the liquid before cooking. I find it perks the rice up and gives it a nice extra bit of flavor. You can also sift in dry spices with the wild rice, if there are spices your parents like. The total cooking time is 15-20 minutes, depending on how much rice you're making.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

I've made this recipt before with modifications and it came out quite well. Made rice to serve over and had a good meal.

Silver Crusade

Tacos are good.

Always trusty for picky eaters: chicken and stuffing bake.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Ooh, I only just saw this thread. Love discussing recipes.

I love this America's Test Kitchen recipe for mac and cheese which is designed to freeze super well (which I can attest it does); the recipe is designed that you split the mixture into two different 8x8 foil pans, so you could keep one to eat and freeze the other (or freeze both). It can be a little time consuming to make the bechamel, but the point of course is you make it when you have time and then you or they can reheat it later.

ATK also devised this super easy stovetop mac and cheese recipe which is way simple and easy (boil pasta in milk and water, stir in spices and grated american and cheddar, done). (The breadcrumb topping is optional.)

There's some great recipes out there for sheet pan suppers that are also nice--you just put everything on a sheet pan and bake, so the cleanup is simpler.


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I realize that this isn't a kids-centric or even a picky-eater-centric thread, but I have to point out (because I've been personally affected by this) that if you try and do anything fancy to mac and cheese, kids won't eat it.

(Obviously not all kids; please don't quibble with me about this. I'll get emotional and cry.)

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Are YOU quibbling with my awesome links to awesome (and not fancy) mac and cheese recipes?

*raises eyebrows and prepares laser beam stare*


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I know my kids won't eat a hamburger unless you call it a Krabby Patty.


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DeathQuaker wrote:

Are YOU quibbling with my awesome links to awesome (and not fancy) mac and cheese recipes?

*raises eyebrows and prepares laser beam stare*

YOU'RE NOT MY REAL MOM!!!

*runs out of the room, sobbing*


Freehold DM wrote:
Shepherds pie.

I made shepherd's pie (technically cottage pie because I used beef instead of lamb) a few weeks back, and I didn't think results were worth the effort. Leftovers didn't get eaten either. But if you like it, more power to ya.

quibblemuch wrote:

One thing I've been doing with rice lately:

Get wild rice (I just use the generic supermarket blend). I use a rice cooker (I found a $15 one at Target that is awesome. Like, witchcraft has to be involved because it makes the rice perfectly every time.)

Instead of water, use broth (any kind). Add a tablespoon of lime juice and a tablespoon of soy sauce to the liquid before cooking. I find it perks the rice up and gives it a nice extra bit of flavor. You can also sift in dry spices with the wild rice, if there are spices your parents like. The total cooking time is 15-20 minutes, depending on how much rice you're making.

Yeah, unless a recipe specifically needs plain white rice, I always use chicken broth anymore to make rice. Works well with tabouleh and couscous too.

DeathQuaker wrote:

Ooh, I only just saw this thread. Love discussing recipes.

I love this America's Test Kitchen recipe for mac and cheese which is designed to freeze super well (which I can attest it does); the recipe is designed that you split the mixture into two different 8x8 foil pans, so you could keep one to eat and freeze the other (or freeze both). It can be a little time consuming to make the bechamel, but the point of course is you make it when you have time and then you or they can reheat it later.

ATK also devised this super easy stovetop mac and cheese recipe which is way simple and easy (boil pasta in milk and water, stir in spices and grated american and cheddar, done). (The breadcrumb topping is optional.)

There's some great recipes out there for sheet pan suppers that are also nice--you just put everything on a sheet pan and bake, so the cleanup is simpler.

{covers Freehold's eyes} Alton Brown had a couple recipes for baked mac & cheese and stovetop mac & cheese that looked pretty good. Haven't tried them yet, or Kenji's very easy stovetop mac, either.


Ye gads I love shepherd's and cottage pie!


Tonight is boneless pork roast (made with this*), mashed potatoes & pan sauce, basic lettuce-tomato-celery-carrot-onion salad, and rolls (from frozen dough).

Roast: browned, prepped, & sitting in fridge ready for oven
Taters: peeled & cubed, soaking, ready to boil
Salad (and dressing): done
Rolls: thawing & rising
Mom: there & back for blood work
Car: filled tank (@$2.26/gal)
Slaad: ready for nap

* Edit: I used their seasoning packet for Marsala chicken on Monday, served it over gnocchi (from frozen). It was ok, but nothing spectacular.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Ye gads I love shepherd's and cottage pie!

I think the my problem is primarily if I'm going to spend that much time and effort (including shopping) making something from scratch, I want it to knock my socks off. The cottage pie wasn't bad, but it didn't wow me. But I didn't grow up eating it, and Mom & Dad didn't have it from their parents either, so maybe it's just not something we're used to.


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After last year my son is now in charge of the turkey.

Spatchcock Turkey


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Yep, spatchcocking chicken for dinner tonight. Trying a slightly different seasoning process (and spice blend) this time, will see how it goes. Serving with spinach and mashed taters & gravy (also tweaking this recipe too).


Sunday was baked pork chops with black-eyed peas and garlic-y mixed greens.

Monday was grilled strip steak and baked potatoes. (They were amazingly tender. One of our local supermarkets has noticeably superior beef and pork.)

Tonight is bruschetta chicken: bruschetta over grilled chicken tenders, all over pasta (spaghetti). Served with garlic bread.

Shadow Lodge

This Thursday i will be cooking my fourth batch of green bean casserole, as if I don't bring it to Friday's Xmas lunch my co-workers will riot. As they would have if I didn't bring it to Thanksgiving or the mid-December departmental holiday lunch party.

It's a good thing it's relatively simple and cheap for me to make and I enjoy doing so. Otherwise I imagine the clash the last quarter of the year would be pretty miserable for me.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Imma come over your house for dinner, Amby, 'kay? ;)

Actually tonight I need to bake a mess of cookies. I'm trying to convince myself it will be easy to bake myself at the same time some delicata squash and some kinda side, but the part of me that doesn't want to make more mess than I have to (I do not have a dishwasher) wants to buy food out, though I need lunch for tomorrow and not to be spendy. I suppose I could eat cookies for dinner, but that would probably be irresponsible.


Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Tonight is bruschetta chicken: bruschetta over grilled chicken tenders, all over pasta (spaghetti). Served with garlic bread.

I'm intrigued!

Orthos wrote:
This Thursday i will be cooking my fourth batch of green bean casserole, as if I don't bring it to Friday's Xmas lunch my co-workers will riot. As they would have if I didn't bring it to Thanksgiving or the mid-December departmental holiday lunch party.

I'm intrigued! (Part 2)

DeathQuaker wrote:
I suppose I could eat cookies for dinner, but that would probably be irresponsible.

"Probably" doesn't mean "definitively."

This Sunday we tried out a "vegetarian mexican casserole" in the slow cooker. A can of black beans, a cup of quinoa, 1 jar of salsa, 1 cup of vegetable broth, 1 cup of frozen corn, and then you top it all off with a cup and a half of sharp cheddar cheese. Cook it on low for 4-5 hours or high for 2 to 3. We burned it slightly because it was on low for 6 and a half hours, but it was still pretty tasty. Next time we'll add some sour cream when we serve it.


Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Tonight is bruschetta chicken: bruschetta over grilled chicken tenders, all over pasta (spaghetti). Served with garlic bread.

This came out really well. Instead of the uncooked bruschetta, I simmered it for an hour (so, closer to bruschetta-flavored marinara). 30 minutes in, I dropped in the raw spaghetti (about 6 oz of pot-length spaghetti) and 1 lb. of grilled chicken, let them cook in the bruschetta juices, stirring every 5 minutes or so.

I thought it was pretty good, Mom loved it, and Dad ate it without complaint (he's very picky though).

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

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Interesting. Did you brown the chicken first, or poach it in the bruschetta? I can see how it would be good either way, just curious.

I... made hot dogs. Not my finest culinary hour, but yummy. And only ate one cookie (bringing the rest to staff holiday party, I had to be sure it wasn't poison, you know, so I totally was in fact being responsible).


I grilled the chicken, brought them in to cool till I could handle them with my bare fingers, cut them into tenders, and dropped into the simmering bruschetta with the spaghetti. They weren't that thick, so they were already cooked done from the grill when they went into the pot. The gas grill was set to low, so they got some nice some light browning (not counting the grill marks), but I wanted to keep them juicy inside.

I didn't really need to cook the bruschetta at all, but Dad is picky.

Don't knock yourself. Hot dogs are fine, and they're in our meal rotation too. We're having sloppy joes tonight with the store brand of frozen Checker's fries (lightly battered french fries seasoned with seasoned salt, black pepper, paprika, and ground mustard).


And don't feel bad about noshing a cookie or two. I made a batch of Aldi's brand of ready-to-bake iced cinnamon rolls this morning (I think I paid $1.19 for the tube of eight with icing). I almost inhaled the first one, scarfed down the second, and had to remove myself from their proximity before I ate one or two more.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

The uncooked version with fresh in-season tomatoes would make a great summer pasta salad.

I have a theory most ready-bake cinanamon rolls are made with crack.

We're just getting Aldi's into our area (well, about 15ish miles away). I need to check them out. I'm a big fan of Trader Joe's and I believe they're owned by the same company, and I hear Aldi's is even cheaper.


The Aldis in our area typically has everyday prices that match (Winn-Dixie) or beat (Publix) the other local supermarkets' sale prices. I've liked nearly everything I've tried of their brands so far. My only real complaints are 1) stuff seems to rotate in and out of being stocked/not stocked (which is irritating when you find something you like), 2) our Aldi's are always crammed with older people who are the absolute worse shopping cart drivers, 3) they don't open till 9AM (I like to get in at 7AM and get out before normal customers start showing up), and 4) the closest one is was all the way across town. The last shouldn't be a problem anymore as they are having a grand opening of a new store much closer today, but it'll probably be a little while before the mob dies down enough for me to sneak in there.

The Aldi brand cinnamon rolls were pretty good, especially for the price. Dad didn't like them as well as the Pillsbury ones, but Pillsbury dough always tastes slightly chemically weird to me. I've liked their produce, instant coffee, tortilla chips, aged cheddar (as good as Cracker Barrel, but not as good as Cabots), "gourmet" mac & cheese, and breakfast sandwiches (biscuits and croissants).

Shadow Lodge

I pretty much lived off Aldi when I lived in my apartment, as there was one a block away. But yeah, the late opening hour meant no snagging stuff on the way to work. If I needed something last second, it'd have to be Wal-Mart.


12/24 through 12/26: Various Christmas meals from family & neighbors (baked ham, pulled pork, meatball subs, turkey & stuffing, sides, etc.)

12/27: ?? (Can't remember)

12/28 Friday: Reheated (from frozen) homemade lasagna (with rotini instead of lasagna noodles), Texas toast, basic salad

12/29 Saturday: Tilapia baked in parchment, steamed buttered corn, baked russet potatoes (Mom & Dad)

12/30 Sunday: Hot dogs, baked beans, potato chips

12/31 Monday: Roast chicken breasts (skin-on bone-in), oven-roasted russet potato wedges (Mom & Dad), couscous (me)

1/1 last night: Hamburgers, potato chips

1/2 tonight: Slow-cooker marinated (mesquite BBQ) pork tenderloin (2 lb.), Texas toast, steamed corn, baked russet potatoes (Mom & Dad), leftover couscous (me)

Tomorrow: Probably having homemade pizza (pepperoni & Italian sausage) & garlic knots.

Friday: Probably (ground beef) tacos.

---

I picked up the pork tenderloin grocery shopping late yesterday afternoon. It was packaged in the marinade and on sale, plus it was an extra $2 off as it was close to it's sell by date (tomorrow). Supposedly only takes 45 minutes in 350F oven to cook, but I used slow cooker because I had other stuff to do.

Mom & Dad love their baked potatoes, me not so much. But they are easy: just wash off & dry potatoes, then hand rub with a little olive oil, then bake for 1 hour at 400F. I've got a little 9"x11" baking sheet that works perfectly for this, and because it's so small, I can slide it to the side in the oven and still have room for baking the main course.

I think I mentioned before that when I get ground hamburger meat, I just shape it all up automatically into 1/3 lb. hamburger patties. Cover a cookie sheet with plastic wrap, arrange patties to fit, top with wrap, and stick them the freezer till they're frozen. Once frozen, cut plastic wrap with scissors to separate, and move them all to a larger freezer bag. Makes it real handy for making burgers when short for time, and if making something else, I know that 3 patties = 1 lb of ground beef. Of course it helps we have the freezer space and a kitchen scale.


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HUZZAH! Tonight I made ok-but-not-great mashed potatoes, and I cheated on the gravy, but the meatloaf was pretty damn good. And I normally hate meatloaf, but this I liked so much I went back for seconds. I Fronkensteened bits from two different recipes and then tweaked it a bit, and BAM! Success!

I feel like a dork for getting excited about making a friggin meatloaf, but it worked!


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Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

One menu prompt I found useful when I was doing this sort of thing was to look at Hamburger Helper/Frozen Meals/Other Manufactured Meals

Not to buy them, but to scan their combos for menu ideas. Like Hamburger Helper Beef Stroganoff. Or Betty Crocker Chicken And Biscuits. Or Hungry Man Roast Turkey.

If you've got people who are more on the "traditional comfort food" end of the spectrum than the "kale smoothie" end, then you can get a list of 25+ menus just by standing in the grocery aisle.

Also, Rice Bowls and Pasta Bowls.

Or the old standard casserole algorithm
Starch Thing/Vegetable Thing/Meat Thing/Taste-zing Thing

The other trick is stackable, identical, rectangular Pyrex baking pans with plastic covers. It was worth a trip to the outlet mall and the Corningware store to stock up on 7 of them in the appropriate size* You can assemble, bake, cover, and freeze a week's worth of meals in one day.

Or you can simply double the recipe of whatever you're making that night and freeze half of it. Do that for a while and you'll have both a stash and a system to keep refilling the empty ones.

*I've been doing this for a long time, for a lot of clients. I currently have 2-cup, 3-cup, and 6-cup sets for different size households and appetites.


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Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Sauces & Flavors For International Tastes
Use as marinades, or basting sauce, or simmer sauce for meats and vegetables. Can also be used to thicken pan drippings for serving sauce/gravy.

American: BBQ
Asian: Soy sauce, ginger, garlic (with a bit of sugar this becomes Teriyaki sauce)
Cajun: Bay leaf, thyme, ham or bacon, green pepper, celery
Caribbean: Lime, allspice/thyme/cinnamon/nutmeg/black pepper
East European: Tomato sauce, vinegar, brown sugar, allspice, garlic
Greek: Olives (or oil), thyme, bay leaf
Indian: Yogurt, green chiles, curry powder
Italian: Tomato sauce, basil/marjoram/thyme, garlic
Mexican: Tomato sauce, chili powder, cumin
Provencal France: Red wine, garlic, thyme, parsley

Cheese sauce: cheese, bacon, horseradish

Beans & Rice (for high protein meatless meals)
Black eyed peas: Hoppin John
Black beans: Moros y Christos
Lentils: Mujaddara (Arabic)
Pinto beans: with Spanish rice (tomato, onion, green pepper)
Red beans: with ham bone for Cajun red beans and rice

Being a personal chef has been a side gig for me for most of my adult life, so shoot me a PM if you want more ideas.

Meat and three sides
Sometimes I just make up a list of side dishes and ask people which of these they want with a particular meat recipe. They are easy to make in large quantities, and then freeze in individual servings
Simple stuff: green beans, coleslaw, mac&cheese, baked beans, baked potato, broccoli,

And for other ideas look at the Schwans site
https://www.schwans.com/

Dark Archive

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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
I feel like a dork for getting excited about making a friggin meatloaf, but it worked!

Meatloaf is a favorite. Lots of layers of different cheeses, portabellos, bacon and BBQ sauce, it's practically a hamburger lasagna when I'm done with it!


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Attempting oven-baked BBQ rib(let)s tonight.

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