Lamplighter's Season 5 tidbits


Pathfinder Society

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I started serializing the Season 5 changes for my local Lodge, and thought others might find it useful as well. It has helped get people on board quickly with the rules updates while they get around the reading the entire Guide. I do one for players and an addendum for GMs, but here I'll just combine them into single posts.

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The Core Assumption and Additional Resources!

Players:

If you are playing PFS, it is assumed that you own the Core Rulebook and the free Guide to Organized Play v5.0. As a player, you don't need to have a copy of these at the table, unless you want to disagree with a GM's ruling on something. (Note that the Pathfinder Society Field Guide has been removed from the Core Assumption, but it's still a legal Additional Resource.)

To use anything outside of the Core Rulebook or Guide 5.0, you need to do the following:


  • have a copy of the latest list of Additional Resources from paizo.com, showing that the item you want is legal for PFS;
  • have a copy of the rules for said item from a legal source. A legal source includes the physical book, or a print-out of a watermarked (with your name on it) PDF. If you have a tablet or laptop open and running during the game, you can use the PDF digital file as a legal source, provided you can show it to the GM in less than a minute. Having the PDF on a memory stick in your pocket does not constitute a legal source. Neither does an online source, a print-out from a non-legal source, Hero Lab, or any other source.
  • Finally, you must tell the GM before the game starts that you are using material from Additional Resources, and what they are.

This rule is here to ensure that GMs don't have to know every obscure combination of every possible character, and lets them refresh their rules knowledge before the game starts so they don't have to slow down play.

Characters who do not have the rules available at the table as described above will be unable to use those feats, classes, items, etc. for the duration of the game. If this renders the character unplayable (at the GM's discretion) the player will be allowed to play a legal Paizo pre-gen instead.

GMs

[NOTE: This paragraph is a recommendation to our local GMs to reduce table variation, and does not constitute an official PFS ruling.]First, an addendum to the post on the main page: If you have a player who doesn't have all the rules for their character as described on the main Lodge page, you are within your rights to deem their character unplayable. However, if all they're using is a couple pieces of equipment and a feat that you know the rules for already, it's better to let them play but give them a warning on the Chronicle sheet regarding additional resources. I recommend you save the "you can't play" for extreme or repeat circumstances. [/b]

To GM PFS, it is assumed that you have access to the rules in all of the hard-cover books - but you do NOT need to own them or have the whole set at the table. GMs can use print-outs from the free Pathfinder Reference Document at Paizo to have the rules they need to run the scenario. This means when prepping, you should print out stats for all the monsters, NPCs, and rules you might need and bring them along. This is now part of GM Prep for PFS scenarios. Note that you should have the rules handy for anything you're unsure of. I like to go through the scenario and make notes of feats, etc. so I remember both to use them and how they work. I will also make Initiative cards with all the notes I need on them,s o I don't have to look at the scenario during combat.

PLEASE don't skip this aspect of prep. We all have different levels of rules knowledge, so make sure you bring what you need to run the scenario as written using all the tools that the authour and developer gave you - every feat, item, unusual bloodline power, etc. PFS scenarios are famous for not describing things like domain powers or bloodline/arcana, which can sometimes be an enemy's best option (especially at lower levels). Make sure you know how to use them!

Lamplighter
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Experience and Prestige

  • If a player participates in 3 encounters, they get 1 Experience Point.
  • If the party completes the main mission assigned by the Venture-Captain, they get 1 Prestige Point.
  • If the party completes the secondary mission, they get 1 Prestige Point.
    (NOTE: the list of secondary missions is not ready yet for all scenarios. UNtil it is released, assume the secondary mission is fulfilled if the PCs earn the 1XP for completing 3 encounters.)

Is is theoretically possible (although unlikely) to complete the secondary mission without completing the primary mission.

Remember, "3 encounters" doesn't always mean 3 combats - there are significant social encounters or traps to consider as well. In general, give them the XP unless they clearly didn't do three encounters of any sort. (No, the V-C briefing doesn't count as an encounter!)

If a player is present for only part of the game, award them PP and XP based on the time they were actually present.

[NOTE: The following paragraph is a recommendation to our local GMs to reduce table variation, and does not constitute an official PFS ruling.] It is also technically legit in extreme circumstances to not award the XP to an individual party member who was present, but didn't contribute in any way to at least three encounters. This should be done only in extreme cases, and only after a SPECIFIC warning to the player stating, "You are not doing anything, you are in danger of not gaining an XP for this scenario!" and probably after checking with a couple of other GMs or Venture-Officers who are at the event as well. (I can think of only one time where I have considered this, so don't go looking for it - you'll know it when you see it.)

Lamplighter
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Factions

Effective immediately, completing a faction mission does not provide Prestige Points.

For Season 0 through 4, faction missions are optional for players who wish to undertake them, but they will receive no mechanical benefit from doing so. It is recommended that the typical "stop-being-a-Pathfinder-and-fetch-me-a-teapot!" style of faction missions be ignored, as they distract from the main story and interfere with the team aspect of the game. GMs should be prepared to hand them out, but each player can decide if they want to do them or not.

For Season 5 scenarios, each faction has a goal to accomplish. As you undertake your missions as Pathfinders, if you see something you think could help your faction, go for it! But, you will no longer be getting an omniscient note telling you exactly what to do - you'll have to know your faction's goals, and keep your eyes open.

Certain scenarios will have this sort of thing for certain factions, and there may also be faction-specific boons from time to time for doing something that helps your faction. This changes factions from a priority source of Prestige to a story element that can increase your immersion in the campaign world without getting in the way of the Society's mission.

Lamplighter
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Season 5 tidbit of the day - Clearing the "Dead" condition!

There are two kinds of "Conditions" which must be dealt with before leaving the table - death, and almost everything else. Today we'll cover death, and the associated permanent negative levels.

First of all, death is not an individual concern. Usually when someone else dies, it's because the bad guys didn't kill *you* instead. It is strongly recommended that all players at the table contribute to the cost of raising fallen companions. While technically the dead character can sell their gear to afford it, sharing the costs makes it easier on everyone in the long run. (Alas, you cannot contribute Prestige Points to help raise a character, even if you are of the same faction.)

Death needs to be resolved before you leave the table. Either you pay for the appropriate spell (with gold or prestige), or someone in your party casts the appropriate spell to bring you back.

  • If a player at the table casts the spell, the GM must record the name and PFS # of the person who casts the spell. It is considered good form for the dead character to provide the costly material components.
  • If other players contribute gold, the GM should record the name, PFS #, and amount of gold contributed from each player on the dead character’s Chronicle, and the name, PFS number of the dead Pathfinder and amounted contributed in the "Conditions Gained" or "Notes" section of each contributor's Chronicle. Remember these people, you owe them your life!

If you do not deal with this before you leave the table, your character is reported as "dead" and cannot be later raised.

Remember that you must be in a settlement of more than 5,000 people to purchase spell casting services with gold. If you are using Prestige instead, you can pay an extra 5PP to have the spell caster essentially come to you to do it (but you can't mix gold and prestige for this purpose). This means that even in the middle of nowhere, you can have the appropriate spell cast if you have enough prestige.

"The appropriate spell" depends a bit on how you died. Usually a raise dead is sufficient, but that requires a whole body. Normal injuries (even those from big animals etc.) don't usually prevent the use of raise dead, but if you fall into a pit full of acid or are swallowed whole by a purple worm and your friends run away and leave you there, then you will need more powerful magic (resurrection or even true resurrection) to restore you to the land of the living. (A reminder: reincarnation is not a PFS-legal spell.)

If for some reason, your body is whole but was not recovered (i.e. a TPK, or your colleagues had to leave you behind), you can pay 5PP to have your body recovered. A body recovery also recovers all of the character's gear. This doesn't work in the aforementioned "pit of acid" or "purple worm" scenarios above.

When you are raised, you normally come back with 2 negative levels which each require a restoration to remove. If you have the spell cast during the game, remember that you can only benefit from a single restoration spell per week, so you may wind up playing the rest of the scenario with at least one negative level.

If you cannot afford to remove one or both of the negative levels, they are recorded as "Conditions Gained" or in the "Notes" section of the Chronicle, and you carry them forward into future scenarios until they are removed. Permanent negative levels are one of the few conditions that can be carried forward into future scenarios. Just make sure you don't forget about them next time you play that character - let your GM know and make sure the appropriate penalties are applied until you have them removed. Again, remember, only one restoration spell per week can affect you, so once you start your next scenario you can't have more than one negative level removed unless you have more than a week in-game.

Lamplighter
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Retraining

If you own Ultimate Campaign, you can use the retraining rules there to swap out past feats, classes, etc. In addition to the costs in Ultimate Campaign, there is a cost of 1 Prestige Point per day of retraining. This is the limiting factor in using these rules for PFS. They are designed to allow characters to take advantage of new rules or options that came out after the PC was created. They are *not* there for people to change their characters wholesale or adapt from scenario to scenario. This is why the Prestige cost is high.

[NOTE: The following paragraph is a recommendation to our local GMs to reduce table variation, and does not constitute an official PFS ruling.] Until everyone has become familiar with these new rules, the use of the retraining rules *requires* a full GM audit of your character before you can play it. DO NOT just do it at home, show up to a game, and expect to play that night. You can either provide a full copy of your old and new character sheet to the GM in advance, or email it to me and I will go over it. (This audit is a full character/Chronicle audit, not just a check of the retrained parts. Once retraining occurs, it is very difficult to audit a character.)

Lamplighter
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Faction Goals for Season 5

For those of you who wish to follow the faction storyline, here are the broad goals listed in the Guide to Organized Play. Currently, this is all the guidance you have when looking for ways to advance your faction's interests; however, watch the in-character Faction forums for additional missives from the faction leaders and discussions from other members of the faction.

Note that the faction goals do not in any way allow Player-versus-Player conflict.

Andoran: Root out corruption in Andoran and better understand others’ paths to liberty.
Cheliax: Secure important artifacts and sources of power to establish order in the Inner Sea region and strengthen the faction’s power base.
Grand Lodge: Ensure the success of the Pathfinder Society’s expedition to the Sky Citadel of Jormurdun.
Osirion: Contact the Jeweled Sages, explore their history, and extend the faction’s protection of history beyond Osirion’s borders.
Qadira: Establish a long-term trade deal with one of several possible trading partners.
Sczarni: Extend the Sczarni faction’s reach into central Avistan, and neutralize the faction’s rivals.
Silver Crusade: Aid the nation of Mendev in its crusade against the Worldwound.
Taldor: Assist Lady Gloriana Morilla in gathering forces to march to Mendev.

Lamplighter
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Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

You always seem to be so on top of things organizationally. Kudos, Scott. :)


ooo ... putting a link for this in the shared drive.

Dark Archive 5/5 5/55/5 Regional Venture-Coordinator, Upper Midwest aka Silbeg

This all looks really good, Scott!

Do you have these in a PDF and/or other sort of document we could just use to print out?

If not, I will have to make one, because this did a great job of summing up everything, whether it was changes or not.

One observation, though, is that you made no mention of the ITS, which is now required for all purchases (over 25gp) going forward.


Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscriber
Scott Young wrote:


  • have a copy of the rules for said item from a legal source. A legal source includes the physical book, or a print-out of a watermarked (with your name on it) PDF.
  • I was under the impression it could have anyone's name on it, as long as it did, in fact, have a watermarked name. Is this no longer the case? It seems to me that if one player can bring a book and share it with his friends playing the game, he should also be able to share any PDFs he may have with them.


    Scott Young wrote:
    • If a player at the table casts the spell, the GM must record the name and PFS # of the person who casts the spell. It is considered good form for the dead character to provide the costly material components.
    • If other players contribute gold, the GM should record the name, PFS #, and amount of gold contributed from each player on the dead character’s Chronicle, and the name, PFS number of the dead Pathfinder and amounted contributed in the "Conditions Gained" or "Notes" section of each contributor's Chronicle. Remember these people, you owe them your life!

    I am wondering a bit on this. How, exactly, can one reimburse other PCs for this? Just buying the items? I thought it was illegal to buy things for others or to give them money, aside from chipping in for spellcasting services--for example, if I blow 5000 gp on a diamond to Raise Dead someone (don't ask my why I would even be carrying it around in the first place), that guy can't just toss me like 1k gp to help cover the cost, can they? Likewise with components in spells like Restoration, or stuff like using your own wand charges on people, either directly or inadvertantly (I ate a lot of charges on my wand of CLW during Gencon and had to buy a new one for my Life Oracle due to Life Link).

    I mean I don't think I'd ask someone to pay me back but that stuff could get expensive, y'know?


    PaperStSoapCo wrote:
    Scott Young wrote:


  • have a copy of the rules for said item from a legal source. A legal source includes the physical book, or a print-out of a watermarked (with your name on it) PDF.
  • I was under the impression it could have anyone's name on it, as long as it did, in fact, have a watermarked name. Is this no longer the case? It seems to me that if one player can bring a book and share it with his friends playing the game, he should also be able to share any PDFs he may have with them.

    Players have never been able to share PDFs with someone that does not live w/in their household. The PDF watermark notes the owner of the document


    Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscriber

    So, in this example, my roommate will be playing with me. He lives in my household, I have the PDFs. Is this now legal?

    As a follow up, assuming that situation is legal, how does one verify cohabitation? We are in the military, and therefore our Driver's Licenses have vastly different records of address on opposite coasts of the country.

    If it has to be a family member, is it okay if it's a sister with a different last name; a half-sister; step-sister?

    I suppose I just don't understand the distinction between "guy I know and hang out with" and "lives with me" when it comes to that. Either way the PDF is watermarked and has been directly paid for. I can loan a book I bought to some guy that lives down the street, why not a PDF?

    Shadow Lodge

    The Experience & Prestige section is most important - as a player, this has confused me as to how to get a second prestige point now and I don't think p32 of the PFS guide really spells it out for season 5+. This post above, does.

    I didn't like the idea of jumping into a scenario not fully knowing what I have to do.

    Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Nevada—Las Vegas aka kinevon

    FanaticRat wrote:
    Scott Young wrote:
    • If a player at the table casts the spell, the GM must record the name and PFS # of the person who casts the spell. It is considered good form for the dead character to provide the costly material components.
    • If other players contribute gold, the GM should record the name, PFS #, and amount of gold contributed from each player on the dead character’s Chronicle, and the name, PFS number of the dead Pathfinder and amounted contributed in the "Conditions Gained" or "Notes" section of each contributor's Chronicle. Remember these people, you owe them your life!

    I am wondering a bit on this. How, exactly, can one reimburse other PCs for this? Just buying the items? I thought it was illegal to buy things for others or to give them money, aside from chipping in for spellcasting services--for example, if I blow 5000 gp on a diamond to Raise Dead someone (don't ask my why I would even be carrying it around in the first place), that guy can't just toss me like 1k gp to help cover the cost, can they? Likewise with components in spells like Restoration, or stuff like using your own wand charges on people, either directly or inadvertantly (I ate a lot of charges on my wand of CLW during Gencon and had to buy a new one for my Life Oracle due to Life Link).

    I mean I don't think I'd ask someone to pay me back but that stuff could get expensive, y'know?

    No, but the diamond/material component cost could be covered out of the dead PC's money/resources. The same way a PC could provide the 50 gp gem needed for another PC to cast Continual Flame on one of their pieces of equipment.


    Oh, well that sucks. Then again, if we're in the middle of a dungeon, I can't exactly say, "you'll buy me the jewel" when I need the guy alive NOW. I guess I should just suck it up.


    This is a good thread idea. Someone sticky this.

    Silver Crusade

    Scott, this is a very useful thread. Thank you for compiling all this in one spot!

    Venture-Lieutenant, Canada—New Brunswick aka Lyarie

    FanaticRat wrote:
    Scott Young wrote:
    • If a player at the table casts the spell, the GM must record the name and PFS # of the person who casts the spell. It is considered good form for the dead character to provide the costly material components.
    • If other players contribute gold, the GM should record the name, PFS #, and amount of gold contributed from each player on the dead character’s Chronicle, and the name, PFS number of the dead Pathfinder and amounted contributed in the "Conditions Gained" or "Notes" section of each contributor's Chronicle. Remember these people, you owe them your life!

    I am wondering a bit on this. How, exactly, can one reimburse other PCs for this? Just buying the items? I thought it was illegal to buy things for others or to give them money, aside from chipping in for spellcasting services--for example, if I blow 5000 gp on a diamond to Raise Dead someone (don't ask my why I would even be carrying it around in the first place), that guy can't just toss me like 1k gp to help cover the cost, can they? Likewise with components in spells like Restoration, or stuff like using your own wand charges on people, either directly or inadvertantly (I ate a lot of charges on my wand of CLW during Gencon and had to buy a new one for my Life Oracle due to Life Link).

    I mean I don't think I'd ask someone to pay me back but that stuff could get expensive, y'know?

    I take this to be a note primarily for RP purposes. It's a reminder that this character (and player) helped save your life, possibly in a substantial financial way. It's a suggestion that, while you don't legally owe a debt to that character*, you might show in-character gratitude and/or charity to him/her. If the game was at a convention and you don't think you'll ever see that person again, you might con sider "paying it forward" by being more generous than you would otherwise be to other characters who end up in similar situations that you did.

    Ex: A greedy character might exhibit surprising, if resentful, generosity for a while after receiving help from others. A very honour-bound character might consider himself in a debt that needs to be paid and can really play it up. Even a player who is usually of the opinion that he has no obligation to help others financially might change his tune a little... at least until he's paid out the same amount as was donated to him.

    *helping another player financially does not in any way entitle you to reimbursement. You can RP a desire for it as long as it does not interfere with the course of the game, but you have no mechanical right to expect them to return your generosity. It's a donation, not a loan.

    5/5

    Season 5 tidbit of the day - What doesn't kill you, still needs to be resolved!

    Pathfinders can get the darnedest conditions: disease, curses, ability drain, negative levels, etc. And with only a few exceptions, they all MUST be cleared before you leave the table. "Cleared" means cured, usually.

    The only conditions you can carry forward to your next game are permanent negative levels, and ability drain which does not reduce the ability score to zero. Everything else needs to be taken care of and signed off on your Chronicle by your GM before you leave. If you don't, your character is reported as "dead" and can't be played.

    For some things, this makes sense: if you have a disease that does Con damage, you might fail a bunch of saves in the indeterminate amount of time between scenarios and die before your next mission. But what about diseases that do Dex damage, for example? They won't technically "kill" you... but no Venture-Captain is going to send someone on a mission who may suddenly lose the ability to move. In this case, your character would actually be "fired" instead of "dead", but it's the same difference to the campaign.

    You can either pay to have these conditions removed, or you can roll out your saves and hope to beat it yourself. Remember that remove disease only gives a bonus to saves, it does not remove the disease automatically, so you'll still need to roll it out.

    GMs need to adjudicate this. Always record the condition in the "Conditions Gained" or "Notes" section of the Chronicle. Then record the results in the "Conditions Cleared" or "Notes" section of the Chronicle as well. If there is a party member who can cast spells at the table to help, record their name and PFS number as well. (The person suffering the condition must pay for the material components for this.)

    One other "condition" doesn't need to be cleared by game's end: one that provides no mechanical effect. Being turned blue by a rod of wonder, or the "condition" that Ms. Feathers has taken a shine to your character, or other similar GM notes don't have to be removed (and GMs are encouraged to add them to Chronicles based on how the scenario played out). A Chronicle is more than a record of gear, it's your character's journal of what happened during the adventure.

    5/5

    Glad this is useful to some of you.

    To answer some of the earlier questions: yeah, everyone should buy and be carrying around 5,000gp of diamond dust. Since gens are bought and sold at 100%, if you need to spend that money you can without a loss, but you have it there.

    Alas, you can't give money to other players, but I have seen GMs allow a player to replace the diamond dust before the scenario ends without hassle.

    On legal sources, watermarks, etc: - own your own stuff. If you don't, you might be called on it by the GM. Maybe not, but if you are, the GM is in the right on this one.

    On the other notes: yes, they're to remind you, not a contract to pay someone back. I recently "acquired" a goat in a scenario at PaizoCon (the animal companion of a fellow player who didn't make it out of Bonekeep). I added that info to the Chronicle and paid for the goat (all 6gp of it). Next level, I'm multi-classing into wizard so I can have it as a familiar - it has become a big part of the PC's story. With my poor memory, without that note I might have missed out on a cool concept for my PC.

    GMs should add this sort of note whenever possible - p[layers can ignore them if they have no mechanical benefit, but if they want it can define the character by his or her deeds.

    Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Nevada—Las Vegas aka kinevon

    Scott Young wrote:

    For some things, this makes sense: if you have a disease that does Con damage, you might fail a bunch of saves in the indeterminate amount of time between scenarios and die before your next mission. But what about diseases that do Dex damage, for example? They won't technically "kill" you... but no Venture-Captain is going to send someone on a mission who may suddenly lose the ability to move. In this case, your character would actually be "fired" instead of "dead", but it's the same difference to the campaign.

    You can either pay to have these conditions removed, or you can roll out your saves and hope to beat it yourself. Remember that remove disease only gives a bonus to saves, it does not remove the disease automatically, so you'll still need to roll it out.

    Two things here:

    While, say, Dex damage won't kill you directly, having your Dex hit 0 means that you are unconscious, at which point, if you don't save, you start running into dehydration/starvation saves, unless there is someone there to take care of you.

    Eventually, if you continue unlucky, with Dex staying at 0, you can die from the damage from dehydration/starvation.

    Starvation and Thirst

    Second, Remove Disease is a caster level check against the DC of the disease, not a bonus to the Fort save.

    Antiplague gives a +5 bonus, or two saves without the bonus take the better save, but requires the APG to access.


    Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
    Scott Young wrote:

    Guilty on the second one, but not on the first:

    Quote:
    A character with a Dexterity score of 0 is incapable of moving and is effectively immobile (but not unconscious).
    Only Con makes you unconscious nowadays.

    Can you even go unconscious with a low CON? I thought it was only through negative HPs.

    If your CON reaches 0, you are dead.

    5/5

    Out-of-Tier Gold:

    If a player is playing a character that is outside the actual subtier you are running, they get "out-of-tier gold". This applies to ALL scenarios, not just the new Season 5 ones.

    On season 5 Chronicles, the amount of out-of-tier gold is explicitly listed, but on older ones you have to do the math yourself. OUt-of-tier gold is the average of the gold value for the actual subtier and the next subtier up (if playing up) or down 9if playing down).

    So, if a 3rd-level PC plays at subtier 1-2, they get the out-of-tier gold instead of the subtier 1-2 gold. So would a 4th-level PC and a 5th-level PC playing in subtier 1-2.

    Similarly, a 3rd-level PC playing up to subtier 4-5 *also* gets the out-of-tier gold instead of the subtier 4-5 gold. So would a level 1 and level 2 PC.

    Wait, that doesn't cover everything, you may say! And you'd be correct. Remember, though - you can NEVER play up or down more than 1 subtier. So, no level 7 PCs playing subtier 1-2 in an old Tier 1-7 scenario. That makes most of the other issues go away.

    So the only issue is when a PC of level 3 or higher plays a Tier 1-7 scenario at subtier 1-2, or a level 1 or 2 PC plays at subtier 3-4. In this case, the out-of-tier player gets the "out-of-tier" gold which the the average of the subtier 1-2 and subtier 3-4 gold.

    Basically, if you play up, you get the "out-of-tier" amount above the actual subtier you play at, regardless of your level. If you play down, you get the out-of-tier gold below the subtier you play in. And you can't play up or down more than one subtier.

    5/5

    Zero ability scores:
    A character with a Strength score of 0 is too weak to move in any way and is unconscious.
    A character with a Dexterity score of 0 is incapable of moving and is effectively immobile (but not unconscious).
    A character with a Constitution score of 0 is dead.
    A character with an Intelligence score of 0 is comatose.
    A character with a Wisdom score of 0 is incapable of rational thought and is unconscious.
    A character with a Charisma score of 0 is not able to exert himself in any way and is unconscious.

    Ignore my previous post. :)

    Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Nevada—Las Vegas aka kinevon

    So, any stat damage can leave the PC:
    Unconscious; incapable of movement; dead; comatose; unconscious or unconscious.

    Any of those states, essentially, can leave your PC dead or potentially dying of starvation/thirst unless taken care of.

    My apologies for my error on not looking up the exact stat effects of reaching zero.

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