Weather in Kingmaker


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Check out this Scroll of Weather Forecasting which fits this niche wonderfully. It's designed for Greyhawk, using the system described in the original Greyhawk material, but the months are described (spring, low summer, high summer, winter, etc.) such that you can use them for any campaign setting.


ArchAnjel wrote:
Check out this Scroll of Weather Forecasting which fits this niche wonderfully. It's designed for Greyhawk, using the system described in the original Greyhawk material, but the months are described (spring, low summer, high summer, winter, etc.) such that you can use them for any campaign setting.

That is pretty neat.


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I've used a simple weather system for my games since the 80's.

2d6: Adjust temp for Season

2: Brutal Storm -3 to next roll
3: Heavy Rain/ Snow/ Wind -2 to next roll
4: Rain/ Snow/ Windy -1 to next roll
5: Light Precipitation/ Blustery
6: Overcast
7: Mild Weather
8: Warm and Clear
9: Sunny Warm and Breezy
10: Clear Skies and Sunny +1 to next roll
11: Bright and Sunny +2 to next roll
12: Unseasonably Hot/ No Breeze +3 to next roll

In deserts, sandstorms are more prevalent than rain. Plains might hav tornados. Lakeside areas might get lake effect snow. Etc.

But it's quick and easy and makes it possible to have a trend.


gigglestick wrote:


12: Unseasonably Hot/ No Breeze +3 to next roll

In deserts, sandstorms are more prevalent than rain. Plains might hav tornados. Lakeside areas might get lake effect snow. Etc.

But it's quick and easy and makes it possible to have a trend.

I understand the need for balance but why would unseasonably hot weather help a roll? I could see unseasonably hot weather particularly hampering people who need to wear armor and who have to make certain skill checks.


Light Dragon wrote:
gigglestick wrote:


12: Unseasonably Hot/ No Breeze +3 to next roll

In deserts, sandstorms are more prevalent than rain. Plains might hav tornados. Lakeside areas might get lake effect snow. Etc.

But it's quick and easy and makes it possible to have a trend.

I understand the need for balance but why would unseasonably hot weather help a roll? I could see unseasonably hot weather particularly hampering people who need to wear armor and who have to make certain skill checks.

It's +3 to the next weather roll. IE, weather that's really hot tends to stay unseasonably hot.


Chris Kenney wrote:
Light Dragon wrote:
gigglestick wrote:


12: Unseasonably Hot/ No Breeze +3 to next roll

In deserts, sandstorms are more prevalent than rain. Plains might hav tornados. Lakeside areas might get lake effect snow. Etc.

But it's quick and easy and makes it possible to have a trend.

I understand the need for balance but why would unseasonably hot weather help a roll? I could see unseasonably hot weather particularly hampering people who need to wear armor and who have to make certain skill checks.
It's +3 to the next weather roll. IE, weather that's really hot tends to stay unseasonably hot.

Exactly, I should have been more specific. The + or - is to the next day's weather roll...

You rarely have a snowstorm followed immediately by a scortching hot day (though, wiht magic, other effects, or GM caveat, anything can happen...)


Ah. Okay, sorry then-- that makes more sense.

Liberty's Edge

Where are you guys getting these months? Are they in the PF campaign setting? If so are they analagous (sp?) to RL months in regard to number and length?

Liberty's Edge

They're from Greyhawk, I believe.


Xpltvdeleted wrote:
Where are you guys getting these months? Are they in the PF campaign setting? If so are they analagous (sp?) to RL months in regard to number and length?

I dont know which months youa re referring to, but the Golarion Months are listed in several places, including the Campaign Guide and I think the ROTR Players Guide (which is free).

Do a search for Golarion calendar and you'll also find a nice interactive calendar with holidays...

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

giggle he is talking about the months on the web page link in the OP's first post.

Liberty's Edge

Dark_Mistress wrote:
giggle he is talking about the months on the web page link in the OP's first post.

Nah I meant golarian calendar.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Xpltvdeleted wrote:
Dark_Mistress wrote:
giggle he is talking about the months on the web page link in the OP's first post.
Nah I meant golarian calendar.

Ah ok... well carry on then.

Sczarni

This is what I came up with. I have only finished four months, but have the other eight roughly mapped out. If we like, I will post it when I am done.

I figured that the River Kingdoms was on a latitude about even with London or Brussels. I started the calender in July (Erastus). It also lists the sunset and sunrise times for every seven days. Also storms have the time listings of when they start and end.

Enjoy

Go to Weather Thing


In the end I went back to Rule 1..the weather is what I want the weather to be.

I intend to have the ruined temple fight take place during a thunderstorm


I'm using the weather charts in Silver Marches (Forgotten Realms setting). They work fine well. If the result doesn't match with the scene, i use "Rule 1" of DM Wellard.


Dante wrote:
Go to Weather Thing

Wauw Dante - those are some nice charts! I'll start the campaign at the end of march (Calistri) as the module say, so I won't be using your charts, but I'm, curious to how you made them look so fine? Is it a program/application that does it for you?

I'm using the donjon weather generator from the thread to give me some inspiration and then I'm mapping out 3-4 months weatherr i nadvance with thre "entry points" for each month.

I'll definitely also use rule 1 - but this will help me remeber describing weather and I'll have some guidelines :)


Another handy link for weather peeps:
Dandello's Faerûnian Almanac-Weather in the Realms
It's originally designed for the Forgotten Realms calendar, but "Temperate Forest" describes the Greenbelt fairly well.


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I gave a lot of thought to weather and to day length, and rather than wing it, I decided to base the Stolen Lands on a specific real world location. A lot of people are tossing around northern Canada as a model, but that's not the feel I wanted. For me exact "realism" is less important than verisimilitude and getting the right texture, as it were. I took a look at the materials and decided to go for something deep in the heart of the former USSR as a guide. I determined that the model for what I wanted wouldn't be in northern Russia, since that's Brevoy. Looking further south, I decided on Kiev in Ukraine, which had just what I was looking for: long winters, short summers, and a relative lot of precipitation (so the heavy winter snows can feed the rivers and swamps).

Using Kiev climatic data as my exact guide, I made up this spreadsheet,which lists average highs and lows for each day and average monthly precipitation. I also rolled in sunrise and sunset times for Kiev, since my thought was that short days permit a lot less exploration than long ones.

If anyone has any ideas on how to improve this, please let me know. I hope someone finds it helpful.


I use Lodz, Poland for the same purpose.


Chris Kenney wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:

There's enough going on in Kingmaker already that's new and strange without confounding things by including bad weather. Furthermore, we don't necessarilly want to FORCE anyone to start their Kingmaker games at any one time of year, and we certainly don't expect every Kingmaker game to take the same amount of time. So even if everyone did start in the month of Pharast, by the time you hit adventure 2, group A might be 1 year in the future while group B might be 8 years 3 months into the future.

In other words... the weather element of Kingmaker is left more or less 100% in the hands of the individual GMs.

Actually, at least by implication you didn't leave it entirely in the GM's hands. The charter states that it comes into effect on the last day of Calistril. Unless the PCs say when they're leaving Restov that gives a pretty clear timeframe for when the adventure is going to begin. Though why anyone would start travel on the first day of "march" in the middle of blizzard-prone country is a little beyond me.

Actually, it makes sense. Being from the Hudson Valley area of New York, March is pretty much one of the better times to start, and I'll tell you why: Because it's gonna be about three months of game time taming the Stolen Lands to get to the point where you're building your first city, so about May-June, with about 4-5 months to build before the real winter hits in. I've personally found weather charts in 3.5 and just used those.

Rain really isn't so much an issue as just rain. It's only the extreme conditions that are really going to hamper the players in any way. Snow, however, is going to slow progression intensively, as noted previously, forcing the party to contend with the elements, which i really believe is the key to making them feel what it's like to deal with the world at large.


Where in the Hudson Valley? I'm from Poughkeepsie

-- david
Papa.DRB

DragonStryk72 wrote:
Actually, it makes sense. Being from the Hudson Valley area of New York,


Awesome!!!

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