Weather in Kingmaker


Kingmaker

1 to 50 of 73 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>

I don't know if this is in the rules or I missed it somewhere, but I was considering how exploration might be hampered in the event of rain. So, I drew up a calendar and listed all the days of the month, then I listed on which days there would be rain, which days would have severe storms, and which days would have snow, etc.

Then I slowed exploration speeds by one "step" for each day of rain, due to difficulty of having adventuring and measurement gear work and more limited site ranges and chances for horses to get caught in muck and mud.

Next I slowed exploration speeds by two "steps" for each day of severe storms.

I also have a plan to give players negative morale modifiers to their rolls if they insist on exploring in the muck; basically if they have just traveled in the muck and not cleaned off, they could have a -1 morale modifier for one day of rain. Then, if the rain persists for 3 or more days, they would have -2 morale modifiers unless they have adequately prepared or have sufficient shelter.

Are there some rules for this that I missed, or are there other suggestions for incorporating weather into Kingmaker?


I've mentioned it elsewhere but the Stolen Lands in Pharast is going to be like Upper Canada in March..you could still have snow..blizzards even.

Liberty's Edge

DM Wellard wrote:
I've mentioned it elsewhere but the Stolen Lands in Pharast is going to be like Upper Canada in March..you could still have snow..blizzards even.

Hell, I'm in southern New England, and we've been known to have snow storms in May, much less March.


I'm in Scotland...I've seen snow in Mid July.


It would be fairly silly to have them exploring in a snowy period though, I would presume- since by rights snow should slow them by 3 steps on the chart if rain slows them by 1 and severe storms slow them by 2.

I realize that exploration in the snow can be done, and has been done many many times in the real world, but even by DnD rules, if it snows- speeds to accurately survey any type of land will be significantly reduced.

Maybe we could move back the exploration start date? Either that, or the adventurers should be dealing with a lot of snow.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

There's enough going on in Kingmaker already that's new and strange without confounding things by including bad weather. Furthermore, we don't necessarilly want to FORCE anyone to start their Kingmaker games at any one time of year, and we certainly don't expect every Kingmaker game to take the same amount of time. So even if everyone did start in the month of Pharast, by the time you hit adventure 2, group A might be 1 year in the future while group B might be 8 years 3 months into the future.

In other words... the weather element of Kingmaker is left more or less 100% in the hands of the individual GMs.


James Jacobs wrote:

There's enough going on in Kingmaker already that's new and strange without confounding things by including bad weather. Furthermore, we don't necessarilly want to FORCE anyone to start their Kingmaker games at any one time of year, and we certainly don't expect every Kingmaker game to take the same amount of time. So even if everyone did start in the month of Pharast, by the time you hit adventure 2, group A might be 1 year in the future while group B might be 8 years 3 months into the future.

In other words... the weather element of Kingmaker is left more or less 100% in the hands of the individual GMs.

Actually, at least by implication you didn't leave it entirely in the GM's hands. The charter states that it comes into effect on the last day of Calistril. Unless the PCs say when they're leaving Restov that gives a pretty clear timeframe for when the adventure is going to begin. Though why anyone would start travel on the first day of "march" in the middle of blizzard-prone country is a little beyond me.


Adventurers are crazy? There also isn't any reason for the party to leave immediately the day the charter is signed, especially at the tail end of winter. They could just as easily arrive at Oleg's Trading Post at the start of Gozran.

Liberty's Edge

Dorje Sylas wrote:
Adventurers are crazy? There also isn't any reason for the party to leave immediately the day the charter is signed, especially at the tail end of winter. They could just as easily arrive at Oleg's Trading Post at the start of Gozran.

On the other hand, there's nothing preventing a DM from giving a sense of urgency either; it all depends on the pace s/he wants to run.

It could very well be described that the threat of civil war is too pressing to wait till summer to begin.

I gave no such urgency, but I didn't have to motivate my players either - they wanted to get going, and I think "in-character" they were feeling patriotic in going and doing their call of duty irrespective of weather woes.

It's worked out well, and it's given me some "fun" to play with in giving them [aliteration] weally wisky weather woes to worry with. [/aliteration]

Robert

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Chris Kenney wrote:
Actually, at least by implication you didn't leave it entirely in the GM's hands. The charter states that it comes into effect on the last day of Calistril. Unless the PCs say when they're leaving Restov that gives a pretty clear timeframe for when the adventure is going to begin. Though why anyone would start travel on the first day of "march" in the middle of blizzard-prone country is a little beyond me.

The GM is perfectly free to change the month mentioned. We had to pick a month for the charter since _________ would have looked weird. We picked Calistril because that's analogous to the month in which that adventure was published.

And I'm not sure where folks are necessarily getting the idea that the Stolen Lands are "blizzard prone."


Because it's like "Maine." Which is blizzard prone. ;-P


Dorje Sylas wrote:
Because it's like "Maine." Which is blizzard prone. ;-P

I didn't see anywhere it said it was "like Maine."

The closest I found was James saying "The Stolen Lands are about as big as Maine," in the Hex Size thread.

Scarab Sages Contributor, RPG Superstar 2008 Top 4, Legendary Games

I think the weather idea is based on the latitude, which seems like around Minnesota or the Dakotas, and a similar sort of cool continental terrain with kind of a "Great Lake" just to the north of Brevoy... so people are inferring that the weather would be similar to places like that.

I was in Eau Claire, Wisconsin (a little east of the Minn/Wisc border) in March two years ago for a job interview. Temperature: -13 degrees F.

Not saying it's like that all the time in March (which I think is what Calistril is supposed to be, if memory serves), but the locals didn't seem to find it at all unusual.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Dorje Sylas wrote:
Because it's like "Maine." Which is blizzard prone. ;-P

Yeah; "as big as Maine" doesn't mean "like Maine." For a while, the Stolen Lands were actually as big as Kentucky, and THAT was the comparasion I included, but then we changed the hex scale slightly and Maine became a more accurate example.

ALSO: There are a lot more hills, mountains, swamps, and forests in the River Kingdoms and in Stolen Lands in particular. Inland Northern Europe or Asia is probably a better place to look at for weather patterns.

In any case, if you want blizzards, by all means include them. They're not assumed in the adventures themselves (or in the artwork either, for that matter) because weather simply isn't a part of the campaign due to it being pretty complicated and unusual for a Paizo adventure path to start.


James Jacobs wrote:
Dorje Sylas wrote:
Because it's like "Maine." Which is blizzard prone. ;-P

Yeah; "as big as Maine" doesn't mean "like Maine." For a while, the Stolen Lands were actually as big as Kentucky, and THAT was the comparasion I included, but then we changed the hex scale slightly and Maine became a more accurate example.

ALSO: There are a lot more hills, mountains, swamps, and forests in the River Kingdoms and in Stolen Lands in particular. Inland Northern Europe or Asia is probably a better place to look at for weather patterns.

In any case, if you want blizzards, by all means include them. They're not assumed in the adventures themselves (or in the artwork either, for that matter) because weather simply isn't a part of the campaign due to it being pretty complicated and unusual for a Paizo adventure path to start.

Well its based on the assumption that Magnimar is Seattle.. An analogy which you have used yourself James..if thats the case then the Stolen Lands equate to the Lake Nipigon region of Canada..

Paizo Employee Creative Director

DM Wellard wrote:
Well its based on the assumption that Magnimar is Seattle.. An analogy which you have used yourself James..if thats the case then the Stolen Lands equate to the Lake Nipigon region of Canada..

Doesn't change the fact that we didn't design any of the elements of Kingmaker to take place during a blizzard. Or a hurricane, or an earthquake, or a monsoon.

If you want blizzards in Kingmaker, the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook provides rules for blizzards.

Liberty's Edge

James Jacobs wrote:


Doesn't change the fact that we didn't design any of the elements of Kingmaker to take place during a blizzard. Or a hurricane, or an earthquake, or a monsoon.

....how about a really gentle pleasant spring zephyr??? :-)

oh, my players are going to have a field day trying to cope with that natural phenomenon! I can't wait to spring it on em!

Robert

Dark Archive Bella Sara Charter Superscriber

James Jacobs wrote:


Yeah; "as big as Maine" doesn't mean "like Maine." For a while, the Stolen Lands were actually as big as Kentucky, and THAT was the comparasion I included, but then we changed the hex scale slightly and Maine became a more accurate example.

Ah, that's good to know. Looks like I should move the ogre hillbilly encounter from RotRL to KM...

Liberty's Edge

Sebastian wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


Yeah; "as big as Maine" doesn't mean "like Maine." For a while, the Stolen Lands were actually as big as Kentucky, and THAT was the comparasion I included, but then we changed the hex scale slightly and Maine became a more accurate example.
Ah, that's good to know. Looks like I should move the ogre hillbilly encounter from RotRL to KM...

*Hires an ettin to play Dueling Banjos*

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Jagyr Ebonwood wrote:
Sebastian wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


Yeah; "as big as Maine" doesn't mean "like Maine." For a while, the Stolen Lands were actually as big as Kentucky, and THAT was the comparasion I included, but then we changed the hex scale slightly and Maine became a more accurate example.
Ah, that's good to know. Looks like I should move the ogre hillbilly encounter from RotRL to KM...
*Hires an ettin to play Dueling Banjos*

*...against himself*


James Jacobs wrote:


ALSO: There are a lot more hills, mountains, swamps, and forests in the River Kingdoms and in Stolen Lands in particular. Inland Northern Europe or Asia is probably a better place to look at for weather patterns.

Northern Europe should be a tad chilly, arent temps around 40s or so this time of year? Asia can be much hotter :) SE asia is hot almost all year round, and I think Dec/Jan is considered monsoon season in some areas thereabout.

What would Paizo staff recommend for Stolen Lands weather realism in Calistril (just curious)?

Liberty's Edge

DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
Jagyr Ebonwood wrote:


*Hires an ettin to play Dueling Banjos*
*...against himself*

Yeah, that was kind of the joke ;-P


IMO weather is important for verisimilitude (fav word). It provides a dramatic backdrop for the scenes, and possible strategic use as well. In KM promises Lewis and Clark style exploration and weather is a BIG part of that. Unprepared adventurers can get totally boned with a sudden rainstorm, especially if something decides to attack them. To say nothing of a freak blizzard. Those who are forward thinking enough can bring proper supplies or just wait for the weather to clear, adding some extra downtime.
Two of my players are totally psyched about the opportunities KM presents and would be upset at me for NOT including weather.
I've thought about pre-generating stuff like the weather and even moon-phase etc on a calender like was suggested.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Sunderstone wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


ALSO: There are a lot more hills, mountains, swamps, and forests in the River Kingdoms and in Stolen Lands in particular. Inland Northern Europe or Asia is probably a better place to look at for weather patterns.

Northern Europe should be a tad chilly, arent temps around 40s or so this time of year? Asia can be much hotter :) SE asia is hot almost all year round, and I think Dec/Jan is considered monsoon season in some areas thereabout.

What would Paizo staff recommend for Stolen Lands weather realism in Calistril (just curious)?

Were I running the game, I would have the weather be cold and brisk. Frost in the morning, wind and rain, and the odd sunny day. Nothing all that outlandish at all. At least... not for the first year. Kingmaker APs can go for years and years, and as the campaign goes on, I would periodically add in things like blizzards and the like; in fact, the kingdom running rules account for that. You can randomly roll up a natural disaster like a blizzard during a kingdom's event phase; I'd probably let those rolls determine when events like that happened.


James Jacobs wrote:
Sunderstone wrote:


What would Paizo staff recommend for Stolen Lands weather realism in Calistril (just curious)?
Were I running the game, I would have the weather be cold and brisk. Frost in the morning, wind and rain, and the odd sunny day. Nothing all that outlandish at all. At least... not for the first year. Kingmaker APs can go for years and years, and as the campaign goes on, I would periodically add in things like blizzards and the like; in fact, the kingdom running rules account for that. You can randomly roll up a natural disaster like a blizzard during a kingdom's event phase; I'd probably let those rolls determine when events like that happened.

Thats what I was figuring on starting with as well (except no more snow until next winter), with Rain more prevalent. As the weeks go by Ill have it get warmer and warmer as normal weather patterns go. I might go with what we had here in NY a couple of weeks ago, days of heavy non-stop rains causing some local flooding as the river swells.

I agree with Rodel, weather definately colors the backdrop better adding more flavor to the theme of any AP. I love seeing my players head to an outfitter looking for (and using) wilderness survival gear. YMMV

Paizo Employee Creative Director

And also; 1st and 2nd level PCs are already gonna have it tough. Adding dangerous weather like blizzards isn't really fair to a starting party.

Liberty's Edge

James Jacobs wrote:
And also; 1st and 2nd level PCs are already gonna have it tough. Adding dangerous weather like blizzards isn't really fair to a starting party.

Actually I respectfully have to disagree here to some degree - although yes it isn't going to make the difficult time any easier - 1st and 2nd level are about the only time when such elements in the actually DO make a difference - once characters gain 3rd level spells etc, their capabilities with magic etc is capable of making most terrain and/or natural elements the true complex issue that they would be ordinarily.

I'm definitely in your camp James, that the DM in any case is fully capable and assigned the task of making weather as he/she sees fit, but I am not convinced that just because their low level should mean that such elements should be absent from the game. Like LastKnight said - I agree that the weather does play a significant role in making the setting more believable (I like the word Verisimilitude, too), and making the game more grand and robust.

I have added weather concerns already to great success, and though the Players have been challenged and it is indeed a stressor to them, they have enjoyed it because in a way - it's essentially a type of encounter - no different than an attack from a tatzlewyrm from the trees. Its something that they have to deal with and find a way around the obstacle.

I say so long as it's done intermittently, it adds a great deal of flavor to the game, and a great deal of fun challenges to cope with and leads to good opportunities to roleplay - especially should the PCs be struggling to find the proper gear. For me - this is the first time since 2nd edition Ravenloft games I ran, the players actually paid attention to spend starting gold on rations, winter blankets, cold-weather gear and clothing etc. It's a rather nice and refreshing change to the way good well-flavored campaigns use to be - which is a compliment to Paizo by the way. In fact ALL of my players are veterans from previous editions, and they can all harkon back to those days in just the two sessions we've had - it's is a refreshing change of pace.

To the players out there - if you have access to the old 2nd edition Wilderness Survival Guide - I strongly suggest re-perusing it.

It's one of the ONLY 2nd edition books I kept all these years, and it's first time I've pulled it out since 1999 when 3rd edition was released.

Robert

EDIT: Not LastKnight - Rodel is the one who said Verisimilitude (same avatar, different name....sorry).


Thus far the adventures have gone very well with the rain and the muck. It has provided a bit of entertainment as the players are sloshing through the mess--especially when the faery dragon started tripping and pranking in the middle of a storm.

With the players' perceptions and other skills damaged by morale negatives due to the constant rain, the faeries got away with a few things they might not have otherwise managed.

I basically made a chart with days of rain and days of thunderstorm and I stuck to that for the adventure.

The presence of weather also causes players to take some precautions against the storms, and the value the guide higher (since movement can be faster with the guide). Additionally, it allows the day log of the adventure to drag out longer- so the players can see more and more construction at Olegs' and the arrival of more trappers.

All in all I can say I am quite pleased with the weather that has been thus far implemented-- although of note; the players have made a point NOT to move much when storms are happening so they have managed to avoid fighting in the rain. (They laid up for three days at Olegs' at one point during a particularly nasty snowfall.) I suspect that fighting in the rain might be difficult, but it will be equally challenging for any monsters.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

I did some random rolls for weather that I'm mostly ignoring for now; I'll kick in some difficult weather when the PCs get a few levels under their belts. There's frost on the ground, and patches of snow, but the 4709-10 winter's been pretty mild, save for some light snow and rain. Later years will get rougher (or easier) depending on random rolls.

I read in the Brevoy article that spring and summer are relatively short, so I'm shaving them down to about 2 1/2 months for spring and 2 months for summer, extending winter to 4, and fall will be about 3 1/2 months long. At the very most, I expect it'll extend the campaign while the PCs hole up for the deep cold of winter and lead to more activity during spring, summer, and fall.

From what little I know of history, most countries all but shut down during the cold months anyways. :P

I've been kicking around the idea of having Jhod Kavken have a spell, tentatively called five day forecast, that will give the PCs an idea of what's to come ("oh crap, a blizzard in three days? Let's check out this hex and get back to Oleg's. We can be making potions and forging weapons that day!"), to keep them from being stuck half-dead and freezing in the middle of a blizzard (though it could make for a decent non-combat encounter, or add some challenge to an otherwise cake-walk encounter).

All in all, though, I prefer the weather to be flavor, not dangerous. A fight with gentle snow falling is way cooler than "it's 70 degrees and it's partly cloudy; the army masses at your border in plain sight; roll initiative."


N'wah wrote:
I've been kicking around the idea of having Jhod Kavken have a spell, tentatively called five day forecast, that will give the PCs an idea of what's to come ("oh crap, a blizzard in three days?

You might know this, and that spell is a pretty reasonable concept, Survival can be used to predict the weather. So it can serve, either in the hands of the party or NPC as a weather forecast.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Blazej wrote:
N'wah wrote:
I've been kicking around the idea of having Jhod Kavken have a spell, tentatively called five day forecast, that will give the PCs an idea of what's to come ("oh crap, a blizzard in three days?
You might know this, and that spell is a pretty reasonable concept, Survival can be used to predict the weather. So it can serve, either in the hands of the party or NPC as a weather forecast.

Believe me, sir, I've used it for that, my more-rules-informed buddy (one of the PCs, upon setting out to find the Thorn River Camp, made a check to figure out how the weather would be; it was rainy, but they traveled through that and got clear weather for the fight). I just like letting the PCs know that, say, a nasty storm might be coming up in three days, as opposed to this day. It's not a spell I expect most GMs will use; it just makes it easier for me to say "lay low, work on some Craft stuff, and keep warm."

Say, sir: you know rules and stuff; you got a higher DC mark to gauge what weather will look like past the "next 24 hours" mark? +2? +5? +10? It might be nice when the PCs are away from the guy who knows that spell (and my group lacks divine casters, so it'll probably be an NPC-only spell).

Side note: my PCs neglected to buy any cold weather outfits, so they might get a bit chilly most of the time. Except Benchak's PC, who's got Resist Cold 5. She oughtta be fine. :P

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

At random, I looked up the weather for Stockholm, Sweden; it seems to work well enough. From that, I'm seeing the following:

WINTER
Neth (November) to Pharast (March)- Average daytime temperatures are fully in the Cold category (0-40 F); occasional dips into the Severe Cold range (cold snaps and the nighttime dip will work for this). Precipitation will be snow, unless temperature dips into the above freezing realm. Storms will be snowstorms or blizzards.

SPRING
Gozran (April) to Desnus (May)- Average daytime temperature's in the 40-60 F range, plus or minus; extremes can be justified by hot/cold snaps, plus the dip in temperature from nighttime. Precipitation will be either snow or rain, depending on temperature. Storms will be snowstorms, blizzards or thunderstorms.

SUMMER
Sarenith (June) to Erastus (July)- Average daytime temperature's in the 60-80 range, plus or minus a degree. Record highs have hit the 80+ range (heat waves). Precipitation will be rain. Storms will be thunderstorms, windstorms, or tornadoes.

FALL
Arodus (August) to Rova (September)- Average temperature's well into the Moderate range. August has some hot weather bleed-over, so I'm gonna lean heavy towards heat waves for that month. The rest can be covered by heat waves, cold snaps, and the nighttime temperature difference. Storms will be thunderstorms, snowstorms, or blizzards.

Inspired by another thread, I'm working on 100-card random decks to be available for download soon. Expect 'em soon. :D

Liberty's Edge

N'wah wrote:


Say, sir: you know rules and stuff; you got a higher DC mark to gauge what weather will look like past the "next 24 hours" mark? +2? +5? +10? It might be nice when the PCs are away from the guy who knows that spell (and my group lacks divine casters, so it'll probably be an NPC-only spell).

A look at the Survival skill description on page 107 of the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook shows that predicting weather for 24 hours is a DC 15. It also states that for every 5 you beat said DC by, predicts an extra 24 hours. So with a 25, you're predicting the next 72 hours.

You'll probably never have enough to predict 5 days like the spell you're utilizing, but 2-3 days out should be sufficient for most PCs to prepare for the worst if they do not have easy access to that NPC weather-man.

Robert


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I've used this website in the past.

www.wunderground.com

you can enter a city and check out it's weather history for the past 14 years.
I had a campaign set in an area around a South Carolina'ish latitude and pulled up the weather from Charleston from the past year in a calendar format and when it came into play I had the information right there at my fingertips.

Scarab Sages Contributor, RPG Superstar 2008 Top 4, Legendary Games

Vanulf Wulfson wrote:

I've used this website in the past.

www.wunderground.com

you can enter a city and check out it's weather history for the past 14 years.
I had a campaign set in an area around a South Carolina'ish latitude and pulled up the weather from Charleston from the past year in a calendar format and when it came into play I had the information right there at my fingertips.

Great site. I think I might just use this on Friday for my KM game! Thanks!


James Jacobs wrote:
ALSO: There are a lot more hills, mountains, swamps, and forests in the River Kingdoms and in Stolen Lands in particular. Inland Northern Europe or Asia is probably a better place to look at for weather patterns.

OK,

What real world analog city would you use for Restov?
Berlin? Warsaw? or as N'wah suggested, Stockholm? or another?

Liberty's Edge

Vanulf Wulfson wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
ALSO: There are a lot more hills, mountains, swamps, and forests in the River Kingdoms and in Stolen Lands in particular. Inland Northern Europe or Asia is probably a better place to look at for weather patterns.

OK,

What real world analog city would you use for Restov?
Berlin? Warsaw? or as N'wah suggested, Stockholm? or another?

Personally I've been using Warsaw for New Stetven; since I first read about it; though Restov isn't far removed from that.

Stockholm is coastal - Restov is not. That's the only reason why I discounted that.

Port Ice I have more like Moscow.

Robert

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Vanulf Wulfson wrote:

I've used this website in the past.

linked

you can enter a city and check out it's weather history for the past 14 years.
I had a campaign set in an area around a South Carolina'ish latitude and pulled up the weather from Charleston from the past year in a calendar format and when it came into play I had the information right there at my fingertips.


Robert Brambley wrote:

Personally I've been using Warsaw for New Stetven; since I first read about it; though Restov isn't far removed from that.

Stockholm is coastal - Restov is not. That's the only reason why I discounted that.

Port Ice I have more like Moscow.

Robert

Looking at a map, I'm going to use that site to grab weather from the Dresden area, since it is roughly 200 miles from the coast and near a large river (Oder), and the large forested areas of Western Poland.

Scarab Sages Contributor, RPG Superstar 2008 Top 4, Legendary Games

I'm using Eau Claire, Wisconsin, over in the hilly western portion of the state, about 200 miles or so from Lake Michigan and a bit farther from Lake Superior. A lot of rivers and lakes and some marshy areas there as well.


So far we've got:

Port Ice=Moscow
New Stetven=Warsaw
Restov=Dresden

Which looking at a map doesn't seem that far off from real world / golarion distances from those cities (kind of hard to tell just by looking at the globe on my desk).

The average high/low temps for those cities on March 1st (the theoretical start date of the AP):

Moscow 34/18
Warsaw 43/29
Dresden 43/32

Decidely cold but not brutally so.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Yeah, I mostly used Stockholm 'cuz I clicked on it on a map on Wikipedia pretty much at random. I'm not too worried about exact temperatures, just the ranges that are common for a given month so's I could figure out how long each season should be.

I like all the above suggestions, though, and they fit pretty nicely with my guesstimate. They also make more sense, as actual thought was put into 'em. :P

Are these spots high enough on a map to alter the daylight expected at different times of the year? Like, will the PCs be dealing with solid days of constant brightness/darkness? Or Seasonal Affective Disorder? Or would things have to go down at a higher latitude than what we're talking about here? Just wanna know if I should be telling them that "sunset" is at midnight or something.

Liberty's Edge

N'wah wrote:


Are these spots high enough on a map to alter the daylight expected at different times of the year? Like, will the PCs be dealing with solid days of constant brightness/darkness? Or Seasonal Affective Disorder? Or would things have to go down at a higher latitude than what we're talking about here? Just wanna know if I should be telling them that "sunset" is at midnight or something.

To look for this info I went to weather.com and used Warsaw, Poland to look up.

It mentioned tomorrow (April 7) as

Sunrise: 5:55 AM
Sunset: 7:22 PM

That's about 13-1/2 hours of "daytime"

Back that up one month to the beginning of March - probably shaves off 20-30 mintues of daylight - still with a full 13 hours of "daytime".

By contrast, Moscow shows:

Sunrise: 6:43 AM
Sunset: 8:21 PM

About 15 more minutes of daylight; just starting and ending a bit later.

Hope this helps,

Robert

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

It does indeed! Thanks, sir.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Random Weather

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
xorial wrote:
Random Weather

Best link I've gotten all day. Thank you! Consider it about to be over-used. :D

Sczarni

xorial wrote:
Random Weather

fantastic.

thank you.

-t


So I think this was the thread that was discussing climate and where in on Earth to use as a template for the Stolen Lands. I did some comparing between maps and want to get opinions from maybe more map-adept folks. The region of Poland between Radom and Szydlowiec seems about right. If Inner Sea=Mediterranean Sea and Lake of Mists=Baltic Sea. Seems like the right kind of terrain, to affect weather patterns.
Opinons?

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Rodel wrote:

So I think this was the thread that was discussing climate and where in on Earth to use as a template for the Stolen Lands. I did some comparing between maps and want to get opinions from maybe more map-adept folks. The region of Poland between Radom and Szydlowiec seems about right. If Inner Sea=Mediterranean Sea and Lake of Mists=Baltic Sea. Seems like the right kind of terrain, to affect weather patterns.

Opinons?

Sounds about right to me.


Thanks. I wanted to nail down a RL analogy so that i could model the weather on last year's almanac etc.

1 to 50 of 73 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder Adventure Path / Kingmaker / Weather in Kingmaker All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.