Pathfinder Lost Omens: Travel Guide

4.30/5 (based on 9 ratings)
Pathfinder Lost Omens: Travel Guide

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See the scenic Inner Sea with the Lost Omens Travel Guide! This book is your companion to the culture, life, and sights of the Inner Sea, guiding you through a variety of topics of interest. With this book, you can learn about Inner Sea cuisine and art, experience the thrills of Inner Sea sports, and uncover the secrets of Inner Sea myths and magic. The Travel Guide features dozens of illustrations to show you the fine details of the latest fashion or put you into the center of one of the Inner Sea's greatest festivals. Come learn everything about the Inner Sea and prepare yourself for a journey through an unforgettable region with the Lost Omens Travel Guide!

Written by: Rigby Bendele, Katina Davis, Dana Ebert, Dustin Knight, Aaron Lascano, Ron Lundeen, Stephanie Lundeen, Ianara Natividad, Dave Nelson, Jessica Redekop, Nathan Reinecke, Mikhail Rekun, Erin Roberts, Simone Sallé, and Diego Valdez!

ISBN-13: 978-1-64078-465-9

Other Resources: This product is also available on the following platforms:

Fantasy Grounds Virtual Tabletop
Archives of Nethys

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO9313


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Average product rating:

4.30/5 (based on 9 ratings)

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5/5

This is like a foundational look into the Inner Sea and, in some cases, Golarion as a whole. How does magic integrate with the rest of the world, why are many things similar prices in different places, what's the weather like in Ustalav this time of year? All questions I've had and answers that I've been given.

And the Travel Guide is such a fun read as well. The largely in-universe narration helps sell the idea that the Travel Guide is a product an PC could buy (distribution willing, of course). Cannot recommend this enough to any GM who just wants to know the little things they can include to make Golarion feel like a real and living world, or any player who wants to get really inside the head of their character.


5/5


A must-have for anyone playing or GMing in Golarion

5/5


An Absolute Must have!

5/5

An absolute must have for everyone! Every gaming group should have at least two copies of this one! Gorgeous artwork, great writing and a top notch layout, this book is the complete package!

50 stars and a standing ovation for everyone involved!

Absolutely beautiful work, Paizo!!


2/5


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Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, LO Special Edition, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber
SOLDIER-1st wrote:
Golarion has astrolabes, sextants, and a variety of time keeping devices.

Then traders should have no need to hug the coast all the time.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

On the other hand, the Inner Sea probably does have a lot more sea monsters than our Mediterranean does. That rather than navigation issues would be a good reason to stay near the coast if possible.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Also selling to the people living on the coast.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Gisher wrote:
SOLDIER-1st wrote:
Ed Reppert wrote:
Leon Aquilla wrote:

The sea routes hug the coast a lot more tightly, which makes sense if you don't have a compass.

Three essential tools for open ocean navigation (at least until you get GPS): chronometer, sextant, compass. Of these the compass is least important. Knowing which way you’re going won’t help much if you don’t know where you are. Astrolabe was an early substitute for the sextant. Not sure where Golarion’s tech is on these things.

Golarion has astrolabes, sextants, and a variety of time keeping devices.
In the real world, tools for precise time measurement to determine longitude were the most difficult of those to construct. Golarion has the Time Sense cantrip for extremely precise time measurement. They'd just need a way to compare the time on board the ship to the time at a reference location whose longitude was known.

Absalom ?


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The Raven Black wrote:
Absalom ?

Any place will do, but you need a way to compare times in the two locations. In the real world, that was accomplished by having a really good clock on board the ship.

Let's say that you are in London. You set your clock to noon, and one day when the sun is at its highest point you start your clock. Your clock is now set to the 'true' astronomical time in London. You take it with you on a voyage, and a few days later you notice that when the sun is at its highest point your London clock doesn't read noon.

The discrepancy is because you've traveled East or West from London. The bigger the time difference the larger the distance, so you can use the time difference to calculate your longitude relative to London's. But this depends both on your clock being reliable enough to keep accurate time over long periods and on your ability to determine when the sun is at its zenith — something that can be difficult in stormy weather, for example.

If Golarion has really good portable clocks, then people there could take the same approach, but someone on board could use the Time Sense cantrip to determine local time at will instead of having to wait for the sun to be at its peak. That's convenient, but what I was suggesting was something that actually makes the clock unnecessary.

If you have a magical means of instantaneous long-distance communication, then someone at a known location could use Time Sense and transmit that accurate-to-the-second local time to someone on the ship. The person on the ship could then use Time Sense to determine their local time to within a second and compare the two times to get an absurdly accurate value for their current longitude. You'd basically have GPS level results for longitude with no satellites or clocks needed. You'd still need to make astronomical measurements to determine your latitude, of course, but that's comparatively easy.

I'm not sure whether my physics background or my sailing experience is to blame, but this application was the first thing that occurred to me when I read the description of Time Sense. :)


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Gisher wrote:
If you have a magical means of instantaneous long-distance communication, then someone at a known location could use Time Sense and transmit that accurate-to-the-second local time to someone on the ship. The person on the ship could then use Time Sense to determine their local time to within a second and compare the two times to get an absurdly accurate value for their current longitude. You'd basically have GPS level results for longitude with no satellites or clocks needed. You'd still need to make astronomical measurements to determine your latitude, of course, but that's comparatively easy.

I'm seeing a "Sea Traffic Control Tower" somewhere in Absalom, where mages work around the clock providing accurate time readings to ships at sea. Provided, of course, that you or the ship owner has subscribed to that service.


11 people marked this as a favorite.
Dancing Wind wrote:
Gisher wrote:
If you have a magical means of instantaneous long-distance communication, then someone at a known location could use Time Sense and transmit that accurate-to-the-second local time to someone on the ship. The person on the ship could then use Time Sense to determine their local time to within a second and compare the two times to get an absurdly accurate value for their current longitude. You'd basically have GPS level results for longitude with no satellites or clocks needed. You'd still need to make astronomical measurements to determine your latitude, of course, but that's comparatively easy.
I'm seeing a "Sea Traffic Control Tower" somewhere in Absalom, where mages work around the clock providing accurate time readings to ships at sea. Provided, of course, that you or the ship owner has subscribed to that service.

A Golarion Positioning System? ;)


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Dancing Wind wrote:
Gisher wrote:
If you have a magical means of instantaneous long-distance communication, then someone at a known location could use Time Sense and transmit that accurate-to-the-second local time to someone on the ship. The person on the ship could then use Time Sense to determine their local time to within a second and compare the two times to get an absurdly accurate value for their current longitude. You'd basically have GPS level results for longitude with no satellites or clocks needed. You'd still need to make astronomical measurements to determine your latitude, of course, but that's comparatively easy.
I'm seeing a "Sea Traffic Control Tower" somewhere in Absalom, where mages work around the clock providing accurate time readings to ships at sea. Provided, of course, that you or the ship owner has subscribed to that service.

...and thus, the "Ship's Mage" position became synonymous with "Navigator" on Golarion. :)


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Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, LO Special Edition, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

And navigation is considered an esoteric skill.

Radiant Oath

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Quick and admittedly silly clarification question: on Page 91 (Religious Iconography), it describes the practice among Ulfen priests of Gozreh to use ceremonial ice picks to break ice for their rituals, but the accompanying illustration instead appears to depict an ice axe. I presume this was just a miscommunication between the writers and artists, but which is the correct interpretation if, say, I wanted to roleplay one of those Ulfen Gozrans, and wanted to depict their ceremonial tool accurately?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

I think what the intent was there was for ice axes used in mountaineering. They look kinda like a pickaxe and I assume that someone just said "Ice pickaxe = icepick"

I can't really picture folks from the Land of the Linnorm Kings using a tiny little icepick.

Dark Archive

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Woo for finally this book being out :3

I think its safe to say officially that paizo has shifted from regions being "meta game names for areas" to "they are actually recognized as regions in universe"

Paizo Employee Organized Play Coordinator

4 people marked this as a favorite.

The character options in this book are now sanctioned for use in Pathfinder Society play!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Any reason why this new product doesn’t show on the homepage under new releases? Or why Lost Omens products in general are so hard to locate using the menus on the homepage?

It is as if you need to be active on the forums to find them.

Paizo Employee Marketing & Media Manager

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Vardoc Bloodstone wrote:

Any reason why this new product doesn’t show on the homepage under new releases? Or why Lost Omens products in general are so hard to locate using the menus on the homepage?

It is as if you need to be active on the forums to find them.

Because the update is manual, not automatic and the people whose job it is were focusing on Kingmaker backer PDFs, but I’ll pass the note along. It’s been available for 24 hours, thanks for being so attentive!

The lost omens line has its own dedicated modal on the Pathfinder landing page. We can’t feature every product line on the home page, only the newest Pathfinder and Starfinder rulebooks, which have the broadest appeal.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Fun little fact regarding calenders in Golarion.

Queen Anastasia introduced Earth's calender to Irrisen.

"A more recent invention is Irrisen’s new Stasian
calendar, which sets itself 2,700 years behind Absalom
Reckoning for reasons that, though still unknown, may
be tied to Queen Anastasia’s mysterious origins."

Grand Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pathfinder Accessories, Rulebook Subscriber
zezia wrote:

Fun little fact regarding calenders in Golarion.

Queen Anastasia introduced Earth's calender to Irrisen.

"A more recent invention is Irrisen’s new Stasian
calendar, which sets itself 2,700 years behind Absalom
Reckoning for reasons that, though still unknown, may
be tied to Queen Anastasia’s mysterious origins."

Uh... It should be -2795, -2700 give us our current year, but earth's year in Lost Omen is 95 years behind ours (so now in Pathfinder, it's 1927 on earth). And to get 1927 from 4722, you need to do -2795.

(Still very interesting proposition... :O )
Note: This is based on the year on earth in the one product where Anastasia was introduced to Pathfinder for the very first time, and its date of publication.


10 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

Russia under the late Tsar still used the Julian Calendar, which is what Anastasia Romanov would have been familiar with. The Soviet Union implemented the Gregorian calendar the year of her martyrdom. Which means that inevitably Irrisen will be months behind the rest of the world when Starfinder occurs.

Irrisen living in "Anno Domini" is an amusing prospect.

"Majesty, why does our Calendar say A.D.?"

"Because 1900 years ago God died for all of humanity."

"...you mean Aroden?"

"...No."


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens Subscriber
keftiu wrote:
It's interesting to see a few bits suggesting the events of Age of Ashes have taken place. I'm all for that, rather than the 1e approach to AP canon.

Just noticed that in the What People Know chapter, it seems like the events of Night of the Gray Death are acknowledged as canon as well.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Elfteiroh wrote:
zezia wrote:

Fun little fact regarding calenders in Golarion.

Queen Anastasia introduced Earth's calender to Irrisen.

"A more recent invention is Irrisen’s new Stasian
calendar, which sets itself 2,700 years behind Absalom
Reckoning for reasons that, though still unknown, may
be tied to Queen Anastasia’s mysterious origins."

Uh... It should be -2795, -2700 give us our current year, but earth's year in Lost Omen is 95 years behind ours (so now in Pathfinder, it's 1927 on earth). And to get 1927 from 4722, you need to do -2795.

(Still very interesting proposition... :O )
Note: This is based on the year on earth in the one product where Anastasia was introduced to Pathfinder for the very first time, and its date of publication.

Breaking the 4th wall.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Archpaladin Zousha wrote:
Quick and admittedly silly clarification question: on Page 91 (Religious Iconography), it describes the practice among Ulfen priests of Gozreh to use ceremonial ice picks to break ice for their rituals, but the accompanying illustration instead appears to depict an ice axe. I presume this was just a miscommunication between the writers and artists, but which is the correct interpretation if, say, I wanted to roleplay one of those Ulfen Gozrans, and wanted to depict their ceremonial tool accurately?

I notice that the Wikipedia page that you linked to for the ice axe identifies one of the main components of an ice axe as "the pick."

So perhaps in this context the term "ice picks" is meant to include the picks on the ice axes as well as the more standard ice pick design?


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Aaron Shanks wrote:
The lost omens line has its own dedicated modal on the Pathfinder landing page. We can’t feature every product line on the home page, only the newest Pathfinder and Starfinder rulebooks, which have the broadest appeal.

Ah I see - they are called “World Guides”. I was looking for “Lost Omens”.

Dark Archive

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There are things that could be minor errors in book but in universe presentation means it could be in universe writers research error xD

(the said thing I'm talking about is Thamir Gixx being referred as that and not just Thamir since he is currently in between names ;D Assuming Edgewatch doesn't canonize new primarch being official and Thamir taking his name, don't tell me if it does I'm still playing it)

Paizo Employee Marketing & Media Manager

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Vardoc Bloodstone wrote:
Aaron Shanks wrote:
The lost omens line has its own dedicated modal on the Pathfinder landing page. We can’t feature every product line on the home page, only the newest Pathfinder and Starfinder rulebooks, which have the broadest appeal.
Ah I see - they are called “World Guides”. I was looking for “Lost Omens”.

Good feedback. Hmmmm.

Grand Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Pathfinder Accessories, Rulebook Subscriber
Leon Aquilla wrote:

Russia under the late Tsar still used the Julian Calendar, which is what Anastasia Romanov would have been familiar with. The Soviet Union implemented the Gregorian calendar the year of her martyrdom. Which means that inevitably Irrisen will be months behind the rest of the world when Starfinder occurs.

Irrisen living in "Anno Domini" is an amusing prospect.

"Majesty, why does our Calendar say A.D.?"

"Because 1900 years ago God died for all of humanity."

"...you mean Aroden?"

"...No."

This is legit something that I didn't think about! Thanks!

So... Yes, Anastasia gets moved from earth around the same time the gregorian calendar was implemented as the Soviet calendar, in february 1918. She would indeed be familiar with Julian, but she was 17 when it was implemented, so was most probably aware of the change. The events of the AP happens in july, 5 months after the gregorian calendar was applied.
Tbh, the only change is that they made the leap year calculation more complexe to remove most "century" years and skipped 13 days between the end of January and february 14... Heck, she would have certainly remembered the 13 days skip.

Oh gosh, now that I think of it, that means Golarion and Earth are not exactly in synch with their calendars, because in 2400 on earth it will be a leap year, but not on Golarion cause 5100 is not divisible by 400. (lol, as if that will change anything for us. ;) )

Getting back on track: So yeah, maybe she remembered that the calendar was recently fixed with the "need to be divisible by 400 if divisible by 100", OR she could have just changed the year and the names, without changing anything else of the rules already in place.
Note: I have not read the book yet, and still waiting on my shipment. So there could be more details in there that would break my guesses.
Still interesting to think about.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens Subscriber

I take back what I said about wanting the Lost Omens books to have all lore and no player options - the new astrology backgrounds in this book are amazing.


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One of my favorite books Paizo has ever put out! Thank you!!


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If you like it, review, subscribe, ring a bell for notifications...


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I did in fact review it.


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

Dear Golarion's Finest,

I've recently purchased your newest guide, and I was quite impressed with the wide array of writers! How did you manage to get a Rakhasha and a former Assassin to write for your newest book?

Best,
-An inquistive reader.


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I have to say, this book just makes me rabid for a proper write-up on boundball and the international league for it in Arcadia. An archetype for being a boundball player would be the cherry on top!

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